Do plastic bag refusniks …?

As I was happily chomping my way through a piece of toast with vegemite  … heaven on earth … I asked myself this question:

  • Do plastic bag refusniks (to use Nick Cater’s wonderful term) eat vegemite?

I’m thinking NOT. And for the following reasons:

  • It is full of salt (yum);
  • It is highly processed, mainly yeast;
  • It is manufactured by a tax-avoiding, exploitative multinational company.

I guess their alternative is home-made marmalade, made from organically grown cumquats lovingly picked in the early morning when the dew is still on the fruit.

So Cats, what else do the PBRs of this world shun?

One of my daughters lives around the corner from a weekly “Farmers’ Market”.   She tells me that at one of the organic fruit and veg stalls, the hipsters who run it can be seen taking the avocadoes out of the boxes shipped from Mildura, removing the sticker and lovingly placing them in rustic wicker baskets.

And charging double to triple the normal price of avacadoes.

The PBRs line up for them.

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99 Responses to Do plastic bag refusniks …?

  1. Fred Furkenburger

    I am sure that they would drink alcoholic beverages the production of which puts huge amounts of the horrible global warming carbon (dioxide) into the atmosphere.

    Surely, and hypocritically, against all of their greenie principles!

  2. Brett

    I’ll bet they all have iphone and ipads, and drive hybrids (except the true hypocrites who will arrive at the farmer markets in supercharged Range Rovers); all manufactured by an evil multinational empires using processes that generate carbon and other pollution. The pollution generated in manufacturing the lithium ion batteries alone should be sufficient reason for the PBR’s to reject.

  3. Pickles

    Used to go to West End markets years ago, where the Vege Substitution Racket was in full cry. Wily traders would get pallets of seconds from Rocklea and spread them out under the fig trees. Because they looked like shit the PBRs would assume they were home grown and lap them up. Hats off to the traders. However, you could go to Woodridge market and get the real deal, grown by bent and wizened Vietnamese grannys. The PBRs wouldn’t range that far from their warrens in South Brisbane to Scary Woody so the prices were heaps cheap.

  4. John Comnenus

    What else so they shun? Logic!

  5. perturbed

    at one of the organic fruit and veg stalls, the hipsters who run it can be seen taking the avocadoes out of the boxes shipped from Mildura, removing the sticker and lovingly placing them in rustic wicker baskets.

    And charging double to triple the normal price of avacadoes.

    The PBRs line up for them.

    Criminally amoral hypocrites raping the wallets of criminally stupid incompetents? They deserve each other.

  6. candy

    Those organic biscuits and fruit/nut bars have loads of calories but are supposed to be “healthy” so sometimes organic is just a con job.

  7. e-girl

    I’m a vegan because I really, really, really hate plants, so I destroy them through ritual mastication.

  8. .

    I would love to see some of these doofi served either truffle oil drenched veg. spag bol. or “prime beef” and later to be told they had just eaten ambergris or minke whale tongue.

    I mean, how could they complain after basically eating the best food you can possibly eat?

    It is also a test – if they overreact then being a fuckwit “green” is a religion.

  9. kae

    Vegemite.
    It’s rubbish now, I bought a jar and the middle was slop. And the taste has changed.

    There’s a shop in town here, a bakery, which won’t give out bags any more. Haven’t for years. I don’t shop there.

  10. .

    kae

    Always buy the small jars. The middling and large ones are always foul.

  11. Tom

    This is driving me mad. Does anyone have a link to that gotcha video featured here within the last year about the US hippie zombies talking themselves into loving “organic” fruit and vegies that aren’t organic?

  12. Dianeh

    Kae

    I’ve noticed that vegemite is not as strong as it used to be. I have to use more to get the same bite and saltiness.

    Very disappointing, although I still eat it.

  13. thefrollickingmole

    The same seconds fruit/veg thing goes on at my towns local market.
    Lady selling them works at the “proper” shop and sells the nearly off stuff at the market. Dont think she calls it organic though.

    I was selling our sugar cane drinks at the market with my dad when a lady of a certain appearance wanted to know if it was organic.
    Dad said “No, we drench it in DDT after we fertilize the ground with whale blubber.”

