Wednesday Forum: December 4, 2013

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870 Responses to Wednesday Forum: December 4, 2013

  1. Motelier

    MK50 and I will both be relieved that Unflushable will no longer darken the halls of this blog.

    I have tried to stay away from him for the last week or so (using my anti-troll bloggles) but it has been a tedious affair keep up and reading all of the dribble that comes from the troll relay.

    This might be a better place.

  2. jumpnmcar

    I would pay a handsome fee to some online hacker that published, live, the stump mic audio during the Ashes.
    Harris just gave Carberry a spirited bit of advice should be available to us all.

  3. Tom

    I bought Qantas stock today. Hope the dude in the sky is smiling at me and thinking I’ve done the right thing. It’s a lumpy size and hope it stabilizes around here.

    I think all the bad news is out and the government will step in offering comfort and removing the foreign ownership restrictions.

    You won’t lose money, JC, IMO. If you can hold it for two years, you’ll be rewarded.

    The Qantas Sale Act will be repealed or neutered within a year or so, removing the brake on foreign capital input as that jingoism has no support anywhere .. except for the Greenfilth:

    Greens deputy leader Adam Bandt said that while he believed there was a good case for government intervention, it had to be done on the basis of securing jobs and value for taxpayers.

    “To make sure that … Australians get the benefits of it, and they don’t flow overseas,” he told reporters in Canberra.

    So the shackles won’t come off til H214 when the Greenfilth can’t block it. However, the analysts reckon the new junk rating will cost QF $100 million+ p.a. in extra borrowing costs. QF just halved International losses in FY 13 and says full savings from the EK alliance won’t kick in until FY15, at which time International should be making good cash again.

    Jetstar will also need to be sorted out; I heard today it is losing money on operations and is dropping buckets more playing around with that diabolical stillborn JV in HKG and in Japan, where QF has just had to stump up another $A60m for the Jetstar Japan JV.

    Saving Grace for QF is that it is very cash-rich.

  4. calli

    After whinging on the other thread about government, now for something completely different.

    Carols in the park, walking distance from home (with laden Esky), and my dearest flipping snags yet again for Rotary. And it’s a beautiful evening in Sydney, just a breath of cool breeze, but warm enough to enjoy the nice chilled goodies in said Esky.

    And still no Christmas shopping done…grrr….

  5. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    They also sell antlers, if you are that way inclined.

    Yes! I want some for our beach house. Not exactly a baronial mansion in Scotland, but the old cow’s skull and horns on the back fence is disintegrating. A set of antlers indoors would be just the shot for Da Hairy Ape as a surprise Chrissie present. He could do that Cerunnus thing on the Gundestrup cauldron and frighten the kids in a pagan ritual (while they crawled all over him trying to take them off his head for themselves). Besides, they are an excellent talking point above the tele. A friend of ours who shot on the Royal Estate at Windsor promised to send us a pair, but Australian quarantine regulations defeated him. A local supplier is great.

  6. jumpnmcar

    It’s the Xmas silly season after all but this should make calli and others in the construction game a tiny bit more optimistic.

    The national construction industry maintained its forward momentum in November, expanding for a second consecutive month and at a slightly faster pace than in October. Conditions were boosted by a strengthening in new orders (which increased at their highest rate in almost eight years) and an upturn in deliveries from suppliers. Activity also continued to grow, despite the pace of increase moderating from October’s 31⁄2 year high.

    AIG PCI for November out today.
    A brilliant turn around from 40 consecutive months of decline under labor.
    I suspect the ABC will ignore this fantastic ” News “

  7. Tintarella di Luna

    Miranda Devine – you can have Nigella, CL, this one has all the qualities I admire, as her latest column shows.
    What a woman!

    I’m with you on that one blogstrop. The bureaucracy is fighting Pru Goward tooth and nail on her plan to adopt out children whose deadbeat parents abuse and maltreat them.

    Power to her I say When it comes to big cats – Goward is a lion, on this issue particularly but on many others when it comes to children and communities — and where’s her LINO leader to defend her? nowhere to be seen. Piers Akerman wrote an article in her defence a few months ago on this same issue.

  8. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Philippa Martyr at 5:35 pm:

    “The Margaret River venison farm has lovely produce. They also sell antlers, if you are that way inclined.”

    What does one do with antlers? Are four antlers enough… is five too many?

    There’s only so much space over the fireplace to mount them and more than two hat racks in the vestibule would be a bit ostentatious.

    They’d be a b_ugger to gift wrap for lefty friends.

    Can one crush them up and mix the product with milk as a virility supplement or to improve eyesight?

    I think for me this is an unknown unknown – one of those things we don’t know we don’t know (thanks Donald).

  9. Tom

    Not content with the left’s wrecking of Australia-Indonesia relations through the American NSA traitor, ShakeMyHead.com is bloodymindedly trying provoke another confrontation. Here’s the AAP copy it carried — last updated at 4.16pm:

    Indonesian Foreign Minister Marty Natalegawa has given a cautious response to comments by Prime Minister Tony Abbott that Australia will continue to spy on its northern neighbour.
    …………
    The Indonesian foreign minister said Mr Abbott’s comments (that Australia and Indonesia would continue to spy on each other) were “not necessarily” a contradiction of assurances given by Ms Bishop.

    “It’s a description of fact in terms of intelligence and information gathering. It’s something that countries conduct and carry out,” he said.

