Open Forum: November 24,2012

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983 Responses to Open Forum: November 24,2012

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  1. 2dogs

    Will the ALP preference the DLP ahead of the Greens next election?

    If they offer to do this in exchange for the LNP preferencing the ALP ahead of the Greens, should the LNP accept the deal?

    Some useful analysis here.

  2. tbh

    Rabz, are you also going to pick up the pieces and make an island? Great solo in that song, absolutely ground breaking.

  3. Gab

    Remeber this case? Here’s the outcome:

    A TEENAGER suing an elite private school because she failed to gain entry to her preferred university course has lost her bid for compensation.

    Rose Ashton-Weir took Geelong Grammar to VCAT claiming the school had set back her progress and stymied her wish to study law at the University of Sydney.

    But a judgment handed down this week found this could not be substantiated and the claim was dismissed.

    But the judgment by VCAT deputy president Ian Lulham said Ms Ashton-Weir had failed to see that attending class, having access to school tutoring facilities and additional input from a teacher were all forms of academic support.

    “Support does not mean that the school does the work for the student,” he said.

    Staff from Geelong Grammar gave evidence that Ms Ashton-Weir was disorganised and needed to be reminded to attend classes on time with the relevant books.

  4. Cold-Hands

    Can’t help feeling that the Thursday Fred has been shortchanged…

  5. Rabz

    A TEENAGER suing an elite private school because she failed to gain entry to her preferred university course has lost her bid for compensation.

    Oh, noes!!!!

    roxon – bring the fascist bullshit, you fat ugly cow!

    This is an outrageous outrage, I tells ya!

    It raises the question – what role did tonee yabbott
    play in this heinous decision???

  6. Scapula

    A teacher would be sacked in a state school for arguing that the student had some resposibility for their own learning.

    The principal would performance manage you out as an underachiever.

  7. Jannie

    Listening to Jimmy now Rabz. It was groundbreaking I guess, but technically not superior to a modern journeyman. But it is nice.

    I am thinking Teenage Wasteland by The Who. Describes the Government.

  8. Infidel Tiger

    From today’s Oz:

    JOHN Howard laid it on the line for stringent gun laws 16 years ago, and he sounds prepared to do it all over again if anybody tries to water down those laws today.

    History will judge him to be our 4th worst Prime Minister. A fascist nanny statist twerp.

  9. Tom

    Having no less than six great daily papers in a market of eight million people like London’s means the best writers can be paid properly to turn out the world’s best journalism and writing instead of the second-rate rubbish our little market has to accept.
    On the strength of this column from today’s paper, I’ve just spent $12 on a trial three-month sub to The Times so I can quote to you zinging paragraphs like these from behind the paywall:

    After Jack Kerouac hammered out On the Road on a single 120ft roll of paper at 100 words a minute in under two weeks on his Underwood portable, Truman Capote sneered: “That’s not writing, it’s typing.”

    Writers tend to fetishise their tools, as if the older the technology, the more honest the prose: Cormac McCarthy with his Olivetti Lettera 32; Beryl Bainbridge and her 1980s Amstrad; Ernest Hemingway and his Royal Quiet DeLuxe. (“There is nothing to writing: All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed,” growled Hemingway, just in case anyone though “DeLuxe” meant “easy”.)

    The point of the crackling 1000-word Ben Macintyre column being:

    The arrival of computerised dictation technologies will lead to a hybrid of speaking and writing that may actually improve our understanding of words by returning closer to the Platonic ideal of communication: if the writers of the future must think and speak before they write, then they may become more articulate, and therefore better writers. If the form of the written word is dictated by the spoken word, we may begin to think harder before we open our mouths.

    Please pardon my indulgence if you’re not interested.

  10. tbh

    I’m so glad that the poor aggrieved Geelong Grammar student was not humoured unnecessarily by the court. She should take it as a life lesson and move on.

  11. Scapula

    So what exactly does he mean by ‘the Platonic ideal of communication’? – given that Herr Plato was not very fond of writing.

  12. Gab

    Must you pour forth every inane thought that pops into your tiny skull, Scrappy? This is not Twitter you know.

  13. Scapula

    If she were an international student at a university she’d get a remark!

  14. entropy

    that’s a very cool thought, Tom.

    And the implications are that in the future my kids will regard me as a grunting neanderthal that uses a word editor and they won’t want to talk to me.

  15. Those laws need to be watered down, because they did nothing save punish thousands of law-abiding shooters for the actions of two madmen.

    One of Howard’s few unarguable mistakes. I’m all for restriction of ownership of self-loading longarms (e.g. taking an extra safety course, stringent security requirements), but the changes to the pistol laws were a total waste of time. If I want to shoot target with an ex-military .455 Webley or .45 Colt automatic, there should be no reason why I cannot do so, provided I can keep the guns under proper levels of lock and key and demonstrate safe use to a qualified instructor.

    Speaking as a shooter myself, I am all in favour of shooters having to e.g. take their target arms to the range a certain # of times a year – after all, last I looked, private pilots are obliged to take a flight every now and then to ensure their hand is “kept in” – but there should be few restrictions on what sorts of firearms a sane, law-abiding citizen can actually own.

  16. Poor Old Rafe

    Thanks Tom, great stuff!

  17. Tom

    It was groundbreaking I guess, but technically not superior to a modern journeyman. But it is nice.

    We’ll still be listening to Hendrix recordings in the 24th century, Jannie. His will be in the Vienna World Music Hall of Fame (wash your mouth out!) alongside names like Mozart and Ludwig van (wash you mouth out again!).

  18. entropy

    I am actually using dictation to type this. You need to speak very carefully but I have managed to type this without any parents.

    Bugger, substitute ‘errors’ for ‘parents’

  19. Infidel tiger

    Those laws need to be watered down, because they did nothing save punish thousands of law-abiding shooters for the actions of two madmen.

    He should have encouraged law abiding people to take out concealed carry permits if he wanted to prevent massacres.

    Howard is big government fascist whose only redeeming feature was he liked balancing the budget.

  20. entropy

    Hello Siri can you tell everyone I have tandems

    Hello Siri can you tell everyone I hate handguns

  21. Cold-Hands

    if the writers of the future must think and speak before they write, then they may become more articulate, and therefore better writers. If the form of the written word is dictated by the spoken word, we may begin to think harder before we open our mouths.

    I am not so sanguine- instead I think this technology will lead to more disorganised prose, akin to stream of consciousness, meanderings that will profit from heavy pruning. The very best writers may be disciplined enough to benefit from speech-to-text but most of the twitter generation will need to have personal editors to weed the scattered pearls from the dross.

  22. entropy

    Hello Siri, let everyone know I like long guns

    Siri I am busy playing with a new toy

    En Francais s’il vous plaît. My Creole evening.

    No more name creole hey. My crayon is red. Sleeper anglais

    I think it will be a while before the written word is purely dictated

  23. Cold-Hands

    glean the scattered pearls

  24. Tom

    You’re right, CH. Literacy standards have already collapsed. I’ve already seen them in journalism school using comical spastic phonetics to patch over their ignorance. I asked a lecturer one day: “Why are they sending us illiterate kids (from secondary school)?” He replied: “Has it ever occurred to you that their English teachers are illiterate?” The leftist march through the institutions accelerates: requiring literacy standards – or standards in mathematics and science – is discriminatory and lacks “fairness”. That’s how we got “global warming”: post-modern facts are relative; it’s now OK to barrack for your favourite narrative. FMD.

  25. tbh

    Rabz, great choice with the Massive Attack track. Tracey Thorne is fantastic. I’m a big fan of those guys.

  26. C.L.

    I sniff spin – fresh from the workshop…

    First Shorten, now Kelty – that word:

    FORMER ACTU secretary Bill Kelty has criticised as “inappropriate” the use of a secret Australian Workers Union fund in the 1990s …

    No, Bill.

    Nice try, though, bozo.

    It wasn’t “inappropriate.”

    It was a crime.

  27. Abu Chowdah

    “technically not superior to a modern journeyman”

    You left out the part where you explain that a modern journeyman would not exist but for Jimi.

    It’s spelt Jimi, by the way. And the line is “stand up next to a mountain.”

    Voted one of the top ten songs to fuck to, BTW.

    The solo isn’t groundbreaking but the use of wah was. The great thing is this is Hendrix taking the riff from the equally great “Catfish Blues” and taking it somewhere new.

    That’s the difference between Jimi and a modern journeyman. One is an innovator and the other is a hack with no creative ability doing covers.

  28. Tom

    Fleeced, when you next pop by, could you give us an opinion of what you think is going on at the Oz? They have not only prevented the Google headline search from liberating the text content from behind the paywall, as has been the standard until now, but today (Saturday – the first day I’ve seen it) clicking on the content search result triggers an “Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage” error. Not News-wide; just the Oz.

  29. Jannie

    Hay Abu, I note my respect. Jimmy broke some of the ground in a fertile field. My son is technically better, but he stands on the shoulders of giants etc.

    The kids who cover Jimmy these days do it out of love for music, respect comes later. Doing covers is honourable work. It makes it possible for starving artists to seek truth and hope they will not be forgotten when they die.

    But Abu do not doubt my love for Hendrix, ref his cover of BD’s All along the watchtower.

  30. Jannie

    BTW.

    I explained to my wife what was going on with the AWU slush fund. She thinks I am making it up because I am extremist.

  31. Jannie

    Actually I convinced her I was not making all this stuff up, and she thinks its outrageous and somebody should do something about it.

  32. C.L.

    Hendrix was great but playing live he was a pile of shit. That was largely owing to the untranslatable nature of his wahed and fuzzed and distorted sound from studio to stage. But it was also a function of his boring solo fetish – which even he came to loathe. He became like a comedian in the sense that crowds grew impatient with Jimi the experimentalist and trail-blazer and just wanted him to be Jimi Hendrix. At some of his last concerts he was actually booed in between chanted demands for Purple Haze and Hey Joe. He had turned himself into a performing clown and it came back to bite him on the bum.

    One interesting thing about this mostly negro master is that he isn’t really hailed by America’s blacks. Not as he is by whites. Most of his crowds were white. Possibly, this says something about the sad rapping/dumbing down of ‘African-American’ culture over the past 40 years. I have no doubt there are many fine black musicians around but hardly any are household names. Where there was once Duke Ellington, Satchmo, Chuck Berry, Dizzy Gillespie – etc etc etc – there’s now 50 Cent and Snoop Dog. I doubt if either of them could play the mouth organ.

  33. C.L.

    Yeah, Howard and guns, hey.