    She didnt buy a drink,

  14. Grant B

    Some years ago in the mid-north of South Aust, the old man and I were driving home at night after a few in the local. A tractor was in a crop, headlights on with a boom spray.. I commented that it was a bit odd. He said no, he grows “organic” wheat at inflated prices so he only sprays insecticides at night.

    Presumably they didn’t test the harvested grain in those days. Do they now?

  15. johno

    One of my daughters lives around the corner from a weekly “Farmers’ Market”. She tells me that at one of the organic fruit and veg stalls, the hipsters who run it can be seen taking the avocadoes out of the boxes shipped from Mildura, removing the sticker and lovingly placing them in rustic wicker baskets.

    And charging double to triple the normal price of avacadoes.

    The PBRs line up for them.

    A fool and their money are soon parted.

    If the PBRs are too thick to realise they are being conned, why should I care.

  16. jumpnmcar

    GMOs are shunned despite nature having genetically modifying everything for millions of years.

  17. Token

    Tom, you want Penn & Teller’s Bullsh@t.

  18. James of the Glens

    Dianeh, you too. I thought the same; it’s a ploy to sell more.

    Love Judith’s avocadoes tale; the gullibles are pumped up by the TV shows with the obligatory ‘organic’ presenters and long-table lunch brigade all constantly proclaiming “fresh” (which must be pronounced “frash” for some reason).

    Chaucer and his Pardoner would have a field day at such markets.

  19. MT Isa Miner

    back in the dark ages when tie dyed t-shirts were on their first fashion go round, I shared a house with a true hippie who made his breakfast bowl of what I NOW know are assorted whole grains and most of our fresh fruit fresh and dried fruits and yoghurt in bowl the size of the Mixmaster.

    It took him so LOOONG to eat his breakfast he was always making everyone late to work and ended up quitting work as a brickies labourer so he could eat in peace. Bleeding Jesus on the cross, I did not make this up!

  20. H B Bear

    Bernard Salt uses goat cheese as a test for moving between Green voting Guardian-on-the-Yarra readers and the great unwashed suburban wastelands.

    Probably as good a test as any. Or maybe quinoa.

    I’ve started making a delicious Cypriot grain salad using freekeh from annoying celebrity chef George Colombaris so perhaps it is time to out myself.

  21. Pickles

    MIM the brickie was probably about to sack him anyway, as every time he yelled for more mud, your mate would be down the back having a shit.

  22. brinkin

    Johno you should care as these loud mouth green idiots influence government, take the nt Darwin in particular,we have a container deposit scheme that has put up prices by twice the price of the can deposit and has led to less recycling and we also have a plastic bag ban which colesworth love because they can sell you reusable plastic bags this has led to an increase in food poisoning and as people no longer bag their rubbish, oh my god the flies, however bunnings now sell many fly traps

  23. James of the Glens

    HB Bear, gave up watching that show after wondering why anyone could stand being told to hurry up by the George chappy and then not giving him a clip under the ear.

  24. kevin

    Are you suggesting that all of us home-made cumquat marmalade lovers are PBRa?
    Take that back or we’ll sue.
    The comment is racist, defamatory and distressing so I’m sure I can find a lawyer eager to take it to court.

  25. H B Bear

    I don’t watch the program, it’s rubbish. Lifted the recipe from Hellenic Republic Facebook page. Served with cumin and honey flavoured yoghurt it is delicious.

  26. Jeffrey

    At least Vegemite now has the halal logo on it so should be OK eh?
    I have take my own salt to a relo’s when the odd invite requires attendance. I tell them no krill or whatever were harmed in the harvesting.

  27. Helen Armstrong

    HB Bear, I like goats cheese and a messing about in the kitchen, which is where I should be now, getting my osso bucco on, but I think this is a refelction of conservatism. We eat stuff because it tastes good, not because it is particularly good for for you. Whereas Far Left Logic indulges in a bit of the old hairshirtism feel good stuff. They eat something because they feel enobled when doing so. And that gives them the opportunity (never to be missed) to sneer. Bingo, double payout.

