Sure, Mike, we all believe you

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The event was just about to wrap up when in his closing remarks Holden boss Mike Devereux said: “A lot of folks have been speculating about whether this is the last Commodore … well I can categorically tell you we have already begun working on the Commodore that comes after this one.”

After the speech, Devereux told the frazzled media scrum: “This [Commodore] will run through to the end of 2016. After that time we are going to be putting two global architectures into the [Adelaide] plant, one of them will underpin the next Commodore.”

To make sure he wasn’t misunderstood, Devereux repeated: “There is another Commodore coming after this one. We’re going to build it in Adelaide on a [global] architecture.”

Until this point, Holden had not revealed the second car to be built alongside the Cruze through to 2022 in return for $275 million in Federal Government funding.

Please note that there remarks were made only two months ago.

 

 

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61 Responses to Sure, Mike, we all believe you

  1. Econocrat

    I watched Top Gear last night. They had to by an estate car for less than 1,500 GBP (AUS$2,100)

    Jeremy bought a BMW 5 Series; James bought a Volvo 850 R (basically a street legal racing car); and Richard bought a Subaru WRX. In Australia those cares would be still pushing around $10,000.

    While the Government is in a subsidising mood, could I get a subsidy to reduce the cost for me to buy a car in Australia to European or American levels?

  2. Judith Sloan

    Of course, the importation of second hand vehicles is effectively prohibited in Australia, as a further protection of the local industry.

    NZ does very well by importing close to new second hand vehicles.

  3. Jannie

    I used to think the Commodore was a pretty cool car, well at least it did the job and was appropriate for Aussie conditions etc. Then when I was in Germany I realised that it was actually just a mid range Opel masquerading as an antipodean. And then I drove in the German produced variety and I realised that Oz manufacturing standards are really down under in comparison.

    The truth is Holdens are not Australian, they are poorly produced mid range copies, and about twice as expensive as they would be if imported direct from Germany or an Asian production line.

    Something about keeping manufacturing skills in Australia? Its more like subsidising Trade Unions and rustbelt Labor hostages.

  4. Andrew

    Holden makes cars that dont fit society’s needs…full stop.

  5. Econocrat

    @Andrew

    Correction: Society does not fit Holden’s needs.

  6. Aliice

    Econocrat
    says
    “While the Government is in a subsidising mood, could I get a subsidy to reduce the cost for me to buy a car in Australia to European or American levels?”
    Not when the manufacturers stich up exclusive deals with Australian retailers you cant (over and above the cost of importation)

  7. Dan

    Holden Cruze is just a Chevy Malibu

  8. brc

    The commodore and the falcon are what happens when a company turns it attention to sucking up to the government for a business model instead of producing what people want.

    For whatever reason, Australian families seem to want small-midsize pretend 4wds. Instead of making some of these, ford and Holden have been focussed on milking subsidies and protection and using their existing products cloaked in nationalism to get those subsidies.

    If they were real companies they would have had to respond to the market long ago, and either adapted or gone out of business. But insetead they have adapted to subsidy seeking, and the product line has suffered badly. It’s a fair bet to guess that the execs spend lots of time in government offices with begging bowls instead of in the product department thinking up new concepts, or on the production line looking for efficiencies. Why would you bother working hard at making better cars when you can shake down the taxpayer for much less effort?

  9. Aliice

    Small cars. Demand is for small fuel efficient cars or people movers. far be it from me to tell Holden how to run their business but it seems they are a couple of years behind what got US manufacturers in trouble with Jap cars.
    Maybe all those subsidies have been clouding their view of the customers.

  10. Louis Hissink

    Jannie,

    I remember when GM bought out the precursor to the Commodore for field testing here – it was an Opel, and after a bit of driving on NT/SA dirt roads, the Opel broke in half at the firewall.

    But when all said and done, industry policy for the vehicle manufacturing sector was all about keeping the unions in the lifestyle they had become accustomed to. Same with GM in the US and the EU manufacturers – taxpayers subsidising just about everything.

    And still they cannot figure out what the problem is.

  11. Bill

    In fairness, an A dollar that is about 30% overpriced does have something to do with it.

