Those were the days

I have been rummaging through some old photos that my mother has.  I came across this one.  What can you notice?

  • There are quite a lot of us in the class (over 30) and there may have been absentees;
  • We look like a pretty homogeneous, if a bit scruffy, lot;
  • I always resented the fact that my mother would not buy me a gingham ‘school uniform’ but I was not alone;
  • I can only name one of my classmates (I only stayed at the school for two years).
  • Did the boy have to wear a tie to hold the sign?
  • Which one is me?

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89 Responses to Those were the days

  1. Mike of Marion

    2nd Row from bottom 3 left

  2. val majkus

    2nd row from bottom fourth left
    don’t you love the surprised look on the back row boy far right
    that’s not Wayne Swan is it?

  3. Infidel Tiger

    One poor tacker thought it was casuals day.

  4. val majkus

    sorry I meant second row from bottom fourth right; the girl with the sort of angelic look with the white dress

  5. Jim Rose

    thanks judith, As with my class photos, no one is overweight. I can remember by name my two school classmates who even had a bit of baby fat.

    These days, not only is childhood obesity a problem, it is greatest for children from poor families. When I was a lad, poverty meant not having enough to eat, rather than too much of the wrong food.

    Robert Fogel used physiology to measure economic growth with objective records such army induction medical tests and medical care of army veterans. Class photos of children serve in the study of technophysio evolution

  6. Infidel Tiger

    These days, not only is childhood obesity a problem, it is greatest for children from poor families.

    Cheap carbs.

  7. Gavin R Putland

    The blonde, 2nd row from back, 3rd from left, with the unimpressed look on her face.

  8. Biota

    Back row of girls, third from left.

  9. Judith Sloan

    Gavin and Biota, correct. I think we were probably not instructed to smile.

    Yes, I love the little tacker, in the back row on the right. Making a stand?

  10. Judith Sloan

    And yes, we were not overweight but well-nourished. It was always a cooked breakfast in my house.

  11. candy

    Lovely innocent children all dressed neatly for their school photo.

  12. Jim Rose

    Infidel Tiger,Richard McKenzie wrote a book on the economics of obesity.

    His basic explanation was food is much cheaper now – so we eat more – while time is much more expensive. No time to cook, much less a cooked breakfast.

  13. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    I am deeply offended for you Judith that you were in a “C” class, which scarred you for life – no, no, yes it did, you were scarred even though you believe you were not. Believe me, I am a counsellor (PhD Pacific Western University) sent by the gummint to help you through this.

    I do believe you can seek damages for this inhumane discrimination.

  14. ACTOldFart

    Sorry, can’t resist it – ‘the one on the extreme right’?

  15. Gab

    I reckon Judith is the little blondie, third row, fourth from the right.

  16. Judith Sloan

    Thanks Mick. I’m not sure there is anything in the C thing. In fact, I am pretty sure there were only two Grade 1′s which is pretty strange. The C may have stood for something.

    But I will consider counselling. I had harboured seething resentment against my mother for not buying me a gingham dress until I saw this photo. I now feel better.

  17. Sinclair Davidson

    Second last row, third from the left.

  18. John A

    2nd Row from the top, third from the left. The eyes are unmistakable.

  19. nilk

    The C could well have been for the teacher’s surname. I was in 4W, and there is no way there were 23 classes in one school.

    Mr. Watson was the teacher.

  20. Splatacrobat

    Much the same as my school photos Judith right down to the tucked in shorts and sandles. I visited my old public school a number of years ago and was surprised to see all the signs had dual languages English and Chinese. The school pics now look more like Shanghai public school.

    There was a website called school friends.com where you could look up your school year and find long lost chums. I have my photos uploaded and could name just about all of them. Especially that little shit who stole my Gumbie and Pokie toy.

  21. Rousie

    At least we have moved on from the bowl cuts.
    I can still recall mum cutting my hair that way in early primary.

  22. dover_beach

    Caulfied North primary. I went to Caulfield South primary for Grade 1. My nanny used to walk up the street and give me an apple juice and a pack of Colvan potato chips during lunch break. Then it was off to Holy Cross for the rest of primary.