  28. Bruce of Newcastle

    So Cats, what else do the PBRs of this world shun?

    Reality. Why is it that enviros adopt policies which have the opposite environmental effect?

  29. Judith Sloan

    Hmmmm. I like goat’s cheese. Not sure re quinoa. Just seems like tasteless mush.

    I am thinking of campaigning for the return of flummery, junket and tapioca pudding.

  30. Steve of Glasshouse

    Fresh for me is the stuff we pick from our own garden.
    Made a caeser salad from scratch the other day with the cos lettuce picked about 20 mins before it was needed. Yum. Having said that, I don’t go out of my way to buy organic. I’d rather spend my money on good wine..

  31. Rabz MMEC VRWC

    So Cats, what else do the PBRs of this world shun?

    Common sense.

  32. Rabz MMEC VRWC

    I conducted a simple price test last night in the supermarket, well before this post was up.

    Purchased some chicken breast fillets for $9.50 – the free range fillets were just over double the cost.

    Wankers.

  33. Pauly

    Bernard Salt uses goat cheese as a test for moving between Green voting Guardian-on-the-Yarra readers and the great unwashed suburban wastelands.

    Probably as good a test as any. Or maybe quinoa.

    I’ve started making a delicious Cypriot grain salad using freekeh from annoying celebrity chef George Colombaris so perhaps it is time to out myself.

    Quinoa is a great product, incredibly versatile amd the recipes for using from guys like Gaston Acurio or Rafael Osterling are mind blowing.

    It destroys my chef’s soul to see hipsters using it, because they treat it as a gluten free alternative to couscous when it is so much more than that.

    One free tip, if you cook it then dry it in a slow oven you can use it as a substitute for breadcrumbs for coating food for deep frying or herb crusts and the like.

  34. Infidel Tiger

    Purchased some chicken breast fillets for $9.50 – the free range fillets were just over double the cost.

    Wankers.

    Organic meat is a load of wank, but I would choose pasture fed beef any day over feed lot cattle. Tastes 10 times better.

  35. My sister owns an organic (& fair trade) shop. Trading is directly related to the strength of the local economy in her town.

    That is, when jobs are plentiful & well paid, they flock to her shop “cooing and cah-ing” over all the organic stuff.

    As soon as things tighten up economically, the clientele decamps to Coles to buy irradiated chinese imports that are just oozing mercury, wrong-coloured, pesticide filled, stuff.

  36. candy

    I avoid soft cheeses, just too risky. All that bacteria just thriving in the moist cheese. Yuck.
    People have died from eating goats cheese just recently and others really sick – Victoria I think it was.

  37. Leigh Lowe

    We live in a medium sized country town, which is also a bit of a tourist destination as well.
    There is a farmer’s market once a month which has some genuine recognisable locals – the toothless yokels selling “organic free-range” potatoes, for example. We all know they are not organic but they are good spuds. Or the old Croations selling cured pig meat, and have been around forever.
    But the faux hipsters are as conspicuous as a pork roll stand in Mecca, and about as well patronised by the locals.
    I swear to god, the bloke with the dreadlocks selling “organic” meat. I’ll bet if I said “cattle crush” to him he would think I was talking about the love which dare not speak its name Mk2 that Senator Cory Bernardi was going on about last year.

  38. Is the stuff from the hot box at the Roadhouse organic or not?

  39. Pauly

    Is the stuff from the hot box at the Roadhouse organic or not?

    Its full of wild organisms

  40. Infidel Tiger

    My sister owns an organic (& fair trade) shop. Trading is directly related to the strength of the local economy in her town.

    True. When people have a lot of money they often make stupid decisions.

  41. Dianne

    I lived in Northcote for a time & the local Coles used to send me nutso. There’d be the hairy armpit brigade, with the cloth bags, the itchy bum toilet paper (recycled!) and fifteen boxes of disposable nappies.

  42. Popular Front

    Organic meat is a load of wank, but I would choose pasture fed beef any day over feed lot cattle. Tastes 10 times better.

    Dead right IT, pasture cows are happy cows. Feedlot stock are stressed and unhappy and it comes out in the taste.

  43. Pickles

    Only the crab sticks are organic Winston.