    The other day with Hawke and Ray Martin, he cited the gun ‘buy-back’ – one of the stupidest and most chillingly totalitarian slogans ever; as if this private property had somehow belonged to the government beforehand – as one of his top three signature achievements.

    The result is that law-abiding citizens are now treated like psychopaths and criminals – while psychopaths and criminals are as free as they ever were to shoot people.

    He ought to be ashamed of himself.

  34. Abu Chowdah

    A combination of drugs, post-CBS strat intonation issues, the late sixties overlong solo fetish, and his use of the whammy bar, CL. But you can find plenty of terrific live material. Stellar versions of Little Wing and Voodoo Chile on the Hendrix in the West album, and Band of Gypsies features some of the greatest music of that era.

    And you’re right, he became tired and pissed off, hence the Isle of Wight fiasco. But at the end of the day he changed music with his incredible inventiveness, including his superlative use of R&B phrasing, a la Pops Staples, while singing. Few have mastered that ability. Robert Cray and maybe John Mayer, who is a total JH clone, for good or bad.

    The best analysis of his ultimate disillusionment is in Charles Shaar Murray’s very readable book, “Crosstown Traffic”.

  35. C.L.

    On top of everything else, Hendrix had perfect pitch. He was a nothing short of a prodigy. I don’t know how many times I’ve heard somebody say (no offence, Jannie) that they, or some bloke they know who plays at the pub, is ‘technically better.’

    Yeah.

    Right.

    My favourite is Watchtower and I love the fact that he used a cigarette lighter for the groovy slide progession before the wah riff. He just preferred the sound of it. I rate that riff as perfection. Castles Made of Sand is another favourite – odd, sweet, with lovely mystical riffage. For a stereo with grunt, nothing beats Voodoo Chile followed by House Burning Down. :)

  36. Abu Chowdah

    Jannie, I doubt your son is technically better. Anyone who knows enough about guitar knows that Hendrix stands in a pantheon of greats who might be emulated but never bested.

    He’s up there with Wes, Django, BB, Christian and many others. Each of them is or was technically better than the others in their signature style, but none of them would care to contrast. Music isn’t sports and, as we gigging musicians say, “if you enter a Battle of the Bands competition, you’ve already lost.”

    I’m glad your son loves music. I hope he gets what it’s about and has the humility to admit he’ll probably never be better than Hendrix or the other great innovators.

    This reminds me of my favorite joke.

    A guy is walking along and sees a crowd in the street. They are looking up at a jumper on a ledge. The guy calls out, “Hey man, don’t jump, life’s not that bad.”

    The guy on the ledge says, “You don’t understand, I’m trying to make it as a jazz musician and no one will hire me.”

    The guy in the street says, “Come on, man. Don’t give up. Do you think Bird gave up in the years when he was struggling to make his nut? No way, man. Bird never ever gave up.”

    The guy on the ledge says, “Who’s bird?”

    the guy on the street calls back, “Jump, motherfucker!”

  37. Abu Chowdah

    Hey CL, have you heard “Belly Button Window”? No one who wrote that could support Emily’s List.

    By the way, Jannie, Joe Satriani is “technically” better than Hendrix. After all, he frets with his pinkie and places his thumb on the back of the guitar neck rather than hooking it over to fret barre chords.

    But his music is clinical and boring. And not one in 500,000 people could name one of his instrumentals…

    So much for technical accomplishment.

  38. C.L.

    Emily’s List hates Jimi, no doubt.

    Well. I’m up here in this womb
    I’m looking all around
    Well, I’m looking out my belly button window
    And I see a whole lot of frowns
    And I’m wondering if they don’t want me around

  39. Abu Chowdah

    Great song.

    Here’s a faithful and respectful version of one of his tunes. If your son can do this, Jannie, he has excellent taste and is on the right track. He’s not better than his betters, but he’s doing well.

    http://m.youtube.com/index?desktop_uri=%2F&gl=GB#/watch?feature=related&v=qKpLtHw7IKQ

  40. Jannie

    performance manage you out as an underachiever

    Scapula, its a wonderful thought, but first hell will freeze over.

  41. Tom

    Abu, CL, hearing Watchtower (studio) is entering the promised land. Voodoo Child gets close depending on how big and good the system you’re using to listen to it is. In the past 20 years, I’ve come to love Up From The Skies – Hendrix jazz and whismsy and humour. The other thing that’s forgotten or unknown is that his live stacks weren’t just systems – they were WALLS of sound. The slightest sideways/angular movement by Hendrix would start deafening squealing feedback. Much of his live work/experimentation was about seeing if he could control the sound. Mimics like Stevie Ray Vaughan were just that – Hendrix groupies. They were dazzled and could never take their homage in an original direction. H had also used so much acid by the time of his death I’m guessing his mind was “unshuttable” and permanently in a very weird dimension.

  42. Oh come on

    Yeah, Howard and guns….he cited the gun ‘buy-back’…as one of his top three signature achievements.

    Reminds me of Menzies citing his massive expansion of funding of Australian universities as one of his top three achievements whilst in office. Needless to say, the upgraded tertiary sector promptly turned into a rich state-funded, ultra-fertile leftist breeding ground that churns out leftwing cultural warriors and taxeaters, many of whom would throw the children of Menzies up against the wall if they had half a chance.

  43. Abu Chowdah

    I rate all of that stuff equally. For a guitarist, some of the Gypsies stuff is as good as it gets, I.e., Power To Love. Check out Machine Gun for an awesome experience on a great sound system.

    But the stuff that floats my boat are his R&B ballads: Castles Made of Sand, Little Wing, Bold as Love, Wind Cries Mary, Angel, etc.

    His stuff he did at the BBC live to tape is stellar, IMO.

  44. Jannie

    Abu and CL I must dip me lid to you on your posts about J Hendrix, (Airborne?). I dont mean to suggest my son is technically special, but note that technical proficiency at the guitar is something more common these days than circa 1971. Its one of the few skills they teach well these days.

    But musically I always preferred Cohen, Dylan, Reed and Springsteen (counting Americans anyway).

  45. Oh come on

    I’ve never felt the same about Springsteen ever since I saw an ABC puff piece on Wayne Swan featuring him in a clearly seldom-worn black Springsteen t-shirt (he’d probably bought it brand spanking off e-Bay a few days earlier), wielding his guitar and crapping on about his commitment to Social Justice and how he sees this manifested through Springsteen’s music. It was one of the phoniest displays I’ve ever seen.

  46. Oh come on

    Cohen as a lyricist was mercurial. Some of his lyrics are nothing short of beautiful; others adolescently cringe-worthy. And, for the most part, he’s one hell of a downer.

  47. Tom

    Abu, I just looked at the Axis track list and realised I hadn’t mentioned one of my early loves, One Rainy Wish. Wow. Six-eight — no-one was doing 6-8. It’s just a pretty song, but it’s full of time-surfing and experimental shit that no-one had even tried. Fuck me. I’m going to listen to it again.

  48. Oh come on

    PS. the Canucks won’t be too pleased about you calling Cohen a Yank.

    Fun fact: Suzanne from the song is now a crazy trolley pushing bag lady in LA.

  49. Jannie

    Oh Come on, Swan makes me puke. Springsteen had his time, he was once a working man yearning for freedom, now he is a phoney. But I loved him when we were young. There you have it.

  50. Jannie

    Cohen was an adolescent once, and grew and grew and grew. He grew so big he became an American, he might even be an Australian now.

  51. Jannie

    Oh Yeah, I am going to the Perth ATA launch, Jo Nova and David Evans are there. Tomorrow night at 7pm. Anbody else from perth going?

  52. Blogstrop

    Thanks to whoever it was here that coined the name Goose Springstein for Swannie. Lennon is rumoured to have said that Elvis died when he went into the army. Bruce Springstein back in the days of The Wild, The Innocent and The East St Shuffle may have had a certain backstreets semi-ethnic flavoured charm, but the stridency of The Boss and the move to the big end of town’s mass market venues destroys that ambience.

  53. Fleeced

    Fleeced, when you next pop by, could you give us an opinion of what you think is going on at the Oz? They have not only prevented the Google headline search from liberating the text content from behind the paywall, as has been the standard until now, but today (Saturday – the first day I’ve seen it) clicking on the content search result triggers an “Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage” error. Not News-wide; just the Oz.

    I can’t seem to replicate this result, Tom – seems to work normally for me. Sounds like it was just a bug rather than change in policy… If I had to hazard a guess, I’d say the programmers rushed through a change on a Friday arvo, so they could get started on drinks.

  54. Mike of Marion

    Tom. Agree with Fleeced – still able to Google Oz Headlines and read articles.

  55. John Comnenus

    I wonder what leather face Cassidy and Jon Faine will do if Gillard is questioned by police?

    I wonder how they will respond when their abject bias is so publicly out?

    As guide the ABC should sack both for a lack of new nouse, curiosity, journalism or whatever you what to call it.

  56. John Comnenus

    Looks like Gillard’s dam wall is starting to crack under the strain of holding back all her lies. Hopefully when it bursts it will be spectacular.

  57. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Yay!

    So much for the Arab Spring. Another totalitarian theocracy is born as Morsi (beloved of Obama) takes absolute power.

  58. Tintarella di Luna

    It wasn’t “inappropriate.”

    It was a crime.

    Calling Sue Butler, we need some elasticity in the word “inappropriate” if you please.

  59. blogstrop

    It’s one man, one vote, one time.

  60. The solo isn’t groundbreaking but the use of wah was.

    Indeed. Just ask Johnny Stash.

  61. steve from brisbane

    I didn’t realize before that loving Hendrix was a sign of right wing extremism. What an odd blog….

  62. Anne

    Cohen …….. for the most part, he’s one hell of a downer.

    Music to slash your wrist by…

  63. lotocoti

    Calling Sue Butler…

    Perhaps another of those irregular verbs.

  64. John Comnenus

    Cohen is a brilliant, if dirty old man. So many of his songs reveal his fetishes. His lyrics are brilliant, and his music ranges from the very simple to the complex. He is a genius.

  65. I’m with you, Anne. Hide the razor blades when he’s on.

  66. entropy

    Tom, it might be you are using Internet Explorer. Try another browser.
    Chrome is probably fastest on Windows, but I am in uncomfortable with what Google gleans about individual users these days ( I have switched to DuckDuckGo as my search engine) so maybe Firefox. On a Mac, Safari is clean.