    “My understanding is it’s part and parcel in co-operation between countries.

    “After all, intelligence co-operation is provided for under the Lombok Treaty.”

    An hour later, ShakeMyHead.com’s Jakarta hitman has deleted what Natalegawa said above to try to provoke the Indonesians:

    Indonesia believes that Australia has signed up to a “no further espionage” future, while Prime Minister Tony Abbott is adamant that Australia will continue to collect intelligence on its neighbour.

    Indonesian foreign minister Marty Natalegawa said he took Julie Bishop’s commitment on Thursday not to use its intelligence-gathering apparatus to harm Indonesia as a “very important commitment” to stop entirely the “extraterritorial, unlawful type of intelligence or information gathering, data collection”.

    He acknowledged that countries collect intelligence on each other, but “it must be done under a co-operative arrangement”.

    “If all this is being done as part of the formal, inter-intelligence agency framework, I think that’s very much consistent with the spirit and the letter of the kind of approach we are advocating just now,” he told ABC News 24 on Friday.

    In a later interview with Fairfax Media, he said the “most and important element” of the mooted intelligence-gathering code of conduct between the two countries was “No spying. No more bugging. No more tapping.”

    This is not even subtle. These Fairfax scum are actively trying to engineer conflict to create trouble for Abbott. This really has to be called out. It is fucking disgraceful activism. It is NOT journalism.

  10. Armadillo

    They’d be a b_ugger to gift wrap for lefty friends.

    I have and elephants foot in the lounge room that is currently serving as a vase for a dried flower arrangement. You are welcome to make an offer. Alternatively, if CL happens to piss you off between now and Christmas, it may also make an appropriate gift for him.

    For the ladies, I have a choice of either an elephant skin hand bag or an “alligator hand” coin purse. The best I can offer in the “Christmassy” range is a antelopes foot made into an ash tray. Not quite Rudolf, but pretty damn close. I do have some small figurines carved from antlers but they probably wouldn’t have the same impact as something to hang over the fireplace.

  11. Harris just gave Carberry a spirited bit of advice should be available to us all.

    I hope it was advice on how to catch goobers at five to six.

  12. Armadillo

    So I see Rat Boy has taken a time out? I never understood why he was here in the first place. He claimed to have “connections” within the Labor Party but never had one comment to make about them. Not one. He never even once attempted to excuse or defend them. Talk about a boring useless piece of shit.

  13. Motelier

    Armadillo,

    Rat Boy (Unflushable) did not take a time out. He was red carded.

    Other than that correction I agree wholeheartedly.

  14. H B Bear

    Magnificent spearing of Fran “I’m an activist” Kelly ($255,000 – FMD) by the Media Watchdog this week. Surely even someone as hopelessly innumerate as an Adelaide university arts student could tell the difference between a deliberate policy change that saw 50,000 illegal immigrants arrive over a five year period and 25 people who managed to wash up on Christmas Island?

    The ALPBC is beyond a joke.

  15. Motelier

    It’s the Xmas silly season after all but this should make calli and others in the construction game a tiny bit more optimistic.

    We can only hope. While not directly tied to the construction industry, the interrelationship is easy to define.

    More construction = more fit outs = more business people travelling = more people staying in motels.

    This is a really simple formula but some people in government and the bureaucracy seem to have a little bit of a problem with the = symbol.

  16. Armadillo

    Pickering:

    Free trade agreements and tariff reductions have placed Australia in a world market free-for-all where we are no longer an insulated holiday island and no longer competitive in anything other than mining. We can’t have it both ways.

    Successful local industries have been raped by unions in good times but now the reality of international competition has finally dawned, no-one is prepared to pay the piper.

    Australia is a numerically disadvantaged and debt-ridden south-east Asian nation of 23 million aging people on benefits surrounded by billions prepared to work for one dollar a day without benefits.

    That’s not a good prospect… especially when our currency only favours importers.

    A social and economic metamorphosis is imminent and it will need higher IQs than those with special interests in our Parliaments to deal with it.

    GM-H and Qantas will be thrown to the international wolves along with Vegemite, Golden Circle and a long, long list of others.

    “There is no choice, la dolce vita is no more and how we handle the transformation will be the benchmark of how grown up we really are”.

    We are doomed to die a slow death unless we are prepared to become a cosmopolitan weekend playground for international investors with spare cash.

    Our future is in mining and beef. Unfortunately those industries are not employment intensive but they scream out for international investment.

    Our former backbone of small business has been shattered by cheaper, on-line consumer options.

    Labor’s six years of dream-time “initiatives” (and Abbott’s promise to continue them) have only brought forward the decision time.

    The chopping block will be bloodied with the dismembered corpses of Abbott’s PPL, Labor’s carbon and mining taxes, NDIS, Gonski and the NBN (which already, and predictably, has a negative value of $31 billion).

    The US will recover from its $17 trillion hole, it has the clout and 320 million demanding consumers. Indonesia has 250 million consumers. China 1.4 billion.

    There is no such thing as a small rich nation without oil or minerals, and when those markets dry up, it’s hello third world.

    Labor’s Arthur Calwell once said, “populate or perish”. But Arthur was very particular about who we should invite here.

