How is that Education Revolution going?

Even The Age is onto this:

PRIME Minister Julia Gillard’s goal of Australia having one of the top five schooling systems in the world by 2025 has been thrown into doubt after the nation received disastrous results in the latest international reading, maths and science tests.

The Australian places that disaster – and it is an appalling result – in context.

In the first international reading test of Australian primary schools, about 25 per cent of the nation’s Year 4 students failed to meet the minimum standard in reading for their age, rising to more than 30 per cent in Queensland and the Northern Territory.

Of the 48 countries tested, Australia ranked 27th, comparable with Bulgaria, Slovenia and Lithuania, and significantly behind the leaders Hong Kong, Russia and Finland, as well as the US and England.

A test of maths and science among Year 4 and Year 8 students showed Australian students’ skills had stagnated over the past 16 years, while some countries, notably in Asia, had greatly improved.

Between 29 per cent and 37 per cent of Year 4 and Year 8 students failed to meet the minimum standard for their grade in maths and science, rising to more than 50 per cent of Year 8 students in Tasmania and the Territory.

At the very least, we need to see some high level resignations in the education bureaucracies – and a large number of them too.

We also need to recognise that the rot starts at the top and in Australia’s case that is the very top. Prime Minister Julia Gillard used to tell anyone who would listen how committed she was to education. Well the results are plain to see.

Then there was the great stimulus package where billions were spent on buildings. So I thought it might be interesting to reproduce this discussion I had with Senator Annette Hurley:

Prof. Davidson—No, I totally disagree with the argument there. Certainly the school halls seem to be the most extraordinary waste of money that we have ever seen in our lifetimes. The Australian reported that $850,000, I recall from memory, was being spent on a single-pupil school and nobody thought to think why would we even think about giving this kind of money to a single-pupil school let alone actually give such an amount of money to a single-pupil school. And in today’s Australian we read that they are spending $2.45 million on a school hall for a school that already has a hall, which will give it an extra 30 square metres of space, but nonetheless most of the kids will still have to stand outside. I cannot believe for one second that this is productivity enhancing expenditure.
Senator HURLEY—If you had been at Senate question time, you would have heard many of the articles in the Australian comprehensively taken apart and proved to be wrong. But even if we accept that, the examples in the Australian have been a small part of what is being spent in the stimulus. I do not really think you can—
Prof. Davidson—You may well be right, it may be a small part, but it is the tip of the iceberg.
Senator HURLEY—I do not think, Professor Davidson, that you could argue that the infrastructure spending on education and transport and health that the government has done will not contribute to productivity in some way.
Prof. Davidson—I would be very surprised if a primary school hall where kids have already got one, discounted back to the present at any reasonable discount rate, would add to the productivity.
Senator HURLEY—If that is the best argument you can raise about the total infrastructure spending, Professor Davidson, I will hand over to someone else.

Kids who are struggling to read and write are certainly not going to be as productive as we might expect.

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51 Responses to How is that Education Revolution going?

  1. Biota

    If that is the best argument you can raise about the total infrastructure spending, Professor Davidson, I will hand over to someone else

    In other words I don’t have the brain power to comprehend what you are talking about so want to get away fast.

  2. Rafe

    Nice work Sinc, you beat me by four minutes.

  3. This article – by Madonna King – was printed in the Courier Mail in 2009

    Teachers – a Class Apart

    Wanted: A mature adult, with tertiary qualifications, values, ability to work long hours to educate tomorrow’s leaders in everything from Maths to English to good manners. Need to be able to be criticised, abused and possibly even assaulted.

    Tough job … and a barrage of complaints from parents is only making it tougher for Queensland teachers. Who would apply to be a teacher in 2009?

    As the school doors closed last year, the debate centred around whether red pens should be used in classrooms and whether building a replica of Noah’s Ark amounted to Christian indoctrination. But as those teachers prepar­ing to go back into the class­room this month will tell you, that’s only the beginning. Each day, someone will ques­tion the decisions they make. They accept that. But more and more often, the questions become complaints, which are taking up more and more of a teacher’s time.

    And it’s the consequence of that that we should be worried about. Teachers are rethinking their career choices; many with years of experience are choosing to leave and none of the debate is focusing on where that leaves our education system — or the children at its centre.

    The following is a list of real examples you will not have heard about; they are com­plaints given to organisers of the Queensland Teachers Union. A primary school teacher had a complaint lodged by a parent because she had given the kids a worksheet headed “Spelling demons”. The parent’s objection centred around “the association with the supernatural” and thought the children would be frightened.