  67. blogstrop

    There are various sorts of blogs. Tim Blair’s old one was the best. It allowed instantly readable comments, but tedious and vacuous troll types were, after being given a chance to show if they were capable of joining a conversation in a reasonable fashion, given the flick via Andrea Harris’s administrative boot or spear.
    Instant comments require some oversighting to guard against legally dangerous statements, but this remains the most satisfactory and guarantees many return looks each day. The thing that can spoil this model is the open borders policy, which allows any idiot to clog up a thread. Unfortunately, there’s too much of this at Catallaxy, an otherwise exemplary blog.
    Then there’s the “big business model” or pre-mediated one that Bolt and Blair now find themselves entangled in. This can result in delays of up to a day in comments being published, with 12 hours being common. Blair has to work as an editor as well, so can’t be full-time on the blog. Bolt has been shackled by the PC carry-on and this is to the detriment of News Ltd ultimately. Now there’s little if any commenting on the weekend.
    The saving grace of the blogs of Bolt, Ackerman and Devine is that they are always worth reading for their own sake, and the comments are not essential. Bolt keeps up a fast pace of new material early in the day and often returns later with updates or new material, often into the evening hours. Then he does a radio program on 2GB with Steve Price for an hour as well, which is good too.
    Blair remains unique in his ability to spot and skewer the ridiculous in all things, political or social. The Telegraph no doubt gets good value from him in all his roles, but sometimes I think they could give him a bit more scope on the blog side, which does suffer from slow mediation and at time rather long gaps between items.
    The on the left side of the spectrum we have the delightful types who will not even publish a contrary view even if well put. I see no reason to even read their stuff any more, just as there’s nothing useful added to the conversation here by those who repeatedly gush leftists memes of pretty much the same level of idiotic sloganism as those we get from the ABC, like Israel Bad, Palestinians Good.

  68. Mk50 of Brisbane

    The Guardian is utterly astonished by Morsi’s assumption of absolute power and his creation of a totalitarian theocracy.

    Richard Fernandez puts it beautifully:

    The words of the Guardian can be translated as ‘we on the Left thought the Muslim Brotherhood were Democrats. How foolish of the Egyptians to believe it.’

    Initial treports (very fragmentary, very early) seem to indicate that Muslim Brotherhood religious secret police are already killing the poor fools who believed the western left.

    Wonder if the Preshizzle (Paco™) will go ahead with giving Morsi’s brand new totalitarian state that $4 Bn?

  69. steve from brisbane

    Thanks for explaining what a closed mind sounds like, blogstrop. Smiley 4 you.

  70. Splatacrobat

    I think Shorten meant to say the slush fund was inappropriately exposed.

  71. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Associated press comments on Morsi’s brand new powers:

    All laws and decisions by the president are final, cannot be appealed, overturned or halted by the courts or other bodies …

    The president can take any steps or measures necessary to prevent threats to “the revolution, the life of the nation or national unity and security” or to the functioning of state institutions …

    A new judiciary body of “protection of the revolution” is created to reopen investigations, prosecutions and trials of former regime officials, including ousted President Hosni Mubarak, for the killing of protesters during last year’s uprising.

    The left must be so proud of the outcome they helped foment!

    Now, in about a minute and a half from now, the various leftards here and elsewhere are going to start claiming that Morsi’s new dictatorship is a ‘right wing construct’ and that they had nothing to do with it.

    Hammer this lie from day one. They own this.

  72. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Also like Fernandez on the sheer blithering incompetence of Preshizzle (Paco™) Hussein Obungler and his fountainhead of morons:

    But with a breathtaking dishonesty each disaster has been represented as progress towards democratic peace; tokens of intelligent diplomacy when they were the very opposite: a terrible march to catastrophe orchestrated by a dishonest and ultimately incompetent administration.

    Wretchard has a nice way with words.
    So what next for Egypt? Bloody theocratic islamist opporession is a given (God help the Copts): civil war, starvation, collapse and famine, or that old left-wing favourite, a mix of all of them?

  73. Tintarella di Luna

    I think Shorten meant to say the slush fund was inappropriately exposed.

    But I think lotocoti’s

    Perhaps another of those irregular verbs.

    perhapsing might work too vis a vis as in “to appropriate as in this

  74. lotocoti

    if they were capable of joining a conversation in a reasonable fashion

    That if was exceptionally rare.
    From memory, Bryla was the only one of our progressive friends who regularly managed to slip through with the humans and not end up on the tip of Andrea’s assegai.

  75. jupes

    So what next for Egypt?

    In a just world, the US would stop all military aid immediately.

  76. Rabz

    Wow – good to see some Hendrix fans here, intersting observations.

    And yes Abu – CBS fucking the design of the Stratocaster and compromising it’s physical and aesthetic integrity was a criminal abomination.

    I absolutely love Strats – I’ve got a cherry red ’96 American Standard, crafted to pretty much orginal specs and it’s the bees knees, especially running through my Princeton Chorus.

  77. Tom

    I can’t seem to replicate this result, Tom – seems to work normally for me.

    Thanks, Fleeced. It’s only in Internet Explorer. I can open pages normally in Firefox. The fact that you and Mike don’t have the problem suggests it may have something to do with my current IP address outside Australia. It is still there; when I cut and paste an Oz headline into Google in IE, then click on it, I get the error. Is it a cache problem? Should I clear them? I just don’t understand the tech intricacies of this stuff.

  78. m0nty

    The Oz’s obsession with screaming EXCLUSIVE on every front page story has them leading today with an EXCLUSIVE on… the budget figures since 2009. Wowee, never saw those before!

  79. dd

    Tim Blair’s old one was the best. It allowed instantly readable comments, but tedious and vacuous troll types were, after being given a chance to show if they were capable of joining a conversation in a reasonable fashion, given the flick via Andrea Harris’s administrative boot or spear.

    I didn’t like Harris’ moderating style at all.
    She got lots of fulsome and lavish praise in the comments section of endless, loud admiration of her stern and ruthless control, but she was capricious, too trigger-happy, and and sometimes banned the wrong people. Her treatment of Jules Crittenden was particularly disgraceful.

  80. C.L.

    Right-wing Sydney Morning Herald says she’s been caught lying on Slushgate and that the… Knives are out for Gillard.

  81. dd, I am interested in your opinion on this. You have a US connection and was a big supporter of the Tea Party.

    It is hard to deny the conclusion that the Tea Party cost the Republicans badly in the Senate, and they probably were a large part of the huge demographic change in the Presidential vote too.

    Now that there is a fight going on in the party between the Tea Partiers (who maintain the problem was that Romney was too moderate and not Right enough) and the old school Republicans (who say that the Rush Limbaugh wing of the party ensures it will have no future.)

    Where do you stand in this divide?

  82. I have been meaning to comment here for some time that Planet America is quite a good show, I think.

  83. Tom

    I didn’t realize before that loving Hendrix was a sign of right wing extremism.

    What is the correlation between gullibility, delusion, low intelligence. lack of creativity, tone deafness and leftwing extremism? We should suggest a study of our dumbest troll to a team of research psychiatrists. Our very own Frank Burns.

  84. Cold-Hands

    CL, while it is delicious that Hartcher is finally recognising the quandary that the Red Dalek is in, his analysis is as superficial as ever. Windsor and Oakeshott have consistently ignored the wishes of their electorates since they opted to join the Gillard/Green regime, so despite the public pressure, are unlikely to jump ship, no matter how egregious the provocation. However, the confluence of the NSW ICAC findings and the AWU-WRA scandal will only confirm in the minds of the voters that Labor is synonymous with corruption.

  85. tiny dancer

    Stevieliar QC. Is your wife out stealing bread this morning? Doesn’t look like raining so probably better off theiving tomorrow.

  86. dd

    Where do you stand in this divide?

    Here’s how I see it.

    The GOP establishment is in dire need of overhaul and the Tea Party looked until recently like the solution.

    The Tea Party’s platform is essentially low-debt, no bailouts, low spending, less government and more freedom. While they’ve been a net benefit to the GOP, you’re right that in some cases they have cost them seats. Unfortunately they have on several occasions nominated extreme social conservatives who use their nomination not to push Tea party style policies but to push the same old bog standard social conservative stuff.

    So this has allowed the Tea Party to be mischaracterised as a social conservative movement, which it isn’t. Or it least, it wasn’t originally. So here’s the million dollar question. Is the Tea Party being hijacked by the usual suspects, or are they just really crap at choosing candidates? I don’t know. If the latter, they’ll get better as time goes on. If the former, then they’re screwed.

  87. m0nty

    If the latter, they’ll get better as time goes on.

    A bold claim. There’s no guarantee they will improve, dd. The far more likely scenario is that they will fail to compromise their principles and end up on the scrapheap of history, like so many other such movements.

  88. dd

    A bold claim.

    It wasn’t a claim.

  89. To use a word I have been repeating a lot lately, dd, isn’t the problem that Tea Party economics lacks nuance (it sets a universal solution in respect of lowering taxes, for example, as being Always a Good Thing, regardless of other circumstances) and such lack of nuance attracts people with a lack of nuance in social issues such as abortion, homosexuality, gun control, and even science (climate change is absolutely a crock to be ignored) etc.

    As such, I can’t see how the connection is ever going to be broken, and I agree with m0nty – the movement will peter out.

  90. nic

    I wonder what leather face Cassidy and Jon Faine will do if Gillard is questioned by police?
    I wonder how they will respond when their abject bias is so publicly out?
    As guide the ABC should sack both for a lack of new nouse, curiosity, journalism or whatever you what to call it.

    If When Gillard goes on this I can’t wait to see the looks on the faces of the Insiders crew.

  91. nic

    The Hendrix comments were a great read. Hendrix influenced generations of good guitarists and, for that reason alone, is important. For example, Brian May was a devotee who played hammer on way before EVH made it popular. In Hendrix’s further defence, being left handed and only having the technology available at that time surely should be factors to consider versus say a Satriani or a Vai and the technology they have available today to help them.

  92. dd

    it sets a universal solution in respect of lowering taxes, for example, as being Always a Good Thing, regardless of other circumstances

    Let me state the obvious.
    From an individual’s point of view – from any individuals point of view – lowering taxes is a Good Thing for that individual.

    There may be undesirable consequences in society ability to pay its bills, which is why the tax rate is not zero, but lower taxes are undeniably beneficial for your paycheck, no matter how much you earn.

  93. From an individual’s point of view – from any individuals point of view – lowering taxes is a Good Thing for that individual.

    Well yeah, but people here have been the ones saying that people shouldn’t vote just on what’s good for them. (See slurs about “gimme” voters having won the election for Obama.)

  94. Gab

    Music to slash your wrist by…

    That would be Bread, in my impression as just about every song was about miserable loss.

  95. John Mc

    From an individual’s point of view – from any individuals point of view – lowering taxes is a Good Thing for that individual.

