Monday Forum: September 23, 2013

This entry was posted in Open Forum. Bookmark the permalink.

1,084 Responses to Monday Forum: September 23, 2013

1 3 4 5
  1. Token

    Sorry Tinta, I had to pop off to bed as it was clear Dot was taking his baby sitting duties for Aliice seriously.

    Yes, I was there last night. I dashed after the excellent Peter Phelps finished speaking so I could get home to help my wife put the kids to bed.

    Excellent night with some great speakers. I really liked the Q&A and will be referencing a few of the great answers from Simon, Chris & Janet to the very, very interesting questions in discussions here in the fture.

  2. Aaron

    I’m glad Pyne is moving to reintroduce VSU. It is criminal how they force people to join a union and pay for services they will never use. The student bodies like to wail about how the ‘Student Tax’ helps funds university childcare facilities. Well I already pay taxes because I’m silly enough to work full-time and study so my taxes already contribute towards university funding and subsidising childcare – why am I being ‘taxed’ again?

    The NTEU is planning a three day strike and picket in October. Looking forward to crossing that violent picket line.

  3. Tom

    Having failed to provoke a war between Australia and Indonesia, the delinquents at ShakeMyHead.com still hold out hope that they can trigger a diplomatic fallout between Abbott-Bishop and Yudhoyono-Natalegawa, except that, in grown-up world, it keeps not happening:

    Could it have been a case of lost in translation when Foreign Affairs Minister Julie Bishop met with her Indonesian counterpart Dr Marty Natalegawa in New York on Monday – or simply falling on deaf ears?

    As far as Ms Bishop is concerned her meeting earlier this week with Indonesia’s Foreign Affairs Minister to discuss the Coalition’s controversial asylum-seeker policy was “very cordial”, “positive and very productive”.

    Yet Dr Natalegawa clearly saw – and heard – it differently, and said he warned the Australian minister against implementing the policy, which he strongly rejects.

    Fairfax Media has previously confirmed that the Coalition’s plans to turn around asylum boats was unpopular with the Indonesian government.

    Advertisement “We have reiterated that Indonesia cannot accept any Australian policy that would, in nature, violate Indonesia’s sovereignty,” Dr Natalegawa told Indonesia news agency Antara News following the New York meeting.

    ”I think, the message has been conveyed loud and clear and has been understood well,” Dr Natalegawa added.

    But the message it seems was not heard by Ms Bishop who told Australian media 24 hours after the meeting in New York that they were in agreeance to put an end to people smuggling.

    “I put to Foreign Minister Natalegawa that Australia will be making changes to the laws in Australia so that we take away the product that the people smugglers are currently selling and that is permanent residency in Australia.”

    Asked on three occasions to respond to reports that Dr Natalegawa warned Australia not to introduce such a policy, Ms Bishop refused to answer, instead she repeatedly described the meeting as “positive and productive”.

    “I’m not going into the operational details of our policy but I had a very broad ranging discussion with Mr Natalegawa and I’m confident we will be able to implement our policies.”

    Asked to respond to media reports he was not happy with the outcome of the meeting, Ms Bishop said: “There can be some misunderstanding as to what our policy is and it is certainly not to in any way show disrespect for Indonesian sovereignty and for anyone to think that that was our policy that would be a mistake.

    “Our policy respects Indonesia’s sovereignty, respects Indonesia’s territorial borders, just as Indonesia respects ours.”

    She denied there was any tension between the two at the meeting.

    “We spoke very warmly. We know each other well.”

    She said the discussions would need to continue when she travels to Jakarta later this month with Prime Minister Tony Abbott who will also hold talks with President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono.

  4. Token

    the world is more stable than it was five years ago

    Yes, Somali’s felt confident to kidnap bucketloads of people in Kenya 5 years ago. Syria, Libya and Niger were in flames as civil wars raged, and the IRS was targeting the political enemies and journalists where having their phones tapped.

    This truly is the age of denial by the Leftards Insiders who interdict news they do not want reported.

  5. Tom

    The attempted Fauxfacts gotcha outlined above relies on a deliberately retarded misunderstanding of the fact that Natalegawa’s comments to the domestic Indonesian newsagency Antara are designed to be consumed by villagers in southern Java. FMD.

  6. egg_

    Just remember to lick the ends of the connectors before plugging them in.

    All jokes aside, the 2-channel community appear to favour a pair of bookshelves and a subwoofer (a pair if possible) for reduced cabinet resonance associated with towers, so it is heading in the Bose cube/sub* direction.
    (*On the subject of subs, if you’ve ever heard a decent 10″ bandpass, they’re the equal of an 18″ reflex and are capable of the dynamics of a live performance – as I once heard remarked – ‘have you ever heard a double bass played inside a home?’)

  7. .

    boy on a bike #1013285, posted on September 25, 2013 at 7:27 am
    I blame the IPA for the mess last night. Half the male Cats were probably oggling Janet from close range.

    No blame my hatred of communism (and Nazism).

    Everytime some moron has the gall to refer to Marx as an economist or speak glowingly of communism, I will always jump down their throats. Ditto for those spruiking Holocaust denial.

    I know which side my bread is buttered and don’t wish to fetter away my liberites.

    Their theories are simply nonsense, mathematically impossible, empirically disproven to boot and written by a anti semitic bludger.

    The fools sprouting communism as the way to grow the economy have probably never heard of Lenin’s Hanging Order or the Holodomor. Those who have often deny the significance or importance of these crimes against humanity.

    It is beyond outrageous that schoolkids do not learn about these along with the Holocaust or the heavy handedness in the suppression of the Easter Rising, etc.

  8. Aliice

    Fairfax Media has previously confirmed that the Coalition’s plans to turn around asylum boats was unpopular with the Indonesian government.

    Fine. Take the boatpeople and the drivers back to an Indonesian island somewhere, force them to land and then tow the empty boat back to Australian Waters and sink the bloody thing. Daily Indonesia invades our sovereign waters with this illegal trade and why should we politely keep taking it?

  9. Token

    Anyone else heard to clip on 2GB where Ben Fordham makes an arseclown out of Julian Burnside?