    A primary school in a regional area in Queensland withdrew yoga classes that had been offered to students as part of their fitness program. The reason behind the forced with­drawal? A parental complaint about yoga’s association with “foreign religions”.

    Another primary school removed Harry Potter posters after a parent complained that the posters introduced children to witchcraft.

    Similarly, parents of a high school student complained about Macbeth being studied in English classes because it “promoted witchcraft”.

    The parents of a high school student who complained about “the grave health risk to their child” who was asked to pick up papers from the school grounds as a consequence of persistent dis­ruptive behaviour.

    Melbourne Cup Day was diffi­cult last year — as it is every year — because of the litany of complaints it brings. For example, the last race prompted complaints from parents because students were not allowed to discuss “the big race”. The teachers were accused of being un-Australian. But the same day — and race brought complaints from parents of children who were allowed to discuss it, because it allegedly promotes gambling.

    In cases where Santa was allowed to be part of recent classroom celebrations, these complaints were logged. Santa promotes a fantasy figure and should be banned. Teachers were promoting an unhealthy overweight role model to children and should be brought into line. The presence of Santa in the classroom promoted “greed”. You’d think that would make a teacher’s plan for the next Christmas easy. Ban Santa and stop the complaints. But no. An equal number of complaints are received each December when Santa is not part of celebrations. Parents have complained that (a) it is political correctness “gone mad”; and (b) that teachers are denying children exposure to a well-loved tradi­tional and cultural figure.

    Even the sun-safe “no hat, no play” rule — which has been in place in Queensland state schools for years – - brings regular complaints from parents who claim their children have been “discriminated against” if they are not allowed on to the oval because they have no hat.

    The issue of homework, too, is fraught with problems. Some parents argue that children should do all their work during school hours. But those on the other side say not giving enough homework means teachers are not fully providing for their education and how can all education be achieved from 8.30am to 3pm five days a week?

    Add to that the appalling pay given to our teachers, and you wonder whether we are setting our education system up to fail. Of course, parents should have a say in the education of their children. But surely once you investigate the options, and select a school for your children, barring real evidence that your child is being damaged, shouldn’t we leave the edu­cation to those trained to do it?

    The spectre of daily com­plaints and even legal threats must have an effect on those at the front of the classroom. Why would you go the extra yard, think outside the square, or add to the curriculum if the risk is a barrage of complaints and the threat of legal action? It’s our children who risk missing out here.

    The story throws some light on what has become a major issue for schools and teachers, but it really engages school principals. The amount of time taken up with managing complaints has become nothing short of a scandal. Precious time that should be used for educational leadership, supervision (of teachers) and mentoring has been taken from principals whilst they deal with complaints which are often a product of neurosis, vindictiveness, or sheer bloody-mindedness.

    Last year, I bumped into a principal colleague of mine that I hadn’t seen for a few years. When I asked him what he was up to, he told me that he had been appointed District Complaints Officer.

    The district in which his school was located had been so concerned about the time used for complaints management, that they had created a position (on a principal’s salary) for someone to do nothing but manage complaints. They decided that this was a better use of taxpayers’ money than allowing each school to deal with it.

    He was about to give it up and go back to his school, because he was tired of the abuse he was receiving. It kept him very busy – the phone rang all day long. There are a series of protocols developed around complaints, involving a great deal of paperwork. These protocols featured a flow chart designed to ensure that the complainant felt satisfied (vindicated??) at the end of the process. He reported that this was a rare outcome.

    He told me that the bulk of the complaints weren’t directed at the schools or teachers, but at the other students and their parents. People such as bus drivers, taxi drivers, crossing supervisors and tuck shop volunteers also came in for their fair share of criticism.

    As a principal, I usually found that half an hour face-to-face with a complainant was the most successful technique, especially if the ears were turned on, the mouth turned off, and my behaviour wasn’t defensive. The time was best used to get to the bottom of the issue (which wasn’t always what was being complained about) and doing a little lateral problem-solving. As I remember, only once in twenty years did this not work, resulting in the parent going over my head.

    In this particular situation, the teacher concerned had indeed behaved badly, but out of pride would not apologise. A simple apology would have restored the necessary confidence and respect. It meant lots of reports and paperwork, which I could well have done without.

  4. Muphin

    Amazing!! Julia Gillards PET project comes a cropper, so what’s new? ALL of her policies have failed, which are TOO many for these pages.