    Taxes can also be raised to where they are sub-optimal for society. This is the point where one group is simply attempting to extort more money from another group to get disproportionate levels of spending on their personal priorities.

  96. Mk50, yep. Been watching the whole Egyptian thing, and it looks like we have another Saddam growing into the role.
    Unfortunately, the whole situation won’t settle down until the Gaza strip is depopulated, reoccupied and the border with Egypt sealed.
    Egypt has done nothing to stop the rocket manufacture and so are complicit.

  97. Gab, you’ve obviously never listened to Toni Childs. She’s to music what “Thelma and Louise” were to movies.

  98. Gab

    Her music just doesn’t have the mournfulness about it to the extent of Bread, Winston, imho. eg i’ve got to go now. She’s okay in small doses though.

  99. John Mc

    It is hard to deny the conclusion that the Tea Party cost the Republicans badly in the Senate, and they probably were a large part of the huge demographic change in the Presidential vote too.

    Wrong, that is really easy to deny. In fact it’s completely wrong. Romney didn’t win because he didn’t engage suburban republican voters. Yep, primarily middle class white people living families who go to church, have a college education and maybe small businesses. They simply didn’t vote when they usually could be expected to.

    Why this is the case is probably going to be argued for a long time, but I think Romney being exceptionally rich, Mormon, from Massachusetts with a history of flip flopping on key issues suggesting he doesn’t really hold strong values, just did not engage middle America on the right side of the fence.

  100. dover_beach

    John Mc just might be on to something here.

  101. JohnMc: of course, that is possible too.

    I haven’t noticed a lot of argument around for a return to 90% tax for millionaires in the States, though. Even from Krugman.

    The Obama proposed tax increase on the rich was modest. It would not on its own do much budget wise; but on equity principles, it is a good thing if society feels fair rates of tax are being paid by those who can afford it with no harm to the economy.

    I have been meaning to make an observation too – conservatives often like to criticise advocates who use relative measures for poverty. (You know, how people say that to be poor these days only means that you can’t afford a 60 cm TV.)

    But when it comes to defending current tax paid by the rich in the US, it’s always a matter of pointing to the relative part of the total tax take that they pay. “Look – the top 5% pay X% of the total tax take already. It would be unfair to make them pay any more.”

    This comparison ignores the fact that the rich are not hurting – not one teeny, tiny little bit – by the tax they are paying or a further modest increase in what they may pay.

    And in case JC turns up saying that the US tax system is already very progressive – so what? If circumstances indicate, it becoming a bit more progressive is no disaster.

    That said, I can see the benefit of broadening tax base as well, via GST for example, even though it can be argued it hurts the poor disproportionately.

    So I am not being dogmatic in any direction. What I am criticising is politicians (or economists) who become too dogmatic in one direction. That is where the Republicans are now.

  102. John Mc

    SfB, surprisingly I think you’re partially right. I am suspicious the no increases to taxes on the rich was received badly. However, the no increases in taxes approach is the right path for the GOP. American politicians across the board have failed to control spending, which anyone in the world would have to agree is one of their key functions. Under Obama, they’re not even been putting forward budgets!!! That is failing the basic principles of democracy. The US federal government is borrowing 40c out of every dollar they spend, and two-thirds of that is to meet prior promises passed in legislation. The government needs to take responsibility and get control, we know the Democrats can’t do this, so the GOP needs to get their act together and step up for the sake of the future of the USA.

  103. m0nty

    Why this is the case is probably going to be argued for a long time, but I think Romney being exceptionally rich, Mormon, from Massachusetts with a history of flip flopping on key issues suggesting he doesn’t really hold strong values, just did not engage middle America on the right side of the fence.

    Romney lost Ohio due to white men who didn’t lose their jobs voting for the man who saved them.

    Romney lost Florida due to Hispanics who have relatives who want to become citizens – both in the US and abroad – voting for the man more likely not to throw them out of the country.

    Romney lost the Senate due to non-evangelicals voting for the man who has enough control over his party not to allow extremist organisers to select extremist candidates into close seats.

    Until the GOP addresses those three issues, it is kidding itself if it thinks it has dealt with the meaning on the loss.

  104. blogstrop

    SfB, you’re sounding like a Labor Party issuing “look at me” policies and hoping that somehow you’ll be redeemed before the axe falls. You’ve got a lot of ground to make up, so run for your life! (not a death threat)

  105. C.L.

    Wrong, that is really easy to deny. In fact it’s completely wrong. Romney didn’t win because he didn’t engage suburban republican voters.

    No, it’s even simpler than that.

    Obama won because a psephologically disproportionate number of black and brown people voted for him on strictly racial lines.

  106. dover_beach

    Brown in MA wasn’t an ‘extremist’ and he lost.

  107. John Mc

    Romney lost because 7 million primarily white middle class voters which normal projections would suggest are going to be there, didn’t bother turning up. Where were they?

    This is primarily referring to the popular vote, not so much the electoral college. These voters maybe wouldn’t have got Romney over the line in the electoral college, but they were the key to him getting there.

    They don’t explain Florida I agree. And the promise of the Dream Act is certainly something that the GOP needs to deal with.

    But they absolutely may have explained Ohio and the Senate. Why didn’t they come out?

  108. C.L.

    Australia’s worst ever Treasurer, Wayne Swan, shoots himself (and Gillard) in the foot – saying she was close friends with “crooks.”

    Oopsa-daisy.

  109. m0nty

    The Catholic Archbishop of Sydney has been accused of trying to do the job of the Victorian parliamentary inquiry into child abuse, as he seeks access to court material.

  110. Scapula

    I have a sociopathic lack of empathy for Cardinal Pell.

  111. C.L.

    The Catholic Archbishop of Sydney has been accused of trying to do the job of the Victorian parliamentary inquiry into child abuse, as he seeks access to court material.

    LOL.

    Monty forgot to mention that this hilarious charge was made by “lawyers.” Pell’s lawyers say he is entitled to know the dates and details about an accusation that he was present during the revelation of a Christian Brother’s crime when he says he was actually overseas at the time. Why would they be afraid of providing those details I wonder.

  112. John Mc

    Obama won because a psephologically disproportionate number of black and brown people voted for him on strictly racial lines

    I agree to some level. The African Americans (12%) are always going to vote Democrat, and if a black guy is running the show, those who vote will vote for him. The realistic target for the GOP in the black community is probably one-third. In a tight race, the most the GOP could probably aim for is around 20%. The GOP should concentrate on just targeting the one third.

    Hispanics are not at all the same demographic as the African-Americans. They don’t want the same things. They are also more diverse. They have a higher percentage who do actually believe in traditional American values like personal responsibility and reward for hard work. The GOP needs to get its act together to connect with these people. The GOP can get a majority of Hispanics.

  113. C.L.

    I have a sociopathic lack of empathy for Cardinal Pell.

    Of course you do. He’s a man and you’re a beta.

  114. C.L.

    They have a higher percentage who do actually believe in traditional American values like personal responsibility and reward for hard work. The GOP needs to get its act together to connect with these people. The GOP can get a majority of Hispanics.

    This is nonsense, though it’s become boilerplate analysis lately. Hispanics want welfare and lots of it. Whether or not they support gay ‘marriage’ and Christianity is neither here nor there. The Democrats will always win the welfare auction.

  115. dd

    Romney lost because 7 million primarily white middle class voters which normal projections would suggest are going to be there, didn’t bother turning up. Where were they?

    Romney was characterised as a tax-dodging plutocrat who gave people cancer and exported American jobs to China. He never countered those accusations, choosing to take the high road.

    Sure he released his tax returns but he believed they would speak for themselves. Well, they didn’t, they needed him to speak for them. They needed him to stand up and actually say “I donated one third of my income to charity.”

    Seizing on Akin and Mourdock’s comments, the Dems portrayed the GOP as an extremist party who were going to ban birth control and force rape victims to bear their attacker’s child.

    Romney never campaigned hard against Obamacare, even though it was the central policy issue of the campaign. After all, he was going to repeal it, right? He also stayed away, largely, from Benghazi, Fast and Furious, Solyndra and other scandals.

    Hurricane Sandy pretty much drowned out Romney’s campaign in the final week, and the little political mileage he could have gotten (namely, turning it into a Katrina) he decided not to do. Also Chris Christie, a high profile governor, effectively endorsed Obama and provided him photo ops in the wake of Sandy.

  116. Scapula

    Morsi, Israel and America’s new and more useful Pharoah:

    Behind the scenes, however, Morsi has received high marks by his Israeli counterparts with Israeli President Shimon Peres calling the Egyptian president a “nice surprise” at the height of the talks on Tuesday.

    When National Security Council adviser Ben Rhodes was asked on Wednesday if Morsi was a better negotiator with the Israelis than former President Hosni Mubarak, Rhodes didn’t want to compare but did say that the status quo seemed to be intact.

    And American expression of concern means they support Morsi:

    As the protests gathered pace, international criticism of the decree began to mount. The US state department called for calm and expressed concern.

  117. H B Bear

    Knives are out for Gillard

    KRuddy’s ghost writer has another go.

  118. dd

    Plus, Romney’s GOTV sucked and the unions spent 100 million on get out the vote; that’s not something that polls can pick up, and it’s not something we fully grasped until both sides showed their cards on election day. Joe Bloggs can’t tell the pollster “I’d rather stay home on election day but some dude is going to ring me up and talk me into voting.”

  119. John Mc

    CL, Put some good Latino candidates up for the GOP and see what happens. Hasn’t really happened yet.

    And as a first step, get some GOP candidates who have worked with the Latinos, done business in South America and speak Spanish.

    Finally, put up an immigration policy that allows Latinos to access the GOP version of the American Dream, but allows them to keep the negative aspects of South America out.

  120. Chris

    Monty forgot to mention that this hilarious charge was made by “lawyers.” Pell’s lawyers say he is entitled to know the dates and details about an accusation that he was present during the revelation of a Christian Brother’s crime when he says he was actually overseas at the time. Why would they be afraid of providing those details I wonder.

    He can testify to the dates of when he was overseas without knowing the dates of when he was accused of being present at a meeting. Whether he knows in advance or not exactly when he is accused of attending a meeting won’t change when he was actually overseas will it?

  121. Scapula

    CL quotation:

    Monty forgot to mention that this hilarious charge was made by “lawyers.” Pell’s lawyers say he is entitled to know the dates and details about an accusation that he was present during the revelation of a Christian Brother’s crime when he says he was actually overseas at the time. Why would they be afraid of providing those details I wonder.

    But in the piece quoted by Monty we read this from the judge:

    But in the Victorian County Court late yesterday, Judge Roy Punshon said he “had a sense of anxiety or discomfort about a request for material” in a sensitive matter.

