Putting Aussie Jobs First

Putting Aussie jobs first is to put Aussie jobs last. Labor’s protectionist jobs response will, if implemented, ensure that Australian businesses become less competitive, less efficient and less able to offer higher salaries. It is a recipe for higher unemployment and lower wages. This policy has been tried many times in the past, in numerous countries. It has never worked, always delivering the opposite of the stated objective.

It is therefore a punch in the belly for the taxpayer to be funding an advertising campaign which promotes a policy that is almost, if not quite, entirely opposite to the national interest.

The Gillard Government shares a lot in common with the governments of Nikita Khrushchev and Walter Ulbricht. Will Tony Abbott be the stateman who shouts

Ms Gillard, tear down this wall!

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17 Responses to Putting Aussie Jobs First

  1. sabrina

    Will Tony Abbott be the stateman who shouts – Ms Gillard, tear down this wall!
    No need to tear the vocal cord now, he can quietly start dismantling the wall on 15th september.

  2. lem

    SJ to be fair, she IS putting Aussie jobs first, the only ones she knows about. Union officials. Those guys are very successful. She knows, she’s had a look at a few of their slushies.

  3. She knows, she’s had a look at a few of their slushies.

    The mental images scar the mind.

  4. WhaleHunt Fun

    Perhaps a scarred mind is her problem.

  5. lem

    Following on from qanda last night, here’s your next pm, and yes he has his priorities right. He wants to become a successful lawyer so that he can make lots of money and (get this) help other people (aka join Slater and Gordon) This kid ticks all the boxes.
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/indigenous/a-100m-plan-to-deliver-a-better-future-and-maybe-an-indigenous-pm/story-fn9hm1pm-1226636379963

  6. Rafe

    People need to understand how high quality workers create jobs downstream: an obvious example is a bricklayer who needs several brickies labourers to keep him busy (the number depends how good he is).

    Of course we are not talking about brickies in this context but the principle applies in all kinds of complex activities where projects depend on highly skilled people in key positions. If these positions are not filled the project will not proceed. It is a case of the seen and the unseen: Julia and her union comrades may get a warm inner glow by seeing that some outsider is kept out of a job and the unseen is the jobs not created downstream.

  7. Ant

    By supporting Ossie jobs first do they mean like those in the car industry?

    Oh yeah, why not. Let’s fatten up the unionised bludgers on car assembly lines with their lavish remuneration paid for by government hand outs stolen from businesses whose workers wouldn’t dream of the kind of perks the car guys get.

  8. manalive

    It’s the Berlin wall in reverse:
    … the Soviet bloc characterized the wall as a necessary protection [of the workers’ paradise] against the degrading and immoral influences of decadent Western culture and capitalism. During the lifetime of the wall, nearly 80 people were killed trying to escape from East to West Berlin …
    … or

    According to trade union sources, organised labour will also campaign against Tony Abbott before the election on the themes of job protection, maintaining investment [taxpayer handouts] in automotive manufacturing and [un]fairness at work.

    A ‘workers” paradise indeed.

  9. Andy of Perth

    Sneer all you like but the reality is that engineers in Perth are being put out of work while this country’s high profile resource projects are being designed and engineered overseas.

  10. Seems a bit odd, this, given that Australia’s hospitals, nursing homes, aged care services, cleaning agencies, corner shops, service stations and smallgoods factories are increasingly staffed by ‘new Australians’ or ‘new non-Australians’ as the case may be.

    I look forward to the NDIS being entirely staffed – from Executive Director right down to Level 1 Bottom-Wiper ($19 an hour) – with genuine dinky-di fair-suck-of-the-sauce-bottle true blue Aussies. (Good luck with that one.)

  11. Dr Faustus

    Read through the Plan for Australian Jobs and you immediately see that the Gillard Government assumes that the Australian government and private sectors are far too stupid to allocate resources efficiently. They need expert guidance.

    Wee Combet is splashing a lazy billion on:

    Australian Industry Participation Plans to add paperwork and process delays to projects valued above $500m;

    Enhanced Project By-Law Scheme – to “embed” Australian Industry Opportunity officers within private enterprise global supply offices of projects over $2bn;

    An Automotive Supplier Advocate – “to boost sales of Australian-made cars to government and business fleets” and show Ford/Toyota/GM Holden’s apparently crap marketing departments ‘how to do it’;

    Industry Innovation Precincts – to “create new internationally competitive businesses and jobs.” – like 10 mini CSIRO’s:

    Enterprise Solutions Program – “to help small to medium Australian businesses bid for public sector work” – and go broke, because government typically pays invoices on a 120 days basis.

    It’s the Magic Mushroom effect that happens when you create a Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education.

  12. Ellen of Tasmania

    This policy has been tried many times in the past, in numerous countries. It has never worked, always delivering the opposite of the stated objective.

    “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing he was never reasoned into.” (Jonathan Swift)

  13. …because government typically pays invoices on a 120 days basis.

    And you’ve gotta really ride them to get it paid in that time. I’ve invoices to the state govt that are in excess of 1 year old. I’ve had state govt (health) credit cards bounce – for significant sums.

    I’ve had state govt depts flatly refuse to pay. I’ll do everything I can to make ’em eventually pay, but there will be more than another year of chasing them up, obtuse shuffling by them, and me wondering if the time is worth it.

    I’ve one employee whose role is pretty much debt recovery. All of the debt to be recovered is with state or fed deptarments/instrumentalities/whatevers.

  14. Combine Dave

    with genuine dinky-di fair-suck-of-the-sauce-bottle true blue Aussies. (Good luck with that one.)

    I’m sure there’s plenty of guys down at centrelink that would turn down such an offer of employment.

    I have a friend like that. Went through an extended period of unemployment (due to resigning), turned his nose up at all job offers until eventually his wife forced him to accept an entry level position as a Photocopy-repairman.

    I still hear him complaining that he wants to quit his current job but I’m hopeful this time that reason will prevail this time and he won’t resign until he’s found something better.

  15. I feel sorry for the guy’s wife. But not remotely sorry for him.

  16. Entropy

    From what I can tell this plan for Australian jobs is the compulsory placement of political officers in businesses and the creation of a bunch of quangos to parachute former or so to be former ALP politicians , advisers and assorted labor hacks.

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