    No clip up (but I’ve requested it from 2GB).

    1.Fordham queries Burnside about illegal immigrants.
    2. Burnside tells Fordham they are not illegal.
    3. Fordham queries Burnside on what basis
    4. Burnside says “Trust me, I’m a lawyer”
    5. Fordham responds by reading out the relevant internation law stating people who arrive in a country without a visa are illegally entering
    6. A bitter Burnside says “Thanks for the lecture.”

    This is gold.

  10. A healthy democracy should have at least two parties which are viable alternatives, and a media which is not too aligned with one side or the other. If the media is to do its job of holding both to account, it must have enough varied and capable commenters to do that. This particularly applies to government-funded “national” broadcasters, who should be beyond reproach when it comes to political coverage. Privately owned media can cater to whatever sub-groups it cares to, but as Fairfax has found, this can have market and revenue-flow implications.
    The Labor Party is once again in post-loss naval gazing mode, or should be. There was a time when the parliamentary party was a credible alternative government, and the Hawke years showed that consensus could yield results. The Accord machinations were done with the cooperation of solid union figures, Bill Kelty being one. Hawke himself, and Martin Ferguson, were of union background, but sensible. Simon Crean came across as sensible as leader, but his recognition that union ties were holding the ALP back from full acceptability and his calls for a re-examination of the foundations may have cost him his job.
    In recent years the parliamentary party has thinned as a veneer of acceptability, and there have been some union officials’ activities exposed to public light which reflect badly on the culture. Too close a linkage will continue to be an adverse factor. Rod Cavalier and other senior figures have for years been decrying the culture and advocating a return to the people having more say in the ALP.
    I was a Labor voter for many years. By the late 1980s the cracks were showing, and the green vote was being pursued. Then came the Keating years, when political correctness and the “big picture” were paramount. There’s no doubt that changing your career can change your perspective, and the effect of age and experience is to make you see more clearly over time how things work or are derailed.
    Those who voted for Howard initially did so in hope rather than certainty, as the media had done their best to present him as a second-rate option. Four elections later, they had to agree that he was a “clever politician”, since he had beaten them at their own game fairly comprehensively. They are still having trouble admitting that financial management back then was superior to what we’ve had since.
    But now we are faced with a poor prospect for the future. By that I mean we have a Labor Party that is more aligned with the union movement than ever, and an IR system that is a throwback to pre-Hawke times. I’d like to see them become more centrist again, and ditch the extreme left and the greens. This is not rocket science, but simply a way to regain respectability (read votes) and to be once again a viable alternative government. What happens next will be interesting, but there’s a fork in the road, and they have been there before. Down one road lies the rejigging of the party’s rules and the hosing down, at least to some degree, of union domination of Conferences, and factional domination of pre-selections. Down the other road lies the “lipstick on the same old pig” approach. Which will we get? I know that large sections of the media will cover for them if the lipstick is opted for. That’s a poor reflection on their perspicacity and their concern for the national interest. But that’s been the way of it for quite a while now.
    A healthy democracy need healthy parties and healthy media – media which keeps both sides honest. It used to be a constant theme in politics and media that the conservatives were aligned with the “big end of town”. Sober reflection tells us that they are aligned with wealth creation, and not with the notion of “taxing your way to prosperity”. Unless they go full retard, and do a throwback of the same order of magnitude as Labor has done with IR, we have nothing to fear. The old bogeyman of the plump capitalist destroyer or enslaver of lives is long gone, now more likely to take the shape of a Holmes A’Court or a Twiggy Forrest, or even a Mr Wotif. The Greens have turned out to be aligned not so much with starry-eyed tree huggers, but other remnants of the old extreme left, all the way to the communists. That’s their right, it’s still a free country, but it should be dealt with openly by the commentariat. The Nationals have a rural constituency and can be expected to take that side. We shouldn’t forget, however, that agriculture is a vital industry for our own food supply but also for export income. Minor parties have hatched out lately in large numbers, and will probably burn across the firmament like meteorites for a short while – wait, make that six years! The Senate voting system is also a sore point when discussing healthy democracies. I’ll leave it at that for now.
    I hope to see a healthy political balance re-emerge from the chaos of the past six years, and the Labor Party’s next review of itself will be critical. I’m not anti a party which has a leaning towards giving assistance to the less fortunate, or the less empowered. But it has to be done sensibly, not by an Alinskyist putsch which seeks to “remake what it is to be Australian”.

  11. Token

    No blame my hatred of communism (and Nazism).

    You are not going to get Aliice to change her closely held values, no matter how disgraceful they are. She trolls you and wastes your time.

  12. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Mr. Homent at 6:47 am:

    “Well then. Last night appears to have been the blog equivalent of a pub brawl.

    It was pretty to watch, sitting back and egging it on to its inevitable conclusion – the chief protagonist-ette finally succumbing to the flagon wine, sliding down the wall and slumping to the floor.

    “I’m sorry I wasn’t around – not for the brawl – to advise on Pickles’ new stereo, but I’m working on it and will be back later on that subject. Anyone wanting similar advice please feel free to email me via my website. Tell me what bits if any you want to keep, what is in need of replacement, and a rough budget, and I can make some recommendations, with various options as required for size and look. I’ve been in the industry since 1988, having decided to leave the defence department and go private enterprise at that stage.”

    Well now, I’m not a bit surprised you eventually left Defence to set up that excellent business of yours, with all the noise you specialise in! Did they not tell you at the induction that they like to sneak around quietly, all blackened eyes and camouflage and stuff, rather than striding into town like the Romans with trumpeters and drums?

  13. Token

    Tom, FauxFacts & the ALPBC are shitscared the Coalition will cut a deal with Indonesia.

    The objective is to import as many voters. The last thing they want is to stop the deaths at sea.

  14. Rafe

    Met at Cat lurker at the IPA show last night, would have liked to meet others who were there.

  15. egg_

    A healthy democracy need healthy parties and healthy media – media which keeps both sides honest.

    If the Libs don’t restructure Aunty this time around they only have themselves to blame.