    Her latest ploy to provide more teachers is to train year 9 and 10 dropouts as TEACHER!!! This remarkable as the average year 9/10′s can’t read or write anyway.

    It is a very sad reflection on the standards of our teachers.

  5. Minderbinder of QLD

    Well yes, it does start at the top. The PM herself is an example of a failed education system. How this barely literate person, who butchers the language, makes up words, redefines words, screamingly shrieks abuse as a debating method, and generally behaves as a dictator, could ever have reached the standard required to be admitted as a solicitor, (even if that qualification has now passed into history), defies belief.
    This education news is what many have known for decades now. Our education system has, is, and ever more will be, dumbed down. A quality education costs too much, and is too restrictive on the numbers of people who can benefit from it. “Everyone passes” is the motto of OZ, no matter if the standards have to be lowered to achieve this result; after all there is so much funding, (at all levels), to be lost if this is not the outcome. Politicians, and Bureaucrats, now run the Education system in Australia, and they are the totally wrong people for the job,and don’t the results show it! Build a few more Halls, that will fix everything.

  6. Patio Boy, what does that have to do with Sinc’s post really?

  7. Keith

    Her other pet project within her super department was the Fair Work Act. Put the two together and you’ve got the destruction of industry and entrepreneurialism.
    She also presided over higher education, and just look at that !

  8. Rafe

    A well-run P&C should handle the complaints that Numbers cited, that would sort out the vexatious from those that really need attention.

    I wonder what prompted the culture of complaint? Maybe the same thing that gave us the culture of entitlements.

  9. .

    “The amount of time taken up with managing complaints has become nothing short of a scandal.”

    DON’T COMPLAIN!

  10. Rafe

    Revising Howard’s policy on asylum seekers was her project as well. How did that pan out?

  11. Rafe

    Off topic but related to another fashionale issue, and the culture of complaint and entitlements , playground bullying is hugely aggravated by aggro parents who wont support efforts to control their kids.

  12. Kruddler

    I blame the infiltration of the Steiner retards

  13. boy on a bike

    Rafe – too right. Only problem is that too many parents are too lazy to make the time and effort to turn up at a P&C meeting and present their complaint in front of a bunch of other parents. If your complaint won’t past the test of “the other parents will think I’m a dickhead for complaining about this”, then you should clam up and live with it.

  14. A well-run P&C

    Run by whom – the principal or the parents?

  15. Ant

    I was one of the professional consultants involved with the BER. The office where I worked made an absolute fortune from the fees, which largely was justified by the insane time frames placed on us to produce documentation to get projects tendered. In some cases, the turnaround time was a matter of several weeks, where ordinarily it should have been several months at best.

    Not enough has been made of how this haste contributed to 3 key failures with the BER program – and I doubt any of the pointyheads in government even understand it:

    1. Hugely inflated building costs: Demanding speed in the building industry is the same as writing consultants and builders and suppliers a stack of blank cheques. We and they were like pigs sloshing in mud.

    2. Poor quality: The design and construction of much of the work – particularly in the public sector – is of a relatively poor standard and the ongoing maintenance costs over the life of these projects will be very high.

    3. Knock-on effects: High construction costs are primarily due to high labour and material costs. Once the benchmark has been ratcheted up in this area – particularly with labour – it’s extremely difficult to get it back to where it was without the artificial ‘stimulus’. Material suppliers were also released from he shackles of having to be competitive because their other competitors just couldn’t keep up with the crazy demand. Now that the BER is long gone, we are still dealing with contractors charging between $80 – $100 per hour for labour on variations. It hasn’t gone down.

    And the killer is this: These rates filter through to the domestic construction sector, which is largely un-unionised, making the cost of everything from building your house to replacing a circuit breaker much higher. So much for affordable housing.

    So the Rudd/Gillard BER, apart from its farcical result in terms of education quality, succeeded in inflating construction costs in Australia.

    They would have been better off picking on another area to stimulate, if stimulating was their obsession.

  16. Dr Faustus

    How is that Education Revolution Going? The short answer is ‘exactly as well as anything else this pathologically hopeless government puts out’.

    Invective aside, it seems to me that the problem is more grass roots that Gillard’s fantasy that she is the Patron Saint of Education. Based my personal observation, the teaching profession has been devalued in our society to the extent that it has become a fairly low status and poorly paid job (compared to other tertiary qualified professions – eg engineers).

    The net result is a low attraction rate of well-qualified, enthused people and a high retention rate of low-to-moderate talent who are happy to trade crap salary prospects for long holidays. It seems to be a common experience that most schools have a small cadre of inspirational educators and a far larger population of teachers who would struggle to fit into the drone class.

