More nostalgia

As I was saying, I have been rummaging through stuff at my Mum’s and I also came across this school report of mine from 1966.  By this stage, I was in Form 1, which is Grade 7 in the new money.  I think I was cheated frankly … I recall being very good at arithmetic but I do think it is historically interesting.

I have not picked the term in which my form teacher wrote in General Remarks: “It is a pleasure to look at her happy, healthy face.” The teacher would probably be charged with something these days.

It must have taken the teachers some time to write these reports: I had a form teacher, but a different teacher for French, Science, Art, Craft and PE.

I’m not sure what ‘learning greater tolerance towards others in the class’ was all about.  The teacher seemed to have forgotten all about this in Term 3.

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55 Responses to More nostalgia

  1. Infidel Tiger

    5 days absence. Tsk tsk.

  2. SteveC

    The teacher would probably be charged with something these days

    .Jesus Judith. Get a grip. I know it’s late and all but what do you mean by that?

  3. Gab

    You were a very co-operative little student!

    By the way Judith, will you be telling us which one was you in the school picture on the other thread? Hmm?

  4. Cold-Hands

    By the way Judith, will you be telling us which one was you in the school picture on the other thread? Hmm?

    read the comments again Gab. All was revealed ;)

  5. Andrew

    By the way Judith, will you be telling us which one was you in the school picture on the other thread? Hmm?

    Judith already stated on the other thread.

    Anyway, seeing these reports and then thinking about how things have changed is quite amazing although the basic letter grading is still the same. I will be receiving my final marks tomorrow.

  6. Anne

    Those ‘B’s’ must have been devastating to your parents. No wonder you never amounted to much!

    Honestly, could you BE any more perfect!!! Suck!

  7. Gab

    Thanks, Cold-Hands & Andrew.

  8. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    These old reports would make an interesting honours student’s study in the philosophy of education.

    Not just yours, Judith. Others as well. Some of the commenters on the photo post you put up would doubtless have some case material they could provide. :)

  9. C.L.

    Judith was an alpha female, obviously.

    Check out the sports report: she was the boss lady.

    Tolerance, schmolerance. DARWIN, baby. Darwin. :)

  10. Splatacrobat

    Another success story for Mr & Mrs Sloan and Harold Wyndham .

    And what do we have today :

    Australian ranks 27 of 48 countries in reading and our maths and science performance hasn’t lifted since 1995, according to two international studies, providing a ‘wake-up call’ according to Education Minister Peter Garrett.

    Don’t worry about maths and science as long as they excel in SOSE, LOTE, and sex education.

  11. James Bauer

    Is it a coincidence that those who cannot do engineering or hard science are often left-wing? I feel I may be being unfair to my conservative/libertarian friends in the humanities and social sciences here.

  12. What a pity you didn’t study Latin. The linguist discipline would have improved your writing and your capacity for logical reasoning.

  13. Aus Autarch

    I am currently teaching, and looking at this report compared to the reports that teachers are required to write today. Every student receives an A4 sheet for each subject. Each student report requires an average time of at least 15 minutes to write. Multiply this by the number of students, and even with reduced class sizes (now as compared to 1966), it is likely that teachers spend a far greater proportion of their time writing reports than was previously required.

    I just wonder if this increased effort is wanted and valued by parents – it seems somewhat less than effective to me.

  14. Blogstrop

    Another Eureka moment from numbers. The man has a stockade mentality. Sinc, you own him.

  15. Abu Chowdah

    What a pity you didn’t study Latin. The linguist discipline would have improved your writing and your capacity for logical reasoning.

    By now, I’m sure you realize that the reason you have never amounted to anything in life is manifest in your online behavior. You’re a total fucking ass.

  16. Pickles

    Judith (like Peter Cook) could have been a miner but she didn’t have the Latin.

  17. Judith Sloan

    But numbers I did study Latin. We did not start it to Form 2. My sister went on to do Year 12 Latin. I stuck to French.

  18. Abu Chowdah

    What a missed opportunity, Judith. Yet, somehow, if you had gone all the way with Latin, it wouldn’t have been enough for the Walter Mitty of FNQ.

