The cartoon says it all

The cartoon says it all.

minwage11

 

But in the meantime, the Fair Work Commission – presided by Labor mate and former Maurice Blackburn partner – has knocked back the application to vary penalty rates.

A renewed push to reduce penalty rates for hospitality workers has been knocked back by the Fair Work Commission. The calls to scrap the penalties paid to weekend and late night workers came from the Restaurant and Caterers Association. It was backed by some of the country’s highest profile chefs who argue paying workers extra money was too costly for their businesses. The decision’s been welcomed by the union, United Voice, which argued workers should be rewarded for working unsociable hours.

No surprises there.

Amazingly, on the recent public holiday in Queensland, the local Bunnings was closed, the two major shopping centres were closed and half the restaurants along the normally busy Mooloolaba strip were closed.  It is clearly just uneconomic for these businesses to open with the penalty rates at 2 1/2 times normal rates.

I am not sure that Tony Abbott can bury his head in the sand on this issue.

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272 Responses to The cartoon says it all

  1. None of ‘em was as small as a pub, though

    Define “small”. Just for example, Mr. Hilton’s pub operation doesn’t qualify as small in anybody’s language.

  2. Tony N

    “Pop over to one of those countries where labour costs a whole lot less, and employers are not subject to judicial penalties for empoying, and you’ll see people sweeping under the wheels when mechanics change tyres, no such sweeping happens in mechanic shops in this country.”

    Steve that is a good example. In the old days you drove into a service station and someone came out and checked your oil and gas, checked the radiator and tyre pressure squeegeed your windscreen and often you didn’t need to get out of your car. What happens today? No one comes out, we have petrol price gouging and the big companies have put the private operators out of the industry. Nothing to do with labour costs there.

  3. Septimus

    Define “small”.

    That would cost you … I could send you a quote.

  4. Define “small”.
    That would cost you … I could send you a quote.

    Ever looked up the meaning of the word “hubris”?

    Did you ever work for owners, ie people who paid you with their own money? Or merely managers or corporate types who are salaried & using someone else’s?
    Did you work in the relevant industries first? Or was it all theorising?

    The pub trade (like any) is bristling with “experts” who are good at writing reports that say “get better staff, get more customers, reinvent the business” etc etc etc.
    What makes you any different to any other armchair theorist? 😉

  5. In the old days you drove into a service station and someone came out and checked your oil and gas
    What country did you say you’re in?

  6. Septimus

    hubris

    Ah, you are funny, Steve … no hubris here … I’ll leave that to you and politicians. Remember, you cast aspersions on me just up-thread there, did you not? My friend, I know how good I am … no hiding lights under bushels … clients kept employing me because I know my stuff … they are still seeking out my assistance even though I am now retired … and they are still prepared to pay me well for it. If you want to have a polite conversation, then let me know … otherwise, we just stopped talking

  7. I’ll take that as, no, nobody ever used their own money to hire you. 😉

  8. Tony N

    “What country did you say you’re in?”

    Australia. That’s the way it was in the 60’s and 70’s in WA. The people at the bowser often wore money pouches so they didn’t have to go inside to fetch your change. The service station owner generally knew us all by name and if we were short on cash we could book it all up and settle on pay day. Can’t speak for Brissy but Qld has always seemed to me to be the odd state out.

  9. dd

    No I’m not saying that. I am saying that they will not (or should not) employ people they don’t need. Why would they? Why would you employ more people and pay them more if you don’t need them?

    Steve at the Pub is right – your statement shows that you’re basically at square one with understanding this stuff. Let’s start with a simple idea for you to chew on: businesses have some control over the size of business they want to be.
    —————

    What happens today? No one comes out, we have petrol price gouging and the big companies have put the private operators out of the industry. Nothing to do with labour costs there.

    exactly wrong. There is no price gouging; this is just a baseless conspiracy theory. There are still private operators. Of course labour costs are a factor.

  10. Sorry, Tony, I didn’t realise West Oz cars ran on gas in the 60’s & 70’s

  11. JC

    There speaks the voice of theory.

    You mean like not knowing how many kegs of beer you sell a week is theory, is it. You’re really talking shit now.