  16. CD

    I heard it Token.
    It was great radio and Ben calmly dissected the dope Burnside. If you heard Burnside spew his view I doubt you’d want him as your lawyer. His facts were plainly incorrect. It was a while ago so possibly that’s why the podcast is not on the site.

    It def was available on that day.

  17. Token

    Found the interview between Fordham & Burnside.

    It is worth listening to Burnside, he is one dodgy character. He is caught out multiple times by Fordham playing fast and loose, he is not used to being interviewed by a journalist.

    Each time Burnside lays out the crap, Fordham throws out stats and Burnside will throw open ended emotive statements like “Fair Share”.

    The discussion on illegal immigrants with the famous “Trust me I’m a lawyer line” is 8 minute mark. Ben verifies the ABC confirms the view the immigrants are illegal.

  18. .

    Token #1013340, posted on September 25, 2013 at 8:57 am
    No blame my hatred of communism (and Nazism).

    You are not going to get Aliice to change her closely held values, no matter how disgraceful they are. She trolls you and wastes your time.

    Then we ought to expose the views of a significant minority in the ALP and Greens who are closet communists.

    They turn a blind eye to these atrocities and wish to treat ordinary Australians as serfs whilst elevating themselves to the status of Commissar or Gauleiter.

    It is simply reprehensible that Lee Rhiannon was on the payroll of the Soviet Union and sits in the Senate, a rare place of dignity and raw political power.

  19. Pickles – re your stereo. I gather that your JBL speakers are still ok and to your liking. Fine. The new NAD amps are better than the oldies, even though some get nostalgic about the 3020 etc. The current crop with the BEE suffix are all better than the old ones. I often recommend the C375BEE, which is brilliant value at $1699 for a very well made 150w (up to! – the volume control doles out the watts, starting at zero) integrated amplifier. The only snag with NAD these days is no Phono stage for LP – if you still use them. That bit costs another $150 or so.
    The next model down is the C356BEE, which at around 80w will do most people very well, and should drive the JBLs ok. I think – what was the model again? The critical thing with amp power v. speakers isn’t the rating of the speaker power wise, but the efficiency. 87dB is harder to drive, 91dB easier. If the 3020 drove them ok then even the C326BEE will do it. But I’ve always found that if you like the music to be loud and have good bass control, and not get edgy at higher volumes, the extra watts help to keep things under control. At normal listening levels we are usually only using a few watts per channel. But it goes up exponentially as the volume increases, so the extra power available in the amp results in the amp working more easily and responding to the constant changes in peak power needs with headroom to spare.
    Your 40w amp if played too loud into 100w rated spealers (usually past the 12 o’clock mark) will often damage something, or at least sound rough, as it’s going into “clipping” which can send hot current down the line to the speaker.
    Over the years I have also sold Yamaha, Marantz and Denon, all of which aquit themselves well. Marantz and Yamaha usually have the Phono stage for LP at no extra cost. A tuner/amp combo in the industry is called a “receiver”,and is a good way to go if you use FM, which still sounds better than DAB+ unless you’re after one of the channels that’s DAB+ only. Digital radio is not yet in the regions, but should start to go there next year once analogue TV is switched off.
    Any questions?

  20. .

    Yep.

    What do you think of Music Fidelity?

  21. Steve D

    Apart from the taxi shenanigans, Bolta’s post about Short Bill contains the quote:

    We are pro the growth of our population through immigration. We are pro refugees. It is not a bad thing to want to come here. People should know where we stand.

    Can someone communicate to these idiots (and those that hang on their every word) that the rest of us are not necessarily anti-immigration, but there is the small matter of whether we choose who gets to come to this country, as opposed to the recent trend of self-selection?

  22. Steve D

    Rafe: #1013344, posted on September 25, 2013 at 9:01 am

    Met at Cat lurker at the IPA show last night, would have liked to meet others who were there.

    Turn your Gravatar into a lapel badge?

  23. Token

    Can someone communicate to these idiots (and those that hang on their every word) that the rest of us are not necessarily anti-immigration?

    It is like their statements that they are for the vulnerable, the disabled, the sick. Empty motherhood statements which imply only they are virtuous and thereby demonising everyone else.

    This is the sanctimonious crap which the Stenographers indulge which is all about dividing people based upon lies for short term political gain.

  24. entropy

    I had a NAD 3020. Fantastic little amp paired with some KEFs. It got stolen and I placed it with the 5020.
    It still gets used today, but of course it doesn’t really cut the mustard in the world of home theatre these days.

  25. mct

    in agreeance

    Dear God, have SMH standards dived so far as to admit this abomination of a non-word into the “journalism”???

  26. egg_

    Mr. Homent
    #1013356, posted on September 25, 2013 at 9:22 am

    What of a well integrated subwoofer, even in a 2-channel system, especially if advocating a $1.5k amp*?
    Haven’t heard said JBLs, but if their tweeters are up to it, if we’re into modern HiFi, 40Hz-20kHz is really only achievable with a sub?

  27. Aliice

    Token
    You are a damn disgrace and so is Dot for labelling me thus

    You are not going to get Aliice to change her closely held values, no matter how disgraceful they are. She trolls you and wastes your time.

    You are both truly illogical and play very lightly with the truth and the facts. Nowhere did I say I loved Marx. You are both a pair of idiots.
    Quote me exactly where I said that and then desist with your childish catcallings.
    Can no-one here discuss or mention the word Marx without both of you having invective ridden headed hissy fits?
    Either argue the man’s ideas or some other man’s ideas if you want without sinking to the level of a couple of name calling twits.

    Foolish in the extreme. As well Token, at least Dot had comprehensive and interesting discussion points but still reverted to misinterpretation, invective and insults. You did not even have that.
    You are both tiresome but Dot is slightly less so.

    It was me doing the babysitting of both of you last night.

  28. egg_

    It still gets used today, but of course it doesn’t really cut the mustard in the world of home theatre these days.

    I quite favour surround amps, which usually also feature DRC compression as well as surround modes, plus an active subwoofer, for music – particularly live performances – it can appear to be ‘at the concert’.
    Even PC soundcard software has many of above features nowadays.

  29. .

    Either argue the man’s ideas or some other man’s ideas if you want without sinking to the level of a couple of name calling twits.