    He acknowledged that some of the information seemed “highly relevant” to the application but said there was a need to protect the privacy of Victim 2.

  122. John Mc

    dd, I also think the failure of Romney camp managing their operatives and stuffing up their IT systems on voting day contributed to the result, when the Obama camp nailed these factors (as they did previously).

  123. roger

    Behind the scenes, however, Morsi has received high marks by his Israeli counterparts with Israeli President Shimon Peres calling the Egyptian president a “nice surprise” at the height of the talks on Tuesday.

    Correction: Shimon Peres is the President of Israel. He is not Morsi’s counterpart because in Israel a President is a symbolic role (as opposed to a PM, which is an executive position. But this is Netanyahu, not Peres). He is not supposed to stick his nose into politics any more than the GG of Australia should. Both are mostly symbolic roles, and are meant to be impartial politically – i.e., keep their opinions to themselves.

    Peres, however, who has never won an election in Israel (though he did get the top job as PM, however never by winning an elections) was by an large a failure in politics before he became President of Israel. In any case, his opinions – who, quite frankly, he should keep to himself anyway – are not representative of Israelis.

    Lefties, however, like to quote this loser because he is also a Leftie, ignoring both his perfect record of failure to win a single election (though he tried many times), or the fact that now, his role is mostly symbolic rather than representative.

  124. Scapula

    Morsi is Israel’s new best friend according to the Jewish Chronicle:

    Israeli officials say that the behaviour of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi is “perhaps the biggest achievement for Israel in the entire operation” as the Muslim Brotherhood leader emerged as the mediator between Israel and Hamas.

    Following the Israeli strikes on Gaza, Egypt recalled its ambassador to Israel and Mr Morsi repeatedly condemned “Israeli aggression”. This was a limited diplomatic measure, however, and Mr Morsi has expended time, effort and political credibility in trying to bring about a ceasefire. President Shimon Peres expressed Israel’s satisfaction at the role played by Mr Morsi when he said this week: “I didn’t expect that he would truly try to limit the tension, it is a surprise.”

    While the Egyptian president did not speak directly to his Israeli counterpart, his frequent phone conversations this week with US President Barack Obama were part of the indirect dialogue between him and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

    In response to calls by his own supporters in Egypt to do more for Hamas, Mr Morsi sent Prime Minister Hisham Kandil on a visit to Gaza on Sunday, during which Israel temporarily halted air-strikes. Mr Kandil refused to allow Hamas to resupply its forces with arms.

    Perhaps the most surprising comment came this week from Aatef Salem, Egypt’s ambassador to Israel, who gave a conciliatory interview to the daily Al-Watan. He said: “The elites in Egypt and the Egyptian public believe that Israel wants to warmonger against Egypt. These thoughts have no basis in reality. The peace with Egypt is one of Israel’s foundations of national security and they won’t give it up.”

  125. Scapula

    Haaretz on Egypt and Turkey as Israel’s best friends:

    But no matter how successful Egypt’s mediation efforts are, one can’t help but focus on the metamorphosis of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi. At times it’s hard to believe that this is the same senior Muslim Brotherhood leader who was described during the Egyptian presidential election campaign as the man who “would liberate Gaza and turn Jerusalem into the capital of the united Arab nations.”

    And yet this same Morsi, who for years saw Israel as a hostile entity and had difficulty even saying the word “Israel,” let this country’s name escape his lips a few days ago, during a joint press conference with the Turkish prime minister, another great friend of Israel. While it isn’t clear whether Morsi referred to the contacts between “the Palestinian side and the Israeli side” by accident or on purpose, in these crazy days it’s no small thing.

  126. Scapula

    Even the Australian newspaper noticed Morsi’s right wing shift towards being Israel’s best friend:

    THE Gaza ceasefire deal marks a startling trajectory for Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi: an Islamist leader who refuses to talk to Israelis or even say the country’s name mediated for it and finally turned himself into the Jewish state’s de facto protector.

    The accord, reached yesterday, inserts Egypt to an unprecedented degree into the conflict between Israel and Hamas, establishing it as the arbiter ensuring that militant rocket fire into Israel stops and that Israel allows the opening of the long-blockaded Gaza Strip and stops attacks against Hamas.

    Mr Morsi emerged as a major regional player, winning the trust of the US and Israel, which once worried over the Islamist’s rise.

    .

  127. Tiny Dancer

    When Gillard goes, no doubt kicking and screaming like a pig, she can only blame her own party and like minded luvvies.

  128. Viva

    What the hell is happening in the UK?

    A couple had their three foster children taken away by a council on the grounds that their membership of the UK Independence Party meant that they supported “racist” policies.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/9700001/Foster-parents-stigmatised-and-slandered-for-being-members-of-Ukip.html

  129. roger

    Even the Australian newspaper noticed Morsi’s right wing shift towards being Israel’s best friend:

    I have checked and it seems to be an article from The Huffington Post. Couldn’t find it on The Australian. Care to explain?

  130. Scapula

    Its from AP and it was published in the Australian and the Huffington Post basically does little of its own journalism.

  131. Scapula

    This is the precise byline of the Australian article:

    AP November 23, 2012 12:00AM

  132. Scapula

    The title is:

    Islamist Mohammed Morsi emerges as Israel’s protector

  133. Jarrah

    “He never countered those accusations”

    Because, apart from the cancer one, he couldn’t – they were accurate descriptions.

    “Sure he released his tax returns”

    He only released two returns, and later a letter from an accountant.

    “They needed him to stand up and actually say “I donated one third of my income to charity.””

    He averages 13.5%, which is very impressive (twice Obama’s rate), but hardly a third. Since he’s supposed to tithe 10% as part of his religious duties, that means his willing contributions to actual charities was 3.5%.

    “Seizing on Akin and Mourdock’s comments, the Dems portrayed the GOP as an extremist party who were going to ban birth control and force rape victims to bear their attacker’s child.”

    It was easy to do that, because that’s the GOP platform.

    “Romney never campaigned hard against Obamacare, even though it was the central policy issue of the campaign.”

    I don’t know how much harder he could have gone, considering it was a Republican idea that he pushed through as state governor.

    “He also stayed away, largely, from Benghazi, Fast and Furious, Solyndra and other scandals.”

    Because as far as scandals go, those were hardly worth complaining about. The political damage from being seen as needlessly negative likely outweighed the benefit from exposing government mistakes.

    “Hurricane Sandy pretty much drowned out Romney’s campaign in the final week”

    It did, but the polls that turned out to be 100% correct on election day didn’t show much of a bounce for Obama because of Sandy, so I expect the storm was a positive for Obama but not a big one.

  134. DaveF

    That’s terrible Viva.

    I notice the Council was unapologetic.

    A spokesman for Rotherham metropolitan borough council said last night: “After a group of sibling children were placed with agency foster carers, issues were raised regarding the long-term suitability of the carers for these particular children.

  135. jupes

    (Morsi)…finally turned himself into the Jewish state’s de facto protector.

    lol

    Israel doesn’t need a ‘protector’. They have been doing a very good job of that themselves for the last 64 years.

  136. Scapula

    ‘Protector’ is of course too strong, but neverthless to have the Islamic Brotherhood supporting Israel’s position against Hamas and being the guarantor of peace on its Western flank is the current reality.

    Morsi’s reward is the green light from America to turn himself into a new Pharoah with all the riches that Mubarak once accrued from that role.

  137. dover_beach

    The GOP platform wants to ban contraceptives?

  138. m0nty

    This is nonsense, though it’s become boilerplate analysis lately. Hispanics want welfare and lots of it.

    CL, let’s follow your logic if that is true. Given the demographic changes in the US, how does the party justify not changing to meet those demands, if it doesn’t want to disappear? The way you’d have it, the Republican Party would be reduced to a rump in the long term. Either the right changes, or it becomes irrelevant.

    It’s a rather fatalistic view you have, electorally.

  139. steve from brisbane

    m0nty, it matches what CL wants for the Catholic Church.

  140. Gab

    He averages 13.5%, which is very impressive (twice Obama’s rate), but hardly a third. Since he’s supposed to tithe 10% as part of his religious duties, that means his willing contributions to actual charities was 3.5%

    LOL. “No, no he “only” donates 3,5%”. My God, the spin is dizzying.

  141. steve from brisbane

    The GOP platform wants to ban contraceptives?

    Well, a large number of its followers think young women are sluts for wanting it covered in health insurance. Viagra, on the other, is essential for a large number of older white men, and therefore nearly got a mention in the Republican platform.

    :-)

  142. John Mc

    CL, let’s follow your logic if that is true. Given the demographic changes in the US, how does the party justify not changing to meet those demands, if it doesn’t want to disappear?

    If that’s the case then so be it. If the citizenry just want to vote them selves an easy life on the public purse and run the country down until it collapses and there’s enough of them to keep a majority and no constitutional protections to stop it, that’s how it has to be. Greece deserves to be where it is and the people deserve to live like shit. America is just an idea. Corrupt the idea and accept the consequences.

  143. Jarrah

    ““No, no he “only” donates 3,5%”.”

    dd brought up the “one third” furphy. I was correcting him, not dissing Romney.

    “My God, the spin is dizzying.”

    Learning facts makes you dizzy? No wonder you struggle on this forum.

  144. Gab

    No, Jarrah your words are quite clear as is your meaning. It’s there for all to see. He donated 13.5% which you turned into some biazzaro logic of really he only donated 3.5% becuase the other 10% was just religion.

    I’d better not say anything further lest you again go running to Sinclair with threats of law suits.

  145. C.L.

    The idea that the GOP must elect a congress full of reps called Chavez in order to be elected again is hilarious. White people are the very large majority of voters. You’d be better advised to tailor policies to ween deadbeat white Democrats off the dole than delude yourself into thinking a welfare hoover like the Latino demographic will ever consistently vote for you.

  146. C.L.

    Well, a large number of its followers think young women are sluts for wanting it covered in health insurance.

    No, they believed that one woman was a slut for going on national television to claim that she did so much rooting that she couldn’t afford 10 bucks a week in contaceptives, week in week out.

    There’s no evidence to suggest Fluke resonated – indeed, her public appearances became debacles in parking lots where she addressed 3 stray dogs and 5 homeless men.

  147. areff

    Pardon the self-promotion, but I have just penned and published a piece at Quadrant Online on Jon Faine’s two-day monstering of anyone who questions his beloved PM.

    http://www.quadrant.org.au/blogs/qed/2012/11/their-abc

  148. candy

    “I notice the Council was unapologetic.”