  44. Myrddin Seren

    So Cats, what else do the PBRs of this world shun?

    Well, unless they are being screaming hypocrites ( surely not ? ) how about:

    Babies – massive unsustainable consuming machines that grow into bigger CO2 emitting consumers. obviously all good PRBs will sterilise themselves for Gaia.

    ( I have three offspring myself – so I am being ironic here ).

    Toilet paper – killing the planet one sheet at a time.

    Anything written by Al Gore – takes money from the fossil fuel oil ticks.

  45. Pauly

    Getting back to PBRs, if I had to choose any one thing of their myriad of muddle headed wombattery it is “food miles”.
    (1) Freshness is detrermined by how long it took the food to go from alive and growing to get on your plate. It’s why the Japanese pay $100,000+ for a single airfreighted tuna. You get better and fresher Southern Bluefin Tuna in Tokyo than you do in Melbourne.Sydney/Brisbane.
    (2) A second rate locally grown product is inferior to a first rate product that has been properly freighted to your door.
    (3) It takes many more inputs to grow a second rate product in a marginal climate than it does to grow a first rate product in an optimum climate. The tractor miles and fertiliser and pesticide costs can eliminate any environmental benefit of not transporting the product pretty damn quickly.
    (4) We live in Australia. Our entire food network is based around extending seasons by growing products at different latitudes and altitudes. This is a good thing, unless you want to only get fresh strawberries for 4-6 weeks of the year.
    (5) The Spice road, the first dedicated international distribution network, existed because not everything you want grows locally. Humanity has been transporting food products vast distances for at least 4,000 years.

  46. Gab

    Nice to see you back, Pauly.

    Humanity has been transporting food products vast distances for at least 4,000 years.

    Yeah but, like, Carbin didn’t, like, affect the climate back in them days.

  47. candy

    “I am thinking of campaigning for the return of flummery, junket and tapioca pudding”

    Judith, I think there’s something nice about those old fashioned milky vanillary rice pudding type dishes too, tapioca can have a splash of brandy or something to enliven it, but time consuming dishes and generally not fashionable.

  48. Infidel tiger

    I’d love to know what coffee the “food milers” in Melbourne drink. Must come from the foothills of Fitzroy. Or maybe like the famous Indonesian coffee sourced from a civet cat’s shit they rifle through the dung of a hipster who has recently travelled to Brazil?

  49. Gab

    flummery, junket and tapioca pudding”

    Love them, including sago puddings. Still make them occasionally but haven’t used Junket in ages.

  50. She tells me that at one of the organic fruit and veg stalls, the hipsters who run it can be seen taking the avocadoes out of the boxes shipped from Mildura, removing the sticker and lovingly placing them in rustic wicker baskets.

    And charging double to triple the normal price of avacadoes.

    This is to be celebrated. The refuseniks obtain value from the experience; the sellers obtain currency which is exchangeable for goods and services. Net utility is increased by the transaction.

    This is the free market at work, and it’s great.

  51. Entropy


    Its full of wild organisms

    I find I must apologise for misreading that, Pauly.

  52. kae

    Thanks for the vegemite hint, dot.
    I have a tube left over from parcel to the soldier mailouts and I’ve been finishing that off with the cravings.
    I did buy the big jar and, like I said, it was runny in the middle and tasted awful!

  53. MT Isa Miner

    Teh lcoal Coles stopped selling junket for a while and I had to order it online for the mother in law but as Mr Gump says “fur no purtickular rasin” they brought it back.

    It only takes up 10 by 10cm on the very bottom shelf anyway- but I suppose it wan’t worth Coles putting out an own brand version of a chemical mimicing rennet a byproduct of dead calves stomachs now produced by black mould to curdle milk so they brought it back. I like all those fancy jiggly white puddings too.

  54. duncanm

    Immunisation for their children. They really are selfish ignorant dills

  55. Chris

    This is the free market at work, and it’s great.

    The free market at work is businesses lying to their customers? That explains a lot.

    Purchased some chicken breast fillets for $9.50 – the free range fillets were just over double the cost.