    We did, you avoided the question save for you thought his Mathusian predictions were correct.

    I showed mountains of evidence to the contrary and you shut up.

  30. Rococo Liberal

    May I ask a question?

    Every so often a poster called Aliice gets in a flame war with Dot and says the silliest things.

    Then for the rest of the time a poster called Aliice is normal and contributes reasonable right-wing comments.

    Are there two Aliices?

    The thing that amuses me about the angry Aliice is that she thinks she’s hot stuff becasue she is an academic. Being an academic is actually not really such an achievement, Aliice.

    Doomlord, Steve Kates and the Catallaxy crew are all hot stuff in spite of being academics.

  31. Popular Front

    Ben Fordham makes an arseclown out of Julian Burnside?

    Julian Burnside is a totally self-made arseclown, Fordham was just reminding his listeners of that f

  32. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Mr. Homent at 8:56 am:

    “…
    The Labor Party is once again in post-loss naval gazing mode, or should be. There was a time when the parliamentary party was a credible alternative government, and the Hawke years showed that consensus could yield results. The Accord machinations were done with the cooperation of solid union figures, Bill Kelty being one. Hawke himself, and Martin Ferguson, were of union background, but sensible. Simon Crean came across as sensible as leader,

    I hope to see a healthy political balance re-emerge from the chaos of the past six years, and the Labor Party’s next review of itself will be critical.”

    Labor has seen its best days, in the 1980s under Hawke and Keating. Setting aside political preferences the first Ministry was the most highly qualified, experienced and talented group I have seen. That period coincided with a powerful and disciplined NSW Right machine which dominated and directed the party well. The Victorian Left was afforded its rewards and Hawke, remarkably unaligned, held it together for a very long time. Being in Sydney and close to it I can say the whole show moved forward with focus and drive.

    I was away for a time and then commuted often to Sydney and Melbourne, from about 1999. The shambles I saw was astonishing – from the roots of the Party all the way to State ministers and their departmental chiefs. The discipline of the NSW Right had been completely over-run by opportunists and, notably, a particular migrant group which had seized the concession on favours and appointments. It wielded a form of control through those mechanisms but had no interest in Party discipline and sound evolution.

    Their only interest was singular, financial and personal.

    For a decade Comrade Lieutenant General Robert E. Carr sat aloof at the top, doing exactly nothing, enjoying his Civil War readings and acting as directed by a couple of immensely powerful individuals (one insider and one outsider) who had been ushered in the door by him a few years before. I’d long regarded him as the least impressive of the Brereton-Keating-Richardson cadre and he went on to prove that reading correct. They reckoned Askin was bent!

    By my reckoning it took just short of ten years for the Party to build the sound base which underwrote Hawke’s leadership and the emergence of other good men outside the parliamentary group, such as Kelty, who was serious about the future.

    As to your last paragraph where you note the Party’s next review. It need only retrieve from its archive its record of “Rod Cavalier and other senior figures have for years been decrying the culture” which has sat there ignored, unread for more than a decade. Cavalier, Button, Walsh and Cohen have all said all that needs to be said about reform, legitimising and strengthening.

    Just as Rudd and Gillard were, these two little, little fellows touting to lead now are products of the self-promotion-comes-before-all school of the 2000s – insignificant mongrels without pedigree – and they will take the Party nowhere. It will revive, in spite of them, and (fortunately) it will take much longer because of them.

    The continuing faint, weak, insipid but immensely upsetting shadow cast by Rudd is the icing on the cake.

  33. Gab

    Another Labor apparatchik sooks off…

    THE Labor-appointed head of the federal building watchdog, Val Gostencnik, has resigned ahead of moves by the Abbott government to seek to reinstate the Australian Building and Construction Commission.

    Excellent.

  34. brc

    Why would anyone argue about Marx? He was a philandering idiot who fathered illegitimate children, disowned them and helped himself to his long-suffering colleagues inheritance; a man whose inane ramblings belong in the fantasy section of the library but gave cover to the worlds worst mass murderers to slaughter people ‘for the workers’.

    Why Nazism is rightly spurned but Marxism is still discussed as though it is still worthy of anything but outright scorn and derision really is a mystery for the modern age. Leaving aside that Nazis were also socialists, the murderous communist regimes of the 20th (and 21st, North Korea is still with us) were all inspired and guided by the works of Marx.

    Anyone who even brings up Marx except to ridicule deserves ridicule themselves.

  35. Ezra Levant uses excerpts from “Q&A” to prove what a fraud Suzuki is to Canadian viewers. Tony Jones, no doubt, will be pleased that his show has been useful for once.

  36. Tom

    For the third successive year, a group of feral scum from Melbourne has the Queenscliff Golf Club on Swan Island shut down for up to three days just for kicks in the September school holidays to “protest against the war in Agfhanistan” (Swan Island hosts an ASIS counter-terrorism training base). The island and the base are accessed by a single-lane road so the blockade stops all movement on and off the island, costs the golf club thousands in lost revenue and pisses off the entire town*.

    Just a local skirmish? Hell no! Just as its cavalry was needed to provide the propaganda for the ring-in Greenfilth campaign against Sophie Mirabella in Indi, the ABC leads in its Victorian news with the story, which Bolt picks up on:

    Just 30 young Leftists try to get into the Swan Island military base this morning to complain about our involvement in Afghanistan. This is thought so significant that it’s the first item on ABC Melbourne’s morning show, which interviews an excited young girl.

    UPDATE

    The head of the Swan Island golf club then rings the ABC to complain that these protesters come down at the same time every year – at school holidays – and cost the golf club thousands of dollars, because police are forced to block access to the island.

    Presenter Ali Moore assures him this is “the last thing” on the protesters’ mind. Left unaddressed is her own role in inciting protests that hurt the locals.

    UPDATE

    An hour later Ali Moore gives air time to another tiny group of protesters, this time blocking drilling for a road tunnel at some cost, ultimately, to tax-payers.

    Your taxes in action.

    *I live nearby.

  37. Gab

    What a good idea. Hope the receipt will show the proportion of tax dollars being used to pay back Labor’s massive debt.