  12. OldOzzie

    Why have neither Holden nor Ford put a Diesel Motor in their Commodore/Falcon cars – both GM and Ford have some great diesel motors in their bin buckets that would fit perfectly in the Commodore and Falcon

    Both Commodore and Falcon are great for the Australian Outback, especially for the dirt/gravel roads

    Never understood Holden and Flacon on this

  13. adrian

    subsidies to car companies are chicken feed compared to the subsidies the ‘renewable’ energy sector recieves from all levels of government every year. So i think it a tad strange that the Coalition wants to get rid of car marker subsidies but keep ‘renewable’ energy subsidies.

  14. Dan

    Adrian, in the future we will all be driving electric cars and need all that wind and solar to charge the batteries. You know it makes sense.

  15. Car manufacturing – going.
    Oil refining – going.
    Computer manufacture – gone.
    Light Industry – gone.

    Australia never misses an opportunity to miss an opportunity to manufacture.
    Bloody Unions, bloody ALP.

    Don’t any of them understand opportunity cost?

  16. Jannie

    Louis, so did they somehow upgrade the engineering standards for Australian roads? Its hard to imagine. A German mate of mine, Stuttgart trained mechanic, tells me the Commodore is a common template of Opel and Chevrolet, they seem to mix and match models. And he is scathing of the Commodore finish. A few years ago I drove a German Opel diesel and it was remarkably better finished, and it performed and sounded better than my Office fleet petrol Commodore. I recently hired an Opel Astra in Italy, 6 gear diesel, and it made the 2008 office petrol Astra seem like a jalopy.

    The Unions probably dont help build a culture of excellence on the factory floor, and it takes many generations of training and philisophical commitment to create the kind of excellence they have in Germany and North Italy. The French and Italians still produce a lot of mid range stuff, not particularly well finished but good enough, but effectively government susidised. But I dont know how long even the Germans will be able to compete against the Koreans and the Chinese, at least in the mass market. There will always be a market for top quality stuff Ferraris, Lambos, top range BMWs & Mercs, but the Europeans and Americans, not to mention Australians, just cant produce the mass market stuff at anything near a competitive price. If it wasnt for the Euro, the Germans wouldnt be able to compete – and it wont be able to forever.

  17. Dr Faustus

    Assuming the chart plots numbers of vehicles, by my rough estimate, Holden will be selling approximately minus 5,000 Commodores in 2016 – and Ford, 17,000 fewer Falcons than that. Whatever, sales over the past 10 years clearly illustrate:

    * The future of the Commodore;
    * The effectiveness and fundamental wisdom of the Commonwealth subsidy.

    People don’t want to buy the big bastards; they want SUV’s and fully featured small Asians. Ye canna’ defy the laws of the market, Cap’n.

  18. Brett

    Here an example of the level of market distortion in Australia; I was recently looking at a new MB. While in the US in January I discovered the that drive-away price of the car in California is USD59,800. The RRP for the same model in Australia is AUD169,900; a difference of AUD110,100.

    I decided not to buy one, because I just cannot stomach a price difference of that magnitude.

  19. BRC & Aliice,The cars people want are the Mazda 3 and equivalents.They are in fact of similar dimensions to the Holdens and Falcons of the early sixties.

  20. Louis Hissink

    Jannie,

    Mercedes manufactures vehicles with “tropical” specification, or they used to. That meant larger capacity cooling systems and seriously beefed up suspensions. Last year they test drove some new G-class units up the Canning Stock Route – shock absorbers were the only things that failed.

    Ideally we should close all the vehicle manufacturing plants and import the lot – after all, some of our iron ore and zinc comes backs as cars etc.

    Unfortunately we have the English Disease, but perhaps China and Korea might prompt a reassessment of that attitude. One of the reasons WWI occurred was because the rising German industrial might and Britain, then at the height of empire, was prepared to compete with the Germans; rather she decided to eliminate her competition. Seeing how English Shop stewards are parodied in the movies, one can see how the English preferred not to compete. That attitude exists here too.

  21. Louis Hissink

    whoops, England was NOT prepared to compete etc

  22. Louis Hissink

    Brett, economies of scale might be a factor – RH vs LH drive. Take the turn indicator, on a EU car for RH drive its on the left of the steering column. On basic RH drive its on the right.

    And it’s fun converting a unimog from LH drive to RH drive. You can’t with the early models.

    So its the size of the market which determines how many RH cars you can produce to supply the market.

  23. Popular Front

    Of course, the importation of second hand vehicles is effectively prohibited in Australia, as a further protection of the local industry.