    Similarly for free range eggs versus cage eggs. I don’t think they taste any different but people purchase the free range ones for animal cruelty reasons, not taste. I have a couple of chickens in the backyard and I do think they produce much tastier eggs though. Might be diet related. Similarly for the veges grown in the backyard. Corn cooked within a few hours of being picked tastes amazing. And home grown tomatoes are often much tastier than supermarket ones. i don’t bother buying organic fruit and veg though.

  56. Chris

    Organic meat is a load of wank, but I would choose pasture fed beef any day over feed lot cattle. Tastes 10 times better.

    Grain fed beef is pretty popular though because you get better meat/fat color which people care about when buying meat – especially for export apparently.

  57. Ellen of Tasmania

    flummery, junket and tapioca pudding

    I don’t flummery, but I do make junket and tapioca puddings – lemon tapioca in summer is lovely.

    We had a jersey cow for a number of years and nothing is nicer than fresh, creamy, jersey milk. Our cat refused to go back to the bought stuff and he was no PBR.

  58. Gab

    I do love the way those inner-city greeny types carry on about how great home-grown veges taste, like no one has ever grown vegetables at home nor anyone ever lived on a crop farm. It’;s like they think they invented growing vegetables in the backyard.

  59. kae

    Growing at home is different to growing vast quantities which are bred to travel and store.

    Many heirloom varieties of tomoatoes, for example, will not store and will ripen quickly. They’re no good for supermarkets and travelling vast distances. Grow the heirlooms at home and enjoy them fresh out of your garden for flavour full food.

    Corn, I live up the road from a huge corn producer in the Lockery Valley. I can have fresh corn in season all the time very cheap. I find it best to cook it in the husk in the microwave for two mintues on high. Peel it and enjoy the wonderful, sweet flavour!

  60. Gab

    We had some dairy cows on the farm when I was a kid, Ellen. Milk straight from the cow and then filtered through a cloth mesh…I can still remember the taste *sigh*.

  61. Kae

    I’ve noticed that vegemite is not as strong as it used to be. I have to use more to get the same bite and saltiness.

    Very disappointing, although I still eat it.

    Australian caviar!

  62. Steve of Glasshouse

    Kae,,open the corn cob as if you were opening a banana, place a mix of smoked paprika, salt and butter against the corn , rewrap, then microwave or BBQ if you wish. Nice. Variation..cajun spices..

  63. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    Mummy blog alert.

    Remember, it ends with Slush Fund stuffing scones in your mouth and then using the event as fodder for telling the press how popular she is.

  64. Jazza

    But,but, but, Judith…
    They can hardly not “produce” the goods to sell for profit, and when their backyard or balcony pot plants don’t deliver the goods,what else are they to do?

    After all, cost effective hothouses are plastic personified aren’t they?

  65. Pickles

    Pauly thanks for the pork crackling tip. Worked a treat.

  66. .

    Grain fed beef is pretty popular though because you get better meat/fat color which people care about when buying meat

    No and no.

  67. Chris

    Dot – i worked for a while in an abbatoir.Not the most pleasant of places to work but they had seriously good bbqs! Anyway one link for you. Intramuscular fat (marbling) is pretty important for flavour too. And the yellow colour of the fat you get with grass fed beef puts some people off it as they expect white coloured fat.
    It’s pretty common for grass fed cattle to spend some time being fattened up on grain before slaughter.

    http://www.kingsleys.com.au/food-beef-fed.html

  68. Tom

    Thanks to Token for jogging my memory: Here is Penn and Teller’s hilarious guide to consumer gullibility on organic food.

  69. Tel

    Purchased some chicken breast fillets for $9.50 – the free range fillets were just over double the cost.

    That’s interesting because free range whole chickens are only about 15% more than regular whole chickens and the labour rate involved in cutting them up should be about equal (unless they also have free range process workers these days, which might explain the lack of productivity).

  70. Helen Armstrong

    Yellow fat is a result of the cow eating green feed. If the steer is off hayed off pasture, the fat is white. Takes about 6 weeks. Trust me, I eat my own. Feedlots are for finishing cattle to the consistency reqired for their target market.

  71. Infidel Tiger

    Feedlots are for finishing cattle to the consistency reqired for their target market.