    In one of his first acts as Treasurer, Mr Hockey will instruct the Australian Tax Office to send taxpayers a personalised and itemised receipt thanking them for their tax dollars and detailing where the money was spent.

    The receipts will show, in dollar terms, how much of a person’s tax bill was spent on welfare, health, education and other areas.

    The level of gross government debt will also be displayed prominently with a break-down per person.

    Treasurer Hockey said the receipts, which will be sent at tax time starting next year, would boost transparency and hold government to account.

    This is what the tax receipt would look like.

    This is what the tax receipt would look like. Source: Supplied

    “Taxpayers deserve to know where their money is being spent,” Mr Hockey said.

    “The Coalition understands that every dollar the Government has it holds on trust for the taxpayer.”

    For a person who has paid $20,000 in tax, the receipts would show that nearly $7000 was spent on welfare alone, plus $3200 on health, $2600 in transfers to state governments and $1500 on education. These four items make up over two thirds of total federal government spending.

    Of the $7,000 spent on welfare, about $2,700 would go towards aged care, $1800 to family support, $1300 on disability support and $500 on jobless support.

    Defence spending would account for another $1,100 of this person’s tax bill while paying interest on Commonwealth debt would absorb another $600.

  38. C.L.

    Leader of the Free World

    Obama caught on open mic:

    He said he has not had a cigarette in “6 years” because he is “scared” of Michelle.

  39. Gab

    Heh. They really hate News Corp don’t they? Except for when the want something from them…

    Bob Carr lunching with News Corp’s Col Allan at Rockpool. The party for da workers and da little people sure live high on the hog.

  40. nic

    The attempted Fauxfacts gotcha outlined above relies on a deliberately retarded misunderstanding of the fact that Natalegawa’s comments to the domestic Indonesian newsagency Antara are designed to be consumed by villagers in southern Java. FMD.

    Bishop’s response was pure diplomacy and class

  41. Steve D

    Oooh, I like that fiscal report card. Can the states give me one as well?

  42. boy on a bike

    the rest of us are not necessarily anti-immigration

    There is also the small matter of ensuring sufficient infrastructure is built at reasonable cost to cope with all the new arrivals. Roads, dams, coal fired power plants, airports, schools, hospitals, houses etc etc. Even fricken bicycle paths.

    Labor welcomes immigrants but hates pouring the concrete that is necessary to stop our cities from turning into overcrowded, hyper-expensive, under-watered, choked fetid swamps.

  43. nic

    Are there two Aliices?

    Alice on sauce and Alice not it seems

  44. Musical Fidelity? I’m (part time these days) involved in selling it, so (a) may be biased, and (b) have a fair bit of experience of it.
    They offer some pretty heavyweight and good value amplifiers, which you need to compare with the other high-end brands like Krell, Premium-end Marantz, and other names more esoteric. If you’re shopping for 200w + and with a budget of $5k or more, yes, you have to audition it.
    But, they also have a more affordable M1 range in half-width components, so they’re not just in the upper bracket. You can mix and match various M1 bits to get the system you need. Then down at entry level they do some add-ons for everyone, the V-series bits like DACs and phono stages, headphone amps, in the $250 to $400 range.
    Comparing Krell and Musical Fidelity, I’d say Krell gives you a more attacking sound, more presence and harder hitting bass. With some speakers you might however find that the MF has a smoother edge to it, together with a very wide and deep soundstage.
    Use of Subwoofers in stereo – no problem, provided the sub is quick and doesn’t add blurry or bass-port wheezing/delay. Choose a sealed cabinet design, these days they come in 8/10/12 inch models from various brands but Velodyne (SPL) and Sunfire (HRS) are two I know to be good – at a price. B&W PV1 is also good. Budget series from Sunfire is the SDS range, from $599. Not as heavily built as the others, but good value.
    Larger speakers can get down to 40Hz and even lower in-room response, but I quite like to get the extra depth that a sub adds. Just don’t over do it!

  45. brc

    Gab, I have agitated for something like that for years, when I saw your post I thout it must have been a fake.

    I notice that the negative comments on the story are taking the angle that it is a waste of money.

    Amazing…6 years of wholescale waste and debt, and all of a sudden the government is to be criticized for printing an a4 page with your tax receipts.

    I assume said commenters were also outraged at the glossy booklet distributed to justify the carbon tax. I still have mine – its going to be a valuable tool in teaching people the folly of grand governemt schemes.

    I’m excited at the prospect of a tax receipt. I would like to see more breakdown in heavily taxed items like electricity and water, and there should be a website where you can really drill into the line items until you get down to salary/rent level for individual departments.

  46. Gab

    Anyway, back to politics, remember all the scare ads about Abbott666? You know, the ones raging on about how Abbott666 will “rip money out of hospitals, sell them off blah blah blah”?

    THE Federal Government’s share of public hospital funding has fallen to its lowest level in a decade as hospital waiting lists fail to improve.

    Despite claims it was injecting billions of extra dollars into the health system under new reforms the previous government’s share of hospital funding fell from 39.6 per cent to 38.2 per cent.

    Although the amount it spends on hospitals is increasing, late last year the Gillard Government imposed a retrospective $403 million cut to funding.

    And new hospital funding cuts are already slated for future years after the previous government claimed the population was not growing as fast as forecast.

    The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare reports the annual growth rate for federal hospital funding was just 1.6 per cent in 2011-12 compared to a growth rate of eight per cent by the states.

    “This resulted in the Australian Government share of funding falling to its lowest level since 2001-02,” the AIHW says.

    http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/lifestyle/health-fitness/federal-government8217s-share-of-public-hospital-funding-lowest-in-10-years/story-fni0dguz-1226726394738#

  47. Tracey

    From Gab’s link.

    ”I rather liked my job as foreign minister and I certainly didn’t appreciate the contribution of News Limited to seeing that I and my colleagues were edged out of our jobs,” he told Fairfax as he left Rockpool Bar & Grill.

    We rather liked not being governed by out-of-control totalitarians, thugs and children and certainly didn’t appreciate the contribution of the ALPBC and Fairfax to seeing that Carr and his colleagues be allowed to continue.