  19. If Numbers had studied French it might have helped him to see the difference between patois and patios.

  20. Although I don’t know what language would have helped him discern between “peddled” and “pedaled”. English, perhaps.

  21. Mike of Marion

    sdog @0721

    “Pedaled” reminds me of a spelling test from my school days!!

    The embarrassed pedlar met the harassed cobbler in a cemetery where they gauged the symmetry of a single lady’s ankle with unparalleled ecstasy.

  22. James of the Glens

    So Numbers now affects a cross; he has obviously become a committed Christian and should be commended for such. Let’s hope he’s a Nec Tamen Consumebatur and quickly learns the better path.

  23. Toiling Mass

    Considering the miners at the Eureka Stockade were independent businesses, risking their own capital and energy (and rightfully expecting to be able to retain the fruits of their efforts without ‘redistribution’ plans, or being hectored by mendicants demanding ‘their fair share’), and given that the were rebelling against government trying to stifle their efforts and burden them with further regulation and control, the Eureka Stockade seems an odd icon for the unions and the nanny-state ALP.

  24. Toiling Mass

    they were rebelling

  25. Pickles

    Yes TM, they’ve adopted the icon, but they are the Traps.

  26. .

    I agree.

    The Eureka Stockade Flag is a bizzare flag for the extreme left and right nutters to appropriate.

    The revolt was basically fought over a lack of rule of law and excessive taxation by a multi ethnic group.

    It led to representative democracy and sixty plus years of liberal democracy, free markets and Australia being the wealthiest nation in the world.

    You couldn’t get a more libertarian banner than the Eureka Flag other than the Gadsden Flag.

    Why the BLF and skinheads think it is their own could be due to their illiteracy or innate stupdity.

  27. candy

    ” the Eureka Stockade seems an odd icon for the unions and the nanny-state ALP.”

    perhaps it just equates to “hate the bosses” with no deeper thought than that.

  28. john malpas

    The reports make the class seem rather like a commune. No individualty allowed?
    My school reports from circa 1948 were very individualistic with the ranking being of the ‘winner is the best’ philosphy.

  29. Token

    The Eureka Stockade Flag is a bizzare flag for the extreme left and right nutters to appropriate.

    The revolt was basically fought over a lack of rule of law and excessive taxation by a multi ethnic group.

    I thought the same when I realised the union movement had stolen it.

    Is there any more regressive statist mono-cultural movement in any country?

    Most nativist movements have their direct membership in such groups.

  30. Phillip

    Even here you can see the start of the slow slide – I also have my old school reports and in my day we received actual percentages rather than letter gradings.

  31. Andrew

    Even here you can see the start of the slow slide – I also have my old school reports and in my day we received actual percentages rather than letter gradings

    You still get number grades throughout all years in high school. In year 12 you get letter grades which form a score for each subject and then your ATAR, obviously a percentage ranking.

  32. .

    That means nothing.

    How do you compare someone who studies maths and ancient history and compare that to someone else who studies English literature and Arabic?

    My HSC results had my final exam and all other work expressed as a raw mark, then my decile band for each combined result.

    Your TER/UAI/ATAR ought to show how it is derived. I simply had a slip of paper that looked a bit like a check.

  33. Chris

    Even here you can see the start of the slow slide – I also have my old school reports and in my day we received actual percentages rather than letter gradings.

    I went through school in the 70s/80s and the reports had both letters and percentages, although they didn’t give us grades for things like sports.

    Is it a coincidence that those who cannot do engineering or hard science are often left-wing? I feel I may be being unfair to my conservative/libertarian friends in the humanities and social sciences here.

    I would have said the opposite was true. I studied engineering at university and work with a lot of computer science/engineering types people here in Australia and the US. And the vast majority would have centre-left political views (probably far-left in Catallaxy speak). Eg pro carbon-pricing, pro choice, support more compassionate (and permissive) refugee policies, generally supportive of environmental concerns (support scientific based decision making) etc.

    How do you compare someone who studies maths and ancient history and compare that to someone else who studies English literature and Arabic?

    Not sure how its done now, but when I did year 12 for the situation you suggest they look at students who did both Maths and English or ancient history and Arabic. And presumed that on average they were equally capable at both. So if the raw scores in maths were a lot lower than those in english for the same students the maths scores would get a bit of a boost for the TERs. It would depend year to year, but generally the science based subjects went up a bit, and the humanities down a bit based on this methodology.