    I see in that that article those three little children, one a baby, were of ethnic origin from an abusive home.
    They were just getting attached to their foster parents when taken away because the parents belong to some obscure political party. They had fostered kids for seven years happily and successfully up till then.

    Hope that doesn’t start to happen in Australia under the Labor Party. Hideous.

  149. val majkus

    I have just penned and published a piece at Quadrant Online on Jon Faine’s two-day monstering

    love this bit:

    There are some who argue that the ABC has outlived its usefulness as “a market-failure broadcaster” and should be sold off holus bolus, the inmates cut loose to find employment where they can. Count this writer among those who think that would be going too far. Its bush broadcasting, while not without fault, does a serve a market increasingly subjected to the anodine and syndicated ear wax peddled by commercial operators. In the bush, if only for emergency alerts and the latest market prices of turnips and fat lambs, ABC Radio remains something of value.

  150. DaveF

    They were just getting attached to their foster parents

    Starting to call them Mum and Dad. Really a terrible story.

  151. Viva

    some obscure political party

    Not in the UK it isn’t Candy. It’s considered the only real conservative party in the land.

  152. C.L.

    Being sold as ‘progress’:

    A 16-YEAR-OLD girl is thought to have become the first person to speak from the House of Commons despatch box while wearing a hijab, The Times newspaper reports.

    Sumaiya Karim was speaking as the youth parliament held its annual session in the lower house’s chamber, according to the report on Saturday.

    Teen makes Hijab history in UK parliament.

  153. Jarrah

    “No, Jarrah your words are quite clear as is your meaning.”

    Yes, they are. Apparently you still haven’t worked it out.

    “He donated 13.5% which you turned into some biazzaro logic of really he only donated 3.5% becuase the other 10% was just religion.”

    I never said ‘only’. I pointed out that his willing contributions to charity were, in fact, 3.5% on average. This is quite nice of him, but it’s not “a third”. Again, I’m just correcting dd, not dissing Romney. That you have to twist my clear words and plain meaning says quite a bit about how such facts discomfort you.

  154. Scapula

    Faine was excellent.

    The reality is that the scandal mongers are like dogs trying to sniff out a truffle but finding none.

    Naturally they’re going to look stupid.

    There is as yet no real scandal as there is no alleged wrongdoing.

    Its a Foxified Seinfeld or Clayton’s scandal.

    Faine asked was there any evidence that the POA was not witnessed by Gillard beside that of a self-confessed fraudster and bagman and Smith had no answer.

  155. m0nty

    The idea that the GOP must elect a congress full of reps called Chavez in order to be elected again is hilarious. White people are the very large majority of voters. You’d be better advised to tailor policies to ween deadbeat white Democrats off the dole than delude yourself into thinking a welfare hoover like the Latino demographic will ever consistently vote for you.

    Very large is an overstatement. The white vote has declined an average of three points in each presidential election since 1992, to be nearing 60% now. Within a decade or so, it will be less than 50%. At some point the Republicans will have to address this.

  156. C.L.

    …a self-confessed fraudster and bagman…

    …who was Gillard’s very good friend, for whom she did dodgy legal work that got her sacked from Slater & Gordon.

  157. entropy

    I dunno about ABC rural. Most of the time it is just reboadcasts of the metro programs. How do you know the 15 minutes of rural news at 6:15 am and the hokey add ons of local content to the national news every now and again could not be done by the private sector which currently does not provide this service as it is already provided by their ABC?

    The “local” rural news is also done at a region level. There are only three clearly separate reports at 6:15 in Qld for instance (although on the website these still look like six), and even then content is frequently shared.

    And the country hour at lunchtime is a state level program with a lot of shared national content

  158. C.L.

    Since 1992 huh?

    What happened between 2000 and 2008?

    Did Latinos mistake George Bush for the Cisco Kid or something?

  159. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    The thing that can spoil this model is the open borders policy, which allows any idiot to clog up a thread.

    I think people have to be given a bit of time to get used to the culture of the Cat. There are actually some fairly dominant forms of etiquette that exist here (don’t laugh, read on).

    Firstly, timidity and wetness is not appreciated no matter what your perspective – you are expected to state and defend your position, showing some intelligence. Once you are established and known here, people get where you are coming from and let you rip away as you wish within the fray.

    Secondly, creative invective is appreciated and thus tacitly encouraged, especially if witty and if it is used in the exposition of ideas or demolition of arguments and their carriers. However, more careful contributors like Daddy Dave and Dover Beach, never do this, certainly not to the level of personal abuse (you can be like them too; abuse is not mandatory). The Cat seems to be largely self-controlling – people will say if others are becoming on the edge of illegal, seedily salacious, boringly wrong and obtuse or just plain boring. Seriously stupid trolls are very, very, very boring: their main sin, married to their stupidity.

    Thirdly, the gentlemen here rarely throw abuse at commenting ladies although wymin can get trounced if objectionable, and everyone cares for the welfare of the sick and injured when it is real. Ladies, imh experience are given much leeway to be off-track as we are few in number and I guess appreciated for our very presence and charms. The girls’ brains, housekeeping skills, wit, wisdom and feistiness make gender an interesting feature of the Cat. Very wet ladies are only admired if they can be envisioned looking good in dampened t-shirts or jelly-wrestling, where JC is the connoisseur who will run a book on it.

    Fourthly, the posts are not for clogging or hogging (although after 12 midnight Blogstrop I think myself they are more available for individual battles and/or shared appreciations). Open Thread is good for anything at any time, especially Friday nite late, but as this is a politics/economics blog keeping vaguely to tune can be helpful.

    Fifthly, this is a community. Many people here have established relationships and have fought and agreed or disagreed over a long period of time; others less so. Stick around and try to work out the way things have shuffled down between particular people. Etiquette is knowing when to butt out as well as in.

    Sixthly, Gab is the Cat Internet Queen. She is very quick on the draw. SfB is the pet troll along with a few others. Sinc can take trolls on a one-way trip to the vet anytime. Some think he should do this more often but in the light of the ‘etiquette’ that applies here it seems to me to be fair to give people a run to establish their position (and personna, don’t forget the personna), to get known, and to rectify any oar that they might have put wrong at first before they are declared troll absoluta.

    I am not a big blog haunter. I was threatened with extinction the very first time I ever went on Legal Eagle’s Blog. I determined never ever to go back there; perhaps they’re thrilled, who knows? In contrast, I have never been banned here, although I know I can annoy hell out of some people for being a ditzy burlesque dancer (I have some great new moves after last night’s party) and zoo keeper of note. But tucked somewhere in my head is quite a good brain which enjoys coming here. So I just thought I’d say the above, fyi newbies. If inclined, others could say much more.

    ps. I sometimes do go on a bit long. Anyone here could tell you that. :)

  160. areff

    If I remember Catholic doctrine correctly, the scapula gets you into Heaven on a free pass if the wearer dies on a Saturday.

    It is Saturday and Sinc should send Scapula on his way to the afterlife without delay.

  161. val majkus

    Faine was excellent.

    and your opinion has support:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjyOBc50cig&feature=youtu.be

    oh wait …

  162. kae

    Gab 12:15am

    attending class, having access to school tutoring facilities and additional input from a teacher were all forms of academic support.

    “Support does not mean that the school does the work for the student,” he said.

    This gem of information should be spruiked around universities, too.

    Questions from some students are amazing. “I can’t attend all the classes, are they compulsory?”

    Answers better: “No, attendance is not compulsory. However, the rate of failure is much higher in students who don’t attend classes.”

    There’s been a crack down at my institution and now students must pass all items of assessment including the final exam, to get a passing grade.

    Students have discovered that there has been a crack down on integrity, ie, cases of plagiarism and other activities which breach academic integrity.

    I suspect there are too many students who get high grades and shouldn’t and when their grade reflects their academic skill they make huge waves. Too manu students are leaving with qualifications which they shouldn’t have been awarded but there’s been no way to check their work (eg. internet assignment writing which means someone with awful English who shows no knowledge in class has wonderful assignments then fails the final exam miserably). Now students must pass the final exam as well as their assessment items to receive a passing grade.

  163. Gab

    This is quite nice of him, but it’s not “a third”.

    The Romney’s 2011 tax return shows they made $13.7 million and donated $4 million. You’re right, it’s not 33.333%, it’s 29.197% of their income for the year.

    Math is so hard, Jarrah, I can understand why you struggle.

  164. m0nty

    Pardon the self-promotion, but I have just penned and published a piece at Quadrant Online on Jon Faine’s two-day monstering of anyone who questions his beloved PM.

    I note, Roger, that you failed to address Faine’s point, which is that amongst all these “questions Gillard must answer”, none of them lead to any allegations of actual wrongdoing that would stand up in a court of law.

    It’s a massive fishing expedition, a media super trawler that has so far brought up nothing substantial against Gillard. Plenty to incriminate the self-confessed fraudster Blewitt, of course, but he’s managed to con the cops into granting him immunity. What for, I don’t know. It’s like granting Al Capone immunity to try to nail his accountant.

  165. Scapula

    The point is that nothing will be found as there’s nothing to find.

    But the remarkable benefit of this fact is that it can go on forever.

  166. Jarrah

    “The Romney’s 2011 tax return”

    Exactly. In the year before he ran for president, he upped the amount he gave to charity. In that particular year, it was almost a third. But, like I said and you’re apparently can’t understand, his average is a bit over 13%.

    Math English is so hard, Jarrah”

    I’m trying to be sympathetic, but you will have to use your brain instead of your ovaries.

  167. m0nty

    Since 1992 huh?

    What happened between 2000 and 2008?

    Did Latinos mistake George Bush for the Cisco Kid or something?

    Dubbya was rather liberal on immigration.

  168. Gab

    And if you want to get even more persnickety, which you are to a fault, the Romneys’ net worth is estimated to be $250 million, and so $4 million is just 1.6% of that. This game could be played all day.

    I’m trying to be sympathetic

    No, you’re lying. Your first response to me was disproportionate in abuse to what I actually wrote,but then that’s no less than what I’ve seen you often do.

    but you will have to use your brain instead of your ovaries.

    I always do use my brain.

  169. JC

    Shut up fat boy. You have no business getting these discussions about the Tea Party as you only read stuff about them from far left wing sites.

    DD

    The tea party will survive and prosper for the simple reason that it has a strong argument about debt , deficits and taxes. By rights it ought to be the young voting for it as Nial Ferguson suggests as they are that will be paying off the debt for present day consumption. They will get better at selecting quality candidates.

    They also act in making sure the GOP keeps on the straight and narrow.

    Good speed to them.

  170. Scapula

    Craig Ferguson has a better grasp of what the young want.