  48. Gab

    I assume said commenters were also outraged at the glossy booklet distributed to justify the carbon tax

    Said commenters probably don’t pay tax either, brc.

  49. Token

    The luvvies feel vindicated:

    FOREIGN minister Julie Bishop has been warned by her Indonesian counterpart that his country will not accept any breach of its sovereignty by Australia as it attempts to stop asylum boats.
    Ms Bishop said her face-to-face meeting with Marty Natalegawa at the UN headquarters in New York overnight was “very productive and positive”.

    But Mr Natalegawa told Indonesia’s Antara News agency that he left Ms Bishop in no doubt that Australia must respect Indonesia’s sovereignty.

    2 responses to those empty rhetorical threats:

    1. Nice distraction, the issue under discussion Mr Natalegawa is Indonesian vessels not respecting Australian sovereignty

    2. Good luck next time one of those un sea worthy Indonesian vessels sinks in Indonesia waters as the Australian government “chooses not the breach Indonesian sovereignty”. The RAN taxi service will not be steaming in to save the Indonesian government the embarassment of drownings in your waters.

  50. Gab

    ”I rather liked my job as foreign minister and I certainly didn’t appreciate the contribution of News Limited to seeing that I and my colleagues were edged out of our jobs,”

    yes, Tracey. What Boob Carr is saying: Those stupid voters who have no idea how magnificent I am voted ‘we are us’ out becuase they read the evil Murdoch rags. They are so stupid. They should read Fairfax instead.

  51. nic

    Good luck next time one of those un sea worthy Indonesian vessels sinks in Indonesia waters as the Australian government “chooses not the breach Indonesian sovereignty”. The RAN taxi service will not be steaming in to save the Indonesian government the embarassment of drownings in your waters.

    Yep, got it in one.

  52. stackja

    boy on a bike
    #1013409, posted on September 25, 2013 at 10:43 am
    the rest of us are not necessarily anti-immigration
    There is also the small matter of ensuring sufficient infrastructure is built at reasonable cost to cope with all the new arrivals. Roads, dams, coal fired power plants, airports, schools, hospitals, houses etc etc. Even fricken bicycle paths.
    Labor welcomes immigrants but hates pouring the concrete that is necessary to stop our cities from turning into overcrowded, hyper-expensive, under-watered, choked fetid swamps.

    From the First Fleet people came here. Most contributing to creating the best country on the earth. Recent ‘ideas’ on who comes here have created a problem. How this can be called anti-immigration shows newspeaks.

  53. Token

    Question, are the university economics lecturers going to take turns criticising the Coalition based upon strawmen they construct?

    Professor Corden and Professor Freebairn say: “An aversion to debt financing of socially productive investments by government means either higher taxes on the current generation or a deferral of investment and lower incomes for future generations.

    This is like those “eminent” academics who condemned Maggie Thatcher. Same old lefty tactics using the old experts fallacy.

    When you read the article it is a case of the professors actually aren’t criticising the Coalition, but the headline is structured to encourage more debt for “infrastructure” regardless of a business case being established. They are counting on few people actually reading/comprehending the text and most people being effected by the by-line.

  54. Combine Dave

    Labor welcomes immigrants [so long as they stay on welfare out of the worforce and vote ALP ] but hates pouring the concrete that is necessary to stop our cities from turning into overcrowded,

    FIFY, modern Labour has demonstrated a number of times their dislike of skilled immigrants, as opposed to boat people, who in 2007 they welcomed with open arms and opened wallets (tax payer funded)

    It is heartening to see PM Abbott cutting aid to fund infrastructure spending in Australia.

  55. brc

    Professor Corden and Professor Freebairn say: “An aversion to debt financing of socially productive investments by government means either higher taxes on the current generation or a deferral of investment and lower incomes for future generations.

    Socially productive? What the hell does that mean?

    McDonalds is socially productive. They provide cheap calories, children’s entertainment and teenage employment. Should we be borrowing public funds to build McDonalds outlets?

    Note they say ‘higher taxes on current generations or deferral for future generations’ leaving out the slight issue of both higher taxes and lower investments for future generations if you borrow up big now.

    If something is worth building, then private investment will be interested in building it. The only reasons they wouldn’t are either poor returns or government regulation / regime uncertainty getting in the way.

    Case in point :NBN. 6 years after Rudd took power promising a new world of hi speed broadband. Only 30,000 people have this service. The number would be higher had private investment not been chased from the field. We have the worst of all situations now : nobody will invest in high speed broadband because the governemnet signalled they were building a costs-be-damned monopoly, and yet, the government cannot build large scale infrastructure. So we are left without the new tech, and without the prospect of anyone building it anytime soon. Just to add insult to injury, we have higher government debt and the prospect of higher taxes to pay for it.

    “socially productive”. We will never get anywhere until people lacking like this get laughed from the room.

  56. Combine Dave

    Question, are the university economics lecturers going to take turns criticising the Coalition based upon strawmen they construct?

    The ABC hasnt stopped since the LNP has taken office. I am sure the ABC will offer a pulpit to any academic with the appropriate critical point of view.

  57. dover_beach

    Ezra Levant uses excerpts from “Q&A” to prove what a fraud Suzuki is to Canadian viewers.

    Quite incredible. Well, I really shouldn’t be surprised, and yet. Staggering ignorance.

  58. boy on a bike

    Amazing…6 years of wholescale waste and debt, and all of a sudden the government is to be criticized for printing an a4 page with your tax receipts.

    There is a website somewhere that does this already. Can’t remember what it’s called. It’s been around for years.

  59. Token

    The ABC hasnt stopped since the LNP has taken office. I am sure the ABC will offer a pulpit to any academic with the appropriate critical point of view.

    That is where I am coming from. I suspect the ABC will cycle through the discontented slowly over time rather than burning them all in one petition like they did in their previous Fabian campaigns.

    The academics have axes to grind with the Coalition due to statements like the one I provide below and all those reviews revealing how many of them make a motza from grants from the public teat indulging their myriad of trivial and unproductive reseach topics.