  12. You mean like not knowing how many kegs of beer you sell a week is theory, is it. You’re really talking shit now.

    FFS JC, I don’t know any other publican who counts kegs either. I haven’t the faintest idea how many we sell, it hasn’t been a relevant indicator of anything for more than 10 years, probably longer.
    This does not mean we aren’t able to order.

    As an aside, large scale liquor ordering isn’t cut & dried. We don’t just tick boxes on an order form (like on a motel breakfast menu).
    It takes months to teach someone to do it, and they need a whole credenza full of support information & documents.
    Ten years ago I could bring a reasonably perceptive person up to speed within a month, to the point where they could handle all the ordering for a pub. This is purely due to the liquor companies making it harder.

    Do you subscribe to the (somewhat widespread) belief that publicans are either dumbasses or spivs?

  13. dd

    SatP, I think JC’s point is that you must know what you’re moving in order to stock inventory; therefore your blazé statement that you don’t know how much beer you’re selling just didn’t sound right.

  14. SatP, I think JC’s point is that you must know what you’re moving in order to stock inventory; therefore your blazé statement that you don’t know how much beer you’re selling just didn’t sound right.

    JC ain’t exactly noted for reading a post carefully before putting fingers to keyboard. He often goes off the deep end on what is obviously a tangential, or even diametrically opposed point.

    I was making the point that what was once the beginning & end of information on a pub (“How many kegs does it do each week?”) is now, and has been for some time, not even relevant.
    To people whose knowledge of the pub trade is stuck in the 1960’s, this can sound sort of like men in their twenties totally ignoring some hot ethnic babes and announcing that fat chicks with freckles & bad teeth are “in”.

  15. Tony N

    “There is no price gouging; this is just a baseless conspiracy theory. There are still private operators. Of course labour costs are a factor.”

    That is why fuel can change up to 10c/Litre overnight even though it is the same fuel that was there yesterday. Wednesday is always the best day to buy fuel, I always have the fuel prices emailed to me daily so I can see what is the cheapest within 3Km of me. We also get warnings about when one of the big operators (won’t say which one) has hiked its prices above what is reasonable. There are very few private operators left. In 10 years there will not be any. How can labour costs be a factor when most times the only person there is the one behind the counter, and not a mechanic? What the heck is a price cycle anyway? Does any other commodity we use have “price cycles’ ? Trying to baffle me with BS doesn’t work dd.

    http://www.accc.gov.au/consumers/petrol-diesel-and-lpg/recent-city-petrol-prices#petrol-prices-in-perth

  16. Tony N

    I’m been invited out for tea so you’ll just have to continua this discussion amongst yourselves.

  17. This has gone right off on a tangent. My example was a tyre fitting shop.
    How did servos get into it?

    This is union meeting “bait & switch” style tactics, for when you’re being “done” on the meeting floor.

  18. Tony N

    “This has gone right off on a tangent. My example was a tyre fitting shop. How did servos get into it?”

    My example was service stations in Western Australia . How did tyres in other countries get into it?

  19. My example was service stations in Western Australia . How did tyres in other countries get into it?

    I started it with:

    Pop over to one of those countries where labour costs a whole lot less….when mechanics change tyres…

    😉

  20. dd

    In 10 years there will not be any.

    I’m not kidding when I say they were predicting that 20 years ago.

    Does any other commodity we use have “price cycles’ ?

    fruit, vegetables, airline tickets.

  21. Tony N

    “fruit, vegetables, airline tickets.”

    Fruit and vegies – supply and demand often determined by weather – heatwaves , storms etc, airline tickets seasonal or promotional, These are NOT price cycles. Is Steve’s beer dearer on Mondays and Fridays than Wednesdays on weekly or fortnightly cycles? dd the only polite way I can put this is that you really have no idea what you are talking about.

  22. “fruit, vegetables, airline tickets.”

    Nay, I’ll back DD on this. I’ll add wholesale booze (which is what makes ordering for a pub so complex)
    DD has every idea what he is talking about.
    I’ll also add labour. It costs $20 an hour on Monday at morning smoko time, and $49 an hour on a public holiday. Do you think the product or service is any better on a public holiday?

    Why should you receive the same service/product, for the same price, on a public holiday? WHY?

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