    If that is true Judith, the guvmint is not policiing that policy very well. In my hometown there is a car import business bringing in 2nd hand sporty cars from Japan (where you may not re-register a vehicle over 5 years old). You can see some real exotica from all the big Japanese auto makers charging around. Almost none of the teens are driving GMH or Ford, unless it’s Dad’s car.

  24. Leigh Lowe

    Holden makes cars that dont fit society’s needs…full stop.

    Correction: Society does not fit Holden’s needs.

    Whatever the cause of the misfit, something has gone awry. Australian car manufacturers haven’t just enjoyed Government subsidies over the years, they formerly had a kind of social subsidy.
    Back in the 80’s and 90’s, if you got a company vehicle in this country, you were given the broad choice of a Commodore, Falcon or Magna.
    Gradual freeing of vehicle salary sacrificing policies by corporations slowly but surely whittled away this advantage.
    Choice …. adapt or take the begging bowl to Canberra.

  25. Andrew

    @Andrew
    Correction: Society does not fit Holden’s needs.

    No, Holden has to make products that consumers want or they won’t purchase them.

  26. Leigh Lowe

    Car manufacturing – going.
    Oil refining – going.
    Computer manufacture – gone.
    Light Industry – gone.

    Brothels in ALP heartland – booming.
    But I digress.
    Watch this space regarding oil refining.
    Shell’s announcement that it is selling it’s Geelong refinery is no surprise on economic grounds.
    But, seeing how the neighbouring electorate of Corangamite is held by Darren Cheesestick on a margin of two dozen votes, standby for a big barrel of pork.

  27. Brett

    economies of scale might be a factor – RH vs LH drive.

    Maybe, although the RHD version is sold in all RHD markets. I understand that RHD numbers will be lower than LHD but we are still talking about a fair number of RHD cars. And MB engineers the majority of its models for RHD from the drawing board.

    I read somewhere recently, and I don’t now if it is true, that Australia is one of MB’s smallest markets, but it is it’s most profitable market.

  28. Econocrat

    In my view, Ford and Holden have “lost their social licence to operate”!

  29. Michel Lasouris

    GM know very well what their policy is, just look at the Opel Astra v Holdens Cruze. The German (?) import is better finished and better appointed than the Cruze; if a tad more expensive. Of course, Labors willful refusal to do anything about the overpriced Oz Dollar has an influence, as has the stupidity of the relevant unions. However, Gm is playing a double game here even if GMH’s Ceo doesn’t know, or won’t admit, it. Once again the totally incompetent socialist State and Federal governemnts display their woeful understanding of Global business yet again. I shudder to imagine what catastrophies Gillard has saddled us with during her current re-indoctrination in China

  30. Steve of Glasshouse

    Let’s not forget the Luxury Car Tax which has also favoured the “local” product

  31. Gab

    Labors willful refusal to do anything about the overpriced Oz Dollar has an influence,

    Like their cars, I’m no longer buying what they’re selling. Blaming the AUD, as Devereux did yesterday, is somewhat curious given the AUD was at 0.60 to the USD ten years ago and Holden was bailed out by the taxpayer back then, as has been the case over the last twelve years. I see today that Devereux is also blaming the YEN. No doubt these play some part but really to what extent? The carbon tax has had an effect too, as he mentioned yesterday. A 22 per cent wage increase in 2012 with no productivity increase, a union that runs the hiring and firing of the workers as well as dictating which employment agency Holden “is allowed” to use are surely all important factors, along with the basics of producing what people want to buy and delivering a good quality product consistently (Holden really fails in this area). It’s never just one thing.

    Like that relative who always gets bailed out from another fine mess he’s gotten himself into, Holden has never had to stand on it’s own two feet when the government (Lib and Lab) is all too willing to step in and prop up that which never learned how to be successful in its own right.

  32. johno

    [email protected]

    So i think it a tad strange that the Coalition wants to get rid of car marker subsidies but keep ‘renewable’ energy subsidies.

    I think you will find that the Coalition plans to continue to waste taxpayers money on unproductive car manufacturers.

    We just think they will save taxpayers money because we think they believe in free markets and limited government. They don’t. They only care about getting elected and, currently, they belive that requires further wasting taxpayers money.

    Getting rid of Green subsidies would appear to be a vote winner to them. We should be happy with that.

  33. Craig Mc

    It’s easier to name the world’s car manufacturers that aren’t getting government assistance.