    Gillard has proposed a performance pay scheme (some time out in the future) for selected top teachers – however, this doesn’t even start to address the performance problem of the majority low-flyers.

  17. .

    Not enough has been made of how this haste contributed to 3 key failures with the BER program – and I doubt any of the pointyheads in government even understand it:

    1. Hugely inflated building costs: Demanding speed in the building industry is the same as writing consultants and builders and suppliers a stack of blank cheques. We and they were like pigs sloshing in mud.

    2. Poor quality: The design and construction of much of the work – particularly in the public sector – is of a relatively poor standard and the ongoing maintenance costs over the life of these projects will be very high.

    3. Knock-on effects: High construction costs are primarily due to high labour and material costs. Once the benchmark has been ratcheted up in this area – particularly with labour – it’s extremely difficult to get it back to where it was without the artificial ‘stimulus’. Material suppliers were also released from he shackles of having to be competitive because their other competitors just couldn’t keep up with the crazy demand. Now that the BER is long gone, we are still dealing with contractors charging between $80 – $100 per hour for labour on variations. It hasn’t gone down.

    Don’t tell numbers. He reckons it is all LIES!

  18. one old bruce

    Wait, Asian nations are beating us in education?

    Surely its the cultural differences – nothing directly to do with government policy.

  19. m0nty

    A test of maths and science among Year 4 and Year 8 students showed Australian students’ skills had stagnated over the past 16 years

    Hmm, what happened 16 years ago… oh yeah, the election of the Howard government.

  20. Sinclair Davidson

    m0nty – actually this is mostly a state government issue – but many, many heads should roll.

  21. TonyO

    “Prime Minister Julia Gillard used to tell anyone who would listen how committed she was to education.”

    Sinclair, I think you got it wrong there – I am sure she always said “Re-education”.

  22. http://hisii.hawaii.edu/pcc2007/papers/PCC2007_Theme_III_Froumin.pdf is a paper from the World Bank that is quite honest on just how manipulative these international assessments are. They are designed to influence a country’s education policies toward the UN model.

    PIRLS, PISA, and TIMMS are all influenced by Benjamin Bloom’s Mastery Learning/Outcomes Based Education work. What is being assessed is frequently not what the public believes. I have done some work, for example, tracking down what constitutes a Competence under PISA and it’s an odd mixture of skills and attitudes.

    In the end none of these assessments are about the “free play of intelligence” that comes up with the next ground breaking technology. It’s more about education to prevent future Creative Destruction and create a compliant future voter who can be manipulated without being aware of it.

    That’s why social and emotional learning is pushed so much now by the OECD. It fits with their Green Growth/Corporatist/No Real Distinction between Public and Private Economy of the 21st century.

  23. one old bruce

    Sinc I just read your ‘Economists as Social Engineers’ and found it superb.

  24. Rafe

    As pointed out on the other thread, the bad policies came in during the ’70s and they took some time to take full effect, especialy as there have always been a heap of good and dedicated teachers in the system doing their best against the odds.

  25. Dead Soul

    A test of maths and science among Year 4 and Year 8 students showed Australian students’ skills had stagnated over the past 16 years

    Hmmm, some studies show iq scores in Australia have stabilised\declined since the 1980′s. This is a world wide trend with no clear explanation but one account I read stated the decline is in the bottom half of the distribution. That makes a certain sense to me, I can see potential reasons for that half declining. But it doesn’t explain the overall decline in numeracy and literacy skills.

    So what happened in the 70′s that has created this trend? Recently, I read an interesting account of reinforcement in human behavior. It relates to the minimal efficiency principle. That is, if you want to encourage the internalisation of behaviors the providing of big rewards or punishments can mitigate against that because the person focuses on the reward or punishment rather than the consequences of the desired behavior. So you learn to please your teacher or parent rather than learn to please yourself and enjoy learning. Learning becomes a means to an end. Have we created a generation that only values learning for the monetary, social, and status rewards that it brings?

    I’m guessing of course but remain mystified as what has happened.

  26. I have a sample of one – my childrens’ school. They spent $800,000 on a school hall that doesn’t fit all the students in. I asked builders for ball-park figures of what they would charge. Responses were typically $200,000-$300,000 and some said with such quotes they’d be laughing all the way to the bank.

    If you wouldn’t pay it out of your own money, you shouldn’t pay for it out of someone else’s!