  34. Lew

    A mark for the handwriting of the Form Mistress? A C-, but only because it’s Christmas and I’m feeling generous.

  35. .

    Not sure how its done now, but when I did year 12 for the situation you suggest they look at students who did both Maths and English or ancient history and Arabic. And presumed that on average they were equally capable at both. So if the raw scores in maths were a lot lower than those in english for the same students the maths scores would get a bit of a boost for the TERs. It would depend year to year, but generally the science based subjects went up a bit, and the humanities down a bit based on this methodology.

    What a terrible bloody idea.

    Eg pro carbon-pricing, pro choice, support more compassionate (and permissive) refugee policies, generally supportive of environmental concerns (support scientific based decision making) etc.

    Catallaxy is a libertarian site and libertarians do not oppose the movement of labour globally, refugees or early term abortions.

  36. Tintarella di Luna

    Why the BLF and skinheads think it is their own could be due to their illiteracy or innate stupdity.

    or both

  37. Chris

    What a terrible bloody idea

    It may be the best of alternative solutions though where universities use a single mark to determine who attends. Otherwise students gravitate towards subjects where it is easier to get high scores. Though I think one of the worst decisions Universities made with regard to intake is to not have mandatory year 12 subjects for certain courses (eg need double maths for Engineering). It must put a lot more pressure on the lecturers for first year students.

    Catallaxy is a libertarian site and libertarians do not oppose the movement of labour globally, refugees or early term abortions.

    I think you’ll find a lot of Catallaxy regulars who are opposed to early term abortion on demand, or even higher refugee intakes – not all or maybe not even a majority I will admit.

  38. Andrew

    That means nothing.

    How do you compare someone who studies maths and ancient history and compare that to someone else who studies English literature and Arabic?

    My HSC results had my final exam and all other work expressed as a raw mark, then my decile band for each combined result.

    Your TER/UAI/ATAR ought to show how it is derived. I simply had a slip of paper that looked a bit like a check.

    They do show how it is derived on their website. Every subject is scored based on a standard distribution curve with a mean of 30 and a standard deviation of 7. Students within each subject are ranked based on their coursework and exams throughout the year. They compare the different subjects with scaling. The scaling for each subject is worked out through the average ‘raw scores’ of all the students for all their subjects. If the average is above the mean, the subject is scaled up because the competition within that subject is of a higher standard. If it is below the mean, the subject is scaled down accordingly. The scaled scores then are added up and then go into an aggregrate which based on all the students’ scores, results in an ATAR, which ranks the students against the rest of the state. It is a perfectly clear and transperent system.

  39. .

    Every subject is scored based on a standard distribution curve with a mean of 30 and a standard deviation of 7.

    You see why assuming general english has the same normality assumptions as background speakers russian, is problematic, right?

  40. Andrew

    You see why assuming general english has the same normality assumptions as background speakers russian, is problematic, right?

    There is English Second language and they do make considerations for people who are not native speakers. NO system is 100% perfect but the current system in my opinion is very fair.

  41. Alice

    Judith Im beginning to think you were a goody two shoes. Have you got any bad reports at all? I had plenty!
    “Very good student but disruptive in class.” “Able student but needs to pay attention in class.”
    It was pretty hard sometimes to pay attention when I would have rather been outside playing! By third class I had worked out some very good strategies on how to get ejected so I could be oustide playing.

  42. .

    You’ll get it in a couple of semesters, Andrew.

  43. .

    What did you apply for Andrew?

    Good luck.

  44. TonyO

    Chris
    “I would have said the opposite was true. I studied engineering at university and work with a lot of computer science/engineering types people here in Australia and the US. And the vast majority would have centre-left political views ….”

    I am a mechanical engineer and worked with 18 other mech and electrical engineers – they were certainly NOT “centre-left”.

    Maybe computer science types are a bit more “artsy” than the hard engineering disciplines…

  45. John Mc

    I’m a mechanical engineer and I would say engineers are predominantly left-wing. I think it stems from:

    - a desire to do good and make the world a better place (which I find very common to engineers),

    - a lack of understanding of how the social world works (which most people would agree is somewhat common to engineers)

    - and a belief that you can design anything, including social systems, from the top down with a general fondness for overarching command and control.