  17. Got any stretched whale penis lampshades? If not, I could be in the market for some polar bear cub boot cleaners.

  18. Da Hairy Ape as a surprise Chrissie present. He could do that Cerunnus thing on the Gundestrup cauldron and frighten the kids in a pagan ritual (while they crawled all over him trying to take them off his head for themselves).

    I’ve heard that at the Cat we like to burn strangers in a wicker man around this time of year.

  19. For the ladies, I have a choice of either an elephant skin hand bag or an “alligator hand” coin purse. The best I can offer in the “Christmassy” range is a antelopes foot made into an ash tray. Not quite Rudolf, but pretty damn close. I do have some small figurines carved from antlers but they probably wouldn’t have the same impact as something to hang over the fireplace.

    Armadillo, you are a true gent. I think I’ll pass on the ladies’ items, and go straight for the antelope’s foot, which is both tasteful and useful.

    I had no idea you had such a fascinating private life.

  20. blogstrop

    The way things are going, if you want any processed food which is processed here, you better do it yourself. The fresh meat and veg market may survive a bit longer.

  21. Armadillo

    I think Pickering makes a pretty good point here:

    Australia is a numerically disadvantaged and debt-ridden south-east Asian nation of 23 million aging people on benefits surrounded by billions prepared to work for one dollar a day without benefits.

    The “hand out” mentality has taken over society. Years ago everyone used to complain about “sit down money” in relation to Aboriginal Policy – it’s now become National Policy. “Sit down money” has slowly but surely crept it’s way into every part of society. Socialism – take a bow. For now. When the “free” money runs out, it’s gonna get ugly.

  22. blogstrop

    I’ve heard that at the Cat we like to burn strangers in a wicker man around this time of year.
    Not a (quick and clean) death threat.

  23. jumpnmcar

    More construction = more fit outs = more business people travelling = more people staying in motels.

    Construction activity is, in my view, the canary in the economic mineshaft.
    And when local building companies do well there are no better philanthropic force at the ground level.

  24. Tracey

    For the military buffs I just spotted something on 7 at 9:30 (DST) about WWII air wars that might be worth a look.

  25. Tracey

    Jeeze, be careful Armadillo. It’s not a big leap for the Cat ladies to go from pondering alligator hand coin purses and antelope foot ashtrays to checking out that delightful armadillo shell handbag we saw here a week or so back.

  26. blogstrop

    Gee, those daily pay rate quotes get the lefties agitated, doncha know? Even when they’re quoted not as a plan to pay Australian workers that rate, but as an illustration of why resources in Africa (for example) might get more capital injected.

    But that’s been the “budgie smuggler” line used by the ABC leftards ever since their bete noire (for attempting to influence their fair cousin Fartfacts) Gina Rhinehart was game to make a public statement on the subject.

  27. Jeeze, be careful Armadillo. It’s not a big leap for the Cat ladies to go from pondering alligator hand coin purses and antelope foot ashtrays to checking out that delightful armadillo shell handbag we saw here a week or so back.

    Now Tracey, that was a one-off incident. And please don’t mention the blue dress, because it’s Friday night and it may trigger an awful outbreak of violence.

  28. Motelier

    Construction activity is, in my view, the canary in the economic mineshaft.

    Exactly the point I was making above.

  29. JC

    Arm

    Pickering is a first class twit. Our debt level are not excessive although the way it grew showed a government totally out of control.

    We have one of the highest living standards in the world.

    To suggest having a system of relative free trade is a curse rather than a blessing is laughable. Perhaps Pickering wants us to go back to the time when there were import quotas on overseas goods and one had to apply for permission from the reserve bank in order to purchase foreign currency if going overseas.

    Pickering is a doofus.

  30. I think Pickering makes a pretty good point here:

    Australia is a numerically disadvantaged and debt-ridden south-east Asian nation of 23 million aging people on benefits surrounded by billions prepared to work for one dollar a day without benefits.

    It doesn’t take Einstein to see that. Most regulars on here would have articulated that thought years ago. Arguably, the only things perpetuating this sad state of affairs are the ALP/Unions’ refusal to break free from their anglo-centric roots and the Conservative refusal to cast aside Empire and, lately, fear of electoral oblivion once it became clear that the die was cast. The Empire has died hard in Oz.
    What to do about it, though. Does Pickering offer a solution?
    Yet what to do about it?

  31. Tracey

    Funny you should mention that dress, Philippa. Did we ever find a suitable handbag to accessorise that?

  32. Armadillo

    Got any stretched whale penis lampshades?

    Sorry Shossy, closest I can go are some scrimshaws I’m afraid. And just to horrify CL a little more, plenty of netsukes. No deal with polar bear cub foot cleaners – that’s just plain disgusting. Polar Bears are delightful (especially the little ones).

  33. JC

    Australia is a numerically disadvantaged and debt-ridden south-east Asian nation of 23 million aging people on benefits surrounded by billions prepared to work for one dollar a day without benefits.

    I think some people on this blog need to be reacquainted with the marginal productivity theory. High wages are a function of the amount of capital / to number of workers.

    Low wage nations are low wage countries because they don’t have the blessing of high capital to labor ratios. This is about as close to the truism as you can get in economics.

    Anyone thinking Pickering is making some sort of obvious point has to be kidding or just not up to hanging around a Right/libertarian blog.

  34. Motelier

    blogstrop
    The only answer is to censor the ALPBC.