  23. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    “The C could well have been for the teacher’s surname”

    I was in primary school at the same time and the common practice was to name classes “1A, 1B, 1C”, based solely on the point when they had enough children to satisfy the usual class numbers, then onto the next alphabetical suffix.

    “there were only two Grade 1′s which is pretty strange. The C may have stood for something”

    Aha! What happened to the “A” or the “C” kiddies? A losted generation school class!

    It’s time like this that I wish I was a counsellor – 30 odd potential fee paying disturbed clients seeking their stolen roots and so few ancient records available to prove my findings wrong.

  24. Jim Rose

    a japanese univeristy used to assign students to classes alphabetically. they ended up wuith one class with 30 Sato sans

  25. dover_beach

    My nonna, not nanny; for heaven’s sake.

  26. Mk50 of Brisbane

    Test.
    The open thead is broken??

  27. Mike Dee

    The poor are overweight because they have less opportunity than the wealthy for weight loss surgery.

  28. Anne

    That photo brought a chuckle to my throat, it’s SO CUTE!

    …yet poignant…precious little people.

  29. Michael

    I’m amazed that the photo looks just like one of mine taken 10 years earlier at Bondi NSW. However I think that one taken in 1960 at Bondi school would have had most of the children in school uniforms and their hair styles etc rather different. Is Judith’s school from a “less sophisticated”, more Anglo, outer suburb, of say, Adelaide?

    I’m prett sure that the person holding the board in my photos also wore a tie.

  30. Leigh Lowe

    I blame Bert and Pattie.
    They should have been more strict on the boy when he was younger.

  31. Megan

    I have similar photos although a couple of years older from my time at Merri State School 3110 as well as those from my mother’s time at Dromana State in the 1930s and without the little blackboard with the date you would be hard pressed to tell the year they were taken. Pinnys were popular. The girls still had the hair ribbons pulling back their fringes which was clearly going out of fashion when yours was taken and the boys all had the bowl haircuts. There were more than 40 children in each class.

    My first class photo as a new teacher was taken eleven years after yours, in 1971. It was a state school in Collingwood and could not have been more different. 28 smiling children, from 23 different ethnic backgrounds and in that new-fangled colour format.

  32. jumpnmcar

    See the little smart arse with the tie?
    Yeh, don’t like im.
    And the blond lad,bottom far left looks like trouble too.
    If I’m lookin for hard workers it’s the entire back row, cept the second from right boy, the others are distancing themselves, he may be a pissy pants.

  33. Alice

    Judith was the little blondie in the middle..

  34. Alice

    I have a few photos of me with shocking bowl cuts – Im sure I remember my mother doing them before I had my first professional haircut which someone called a pageboy cut and was supposed to be so fashinable and I cried on the way home thinking it was definitely more boy than girl.

  35. SteveC

    We look like a pretty homogeneous

    Yes very white anglo saxon. Quite different to today. Which is a great thing in my opinion.

  36. jumpnmcar

    In my grade 1 class photo* ( just had a look, thanks Judith ) of about the same size, none had shoes on.
    The difference between townies and bushies I spose.

    (* well after 1960 :) )

  37. jumpnmcar

    Yes very white anglo saxon. Quite different to today. Which is a great thing in my opinion.

    And then a fuckhead plays a race card…….

  38. Gab

    Yes very white anglo saxon. Quite different to today. Which is a great thing in my opinion.

    Yes white people being all evil, in your opinion.

  39. Alice

    mine were in the 60s and we all had uniforms by then and the teacher always stood to attention at the side of the photo. This one has no teacher in it.

  40. JC

    SteveC

    Why is it a great thing… In your opinion… Do leftwing idiots like you are even aware just how freakmg racist you are.

    It’s more and more evident tha it is the right which is easy going over the issue of race.

    Most of us saw a pic adorable liittle kids.

    SteveC plays spot the black or Asian…..

    Dickhead.

  41. Sirocco

    Looking at my old primary school photograph from final year 1954 from Greenslopes Brisbane. There were 44 in the class (divided in half from the original 86 children who began primary in 1946) with 19 girls. i can name pretty much all of them, particlarly the girls.

  42. Gab

    He’s gone manic, JC. Nothing but abuse today and sanctimonious lecturing. Perhaps he had an argument with Kimberley, his plastic companion.