  27. Rafe-Bloom set up the summer institutes in Sweden with UNESCO backing to push OBE all over the world starting in 1971.

    http://unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0000/000018/001801e.pdf is the famous 1972 UNESCO Faure Learning to Be report that changed global ed and was meant to. It is called the Learning to Be report. It is about 340 pages so be warned.

    It was updated in mid-90s by the DeLors report as in Jacques DeLors.

    I have to run out but will check threads later if anyone has a particular question about UNESCO and how it has been driving global ed for the worse.

  28. nilk

    Robin, have you seen Teachers4Teachers? They supply to state schools (my offspring’s) and quite possibly private schools. The activity sheets sometimes come home for homework, and to me, they leave a lot to be desired. I’ll have to see if there are any left lying around.

    I’m particularly snarky at the moment with these worksheets because her latest one was about the ‘Goliath Birdeater Tarantula’ spider. Tarantulas are a family of spiders, and as someone who kept a bird-eating spider as a pet (not a Goliath spider) it annoys the crap out of me when they can’t even name animals properly.

    But given this is suburban Boganistan, I guess most people won’t notice.

    It’s remarkable how many worksheets are used, though.

  29. boy on a bike

    Heh. Our school got an upgraded dunny block, which has been locked since it was unveiled in case it gets vandalised! The teachers and parents, via the P&C, were adamant that what we wanted was a revamped science block – essentially an internal makeover of good sized, sound buildings with new fittings and fixtures. Instead, one set of toilets were cleaned up – at a cost comparable to building a brand new 5 bedroom house.

    And no one is allowed to use them.

  30. J.H.

    I beg to differ. The Education revolution by the Australian Socialists has been a rip roaring success….

    The mistake made by those testers was to test for Capitalist follies like maths, reading, writing and comprehension. Silliness that has no place in the Society of Socialist Australia.

    No, indeed the children should have been tested on Political thought and Ecological purity….

    …. There they would have scored the highest possible marks. Their shrill little voices raised in wondrous ideological unison. The very epitome of true education and enlightenment for the masses.

  31. henry

    Robin I have no doubt your points about manipulated UNESCO testing hold true, but comparisons of P4 maths skills and lower secondary reading skills seem pretty simple to me. Kids can either do it/ understand it and answer questions on it or not. Am I wrong ?
    Another issue that could be raised is the whole question of a broad versus narrow education. South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong get excellent results by drilling kids in brutal systems. They start school at 8 am, go to tutorial schools in the evenings, and focus on rote learning. Initiative ? Independence ? Do we really want our kids caught up in that kind of servitude.

  32. Helen Armstrong

    Perhaps we can lay the lowering of children’s IQ at the feet of the processed food god.

    Not junk food so much, but processed food and the insulin based diet that follows.

  33. John Mc

    Heny, I believe this is pretty basic testing we’re talking about here. It’s a question on whether you’ve got the foundations right.

    BTW, I would argue our schooling completely fails to teach initiative let alone independence. In fact, in the state system those things are taboo, especially for boys.

  34. Toiling Mass

    Tony O has it right.

    Julia, no doubt, sent emails and made meeting agenda with ‘Re Education’ and which everyone else mistook for ‘Regarding Education’.

  35. .

    No henry.

    The Finns have the best educational (pedagogical) system.

    Senior high school splits between trades and academics.

    Up to year 10 you get the same teacher all the way through, IIRC.

    Sure they get beaten by Korea, but only after they’ve flogged their kids harder. They can still come first every so often, and virtually always rank in the top four.

    No homework, no tests other than diagnostics until year 12 for their leaving exams. There is little state control over the curriculum.

    I’m probably dumbing it down but this is what I’ve been told by a disgruntled teacher in NSW.

    Coupled with a voucher system and charter schools, we’d go a long way to adopt this, at least intiially for the charter schools on the brink of their privatisation.

  36. .

    You need the scouts for that sort of stuff, John mc.

  37. John Mc

    Scouts aren’t too bad, but transferring to a good private boys school is like going to an alternative universe where the world makes sense. There’s never been any private schooling in any of my family anywhere, and I can see how with my kids this experience prepares you for life.

    An example: one of my sons teachers said in passing during an interview, “one of the things I concentrate on is independence”. Where will you hear that in the state school system? It’s the exact opposite. It’s your duty to yourself to get your shit together, don’t expect other people to be the enablers for your life or to clean up after you, be responsible for yourself. No one teaches that stuff now.