    Seriously we have to have a hard look at ourselves as a nation.
    If we want to play on an international market then we need to be fully into that international market.

    Quote from the Motelier handbook of International Economics “If the cost of production of goods and services that you produce is higher than y0ur competitors, then you must accept lower sales and revenues, unless the product or service you produce is of a higher quality.”

    My statement above applies to Governments and all sizes of business.

    I know – it is simple but hey, I am a small businessman and I like to KISS.

  35. JC

    Well that should get Mark Scott and the head of news fired immediately, like this weekend.

  36. Armadillo

    Steady on ladies. The antelope foot ash tray is all yours. I’ll even gift wrap it.

  37. Gab

    Well that should get Mark Scott and the head of news fired immediately, like this weekend.

    hahahaha.

  38. blogstrop

    We are not all traders surfing the rise and fall of the markets in any immediate way. One’s core strategy super fund election might get a hedged approach to that world, and some funds did 15% last year, which is three times better than the cash options.
    The aversion therapy of an 8-9.5% loss back in 2008 scared many into the lower yields, even though this knobbles you in the upturn.
    Contemplating putting more cash into a super fund at present is a complicated equation. The ripoff of 15% makes you think twice. Depends what marginal rate your income is taxed at, but the lower it is the less attractive additional super becomes.
    As your income tapers off during the part-time employment phase it’s not that attractive. At the moment it takes at least a “good yield” year to regain that lost component (and they are rare), or about three years if you’re in a low risk option.
    But taking risks becomes less attractive too, as retirement age approaches.

  39. Tracey

    Thank you for the offer, Armadillo. I don’t smoke. I love handbags though.

  40. JC

    Don’t be too shocked if something unfolds this weekend, Gab. I think even Turnbull would be really upset this happened.

  41. Gab

    ahahahaha….stop it, Jc, hou’re killing me…ahahahahaha

  42. Anyone thinking Pickering is making some sort of obvious point has to be kidding or just not up to hanging around a Right/libertarian blog.

    So Oz is well placed to thrive in the next 50 years given current conditions?

  43. Armadillo

    I love handbags though.

    Yours. Talk about blackmail.

  44. When will the beta she-male eunuch – aka Malcolm Turncoat the Member for Goldman Sachs – take action against the ABC?

    Bwahahahahaha!

  45. JC

    So Oz is well placed to thrive in the next 50 years given current conditions?

    Don’t move the posts.

    Pickering is making a case for protected markets. The economic illiterate is also making the case that low wage countries will kill us because they are low wage whereas we’re not.

    Anyone who seriously believe this tripe should be posting at this blog.

    Are we well placed for the next 50 years…. Perhaps we aren’t, but not because of the reasons you and your economic illiterate mate Pickering think.

  46. blogstrop

    There was a time when the ABC’s core activity was re-enforcing the Australian way of life, culture and well-being. It’s core activity now is politics, and they are lefty/green players. Even their cultural programs are playing. Their drama is playing.
    Play School this week was just playing normally, as I watched it with grandson, but it was an older repeat.
    If they fuck up Play School I could get really stroppy.

  47. JC

    Anyone who seriously believes this tripe shouldn’t be posting at this blog.

  48. C.L.

    Miranda Devine today used a curious plural:

    Remarkably, [the ABC] has run dead on serious crime allegations against senior Labor figures which are currently being investigated by police, while
    ferociously hunting down every verbal misstep or stumble by the new government.

    OK, we know Gillard is being investigated but – I’m puzzled – is there somebody else?

  49. JC

    OK, we know Gillard is being investigated but – I’m puzzled – is there somebody else?

    Damn, don’t leave in suspense, Miranda. Tell us. We really need to know.

  50. blogstrop

    I’ve no idea who the anybody else could be, C.L. Has anyone said anything to you?

  51. Gab

    is there somebody else?

    Not sure. Who in Labor has been conspicuously absent from the media?

  52. Carpe Jugulum

    The ALPBC – the last program they did that had any merit was Adventure Island. Sad to see that Fester Fumble became leader of the opposition.

  53. Did someone mention above that Bernardi earned the beta she-male eunuch’s ire by “facilitating” Abbott’s successful challenge for the Party leadership?

    I like Cory more and more

  54. C.L.

    No no, ‘strop. No mail at all.

  55. Carpe Jugulum

    I’ve no idea who the anybody else could be

    ? some shadow minister in a industry portfolio?

  56. Perhaps we aren’t, but not because of the reasons you and your economic illiterate mate Pickering think.

    He isn’t my mate. I’m allowed – in my own illiterate way – to think that the status quo is unsustainable, am I not, without being driven from the blog by the all-knowing JC?

  57. JC

    Not sure. Who in Labor has been conspicuously absent from the media?

    I don’t know. Who could it possibly be I wonder.

    Stepford. Donut Monster, you two nutablls are close to the Liars “corridors of power” (as Homer E Paxton used to call it). You guys heard anything, or up for some speculation? Don;t leave us, your friends, twisting in curiosity.

  58. blogstrop

    I’m surprised that the ABC isn’t onto any sliver of a rumour about … you know. They’re normally so agitato about anything to do with …. when it’s somebody not connected with a group who numbers among it’s number a number of friends of a friend …

  59. Infidel Tiger

    If the Vic police are investigating I’m sure we can expect charges some time around mid century.