    THE drive for 40 per cent of 25 to 34-year-olds to have a university degree is at risk of being abandoned, with new Education Minister Christopher Pyne declaring he is “obsessed” with quality rather than targets

    Think if the number of unemployable academics who have been put under threat by the end of creditial inflation which drives more and more expensive certification in low skilled industries.

  60. egg_

    Mr. Homent
    #1013413, posted on September 25, 2013 at 10:45 am

    Yes from analysing even the bassier tracks with a soundcard-based real time spectrum anaylser most mixes seem to roll-off the bass from about 40Hz , so I’d guess the contour roughly approximates room gain; I think that a subwoofer relieves the main amplifier and speakers of a lot of (unnecessary) heavy lifting to go about mid-bass onward duties with fidelity.
    IMHO a bandpass (6th order plus) sub is quite a different beast to a regular driver that interfaces directly with room air; it is a tuned instrument* itself and quite effective in the spectrum in which it operates.
    *Apparently even if the amp is driven into clipping, the instrument does not (and yes I’ve heard all of the phasing/transient response arguments but hearing is believing).

  61. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From brc at 11:12 am:

    ” Professor Corden and Professor Freebairn say: “An aversion to debt financing of socially productive investments by government means either higher taxes on the current generation or a deferral of investment and lower incomes for future generations.

    Socially productive? What the hell does that mean?”

    1. bludgers, touting for other peoples’ money
    2. when one sees that and then finds “Professor” times two, the reasonable assumption is some over-promoted kindergarten teacher wants other peoples’ money, to redistribute to bludgers
    3. sight “debt financing” (i.e. borrowing money. Why do they try to pretend it is something other than that?) and one knows instinctively that, whoever the pertinent bludger sub group is, it is shortly to be embellished with “most vulnerable”, “most valuable”, “most fragile”, “most disadvantaged”, “most stolen generationed”, “most war torn countried”
    4. begging letters such as this will cease when BHP Billiton and Westpac and Fortesque and the other Top 50 cease pursuing profitability in favour of “social productivity” and shortly thereafter declare bankruptcy.

  62. boy on a bike

    Education Minister Christopher Pyne declaring he is “obsessed” with quality rather than targets

    OMG – next thing he’ll be expecting undergrads to be able to read, write and think. Where will it end?

    Oh! The humanity!

  63. brc

    Ezra Levant uses excerpts from “Q&A” to prove what a fraud Suzuki is to Canadian viewers. Tony Jones, no doubt, will be pleased that his show has been useful for once.

    I watched that, it is very effective. Suzuki really did himself a lot of damage. Tony Jones even came off as a bit skeptical of Suzuki which is a shock for those who have watched his partisan barracking before. I believe Jones was trying to feed him lines to improve his response. For Suzuki to attack the questioners and call for the jailing of the PM in the country is visiting will raise more than a few eyeballs.

  64. Driftforge

    PUP got the sixth seat in Tasmania on the button press. Closest alternate was the Sex Party, which was 249 votes short at the crucial exclusion.

  65. Aliice

    Think if the number of unemployable academics who have been put under threat by the end of creditial inflation which drives more and more expensive certification in low skilled industries.

    Exactly Token. There are far too many of our youth on uni campuses paying an absolute fortune to the government to get a degree when the reality is it is hiding youth unemployment levels which are a disgrace.
    The cost is a burden to their parents. The cost of hecs is stupid. What is worse is it burdens youth with debts.
    Where are the vocational practical training programs at a reasonable cost?. Many uni students would have been far better off doing a Tafe certificate. No one needs more and more expensive certification to get to get a low skilled job but this is precisely what Julia Gillards miserable failed education revolution produced. Misery for students and misery for parents in many cases at great cost. Plus it conveniently hides from view the real unemployment levels in this demographic. Bloody disgrace. Get the training programs out there they need – not five years of torture, charges and wasted time to get a degree they cant use in an industry where it doesnt apply.

    This government has been on the take with hecs which is a tax by any other name and its immoral to keep raising this on the young who arent even working yet. So what else did Julia’s revolution permit? Tafe to offer degrees….no hecs only fee help but wait for it – if the kids take that fee help loan its an instant 25% usurious charge as well on top straight to the commonwealth Government. Leeches they were.

  66. Tom

    Deadman, thanks for the Suzuki link at 10.32am. I hope that program got a wide airing in Canada. If so, I think the clown prince has seriously damaged his credibility in his home country. Would you pay $30,000 for this celebrity buffoon?

  67. Tinta

    Yes, I was there last night. I dashed after the excellent Peter Phelps finished speaking so I could get home to help my wife put the kids to bed.

    Hi Token, I really enjoyed the night, I met Peter Coleman which was a great treat for me, and I had a chat with David Leyonhjelm, the Q&A was a good chance for people to ask questions and there were some very interesting ones.

    I just hope the Coalition does what it says about the National Curriculum which is such a piece of trash when it comes to informing children of the how, when, where and why our freedoms are so precious, and that they DO NOT COME FROM THE UN, sorry for shouting.

    I’ve been to most of the IPA talks here in Sydney such a shame that most of the dinners etc.. are in Melbourne I would have loved to have gone to the IPA dinner in support of Andrew Bolt and to the 70th anniversary dinner where Rupert Murdoch was guest speaker, but life being what it is, it is what it is.

  68. Token

    Somehow news is getting out that the pope people are saying is pro-gay marriage may be acting in a different way:

    Just days after a controversial interview with Pope Francis was published in the Jesuit magazine America, the pontiff has reportedly excommunicated a priest in Melbourne, Australia because of his support for female priests and gay marriage.

    This can’t be right, the Stenographers in Aus & the US tell me the Pope is a big fan of gay marriage…

  69. .

    I have learned the rule. Alice after dark is wrong and evil.

    Daylight Alice is fairly reasonable.

    They are so far apart that it would be plausible they are two different people.

    To wit, you remind me of Steve Munn.

  70. Tom

    Speaking of Marxists, the late cut-price Third World despot Hugo Chavez is still destroying Venezuela from the grave:

    If you live in Venezuela and want to fly abroad, get in line.