    Fat Yanks who refuse to chew.

    Pasture fed isn’t as tender but has much more flavour and produces much more testosterone. It’s the good shit.

  72. dd

    The biggest reason for progressives not eating Vegemite is that it is symbolic of traditional Australian culture, particularly Anglo-Saxon culture and the dreaded, mythical “nineteen fifties”.

  73. Pauly

    Yellow fat can also be an indicator of an older beast, not just pasture fed.

    Marbling is also a funny thing. The way we eat beef, a marbling score of 5-8 is about right, but the Japanese will pay a premium for the top (10-12) marbling scores because they eat beef shaved in thin slices, not big slabs of steak. A steak with a marbling score of 12 is close to inedible when prepared in the western style because it just too rich and fatty.

  74. Pauly

    Pauly thanks for the pork crackling tip. Worked a treat.

    Glad to be of service. Freezing the crackling helps a lot because it breaks down the cell structure and allows excess moisture to be cooked out – which is something you want to avoid in 99% of cooking.

  75. kae

    Steve of G
    I just run it through a lump of butter as I eat it. No salt, I don’t eat much salt and have high bloodpressure so probably the butter is bad enough!

    Looooooove butter. Like cream, you can never have too much.

  76. Pauly

    Hmmmm. I like goat’s cheese. Not sure re quinoa. Just seems like tasteless mush.

    Judith,

    Quinoa, or quinua, is fantastic. The problem is that 99% of chefs who put it on the menu in Oz are putting it on the menu because it is what the PBRs want to order to look trendy. They don’t understand the product, nor what they can do with it.
    If you want some good Quinoa recipes that are accessible in English “The Everything Peruvian Cookbook” by Caudra and Escardo is very good. Anything written about Quinoa by Western food writers should be avoided
    If you want to do the work of some Spanish translating Recetario Gourmet Quinua (http://www.gastronomiaycia.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Recetario_Gourmet_Espanol_Quinua.pdf) has some top end restaurant quality dishes.

    Sorry for getting on a bit of a hobby horse but my wife is Peruvian, so I have seen the real deal.

  77. Billy

    Lol, good stuff Judith. I love Vegemite too.

  78. The best meat is an older Bos Taurus, that fattened swiftly after a drought.
    Shot by surprise, it is not fully bled, then hung in a coldroom for 6 months or so.

    Then you have a lovely deep red coloured meat that cannot be equalled for flavour.

    The desire for marbling in meat is purely to get some flavour into an otherwise bland meat.

    I mourn for the bulk of humanity who will never eat anything but meat that requires fat with it to lift the flavour.

  79. Aliice

    LOL Judith says
    “I am thinking of campaigning for the return of flummery, junket and tapioca pudding.”

    I still make tapioca pudding (love it). Cant damn well find Flummery and as for junket it was just milk and a tablet and my Mum overdosed me on it…so thats out.
    But where has that Spanish?? Flummery gone? I just loved it.

  80. Aliice

    Judith – dont forget Lemon sago.

  81. Aliice

    Steve

    “The best meat is an older Bos Taurus, that fattened swiftly after a drought.
    Shot by surprise, it is not fully bled, then hung in a coldroom for 6 months or so.

    Then you have a lovely deep red coloured meat that cannot be equalled for flavour.”

    Music to my taste buds. I swear I would marry you too Steve if I was 30 years younger!