  60. JC

    I’m allowed – in my own illiterate way – to think that the status quo is unsustainable, am I not, without being driven from the blog by the all-knowing JC?

    I’m not driving you from the blog, but if you really think Pickering has anything useful to say about economics, after spouting insane stupidity in support of protected markets and comparing low wage/ high wage countries in the way he did, you really should ask why you’re here as this wouldn’t be the right place for you. Perhaps spending more time with Economics Professor Pickering and learning more about the subject the way he teaches it would be better for you. That way you’ll learn import quotas are great and currency controls raise living standards.

  61. Infidel Tiger

    Pickering economics involves fleecing idiots of money from betting scams.

  62. JC

    Pickering economics involves fleecing idiots of money from betting scams.

    ‘sactly.

  63. blogstrop

    Let’s not let the odd betting plan get between us and a more sound theory …

  64. Anyone who seriously believes this tripe shouldn’t be posting at this blog.

    Or do you just have investments you are desperate to protect? Not that you would do that – of course.

  65. blogstrop

    Whoops! Book time is here.

  66. I’m not the least bit interested in Pickering’s economic theories, but he makes a point in terms of Australia’s population, geo-political position and drivers.
    We are an anachronism. A transplanted Sunderland/Newcastle/Glasgow cotton/coal/car plant populated by said plants’ workers, dictated to by the same plant’s shop stewards. Even dumb pricks like me can see we are out of time and out of place.

  67. Cold-Hands

    OK, we know Gillard is being investigated but – I’m puzzled – is there somebody else?

    It almost certainly refers to the investigation into the rape allegation made against a “senior Labor figure”.

  68. Sadly, I only have Peter F. Hamilton to keep me warm tonight …

  69. Tom

    It almost certainly refers to the investigation into the rape allegation made against a “senior Labor figure”.

    I think you are almost certainly wrong. No-one in the Labor Party would do anything so reprehensible without our valiant media, which is obsessive about protecting the public interest, telling us about it immediately.

  70. Armadillo

    Pickering economics involves fleecing idiots of money from betting scams.

    The bastard. Had I known that, I would have called for his immediate flogging.

    To be fair though, I was the one who originally posted that link, but I was more interested in his comment about “people on benefits” compared to our neighbours and where that may eventually lead. I’m not an economists bootlace but that particular bit did makes sense me. Who knows, perhaps people who don’t understand economics shouldn’t comment here at all. Then again, how are you expected to learn without someone pointing out the ludicrous? Not all posters here are trained in the “darker arts”. We just come to study you.

    Anyway, speaking of more reputable professions, anyone need a tip for the races tomorrow?

  71. Motelier

    Shossmeister
    Correct about Pickering on the size of our population,
    however
    The key IMHO is productivity. I got ear(key)bashed a couple of weeks ago about a price freeze.

    Productivity has to be high in terms of dollar input. If our productivity against a standard is below the norm then we have to accept reduced sales and that means a reduced standard of living.

    Protectionism can not work. If protectionism worked then my industry should have died a still birth before the Aussie dollar was floated.

    All I wish for is a level playing field.

  72. Tom

    The perfect Christmas gift for JC.

    ROFL.

  73. Motelier

    Armadillo

    My last bookie has banned me from playing with him. The bastard. He said it was for my own good measure. He still stay here however :roll: .

  74. Low wage nations are low wage countries because they don’t have the blessing of high capital to labor ratios. This is about as close to the truism as you can get in economics.

    It’s not just because of capital; surely the high capital to labor ratio is a result more than a determinant? I would have said it is more about real privilege; the knowing of what to do with capital, the knowing of how to be, the wisdom we individually inherit from our families and the institutions around us.

    The great threat of leftism is that it seeks to cast aside that privilege, and that when they do so it is far more significant than a casting aside of wealth. It is a casting aside of understanding framed as wealth; once that is realised the insidious nature is clear to any who have eyes to see.

  75. More and more I understand why they call it ‘the dismal science’.

  76. jumpnmcar

    Anyone know about the Sth Korea free trade deal?
    Sounds all positive to me.
    Can I do a ” Well done Tony ” yet?

  77. Motelier

    More and more I understand why they call it ‘the dismal science’.

    Probably why most of our “elected” representatives have little knowledge of it.

    Economics 101 should be taught in primary school. Economics 201 should be taught in secondary school.

    That way the equation of (income – sales = gross profit) would not be difficult for the general punter in the street to understand.

  78. Motelier

    “cost of sales” above
    sorry

    lack of proofreading

  79. Productivity has to be high in terms of dollar input. If our productivity against a standard is below the norm then we have to accept reduced sales and that means a reduced standard of living.

    Hi Mote. Thanks. In my own inimitably non-economist kind of way I think I was trying to say that given that we are an anachronism. A transplanted Sunderland/Newcastle/Glasgow cotton/coal/car plant populated by said plants’ workers, dictated to by the same plant’s shop stewards. then our standard of living is in a freefall trajectory accelerated by the (lower) standard of living our neighbours/competitors are prepared to accept at this stage. Unfortunately, the more pressure placed on us by competing economies, the harder our hard-wired anglo-western sense of entitlement pushes back. In this case there is only one loser and it is us.
    Economists can crunch all the numbers they like, but to poor dumb saps like me Oz is staring a watershed era in the face and determinedly looking the wrong way.
    Sorry to the purists, but us humanities kinda guys have views too.

