A win for federation

This was always a daft idea going nowhere.  In any case, we have the principle of mutual recognition to deal with interstate transfer of those working in occupations requiring registration.

Mind you, the first best solution is to reconsider the basis of registration for many of these occupations – generally it is more about restrictions than protecting the public.

And as for the barriers, I know in my first daughter’s case – she is a lawyer – she transferred from South Australia to NSW and her secretary dealt with the paperwork allowing her to be admitted and practise in NSW.  It took an hour or two to achieve.

A COUNTRY-WIDE licensing authority for a range of occupations including lawyers and real estate agents has been scrapped.

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) has agreed to scrap the National Occupation Licensing Authority which was set up by the former Labor federal government after a 2008 COAG meeting.

Most states decided at a meeting in Canberra on Friday not to proceed with the national scheme, citing the cost and other problems.

“Let’s try to bring about the same outcome in a less cumbersome, less time-consuming and ultimately more productive way, and I think that’s what we are going to do now,” Prime Minister Tony Abbott said.

Mr Abbott said there should be a seamless national economy so people such as lawyers and plumbers could trade in every jurisdiction and not just where they were licensed.

He said mutual recognition could bring that about without the extraordinarily difficult and endless processes national schemes seemed to involve.

States were generally opposed to the scheme because it would mean they would miss out on licence fee revenue.

The authority will cease operations in early 2014.

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14 Responses to A win for federation

  1. H B Bear

    Let’s face it. Eliminating anything introduced by KRudd or Gillard is going to be an improvement.

    Still so much work to be done on the Federation and tax reform.

  2. Brett

    It was completely unnecessary, at the least for lawyers. As a barrister I can appear in Federal Courts anywhere in the country, and most states now have mutual recognition.

  3. dd

    This is a win against the forces of increasing regulation. A blow against the ever expanding credentialising bureaucracy.

  4. stackja

    Trade qualifications should be federal not just state. Fancy a plumber in Wodonga or Tweed Heads not been able to fix a leak in Albury or Surfers.

  5. Infidel tiger

    My Pa has been haranguing every pollie in the country to end this farce. He was sporting a rather big smile today.

    He even gave Abbott both barrels about it a few weeks ago.

  6. Rabz

    A CUNTRY-WIDE licensing authority for a range of occupations including lawyers and real estate agents has been scrapped.

    When I moved from NSW to ZP, I discovered my solicitor of almost two decades was unable to practice in the ACT.

    Why?

    No decent explanation was ever provided.

    But, hey, the new solicitors I was forced to engage were staggeringly inefficient.

    No one could have foreseen such an eventuality.

    Except me.

    :x

  7. dd

    Trade qualifications should be federal not just state.

    You haven’t been paying attention to anything that’s been said, have you.

  8. stackja

    dd
    #1109729, posted on December 13, 2013 at 10:20 pm
    Trade qualifications should be federal not just state.
    You haven’t been paying attention to anything that’s been said, have you.

    No!

  9. dd

    Fancy a plumber in Wodonga or Tweed Heads not been able to fix a leak in Albury or Surfers.

    Let’s invent a whole new big bureaucracy to solve that non-problem.

  10. Mutual recognition is all very well, but it was a curiosity of the thing as applied to medical practitioners that payment for registration frequently fell due in September whilst new jobs (and the interstate transfers which they often required) for anyone moving usually started in January. So one had to pay up for a full year to finish up one’s three months in the original State and then pay up to the new State to start there three months later. It was an utter rort.

    On that basis alone, replacement of the State bodies with a central registration system and one fee per year was long overdue. It also should make it harder (not impossible, but harder) for docs who’ve been struck off in one state to shop around for somewhere that hasn’t heard of their misdeeds.

  11. stackja

    dd
    #1109815, posted on December 13, 2013 at 11:52 pm
    Fancy a plumber in Wodonga or Tweed Heads not been able to fix a leak in Albury or Surfers.
    Let’s invent a whole new big bureaucracy to solve that non-problem.

    The Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) establishes the quality of Australian qualifications.

  12. dd

    The Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) establishes the quality of Australian qualifications.

    Please tell me you are being ironic.

  13. stackja

    dd
    #1110336, posted on December 14, 2013 at 12:00 pm
    The Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) establishes the quality of Australian qualifications.
    Please tell me you are being ironic.

    No. You said “Let’s invent a whole new big bureaucracy to solve that non-problem.”
    The problem is state qualifications. If you call this ironic, so be it.

  14. dd

    No. You said “Let’s invent a whole new big bureaucracy to solve that non-problem.”
    The problem is state qualifications.

    There’s an “in principle” problem in that if each state runs their own show there will be inconsistencies and lack of efficiencies. The plumber in Wodonga who can’t fix a tap in Albury, to take your example. However these are problems at the margins. I mean that quite literally: they occur at the edges of states, or in transitions between states. Those problems are not solved by Canberra stomping in like a giant in clogs and changing the rules across the board.

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