    Flights are booked solid months in advance, not from a new interest in exotic destinations but because locals are profiting from a play on the nation’s tightly controlled currency market.

    The airline scramble has added to shortages, power cuts and runaway prices as another symbol of the Byzantine economic challenges facing the new government of President Nicolas Maduro in the South American OPEC nation.

    “It’s like you’re trapped here,” said travel agent Doris Gaal, telling a customer he would be better off taking a boat to a Caribbean island because the daily flights are fully booked. “It’s all because of these stupid dollars!”

    After a decade of currency controls set up by late socialist leader Hugo Chavez in 2003, the disparity between the official and black-market rates for the local bolivar currency is higher than ever. Greenbacks now sell on the illegal market at about seven times the government price of 6.3 to the dollar.

    There are strict limits on the availability of dollars at the 6.3 rate, but Venezuelans are cashing in on a special currency provision for travellers. With a valid airline ticket, Venezuelans may exchange up to $US3000 ($A3195) at the government rate.

    Some are not even flying, leaving many planes half empty.

    “It is possible to travel abroad for free due to this exchange rate magic,” said local economist Angel Garcia Banchs.

    The profit is realised from an arbitrage process known locally as “el raspao,” or “the scrape.”

    Credit cards are used abroad to get a cash advance – rather than buying merchandise. The dollars are then carried back into Venezuela and sold on the black market for some seven times the original exchange rate.

  71. Token

    Where are the vocational practical training programs at a reasonable cost?. Many uni students would have been far better off doing a Tafe certificate. No one needs more and more expensive certification to get to get a low skilled job but this is precisely what Julia Gillards miserable failed education revolution produced.

    Thanks Aliice.

    The end effect is unjustifiable wage inflation, more read tape that stops businesses from operating and more government tax eaters auditing to ensure the arbitary levels are met.

    Pyne’s statement is good news except for the “lucky few” who were using the old system to clip tickets.

  72. C.L.

    FOREIGN minister Julie Bishop has been warned by her Indonesian counterpart that his country will not accept any breach of its sovereignty by Australia as it attempts to stop asylum boats.

    Red meat for an Indonesian audience.

    And “warned”? Warned? What is this banana republic going to do, invade?

    The only sovereignty being disrespected is Australia’s as Indonesian officials take bribes to allow tens of thousands of (to them, racially loathed) people to wander from airports to jetties and steam out of harbour destined for the Great Southern Land.

  73. Token

    If you live in Venezuela and want to fly abroad, get in line.

    Another Marxist prison camp is being constructed around a previously free people using the lefty weasel words of “fairness”, “equality” and “social justice”.

  74. .

    The worst thing is that universities generally avoid practical training that other employers want.

    If you listen to Sir Ken Robinson it is obvious why – universities have gamed the whole education system to their own benefit.

  75. C.L.

    Further corruption revealed:

    Secret Defence report signals Collins subs crisis.

    A CONFIDENTIAL report has identified 68 critical problems on the navy’s Collins-class submarines that it warns pose a high to extreme risk of forcing their retirement before new submarines can be built…

    It warns of grave challenges including periscopes that suck in water, unreliable diesel engines, faulty generators and sonars, and obsolete internal and external communication systems that could jeopardise the ability of submarines to talk to other navy vessels, including international allies. And it warns that the submarines’ cooling systems are overloaded, making the vessels too hot for the crew and machinery.

    It also says the future failure of some hatches and tunnel doors is “probable” and poses a “very high risk” to the submarines reaching their life expectancy…

    The study was conducted by the DMO last year. The Gillard government did not release the DMO report but instead cherry-picked its findings.

    The then defence minister Stephen Smith stated last December that the report found “no single technical issue that would fundamentally prevent the Collins-class submarines from achieving their indicative service life or a service-life extension”.

    Mr Smith did not mention that the report also detailed 68 major systems on each submarine that the DMO said posed a very high to extreme risk to the submarines ever achieving their initial life expectancy or a life extension of seven years.

  76. C.L.

    The creampuff-isation of our culture:

    America’s Cup crew, 1983.

    America’s Cup crew, yesterday.

  77. Aliice

    Token

    The end effect is unjustifiable wage inflation, more read tape that stops businesses from operating and more government tax eaters auditing to ensure the arbitary levels are met.

    And Token – an awful lot of broken hearts and minds and pockets in kids who dont need to be there and dont cope with it. The whole uncapping was a con as was the idea that 40% of youth actually should have a degree (“shoulds” was all we ever got from the Gillard headmistress style of government – except they never suggested they should take a pay and benefits cut did they?). It was only ever so they could fleece the students with higher and higher hecs, and when they got there fleece them with parking charges, fleece them on text book charges, and on and on.

    Frankly I have been very disturbed by the plight of many students who have come into uni. Had one break down in tears on me only two weeks ago. It costs them a lot of money in many cases for multiple fails when they should not be there in the first place and many are earning a pittance in the lower end of the job market anyway – and its all taking them years longer to get into full time work.

    Damn useless for quite a large number of potentially very productive youth. Get the practical training up and the delusions of grandeur in our universities down. As I suggested it was Ms Gillards nice mask for the real unemployment levels in the demographic.

  78. Leigh Lowe

    If you live in Venezuela and want to fly abroad, get in line.

    Maybe they are just leaving the country temporarily to to take a shit

  79. Rafe

    Taking up the point from Aliice that too many people are at uni, William W Bartley, in his posthumous collection of writings on scholarship and the universities Unfathomed Knowledge, Unmeasured Wealth (1990) propagated the counterintuitive idea that the expansion of the universities, more especially the dissemination of examinable knowledge, represents a threat to the growth of knowledge and even to literacy itself. Such a view would have been regarded as ludicrous when some of us started, when three per cent of people went to universities, but nowadays with 30% on campus (and some talk of 60%) it looks more plausible.

  80. JC

    The Australian copies their ABC’s Australian Story’s new genre….. Which leftwinger has cancer this week.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/media/anna-blighs-gruelling-cancer-battle/story-e6frg996-1226726782064

  81. I notice, JC, that Bligh still has her eyebrows.

1 3 4 5

Comments are closed.