    In this region, the Ford Focus is made in Thailand, rather than here. The top-end ST model is still made in Germany, but it sells for almost double the price of the base model, and in relatively tiny numbers. Currency, labour costs, regulations, and most stupidly, energy costs all conspire against making stuff in this country.

    So what’s it worth to us to have some capacity to make stuff? Do we take the purely rationalist view and go back to pre-WWII levels of industrialisation and import everything more complicated than a box of matches?

    Or do we take the self-defence POV that implies we should maintain basic self-sufficiency even though they’re loss makers? If so, what’s the best way of doing that?

    We can all agree to get rid of idiotic regulations and redundant costs imposed by government. Also, we’d agree to stop directly feather-bedding the ALP’s union mates like we’re doing now.

    I’d differ with most here and say we should use government purchases (and kill the green buying policies) to provide a floor for local car sales.

    In the past, this at least ensured a steady supply of good, barely 2nd hand, large family cars available to the public. It indirectly subsidised working families too. Demographics are destiny.

    I’ve owned both a Falcon and a Commodore in recent years. The Falcon because it was a cheap, 2nd-hand, ex-fleet sale. It was a great car. It’s a great pity that Ford Australia aren’t in a position to export it. I’m driving a V8 Commodore now, and I’m enjoying that too.

    BTW, Ford Oz does make a “pretend 4wd” – the Territory.

    The world’s best selling car is the Corolla. I’ve driven them, and they’re pieces of shit. It’s not so much that we don’t make good cars, it’s that we can’t make crappy little cars to the price they’re sold to. We’ll never be able to either.

  34. Milton Von Smith

    Holden should have hired Michael Mann to massage the data in that chart. Mann could have turned that hockey stick upside down!

  35. In this region, the Ford Focus is made in Thailand…

    This region? Which region?
    People, such as our beloved, mendaciloquent leader, keep referring to “this region”—one that apparently stretches from the west of China, at least (if not as far as Georgia*), to Bishop and Clerk Islets. Why?

    * It’s difficult, at times, to determine whether our dear PM mean “the entire continent of Asia” or “far east Asia” or just “the bits of Asia closest to Australia” or “this bit of Asia I’m visiting” when she refers to “Asia”.

  36. Craig Mc

    This region? Which region?

    The ones we get are made in Thailand. Probably South Africa, and New Zealand gets them from there too. I doubt there are many exports to Japan.

  37. adrian

    It’s easier to name the world’s car manufacturers that aren’t getting government assistance.

    yep, virtually every car company around the world is taking some receiving of gov’t support care of their tax-payers. Opel for instance is bankrolled with gov’t backed loans.

    Furthermore, there is no objective evidence that locally made cars suffer quality problems any worse than other cars of a similar price range.

  38. A person I know works for Holden. He has been sent around the world for the last few months to see where holden will build the next commodores as they aren’t being built in Australia – they are going to be built in Sth Korea, where he has now moved with his family. Didn’t anyone bother to ask Holden where the new Commodore would be built – just assuming if it’s a Holden Commodore – then it’s an Aussie car? What a journalism fail…….

  39. Infidel Tiger

    I think you will find that the Coalition plans to continue to waste taxpayers money on unproductive car manufacturers.

    Correct. There are no dries left in the Liberal Party.

    If Holden manufactured paraffin powered horse buggies, Tony would be saying we needed to support “capitalism with a conscience” with taxpayer money.

  40. Woolfe

    We have a new Thai built Focus, good car.

    In UK or USA I would be driving a Porsche but as was said previously I also cannot justify the crazy markup here. And some of it is market gouging. In UK a Nissan GTR costs the same as as Porsche Carrera, here the Carrera is $40,000 more.

  41. Craig Mc

    And some of it is market gouging.

    I suspect the vast majority of it is price gouging. It can’t all be blamed on taxes & tariffs.

  42. brc

    Here an example of the level of market distortion in Australia; I was recently looking at a new MB. While in the US in January I discovered the that drive-away price of the car in California is USD59,800. The RRP for the same model in Australia is AUD169,900; a difference of AUD110,100.

    I decided not to buy one, because I just cannot stomach a price difference of that magnitude.

    This is nothing ,NOTHING, to do with LhD/RHd or location of manufacture, or differences in vehicle specifications, or any other crap that people make up to justify it. In modern car plants, LhD and RHd as made on the same line at the same time by the same people. It is no different to manual vs auto or 2wd and 4wd offered on some models.