  80. entropy

    jumpnmcar
    #1100748, posted on December 6, 2013 at 9:20 pm
    The Hobbit:
    The Desolation of Smaug
    Looks pretty good.

    Could be, but I don’t recall feisty lady elves, I find mini-Aragon a bit unconvincing, and spiders give me the complete willies.

  81. JC

    Or do you just have investments you are desperate to protect? Not that you would do that – of course.

    Lol… So what you’re saying is that I oppose pickernomics because supporting his views would be against my personal interests.

    Are you for fucking real? That’s verging on troofing.

    I oppose pickernomics because his views would make us into a much poorer nation.

    And by the way, there’s not that much space between his views and the human trash- the greens- in these subjects.

    I’m not the least bit interested in Pickering’s economic theories, but he makes a point in terms of Australia’s population, geo-political position and drivers.

    No he doesn’t. It’s cartoonish, which is right up his ally.

    We are an anachronism. A transplanted Sunderland/Newcastle/Glasgow cotton/coal/car plant populated by said plants’ workers, dictated to by the same plant’s shop stewards. Even dumb pricks like me can see we are out of time and out of place.

    We are an anachronism, but not because of the reason you and Pickering think. There are very few countries with our living standard and that’s what makes us relatively unique.

  82. Y’all have fun crunching your theoretical numbers now. Bed time.

  83. entropy

    And by the way, there’s not that much space between his views and the human trash- the greens- in these subjects.

    A mild version of Blair’s Law

  84. JC

    A mild version of Blair’s Law

    What’s Blair’s law?

  85. There are very few countries with our living standard and that’s what makes us relatively unique.

    But that living standard is built on a chimera. It has been built on an outmoded model and can’t last and anyone who can’t recognise that is … never mind.

  86. jumpnmcar

    Could be, but I don’t recall feisty lady elves, I find mini-Aragon a bit unconvincing, and spiders give me the complete willies.

    You reason like an Ent too ? :)

  87. JC

    Oh this

    Tim Blair as “the ongoing process by which the world’s multiple idiocies are becoming one giant, useless force.”

  88. JC

    But that living standard is built on a chimera. It has been built on an outmoded model and can’t last and anyone who can’t recognise that is … never mind.

    Why can’t it with the right policies?

  89. JC

    You can more or less cement higher living standards just doing a few things. Not in any order

    1. Ensure cheap and abundant energy supplies.

    2. deregulate the shit out of the economy.

    3. Fire 80% of the public sector.

    4. Remove any remaining trade barriers.

    5. Stabilize government spending to 10% of GDP and lower the tax burden.

    That’s more or less all you need to do.

  90. Oh yes, and what are you going to do after lunch?
    Never mind, I’m happy to bow to your expertise :-)
    Don’t stay up too late now.

  91. calli

    I’m looking forward to the second instalment of The Hobbit, even if bears no resemblance to the book. I am a Hobbitomane since 2nd Form, and that was a very long time ago… :)

    Arachnophobia? Pffft!

  92. JC

    Stunned Students Heartbroken Their Playboy Model Teacher’s Been Fired

    We brought you the heartbreaking plight of former Playboy babe turned Spanish teacher Christy Nicole Deweese last week. Today we’re saddened to note she’s been dismissed from her job. Students hardest hit.

  93. Mk50 of Brisbane, Henchman to the VRWC

    Motelier:

    MK50 and I will both be relieved that Unflushable will no longer darken the halls of this blog.

    Yup. Having that odiferous hot steamer about the place lowered the tone and crated an almighty stench.

    Shitfer and Monty are nice pets to have, take a kicking well and are excellent reminders of the irreal idiocy of the soft-left.

    Unflushable was simply masturbatory, getting his trollish rocks off at everyone’s expense. Good riddance.

    And now I have ANOTHER troll head to get stuffed and mounted on the Doomlord’s smoking room wall…

    :)

  94. Motelier

    JC

    You can more or less cement higher living standards just doing a few things. Not in any order

    5 ticks of approval from me.

  95. Motelier

    And now I have ANOTHER troll head to get stuffed and mounted on the Doomlord’s smoking room wall…

    Can I be of assistance?

  96. Gab

    Andrew, Can confirm that the original ABC news report showed 3 separate shots of Brig Bill Mellor’s house including a close up of the street number on the letter box. At the same time, a voiceover revealed the name of the suburb.

    After complaint lodged, the ABC kept the story online but advised that they had pixelated the number on the letterbox and removed the reference to suburb. Now this is the residence of the key public servant tasked with coordinating the effort against criminal motorcycle gangs. The ABC must explain what benefit they hoped to derive from identifying Mr Mellor’s family home, and how they believed doing so would in any way serve the public interest.

    As Habib said, it’s an act of bastardry.

  97. Cold-Hands

    The previous government forced the NBN to tell the government what it wanted to hear, and there is no worse investment than paying people to tell you what you want to hear. They set unrealistic targets, the company was afraid of telling the truth, and again and again they missed those targets. To the Labor Party, the only thing that mattered was the announcement, the media opportunity, the press release. So again they misled the Australian people. Never forget that, at the time Senator Conroy was telling Australians this was a great investment and mums and dads would line up to invest, they had in their cabinet room a report from Lazard that said the value of the project was a negative $31 billion. It would destroy $31 billion of value.