  43. SteveC

    I went to a school that has some token Aborigines. A very small number of asians.
    My son (now in his twenties) went to a school in an affluent Sydney suburb with kids from a vast array of racial and religious backgrounds. As a consequence, racial and religions background is simply irrelevant to him.
    Which is why I think a multicultural class and school is a great thing. It is a great antidote to racism.

  44. jumpnmcar

    This one has no teacher in it.

    Yeah Alice, I noticed that too.
    And the SHOOOOES!
    Bloody lugzury.

  45. SteveC

    And then a fuckhead plays a race card…….

    not at all jumpnmcar. An interesting observation on the chang in Australia’s make up since the sixties. Very few school photos would like that today in public schools in capital cities.

  46. jumpnmcar

    I went to a school that has some token Aborigines.

    You are a joke.

  47. SteveC

    By token I mean about 10 in 1500. A Christian Brothers school.

  48. jumpnmcar

    An interesting observation on the chang(sic) in Australia’s(sic) make up since the sixties.

    Ooooh, I see, Your drunk and the truth and errors are coming out.
    OK, carry on.

  49. jumpnmcar

    Your (sic)?

    Haha, touche Sirocco, well played Sir/Madam.

  50. A Lurker

    Second row from the front, last one on the right?

    I had a similar school photo, although a few years later. We had shoes on, but we were all fresh faced and scrubbed up.

    A blissful time – used to walk a good kilometre to school with my brother – safe as houses back then, no helicopter mums or kids bundled up in bubblewrap.

  51. Alice

    jumpncar

    I seem to remember all I wore at home was no shoes or thongs until I either went out to the city (to “town”) with my mother or to sunday school (in which case it was white dresses, white gloves, black patent one strap shoes like you see in this pic and short white ankle socks) on a three or four year old?

    Imagine how dirty that all white look got before we came home on the train and bus?

  52. Anne

    “token” “TOKEN”???????????????????

    I don’t think that means what you think it means SteveC.

  53. jumpnmcar

    Alice
    Yeh, I only had ” church and shopping ” shoes.
    Fortunately they were rarely used, I could hop and skip along oyster rocks back then.*
    Not now, thanks to steel cap boots my feet are as soft as the underside of my tongue.

    ( I was sort of a coastal bushy, ” bush pig sea cow ” they called us, loved it )

  54. Splatacrobat

    By token I mean about 10 in 1500. A Christian Brothers school.

    Why would 10 out of 1500 mean that it is token? Only 10 might be under the average of the total population but I don’t think any of them offered the chance of education would consider themselves as token.

    Why is it that it’s the lapsed catholics like SteveC who are the most perverse of the left wing trolls with their superior supercilious sneering?

    As a consequence, racial and religions background is simply irrelevant to him.

    Congratulations fucktard you just hoisted yourself by one’s own petard.

    According to experts in racism the first sign of a racist is when they trot out statements like this “People are just people; I don’t see colour; we’re all just
    human.” How very civilised that your son can go through life with the superior attitude of the left that he must be colourblind in order to fit in to it’s ideology.

  55. Splatacrobat

    I had cardboard in the bottom of my school shoes by the end of the year as we couldn’t afford new ones. In fact when I look back at some of my photos it wasn’t any wonder they wore out so quick as they were the only shoes I had to wear even on weekends.
    God how I used to dread the rain!

  56. kae

    I went to a school that has some token Aborigines. A very small number of asians.

    Steve C
    You really are a nitwit. I’d suggest your implications of racism are purely projection.

    I went to school in the 60s and 70s. Punchbowl Primary, Bankstown West, MLC and then Bankstown Girls’ High. I never noticed different races, but we had aboriginal kids in primary school, Philippine kids, other asians as well. And we had a mix at MLC.
    When I was a kid there was no difference between the kids, and I certainly was colour blind.

  57. Alice

    Splato says

    “How very civilised that your son can go through life with the superior attitude of the left that he must be colourblind in order to fit in to it’s ideology.”

    What a lot of crap nyou talk. Who knows what this comment means?