  171. Abu Chowdah

    I absolutely love Strats – I’ve got a cherry red ’96 American Standard, crafted to pretty much orginal specs and it’s the bees knees, especially running through my Princeton Chorus.

    Nice. I have a surf green super reliced CS strat. A 57. Sounds great through my tweed deluxe.

  172. dover_beach

    So Romney doesn’t willing give the 10 out of 13.5%?

  173. DaveF

    I recently saw a documentary named ‘Restrepo’ and I recommend it to everyone.

    It was a cameraman embedded with some US troops in A-stan for an extended period. Very interesting.

    My main takeaway was it was what a documentary should be. He didn’t seem to inject his opinions about the war at any point. He just filmed and let the guys do the talking. And his editing seemed more than fair.

    After watching it I have no idea what the film makers opinion of the war is. Bravo sir.

  174. Jarrah

    “Your first response to me was disproportionate in abuse to what I actually wrote”

    Seriously. This is your defence?

    Let’s review – I made a factual comment to help dd understand where he was going wrong. No comment had been directed at you.

    You proceeded to claim I made a statement that I did not, and that stating facts was ‘spin’, which was ‘dizzying’. Commiserating with you about your weakness was not nice of me, but hardly disproportionate.

    “I always do use my brain.”

    That’s my assumption about everyone, including all women. I don’t assume most use their ovaries when they make decisions – that would be insulting and bigoted.

  175. Jarrah

    “So Romney doesn’t willing give the 10 out of 13.5%?”

    It’s compulsory for membership of that group. Like taxes. :-)

  176. Septimus

    nilk,

    Thanks very much for your links last night to the Credo and Foo Fighters. The Credo is excellent and I have e-mailed it to neighbours who I’m sure will also enjoy it. Foo Fighters – I’d never watched or listened to them before but since watching the video this morning our youngest daughter has loaned me two of their CDs ‘There’s Nothing Left to Lose’ (1999) and ‘Echoes, Silence, Patience and Grace’ (2007), as well as Foreigner’s ‘Platimum Collection’ CD. So, I’ve been enjoying listening to them this afternoon. :)

  177. Gab

    but you will have to use your brain instead of your ovaries.

    I don’t assume most use their ovaries when they make decisions – that would be insulting and bigoted.

    LOL.

  178. Jarrah

    “LOL.”

    Yes, indeed. You apparently don’t know what ‘assume’ means either. It’s something that can be overturned by evidence to the contrary. Your comments suggested that your brain wasn’t being employed. Luckily you had told us all what most women use when they don’t engage their brain, so I applied your own logic to you.

    Didn’t feel good, did it? Maybe you should think about that next time you want to baselessly impugn most of womankind.

  179. blogstrop

    Thanks Lizzie for that exposition, although it gives me no particular comfort. According to the movie, “Coco” Chanel started out as a burlesque singer/dancer, gaining that nic from a well-known song in the clubs back then.

  180. Gab

    This is what I wrote:

    The emotional appeal to wealth distribution is a nurturing and caring psychological clarion call that some women will respond to without a rational thought to the consequences. Most women vote with their ovaries/hearts not their brains.

    1. “Vote like your lady parts depend on it” and they did.

    2. “President Obama’s campaign is out with an eyebrow-raising new ad targeting young voters in which Lena Dunham, the creator of the HBO hit series ‘Girls,’ compares her first voting experience to losing her virginity.

    ‘Your first time shouldn’t be with just anybody,’ Dunham, 26, says in the ad. ‘You want to do it with a great guy.’

    Dunham goes on to explain that ‘your first time’ should be with ‘someone who really cares about and understands women; A guy who cares whether you get health insurance and specifically whether you get birth control.’”

    3. “But pollsters said the newly identified electoral bloc of unmarried women voted for Obama for bringing the country through the recession – with the Democrats’ support for healthcare, equal pay, and Planned Parenthood came a close second.”…”Unmarried women had an additional incentive this year, when Republicans seemed to be adopting extreme and retrograde positions on equal pay, birth control and abortion – which the Democrats quickly jumped on and labelled a “war on women”.”

    Your comments suggested that your brain wasn’t being employed

    Didn’t feel good, did it?

    Don’t flatter yourself into thinking you know how I feel about your comments. Generalization is one thing, personal attacks is your thing.

    Maybe you should think about that next time you want to baselessly impugn most of womankind.

    Aww, diddums, did I offend you? It wasn’t baseless, it was an opinion formed from such facts as listed above. Please make sure to let me know when you will sue me.

  181. areff

    Mr Justice m0nty: I come from the old-fashioned school of journalism so, while you may insist there is nothing that “could stand up in court”, I’m happy to leave that to police and prosecutors. As a newsman, a more pressing question hangs on the PM’s character. She may well have been bent back in the day, but her current dissembling — including calling media proprietors to have reporters sacked and their careers scuttled — says she is definitely bent now.

    She’s the PM, and she is a vicious, conniving manipulator who will ruin people’s lives to save her own skin. That’s a good enough reason for me. Let the courts sort the rest out later.

    I won’t respond to you again. Talking to the dog is more satisfying.

  182. entropy

    “So Romney doesn’t willing give the 10 out of 13.5%?”

    It’s compulsory for membership of that group. Like taxes.

    I was going to call bullshit on that Jarrah, so I looked it up and you are right if you regard entering the temple or receiving financial assistance, which I must admit is a stronger requirement than I expected.

    Is Paying Tithing Necessary to Be a Mormon?

    Only a person’s local ecclesiastical leader knows whether he or she pays tithing, and those who choose not to pay tithing may continue attending the LDS church.

    However, paying a full tithe is a requirement for entering the temple or receiving financial assistance from the LDS church. Prior to baptism into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a person must understand and be willing to obey the law of tithing.

    So I guess it comes down to how important a morman thinks entering the temple is. If you just want to go to church, you don’t have to pay tithe.

  183. CL wrote:

    No, they believed that one woman was a slut for going on national television to claim that she did so much rooting that she couldn’t afford 10 bucks a week in contaceptives, week in week out.

    You’ve been told by me, and probably others, scores of times: she said nothing about her own life at all. But you live in a fantasy world that’s hard for facts to break into.

    There’s no evidence to suggest Fluke resonated

    Well, except for the following:

    Just 44 per cent of female voters supported Mitt Romney, while 55 per cent voted to re-elect Barack Obama – and with women making up 53 per cent of the electorate, those numbers were enough to play a significant role in keeping the GOP out of the White House.

    Amongst single women, it was 67/31.

    And that’s from the Daily Mail, your political journal of choice.

  184. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Jarrah, I suspect you have to have ovaries to even begin to understand what it feels like to think with them. :)

    Men get a bit masculinely glandular in their general thoughts and approach too. You are free to speak about that.

    Gab is hardly ‘impugning’ most of womankind. That is a bit harsh. There is a side of women that thinks ‘softly’, and can be easily led towards the Obama model of welfare etc. We all know about it, and feel it. It makes us good wives and mothers. We also have a skeptical ability to resist this siren call. Two sides to us, both OK.

  185. John Mc

    Jarrah, I suspect you have to have ovaries to even begin to understand what it feels like to think with them

    Sometimes I suspect Jarrah has ovaries!

  186. Woolfe

    Kae,
    My daughter has just finished her nursing degree at Enid Blyton AKA Edith Cowan.

    She says they have some sort of plagiarism software that checks assignments and provides a colour code according to a plagiarism index. They can be failed on this index.

  187. DaveF, I’ve got Restrepo amongst my doco collection, so I really should watch it. You might want to check out Armadillo, if you can. In that one, the maker follows a group of Danish lads when they are sent to FOB Armadillo.

    It’s excellent viewing. I’d like a follow-up to see how they are faring now.

  188. @Kae and Gab, regarding the idea that study is not a requirement for students to pass, and being gobsmacked when they don’t pass.

    I learned the other day that it is now (practically) forbidden to tell children in childcare that they are being naughty. Positive re-inforcement and redirection are the way, no more sitting in the corner for time-out.

    Rather than telling X he or she has been misbehaving, now you must sit them with you and suggest that they should reconsider their behaviour.

    I shiite you not.

  189. Oh, and re the Foo Fighters. I’d not really paid any attention to them until I saw the clip for Learn To Fly.

    That made me sit up and look twice, and start checking out their stuff.

  190. Chris

    Dubbya was rather liberal on immigration.

    Yes and he expressed understanding of why illegal immigration occurs and how parents wanted the best for their children. And promised to make the INS process better too.

    It’s a good example of how if the Republican party stops scaring off Latino and women voters with some of their more extreme policies (or in some cases just extreme candidates) then they will vote for the Republican party (most likely on economic grounds).

  191. DaveF

    DaveF, I’ve got Restrepo amongst my doco collection, so I really should watch it.

    Oh yes.

    I’ll check out Armadillo for sure. Our troops were in Helmand province for a while. Ta for the tip.

  192. Huckleberry Chunkwot

    Re the Foo Fighters: When you also take into account his groundbreaking work with Nirvana, Dave Grohl is one of the most influential musicians of the modern era.

  193. m0nty

    Mr Justice m0nty: I come from the old-fashioned school of journalism so, while you may insist there is nothing that “could stand up in court”, I’m happy to leave that to police and prosecutors. As a newsman, a more pressing question hangs on the PM’s character. She may well have been bent back in the day, but her current dissembling — including calling media proprietors to have reporters sacked and their careers scuttled — says she is definitely bent now.

    That is completely ridiculous, Roger. The Prime Minister is not “bent”. Are you alleging that she has been taking money from crooks since she was elected PM? How big is the conspiracy theory you are constructing here? Your derangement syndrome is as bad as anyone here, evidently.

  194. Tiny Dancer

    Clearly the lying slapper knew about the rort at the AWU. Set it up, conveyancing, mortgage insurance. And probably benefited from it. Only those who refuse to see cant see it. And they are dishonest

  195. Carpe Jugulum

    The Prime Minister is not “bent”.

    How about crooked, borderline corrupt, a shonk, a carpetbagger, dishonest, a tart with a love of other peoples money. You decide.

  196. Infidel Tiger

    Dubbya was rather liberal on immigration.

    Hahaha!

    Dubya joins Reagan and Lincoln et al as Republicans lefties love and admire once they are long gone from office.

    Although admittedly Carter and Clinton are looking pretty damn good compared to the current guy.