  38. boy on a bike

    Finland – for every 10 job applicants for a teaching position, only one is accepted. Either they have a very large pool of muppets applying for teaching jobs, or they have a very rigorous and demanding selection process.

  39. Dead Soul

    The Finns have the best educational (pedagogical) system.

    Thinking about this the other day this thought popped up:

    If you want to encourage critical thinking encourage diversity of views and cognitive styles. In Finland a minimal curriculum and teacher freedom to teach how they wish and what they want provides a collection of children who are not all taught to think the same way and have the same opinions. They are confronted with diversity in their own ranks because they have been taught by different people with different views.

    We have a mono-culture curriculum and teacher popn.

    Not junk food so much, but processed food and the insulin based diet that follows.

    Don’t know but glanced at a headline a few days ago which stated that “underfeeding” in childhood(with obvious limits) seemed to preserve cognition with age, which is sort of concordant with a paper I read today indicating how inhibiting GSK-3 in the cortex, that being an enzyme which produces glycogen, is protective against neural insult. This reminded me of a paper title a friend sent to me two weeks ago: the paradox of under nutrition and healthy aging. Which reminded me of studies on longevity which found centenarians were minimal eaters, which of course brings us to CR but as I just read today in a study on cancer prolonged CR does more harm than good to healthy cells. S

    I don’t know what is going on Helen, it could be anything from too many calories in childhood to chemical loading of our bodies to a culture that promotes sound bytes over sustained critical thinking.

  40. Dead Soul

    Ha! A monoculture of drones.

    Teachers rewarded repressed drones, according to Bowles and Gintis; they found that the students with the highest Grad Point Averages were the ones who scored lowest on measures of creativity and independence, and the highest on measures of punctuality, delay of gratification, predictability and dependability.

    Teachers often say they love creative students. They don’t.

    Judgments for the favourite student were negatively correlated with creativity; judgments for the least favorite student were positively correlated with creativity. Students displaying creative characteristics appear to be unappealing to teachers.

    Read more: http://www.news.com.au/business/executive-lounge/can-this-one-trait-determine-your-future/story-fng3e17m-1226531144203#ixzz2Eo1FuZ7A

  41. Harold

    Hope we all saw the Media Watch recruitment ad Tim Blair recently linked to.

    Journalist with demonstrable strong, accurate researching and knowledge of where to find information from a variety of sources are encouraged to apply.

  42. TonyO

    Has anyone noticed the emphasis these days on “teamwork” – whether school or the workplace. Individualism is a no-no – you have to be a “team player”. Become one of the collective, or the hive.

    And “managers” these days are “leaders” – and they know f/all about the technical skills of management, and even less about leadership. “Leadership” is one of those warm fuzzy feeling bullshit subjective things that can’t be actually nailed down to anything specific and measurable. I am sure Alexander the Great didn’t do a leadership course (popular these days), nor did Napoleon, Churchill or Hitler.

    No wonder the country is going to shit. Run by turkeys.

  43. Dead Soul

    Has anyone noticed the emphasis these days on “teamwork” – whether school or the workplace. Individualism is a no-no – you have to be a “team player”. Become one of the collective, or the hive.

    Today I watched a doco on Isaac Newton. The ultimate non-team player. Creative individuals often have an anti-authoritarian streak to them.

    Team work. Yeah, like we’re all extroverts. What bollocks. A single dedicated person can produce better results than a mediocre mob.

  44. TonyO

    Dead Soul

    “Team work. Yeah, like we’re all extroverts. What bollocks. A single dedicated person can produce better results than a mediocre mob.”

    I agree with you 100% – but the aim is not “better” results, just conformity with a dull grey colour.

  45. John Mc

    I’m all for the team, it’s just the hive-mind that bothers me.

  46. TonyO

    John Mc – I have done good work in a team – but I have done exceptional work as an individual.

  47. Pedro

    I was talking to the principal at our local SPS this morning trying to make sure my daughter doesn’t get the known dud teacher. The School’s hands a tied by the department, but the principal was very clear that it was the quality of teaching that mattered and not the buildings and technology.

  48. nilk

    For TonyO at 2.55. I know it’s the wrong fred, but did somebody say “Turkeys”?

  49. TonyO

    nilk – yep, that’s our federal government – I even saw a ranga there amongst them….

  50. Nato

    Just a note, but you might want to update your post to correct, for the record, that Evesham State High School in Queensland received $250,000.00 and not the $850,000.00 that you cited off the top of your head back in ’09.

  51. aussiebear

    Education Revolution? LOL!

    Its more like Education Stagnation!

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