    Of course he must be colourblind Splato (and we all should be – the colour of blood is red no matter what) but right now I wish my kid had some aboriginie in him. I keep asking my husband if there is a DNA test for it? (He has the country rels and I know my lineage and there is nothing but I was hoping there might be some aboriginie in his)…

    I have some husbands of cousins from the country who have a little bit of aboriginie and let me tell you they have really great high paid jobs and dont have any trouble getting well paid jobs. Better pay than me (like much better).

    Is there a DNA test for it?

  58. Splatacrobat

    I went to government primary and high schools and we had no aboriginal students whatsoever. By your summation Steve I must have gone to the most racist schools in the country?

    We didn’t,t have token anything, we had Italians, Greeks, Indians, balts, English, and a number of other nationalaties that were proportional to the catchment area of the schools. Should I be ashamed of this travisty according to your warped sense of superiority?

  59. jumpnmcar

    but right now I wish my kid had some aboriginie in him.

    Why Alice?
    Is your kid disappointing you if he doesn’t?

  60. Splatacrobat

    So what your saying Alice is that you hope you have some aboriginal blood in your family so you can get your snout in the cultural. trough somehow?

    You really are a pathetic old crone.

  61. SteveC

    fair cop. Token was the wrong choice of word.

  62. candy

    A racist attitude is learnt at home, not at any school.

  63. Amortiser

    My first grade class in 1957 had a hundred kids. There were a lot of kids in that class who were Polish and Dutch migrants after the war. We had one nun and a teacher’s aide to control that class.

    When I tell people about that today they are disbelieving. I was able to check the enrolment register at a recent jubilee celebration and the 100 figure was indeed true. This was a convent school in suburban Brisbane.

    The truly amazing thing was the vast majority of those kids were able to read and write quite well. Those that couldn’t, and there were only about 6, were “kept back”. In these days were class sizes of more than 20 are regarded as unacceptable, it was an astonishing result. Mind you, the discipline in that class was rigid to say he least, otherwise it would have been chaos.

  64. Anne

    One boy in my class became an MP (One Nation) for Fisher and another was David Peever who is MD of RIO.

  65. .

    a japanese univeristy used to assign students to classes alphabetically. they ended up wuith one class with 30 Sato sans

    That’s just bloody hilarious.

  66. Anne

    I joined Mensa and married well.

  67. Splatacrobat

    A racist attitude is learnt at home, not at any school.

    +1 candy.

  68. blogstrop

    I can report getting that one right. Your quality shines through, Judith.

  69. Anne, isn’t that odd? I tried to join MENSA, but they refused on the grounds I was over qualified.

  70. Has anyone else had problems getting online to the Cat today? I was able to get on yesterday morning and this morning, but otherwise I was getting WordPress error messages.

  71. Anne

    Winston, you can’t have it all. You ARE the cutest commenter on the Cat: you with your big eyes and your wee red nose.

  72. Gab

    Has anyone else had problems getting online to the Cat today?

    Yes, Winston. Yesterday and today.

    If you are still getting the WordPress error message, suggest you clear your recent history cache.

    Hope you are recovering quickly and have lovely nurses attending you.

  73. SteveC

    kae,

    You really are a nitwit. I’d suggest your implications of racism are purely projection.

    what implications of racism? What I said was “Which is why I think a multicultural class and school is a great thing. It is a great antidote to racism.” Which seems to concur with your experience at school, which was unusual in the sixties, as evidenced by Judith’s photo.

  74. Anne

    Steve, I don’t think ‘concur’ means what you think it means.

    Do try harder.

  75. kae

    Steve
    We’ve always had multicultural school classes – Greeks, Italians and other post-war immigrants, their children and grandchildren when I was at school.
    You seemed to be trying to say that people are racist because they didn’t have multiculti when they went to school. And you seem to be implying that it’s people of my generation because multiculti is such shiny, new thing.

  76. SteveC

    kae. No we haven’t ALWAYS had multicultural classes as clearly evidenced by Judith’s “homogeneous bunch” in her photo. And i’m not saying a lack of multi-cultural exposure causes racism. That is absurd. But what I am saying is multicultural experience at school is a great way to avoid racial stereotyping occurring later in life. I’m 50, so I’m perplexed by what you mean by “people of my generation”.
    As an aside, did you have any muslims, or Arabs in your school classes?