  197. I like scrag, myself, Carpe. It’s not very moderate, but it is nicely descriptive.

  198. Huckleberry Chunkwot

    FFS m0nty, we are splitting hairs about the definition of being bent. Is that really what it has come down to?
    Using sophistry to sweep under the carpet serious character flaws in our highest elected official should surely indicate to even the most partisan shills that her time has come.
    She has shown that her word can’t be taken seriously, that alone is enough reason for her to go.
    The stuff that sends her to jail will come later.

  199. m0nty

    FFS m0nty, we are splitting hairs about the definition of being bent. Is that really what it has come down to?

    “Bent” is a word that carries connotations of ongoing criminal activity, Huck. If Roger was politically relevant as a publisher – which he is not at all, as Quadrant has no credibility whatsoever – he’d be getting a call from the PM’s office asking him to retract that actionable statement.

  200. Tiny Dancer

    There be no more requests for retractions, no more demands for sackings of journalists nor will the slapper sue anyone for defamation. Though it would be the best party in town. Ever.

  201. Tom

    Quadrant has no credibility whatsoever

    As someone who has only a distant memory of writing about a single specialisation (information technology), Monty is an authority on both journalism and politics. He now publishes Australian Rules football statistics.

  202. JC

    Mr Justice m0nty: I come from the old-fashioned school of journalism so, while you may insist there is nothing that “could stand up in court”, I’m happy to leave that to police and prosecutors. As a newsman, a more pressing question hangs on the PM’s character. She may well have been bent back in the day, but her current dissembling — including calling media proprietors to have reporters sacked and their careers scuttled — says she is definitely bent now.

    She’s the PM, and she is a vicious, conniving manipulator who will ruin people’s lives to save her own skin. That’s a good enough reason for me. Let the courts sort the rest out later.

    I won’t respond to you again. Talking to the dog is more satisfying.

    Lol… He’s a renaissance man. An Instituionalist who also happens to devour Krispy Kremes by the carton.

  203. Huckleberry Chunkwot

    m0nty, to my mind bent means willing to bend the rules for personal (or in this instance, political as well) gain.
    Gillard has shown scant regard for playing by the rules in her personal (married men), professional (dodgy, most probably criminal actions as a solicitor) and political (there will be no carbon tax etc) life.
    As the yanks are wont to say, she is batting 0 for 3.
    At the end of the day m0nty, it is time to face facts, she is unfit for office.

  204. Scapula

    The old right could preach about playing by the rules, but the feral right – no.

  205. DaveF

    Ponting should be dropped.

  206. Interestingly enough, the troll content of todays O.F. is nearly 40%.
    FYI.

  207. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Rather than telling X he or she has been misbehaving, now you must sit them with you and suggest that they should reconsider their behaviour.

    Very Nurse Ratched.

    How to take away a child’s autonomy, I think. The naughty corner is a fine place for personal reflection on the ways of the world without a heavy lecture about things. They then make the choice of when to rejoin civilised company. Usually in about two minutes for the under 10′s, but longer for da Hairy Ape. :)

  208. jumpnmcar

    Ponting should be dropped.

    No, Ponting should drop himself.

  209. Huckleberry Chunkwot

    The old right could preach about playing by the rules, but the feral right – no.

    Scapula
    24 Nov 12 at 5:53 pm

    Fuck me scrappy, you should join numbers on the other thread. What is it with the mental age of leftists? Takes one to know one, FFS, grow up tool.

  210. dd

    The GOP platform wants to ban contraceptives?

    That’s the impression you would have gotten during the campaign.

    He averages 13.5%, which is very impressive (twice Obama’s rate), but hardly a third.

    Jarrah, that’s in addition to his tax. note here:

    In 2011, the Romneys donated about 29% of their income to charity

    on the GOP being demonized as wanting to take away birth control etc, you said,

    It was easy to do that, because that’s the GOP platform.

    It’s not their platform, but yeah it was a trap of their own making.

    I don’t know how much harder he could have gone, considering it was a Republican idea that he pushed through as state governor.

    Well yes, that was a liability for him. It was hard for him to campaign convincingly on the biggest issue of the day.

  211. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    The Prime Minister is not “bent”.

    Well, not any more, some might say.

    Additionally, and more worrying, is the fact that she has lied about the nature of her past involvement. The cover up is always worse.

    Put the same past and the same activities on Tony Abbott and see how Prime Ministerial it would sound and see what a field day the press would have with it. Thankfully, Mr. Abbott is a man of good character and habits, worthy of The Lodge.

  212. jumpnmcar

    WS

    Interestingly enough, the troll content of todays O.F. is nearly 40%.

    And giving trolls oxygen would be % 40 too.
    I therefore look forward to reading only %20 of the Cat.

  213. Tom

    the troll content of todays O.F. is nearly 40%.

    Does that include responses to trolls? In which case it is nearer 80%. It’s like a letterbox overflowing with junk mail today.

  214. DaveF

    I like the Weekend Oz and buy it every Saturday.

    They have what I consider a loose policy toward what they consider EXCLUSIVE.

    But today they excelled themselves, Every story on the front page – 5 of them – was EXCLUSIVE, including a story on some sort of sports program for remote aboriginal kids.

    Dear Editor I think it’s time for an intervention.

  215. DaveF

    An article I was reading had this sentence:

    However, there may be a niche for a private crewed moon venture, says Fred Bourgeois, head of Team Frednet, a competitor in the Google Lunar X Prize race to land a rover on the moon.

    How the hell do you get a surname like that?

  216. Carpe Jugulum

    How the hell do you get a surname like that?

    He used to be called Fred Lumpenprole but went to deedpol to change it.

  217. JC

    Bob/Max at his best.

    The old right could preach about playing by the rules, but the feral right – no.

    Really means.

    But when the old saw was used to cut the roof of the car the kitchen sink fell out of the wardrobe and the ham went through the drier.

  218. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Winston, a good tactic is to run down the list of names and simply ignore the trolls, pets and diverse internet vermin.

  219. Carpe Jugulum

    I like scrag, myself, Carpe. It’s not very moderate, but it is nicely descriptive.

    Nilk – i prefer slattern (old school) or perhaps “lady of negotiable affections”
    (thank you Terry Pratchett)

    Of course back in the my Navy days women such as her would have been referred to as ‘gunbags’.

  220. I normally do that, Mk50, but just decided to do an analysis of it today.

  221. blogstrop

    Troll content 40%, responses 40%. What a surprise.

  222. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Septimus – Tonite it’s Brazilian metal and baroque chamber music.

    Listening to Sepultura’s ‘Arise’ and ‘Beneath the remains’. One of the lads recommended it. Not bad. Had not realised the scale of the metal scene in Brazil.

    next is a CD containing many versions of one thing, Paschelbel’s Canon (one of my favourite pieces of music, especially with the gigue)

  223. C.L.

    Steve, thanks fot that blockquote which confirms that there is no evidence that slut Sandra Fluke resonated at all – except to stray dogs and the homeless in backwoods parking lots. Fluke agreed to be a poster girl for all those (non existent) women in America who can’t afford 10 bucks a week for contraceptive pills. She agreed to be Obama’s tramp and it’s very possible her father will die of shame.

  224. Septimus

    Mk50

    Seultura ‘Arise’ and ‘Beneath The Remains’ – Wow! I already have tinnitus :)

    Pachelbel’s Canon (any version) is fine for me. Enjoy.

  225. johanna

    I strongly recommend Jimi Hendrix Blues to fans of the great man. The CD has a great 16 page booklet inside which outlines his life history, including the fact that he paid his dues for some years travelling with working blues/r&b bands all over the country.

    The songs include classics like Catfish Blues, Born Under a Bad Sign, Mannish Boy and a smokin’ version of Voodoo Chile. Hendrix was a very accomplished straight blues guitarist.

    As for those who claim he was no technical hotshot – pfft – you know not of what you speak. There are a lot of crappy recordings, especially of his live work, out there – mostly released by money-grubbers after his death.

    But Electric Ladyland, Band of Gypsies and Blues are proof that he could certainly play in a technical sense as well as being the greatest innovator in the history of electric guitar. Eric Clapton and Jimmy Page might have been better technically, but Hendrix redefined the instrument.

  226. Septimus

    Just relaxing tonight, so continuing on with ’100 Must Have Movie Classics’. Now playing track 72 ‘A Night on the Bare Mountain’ (from “Natural Born Killers”)

  227. Rabz

    including the fact that he paid his dues for some years travelling with working blues/r&b bands all over the country.

    Yep – the guy had so much cred it wasn’t funny. He wouldn’t have been ‘innovating’ on the chitlin’ circuit – he was gaining his chops.

    This guy reversed his guitars – which I’ve always thought made him inimitable.

  228. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Septimus:

    Sepultura’s ‘Arise’ and ‘Beneath The Remains’ – Wow! I already have tinnitus

    WHAT?? I CAN’T HEAR YOU!!?!

    :)

  229. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Sigh. Long night due. Want to read Fitzpatricks ‘The British Empire in Australia‘ MUP 1941 as well as type out the notes I need from Sir george Aston’s ‘The Problem of Defence‘ and Cole’s ‘Changing Conditions of Imperial Defence‘. Annoyingly, I find (reading it) that I’ll also have to read Critchell and Raymond’s ‘A History of the Frozen Meat Trade‘. I feel like I am going backwards here…

    So I added Avantasia’s ‘Angel of Babylon’ to the listening list. Scandi metal seems a bit ‘deeper’ than Brazilian.

    To be frank, I am found two Sepultura albums back-to-back a little heavy. As you said, tinnitus….

  230. god this blog isa carpet jungle of deserted retards, who are allowed to converse…I think that is admirable, th problem is…th mentality internally spirals

  231. C.L.

    OK, cop this, coffee nazis.

    This morning I bought some Robert Timms coffee bags.

    Well?

    Huh?

    Get some sophistication up ya.

  232. Septimus

    Hai C.L. sama.

    Kohi o nomimasho!

    ;)

  233. What CL?
    Dontcha like International Roast?
    And whose this Robert Timms missus you bought a bit of?

  234. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Um. Coffee? That’s the convenient caffeine-filled powdered stuff for when one cannot make tea.

    Tea now….

  235. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Winston, Caterer’s Blend, please. Gotta have the good stuff.

  236. Septimus

    Don’t anyone tell Carpe . . . I found his Uncle Kenny’s ‘Montage’ CD in my collection ;)

  237. Gab

    This morning I bought some Robert Timms coffee bags.

    Baby steps are good but at this rate you’re never going to have real coffee. Still, you threw out those old old old sneakers of yours, so there’s that :)

  238. C.L.

    Still, you threw out those old old old sneakers of yours, so there’s that.

    No no. They were work boots, not SNEAKERS. :x

    And I didn’t throw them out. They are hanging on a nail. :P

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