    But you only need to look at the Engineers Australia magazine to see there’s nothing even slightly right-wing. Climate sceptics are frowned upon, regular columns on ‘equity and diversity’ and flexible workplaces for women, nuclear movement has been kept quiet, lots for advocacy for public transport, lots of demands for government funded infrastructure programs, I think it’s fair to say general scepticism of free market approaches. The list goes on.

  46. TonyO

    John Mc

    “But you only need to look at the Engineers Australia magazine”

    That’s the reason I am no longer a member of Engineers Australia – it seems to be controlled by, and for, civils and environmentals – and their paycheck is on the global warming gravy train.

    “- a desire to do good and make the world a better place ”

    With the engineers I’ve worked with, this did not translate into “left-wing” idealism.

    “a lack of understanding of how the social world works ”

    Where you working in a government department?

    “and a belief that you can design anything, including social systems, from the top down with a general fondness for overarching command and control.”

    Fortunately, we were realists – we knew what we could, and couldn’t control – no fairy tales.

  47. Mother Hubbard's Dog

    Best report comment ever:

    “Words cannot express how well Tom has done this term.”

  48. Abu Chowdah

    How do you compare someone who studies maths and ancient history and compare that to someone else who studies English literature and Arabic?

    How do you compare any subject?

  49. Abu Chowdah

    Is it a coincidence that those who cannot do engineering or hard science are often left-wing? I feel I may be being unfair to my conservative/libertarian friends in the humanities and social sciences here.

    You certainly are. Just because a person chooses humanities, is not proof that they couldn’t do other subjects. I was one of those kids who did double major maths and all the sciences, but still chose humanities, despite getting a score that would have got me into medicine at Sydney Uni.

    I’d be the first to scoff at French and other “easy” humanities, but the hardest intellectual challenge of my life was acquiring fluency in Arabic, not differential calculus or any other science discipline.

    I would also say that I have seen people with excellent mathematical minds struggle to grasp concepts in political philosophy and who have no chance of extrapolating them to current events.

    But it would be foolish to conclude generally on the basis of such a small sample. So, yes, you are being unfair.

  50. OldOzzie

    “How do you compare someone who studies maths and ancient history and compare that to someone else who studies English literature and Arabic?

    How do you compare any subject?”

    Abu Chowdah

    it has always been a problem

    I did the LC 1961, Maths 1 & 2, Physics, Chemistry, English, French, Latin as well a Honours Maths 1 and Physics.

    From memory, for the Commonwealth Scholarship, there was a weighting given to each subject, according to the perceived complexity of that Subject – so as to give more credence to a result in Maths 1 & 2, as against a result in General Maths

    Anyone else’s thoughts on this

    It is interesting to read the “Draft Guidelines for Teachers of English Leaving Certificate English Syllabus” and compare it with today

    http://www.curriculumonline.ie/uploadedfiles/pdf/lc_english_guide.pdf

    as it states

    ‘The limits of my language are the limits of my world.’

  51. Andrew

    You’ll get it in a couple of semesters, Andrew.

    I understand what you are saying. You can’t directly equate two different subjects as being what is classifed as a ‘normal’ populations and expect that you will get all the marks to fit into the bell/normal distribution curve. That is compensated by other forms of statistical moderation techniques which are used to adjust the scores.

    What did you apply for Andrew?

    Good luck.

    I got my marks today. Very happy and scored in the mid 90′s for my ATAR. English was unsurprisingly my best subject. I have applied for a few different Law courses at different universities and Arts at Melbourne (which I am really keen on) which will lead to doing a postgraduate Law degree (hopefully). What I would actually do in the Arts degree is unknown. I could continue on with my Language and/or potentially study economics.

  52. .

    That is compensated by other forms of statistical moderation techniques which are used to adjust the scores.

    London to a brick they’re dubious.

    Good luck. Continuing on with economics and languages would be good.

    You sound like you want to be barrister. Good for you. There are too many solicitors and law degree holding public servants.

  53. Andrew

    You sound like you want to be barrister. Good for you. There are too many solicitors and law degree holding public servants.

    Well, I can promise you that I won’t set up any slush funds for inappropriate purposes!

  54. Pickles

    Remember you’re young and naive till your late 30s.

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