  77. Helen Armstrong

    I have a picture of my grandmother’s school in the SE of SA – and the children of all ages up to about grade 7 or 8 were standing with their mode of transport from pony (3) to cycle (grandma) to shanks’ pony or holding some kind of sporting equipment, football, tennis racquet,one by for lack of anything to hold or ride appears to be holding a tree root, another is holding a small dog. The teacher (one) of this school posed with the children in her long skirts. I wonder if the tennis racquet was hers? Cant ask grandma now.

    I often think about that picture when we hear how hard it is to teach these days, or how hard it is to go to (get to school). My grandmother was an astute business woman and I am thinking those kids wanted to go to school, they valued it, and their parents valued it.

    Grandma was born about 1901, so that picture would have been taken in 1911 or thereabouts. About 100 years ago.

    And they all wore – it looks like boots.

  78. Helen Armstrong

    Yes we had Muslims in out class, from the afghan cameleers, and blackfellas so what? They were either your mates or not and their ethnicity had nothing to do with either.

    Stop making such a song and dance because you might have shared a sammich with a blackfella once.

  79. kae

    We had Lebanese and possibly muslims, but we wouldn’t have known because we weren’t expected to change our culture to fit with theirs (or their religion).

    Racism is learnt at home.

    Adapting Australia to suit multiple cultures, ie, changing to fit in with immigrants, is a good way to wreck Australia.

    Talk with Nilk about her daughter’s school experience.

  80. SteveC

    We had Lebanese and possibly muslims, but we wouldn’t have known

    because you didn’t ask. Note I’m talking about high school. It would be unreasonable for that kind of discussion to occur in primary. My son’s class had sikhs, muslims, africans, many asian countries represented. As a consequence he does not refer to “our culture”, as you have done. Which was my original point.

  81. kae

    OF course I didn’t ask. It wasn’t important, and it still isn’t important to me. The only reason I’d ask someone’s origin these days is to see if I could pick an accent, particularly an interesting one, or someone from Malaysia or Idondesia because I know a tiny bit of Indonesian language, guaranteed to raise a smile. I also like to pick a mix of nationalities in someone.

    Australian culture is our culture. It’s a rich mix of all previous immigrants who have homogenised! However, these previous immigrants didn’t expect special treatment or observation of their cultural differences from us.

    They blended in.

  82. kae

    In high school I went to school with Maryann and Angeline, surname of an islamic nature, from Fiji.

    They were friends I had breaks with in the playground – there were others but I mostly remember those two.

    My mother taught/teaches in an Anglican school. Private. They have muslims students there. For a good education according to the parents.

  83. kae

    Your son, SC, has probably been programmed to not recognise any Australian culture, homogenous or not.

  84. Anne

    Australian culture is our culture. It’s a rich mix of all previous immigrants who have homogenised! However, these previous immigrants didn’t expect special treatment or observation of their cultural differences from us.
    They blended in.

    Beautifully articulated, Kae, and my sentiments exactly.

  85. Splatacrobat

    And what is wrong with saying “our culture” Steve. Should I be ashamed that my forefathers ate roast beef and Yorkshire pudding instead of bamboo shoots or cheered for Richmond instead of Real Madrid?

    You are just another trendy leftie who won’t be happy until the history books have been rewritten and any “Australian” cultural references pre 1972 are erased.

    If anything it is newly arrived cultures who demand that their culture not only be recognised, preserved, but accepted as more normal than the culture they found when they arrived in the first place.

  86. RedneckRuss

    3rd row from front, cute little blonde 3rd from left. Ahh memories of my QLD schooldays. None of us wore shoes.

    Are we the forgotten generation that let our freedoms slip on our watch?

    RussR

  87. RedneckRuss

    Whats the chip on the shoulder Steve?, I was born and bred in Western NSW and schooled there and Metro Brisbane. Went to school with all sorts of kids English, German, Aboriginal etc. Grew up in a town full of Australians Lebanese shop owners, Chinese market gardners, Italians, Greeks etc..

    No one had a problem until the 70′s and the great ?LP hope arrived. Then the culture wars started.

    Bloody lefties pub fight starters!

    RussR

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