    [...]

    I have a challenge for the Leader of the Opposition. He says that their government had good reason to embark on the NBN and that it was just a bit of a mishap that things did not go quite as they might have done. There is an opportunity for the transparency from us to be matched by Labor. The Leader of the Opposition can agree to the cabinet papers relating to the formation of the NBN being released. What does the opposition leader have to hide on the NBN?

    The Member for Goldman Sachs has been taking it up to the ALP on the NBN. A pity he can’t apply the same rigour to his treatment of ABC mismanagement and bias.

    h/t Michael Smith.

  98. Armadillo

    As Habib said, it’s an act of bastardry.

    Hasn’t the ABC railed against Google Earth in the past and the invasion of privacy that is/was “Street View”?

  99. jumpnmcar

    JC
    Why is a tariff reduction not a happy subject celebrated in the Cat?
    There ‘s not enough credit payed for good shit around here and I recon your the dude to lead the charge that will change all that, being the sensible optimist that you are.
    I intend to highlight the good stuff, are you with me ?

  100. .

    Pickering is wrong for one reason alone, without considering trade theory.

    Please learn what real unit labour costs are.

    If you have high wages, but a better (lower) real unit labour cost, then your costs are, as it turns out, lower in any actually comparable metric.

    Please. Take on RULC before pushing into trade theory.

  101. calli

    What possible relevance would Mellor’s home address have to the story in any case? Are these half wits crying out to be sacked?

  102. James B

    Abbott needs to take some FUCKING leadership and privatise the ABC. WHO CARES what the plebs of the masses think, Juliar gave us a carbon tax against the will of the people, why the hell does Abbott need to appease them? Be a fucking leader, not a populist.

    Also, we need to end the disability support pension. It costs too much money.

  103. Mk50 of Brisbane, Henchman to the VRWC

    Zing! Anthony Tuohy writes an open letter on actual compromise to the USA’s anti-gun nutters and hoplophobes.

    Extract:

    If you (gun control proponents) want to prove that you really aren’t completely anti-gun, sincerely offer any or all of the above (and perhaps other things I haven’t thought of) as real compromises whenever you want some new piece of legislation to pass. Otherwise, you will keep meeting a massive and well-organized wall of resistance, effective enough to completely derail your efforts.

    We don’t buy it when you say that you support the Second Amendment, but then take any possible action to limit the rights of gun owners. When you fail at big things like an assault weapons ban, you go for little things like halting the importation of Korean War relics, and you think that you did something to “stop gun violence.” Basically, you look at what pro-gun groups are saying and take the opposite position, regardless of the logic behind either side’s position.

    We’re left with the impression that you really don’t mean what you say. That’s why we work so hard to oppose you wherever we can. If you want different results, you’ll need to change your actions, not just your words.

  104. JC

    JC
    Why is a tariff reduction not a happy subject celebrated in the Cat?
    There ‘s not enough credit payed for good shit around here and I recon your the dude to lead the charge that will change all that, being the sensible optimist that you are.
    I intend to highlight the good stuff, are you with me ?

    Yep sure, but I have to retrain myself on the optimism side.

    Early in the working career I tried to play down the exhilaration of getting trades right, so that when I invariably lost money i wouldn’t come off a huge high.

    I really fucked that one up, in hindsight, because I mostly never got a really good high from doing well, but suffered very bad lows.

    True.

  105. James B

    Why do we still do trade agreements?

    How about end all (and I do mean all) trade restrictions unilaterally, across the board?

  106. Motelier

    .
    Help me please

    Did you just say what I said above?

  107. JC

    No fiddling the numbers here. No siree.

    WASHINGTON — Creative industries led by Hollywood account for about $504 billion, or at least 3.2 percent of U.S. goods and services, the government said in its first official measure of how the arts and culture affect the economy.

    On Thursday, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the National Endowment for the Arts released the first estimates of the creative sector’s contributions to U.S. gross domestic product based on 2011 data, the most recent figures available. GDP measures the nation’s production of goods and services.

    Sunil Iyengar, the endowment’s research director, said the yardstick was devised in partnership with the Bureau of Economic Analysis and drew on figures from Hollywood, the advertising industry, cable TV production, broadcasting, publishing, performing arts and other areas.

    This yardstick now allows the nation’s creative sector to be measured annually, much as statisticians calculate the contribution of tourism, health care and other sectors to the nation’s economy.

  108. JC

    Dunno, but I smell a very dirty rat in this story.. Homeless, Smartphones, laptops.

    Jesse Angle, Chris Kantola, and Paul Harrison were jobless and homeless for much of the past year, but thanks in part to Bitcoin — the world’s most popular digital currency — they never went without food.

    Between April and September, while living on the streets of Pensacola, Florida, they used their laptops and smartphones to collect a total of about four or five bitcoins. Some of it arrived through donations. Some of it came from rather unsophisticated online services that dole out tiny fractions of the digital currency if you spend some time looking at videos and ads. And over the course of the summer, this free money bought them a pretty steady supply of pizza and chicken tenders.

    http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/12/bitcoin-homeless-redux/

  109. Motelier

    Dunno, but I smell a very dirty rat in this story.. Homeless, Smartphones, laptops.

    Hmmmmmmm Cash, EFTPOS, Direct Deposit, MasterCard, Visa, Amex*, Diners* are legitimate ways of paying for services in my businesses.