    The price difference on a mid-priced Benz is 100k. That is well beyond the differences in complete models in their own range.

    It is solely, 100% because the government hands the manufacturers a monopoly on importing their own product through the prohibition on parallel imports for both new and used vehicles manufactured after 1 jan 1989. Sure the LCT costs a bit, and so does import duties and the GST. But many other countries have high sales taxes as well.

    I can go to the USA and buy a computer and bring it here. The end result is that prices on computers are pretty closely aligned, however, I can’t buy a USA song on iTunes and as a result the local prices are higher. Why? Because they can.

    If I could fly to auckland, hong kong, Tokyo, Bangkok, London or wherever, and buy a new Benz and take care of shipping it myself, I could save 50k or more, even after i paid all the local taxes. But I can’t, because customs will seize my car. So the only way I can buy that Benz is through the official oz dealer. They know this, so they charge accordingly, and then insult me by making up a pile of plausible sounding bullshit to try and account for the price gouging.

    Its not the dealers fault – competition would soon drive down the prices if there were that much fat in the margin. No, it is down to the head office invoice price, which they charge with glee.

    Don’t fall for any other explanation, there is only one. The government hands the car manufacturers a monopoly, and they exploit it with glee.

    Think about how much economic stimulus we could get in this country if car pricing matched the rest of the world. All that discretionary spending released for other consumer goods.

  43. This is how we know that, despite the alleged economic difficulties in various European countries, they’re all doing quite well: everyone drives a foreign car over there.

  44. brc

    This page shows the degree to which australians are overcharged for cars

    http://blog.privatefleet.com.au/home/rip-off/

    Read it and weep. This is not just about high priced cars.

  45. wreckage

    The “least amount of hissing” route here is to end the parallel import restrictions. Everything else will sort itself out.

  46. Brett

    Don’t fall for any other explanation, there is only one. The government hands the car manufacturers a monopoly, and they exploit it with glee.

    Only for so long as consumers permit it. The solution is for people not to buy until the prices align within some sort of reasonable margin.

    I am a case in point; I can afford the AUD169,900, but I now simply refuse to pay it. I won’t be abused in that way.

    As a long term MB customer, they have lost me. They probably don’t care, but if enough people take the same attitude then they might have to pay attention. And strangely enough, I had sold my previous car so I was ready to buy, however I have been managing quite well without a car, and I just might not buy another one at all.

  47. brc

    Only for so long as consumers permit it. The solution is for people not to buy until the prices align within some sort of reasonable margin.

    This is wrong. Clearly many consumers do reject it. Those with the money end up buying something below what they would have bought. The companies would have their models where they could double sales overnight by letting the price adjust downwards. But they don’t, and why would they? If I could overcharge my customers by double and get the same revenue for half the effort I would take it, every time. Why, as a Lamborghini seller would I care what my customers think if I make a 400k margin on each car sold?

    Until the personal import restrictions get lifted, we are doomed to suffer. Take away those restrictions, and the dealers would be suffering immediately. There are apparently two 777 cargo planes a day flying in from new jersey to australia packed with goods that are not parallel-import restricted. Take away the restrictions on parallel importing cars, and you’d have cars flooding into australia from Japan, uk, hong kong, everywhere. Allow LhD registrations and they’d e coming in from the USA as well.

  48. brc

    Having said that, Brett, you should definitely tell the sales people that.

    I told a Benz sales guy recently I would never pay the prices they have because I know what the cars sell for in other countries. They hate hearing it. It will change nothing but if it makes their day worse it’s a small victory.

  49. Infidel Tiger

    Take away the restrictions on parallel importing cars, and you’d have cars flooding into australia from Japan, uk, hong kong, everywhere.

    Hong Kong might be the only place they don’t come from considering what those poor bastards have to pay for a car.

  50. rebel with cause

    A nice car with a good motor is pretty much a waste in Australia anyway. Dare to depress the accelerator more than a quarter of the way down and you are liable to lose your licence.

  51. Michel Lasouris

    And now the ex MD of Mitsubishi Australia endorses my opinion of many months ago…that vehicle manufacturing in Auatralia is a lost cause, It Cant survive.
    So what is plan B? I’d suggest we look closely at PRT, a hybrid people transit system that closely approximates car use within high density urban areas, but at very low cost and without constant interruption to existing traffic infrastructure. Australia has the technology, the manufacturing ability and the type of urbanisation that would make this concept a winner. It would even be a great export opportunity. Please look at www. prtconsulting.com and lets have a discussion.