  82. papachango

    I must out myself here.
    I detest the politics and overall smug wankery of your typical self-righteous PBRs as much as the next Cat, but I do like a lot of their food. I also live amongst them, in the goat’s cheese belt.
    Goats cheese is a favourite and I put it in risottos, beetroot and walnut salads or just eat it with crackers and dried mirabelles. A good quinoa salad with paprika dressing is yum. There’s no way I’ve ever eat cage eggs – cruelty is one issue, but also they taste shit.
    Likewise meat – I’d rather not have stuff that’s been pumped full of hormones and antibiotics, and if it means buying organic so be it.
    As for veggies – Coles and Woolies are Shite with a capital S – give me the farmers markets (or just the Vic Market) any day – far, far better taste. The supermarket veggies are picked unripe and bred for maximum transportation and shelf life rather than taste.
    It’s not so much about organic/non organic – all other things being equal I don’t think there’s much of a difference in taste , just the distribution and freshness – most mass market stuff is tasteless.
    Unlike the PBRs though I see organic as a nice western luxury, being able to afford to eat well, rather than something that should be compulsory.
    One thing I will say is that I can’t stand so-called ‘fair trade’, and will consciously avoid any products labelled such. Not so much because of ideology; in order to enjoy my lattès, goats’ cheese and quinoa I tend to separate food from politics.
    Rather because I think fair-trade products are inferior (especially coffee). If you think logically about it, they’re all paid the same price, judged to be ‘fair’ by some NGO, so where’s then incentive to produce quality?

  83. Pauly thanks for the pork crackling tip. Worked a treat.

    Was this in another thread, or am I going blind from the Internet onanism?

  84. C.L.

    Yeah, can we have that crackling tip again?

  85. Pauly

    The crackling tip was in another thread. This is for a very light and puffy crackling.

    Cut the crackling from the meat to cook it separately. Trim all the meat from the crackling and all but 3-4mm of the fat. Score and salt both sides of the crackling and then wrap in clingfilm and freeze overnight.
    Defrost and then cook. I prefer to cut the crackling into individual serves, but you can cook the sheet whole and then break up after cooking. Lay the crackling between two wire rack to stop it from curling up during cooking.
    Cook at ~180 for 20 minutes or at ~150 for 40 minutes. Remember that all ovens are different and that you will need to keep an eye on things and adjust cooking times

  86. candy

    Hi Pauly,

    That’s true about ovens for sure, they are all different and you get to know your own.
    The oven temperature science is definitely not settled!

  87. .

    Dot – i worked for a while in an abbatoir.Not the most pleasant of places to work but they had seriously good bbqs! Anyway one link for you. Intramuscular fat (marbling) is pretty important for flavour too.

    You have been duped. Grain fed beef for steak or roasting meat is truly terrible.

    “important for flavour”

    No.

  88. .

    I am with papachango.

    I like food that tastes great. More quality, less quantity. If I can get it cheap, good. If it has to be grown by a moonbeam called Fair Dinkum Mc Possum, so be it.

  89. Helen Armstrong

    Here is a study about HGPs in beef, I have been trying to find one from Pennsylvania University which Cattle Council commissioned after an athlete reckoned he tested positive because of the beef he ate. I can’t find it anyhoo, there are more hormones in eggs and a normal serve of cabbage then in beef.

    As for antibiotics, it is our irresponsible use as humans that has most impact on resistance today, through not completing courses and taking them for viruses.

    I used to have chickens for eggs and enjoyed having them, but I dont reckon there was any difference between my free range chickens and cage eggs, so when the last one stopped laying (they all died of old age) I went back to the supermarket. And I buy cage eggs, because they are cheap..

  90. brc

    If you haven’t watched toms link to penn and teller on organic food, scroll back up and get clicking. Seriously funny stuff.

  91. brinkin

    Having been raised on a poultry which was at first free range and barns and then went to cages I search the supermarket shelves for cage eggs because they are hygienic fresh and safe, barn laid and free range are not safe as they are laid in shit at times, it is impossible to ensure that they are fresh when collected and free range merely means that are small door to the barn is opened for a short period. Go free range and organic and poison your kids.

  92. kevin

    “I am thinking of campaigning for the return of flummery, junket and tapioca pudding.”

    I’m with you on the junket and flummery but had my fill of frogs’ eggs at school, thank you.

  93. larrikin

    What else do thet shun? fruit jews of course

  94. kae

    How many times do we have to use the PVC woven bags before we’ve saved the world?

    They usually wear out or get filthy before you use them too many times.

    And then they won’t biodegrade.

  95. Supplice

    because I think fair-trade products are inferior (especially coffee). If you think logically about it, they’re all paid the same price, judged to be ‘fair’ by some NGO, so where’s then incentive to produce quality?

    yesyesyesyes a million times yes. “Fair Trade” coffee is pretty much communism at its shoddy best.

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