    Bitcoin is a ?
    Sorry for being a dumbass but WTF?

    Can I get an education here?

  110. JC

    Okay, this a new subject /connection that would get Bird interested.

    Banking and Sodomy. parts 1 and2.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FBdJglu6s54#t=123

  111. Armadillo

    Jump, looked at that link and noticed another on the RHS – “Australia’s macadamia industry has welcomed the free trade agreement with South Korea”.

    Just a little surprised that the Yanks are a bigger exporter of native Australian nuts than we are. Perhaps Assange is our revenge? Anyway, the story:

    It’s peak body had hoped for an immediate elimination of tariffs, but is happy with the outcome.

    The 30 per cent tariff currently imposed on macadamia imports will be phased out over the next five years.The Australian Macadamia Society’s chief executive officer, Jolyon Burnett, is pleased with the result and says it’s a great step forward.

    “We have been investing in the Korean market for some time,” he said.”We identified it as a key new market in our Strategic Investment Plan, and we have been building awareness and receptivity to Australian macadamias there for a while.”

    But he says at 30 per cent, the tariff had been fairly prohibitive. “Now with this reduction in the tariff over the next five years, we’ve confident that the market will grow,” he said.

    Mr Burnett says the Australian industry will now be able to compete strongly with the United States. “The USA achieved a reduction to zero in their tariff over seven years, two years ago,” he said. “So the fact that our tariff will reduce to zero over five years brings us back into competitive alignment with US imports into Korea.”

    The Australian macadamia market in South Korea is still small. Mr Burnett estimates it at somewhere between 50 to 100 tonnes per year. “It varies depending on the Australian dollar, the size of our crop, and the strength of the Korean demand,” he said. Mr Burnett expects that market will grow 100 per cent per year over the next five years. But he says that will only happen if Australia has the crops to sustain it.
    He says the agreement will add millions of dollars to the export earnings to the industry per year.

    “We’re currently Australia’s fourth largest horticultural export earner, generating somewhere between $120 million to $150 million in export earnings,” he said.

    “Over the next five years this could increase by $20 million to $30 million, perhaps more, just depending on how well the Korean market responds to a more competitive pricing.”

  112. Armadillo

    Creative industries led by Hollywood account for about $504 billion, or at least 3.2 percent of U.S. goods and services, the government said in its first official measure of how the arts and culture affect the economy.

    Bloody hell – that song “Do the Macarona” probably earnt more than the “Macadamia”.

  113. C.L.

    Fairfax headline and spin:

    Stoush continues as Bishop receives cold welcome in China.

    In a cold welcome to Ms Bishop on her first visit to Beijing as foreign minister, her Chinese counterpart Wang Yi said China was “deeply dissatisfied” with Australia’s public criticism of its decision to establish an air defence zone in airspace which covers disputed islands in the East China Sea.

    “I have to point out that what Australia has said and done with regard to China’s establishment of the air defence identification zone in the East China Sea has jeopardised bilateral mutual trust and affected the sound growth of bilateral relations,” Mr Wang said. “This is not what we desire to see.”

    Now here’s a better headline and the remarkable, buried lead:

    Bishop stares down China … in China.

    As she did when the diplomatic stoush first flared last week, Ms Bishop held her ground and said the government’s standpoint reflected the importance with which it viewed stability in the region.

    “I must take issue with you on the matter of the East China Sea. We stand by our view,” she said, before reporters were ushered out of the room as formal talks began.

  114. Motelier

    Sorry troops.

    Breakfast at 6 and I do need to get my beauty sleep.

  115. JC

    What a sissified, pussified, feminized, snitchy, bitchy, totalitarian place the workplace has become.


    Business Insider Fires CTO Pax Dickinson Over Offensive Tweets

    Unprofessional opinions are not endorsed by anyone respectable” reads the Twitter bio of Pax Dickinson, chief technology officer of Business Insider.

    They’re sure not endorsed by his bosses, CEO Henry Blodget and chairman Kevin Ryan, the site’s co-founders. A day after Valleywag raised a stink over Dickinson’s habit of using Twitter to share his views on feminism, poverty and race relations, he is out of the company. “Forced to resign” is how Daily Intel characterizes it; I’m told he was simply “fired.”

    Let me remind you that Henry Bloget is banned for life fmo ever working on Wall Street again for shit he did during the tech boom.

    What were the offensive tweets?

    aw, you can’t feed your family on minimum wage? well who told you to start a fucking family when your skills are only worth minimum wage?

    feminism in tech remains the champion topic for my block list. my finger is getting tired.

    so he’s a woman, but he still has Y chromosomes? now who doesn’t understand how biology works?

    at least if we end up getting into a nuclear standoff with Russia over gay rights we’ll know this universe is just a satirical simulation

    IMO if gay activists protest the Olympics in Russia it’s going to get VERY ugly. They think its just a game but Putin knows the real stakes.

    He has a confrontation with the fellow employee, most likely the snitch.

    Anil Dash ✔ @anildash

    Wow, didn’t realize @businessinsider had hired such an asshole in @paxdickinson. Getting memcache to build made him an expert on misogyny!

    Pax Dickinson @paxdickinson
    Follow

    @anildash really, dude? You know we work in the same building right? Would you like to come call me an asshole to my face tomorrow?

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