  52. brc

    Hong Kong might be the only place they don’t come from considering what those poor bastards have to pay for a car.

    I think you’re thinking of Singapore. Plenty of HK private imports in oz these days. I’ve heard dealers saying they are dodgy because ‘they are kept in underground car parks near the harbour so are full of rust’

    To which I replied, err, like cars from Sydney or Melbourne ?

  53. brc

    Michel – err what?

    Car manufacturing in oz can’t survive, so the obvious answer is to…look at a high density hybrid transit system?

    If you’re going to spam, at least learn how to use the link button.

    Meanwhile, all the sane people think that the solution for Australian car manufacturing is to let it die and let people buy cheaper imported cars.

  54. entropy

    In fairness, an A dollar that is about 30% overpriced does have something to do with it.

    Bill
    9 Apr 13 at 11:39 am


    Given that most of the parts are actually imported, I don’t think so. Swings and roundabouts.

  55. brc

    In fairness, an A dollar that is about 30% overpriced does have something to do with it.
    Bill
    9 Apr 13 at 11:39 am

    The price is the price. If you think the aud is overpriced you’re free to sell all of yours and lock in a 30% profit.

  56. Paul

    Calling the Commodore an Opel copy is wrong and unfair to the many Australians who have worked on this car over the years. Calling it overpriced and not as well made as it should be for the money is right and fair.

  57. mareeS

    It’s amazing to see the protection Australian governments give to car makers and the 2nd-hand market, but they offer no such protection to the boat-building and sales industry.

    There’s been a massive loss of employment in recreational marine construction and sales in Australia since the GFC because it’s so much cheaper to import from the USA and Europe, given the AUD dollar and the financial wreckage in the US/Europe, and the fact that imported used boats are tax-free.

    Our port gets at least 6-8 ships a year, each with dozens of luxury boats as deck cargo, which are offloaded, then sailed or trucked to various destinations in Qld, NSW, Vic and WA.

    The price paid, including shipping, is usually half what would be paid to an Australian builder or dealer, which has caused a collapse not only in new boat sales but also in resale.

    Meanwhile, at GMH and Ford…

  58. tbh

    Maree, I sympathise. Like most Australians, I work in an industry that is offered no protection or assistance by government. And that’s as it should be, as it helps us sharpen our act. We’re a high tech manufacturer, supplying to the mining, oil and gas and civil-geotech markets and we simply try to out innovate our competitors, both foreign and domestic.

    One thing the circumstances against us has forced us to do is to expand internationally and diversify. That’s probably something that a lot of Aussie companies our size have sometimes not done.

  59. mareeS

    tbh, several companies that I referred to did innovate their product and diversify into export, and did well because of their excellence on a world market. Quite a few of them are now offshore.

    It just gives me the shits that an export and domestic market that was excelling in Australia has to cop the full effect of market forces while a lazy and featherbedded industry sector is so heavily protected.

    If it’s good enough for hardworking people in one sector to lose jobs and business through circumstances beyond their control, it’s good enough for the same to happen to a fat, lazy, protected sector.

  60. wal1957

    The demise of the car industry is here. It has been for a while. Oz made cars are not good value for money.

    Why?

    One of the reasons must surely be the exhorbitant pay increases paid to GMH employees. Well done unions. A struggling industry, and the unions tie the company into a pay cycle conditional on government subsidies.

    Oh, and the best part…where does the ALP get most of their reps from?…the bloody unions!

    No wonder we’re in the mess we are in!

  61. tbh

    tbh, several companies that I referred to did innovate their product and diversify into export, and did well because of their excellence on a world market. Quite a few of them are now offshore.

    It just gives me the shits that an export and domestic market that was excelling in Australia has to cop the full effect of market forces while a lazy and featherbedded industry sector is so heavily protected.

    If it’s good enough for hardworking people in one sector to lose jobs and business through circumstances beyond their control, it’s good enough for the same to happen to a fat, lazy, protected sector.

    No argument from me. The injustice of it all bothers me too. I don’t know what it is about automotive manufacturing that makes politicians of all stripes drop their trousers. It’s a bloody disease.

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