Dead Man Walking IV

It looks like Demetriou won’t be going to his grave alone. Here is John Fahey (emphasis added):

World Anti-Doping Agency president John Fahey has conceded comments on Friday that Essendon would be hit with inevitable doping charges was based on no new information.

“I have had some general discussions at different stages over the past year with different personnel, none of which have had any detail in it,” Fahey told the Weekend Australian.

“It has always been my understanding that when they finish their investigation there is a strong likelihood that action will be taken.

“I have learned nothing in recent weeks to suggest one way or another that is correct or incorrect. It has just been my understanding for a long time.”

We keep hearing this. But after an extensive investigation by a star-chamber regulator the chances of changes being brought against specific individuals does tend to be high. Irrespective of whether those individuals have done anything wrong. After all if the star-chamber regulators investigated people without bringing charges we might start wondering what it was that they did. This must especially be true after the “darkest day in Australian sport”.

We also now know that people with money enough and backbone enough to rigorously defend themselves will get off – probably because the whole thing was a Wag the Dog exercise from the very beginning. In the meantime Fahey is starting to look as bad as Demetriou.

Mind you, as much as I’d like to nominate John Fahey for the prestigious Inaugural Andrew Demetriou Corporate Governance Practitioner of the Year Award the fact is Demetriou has done such a fantastic job himself it might be converted from an annual award to a lifetime achievement award.

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52 Responses to Dead Man Walking IV

  1. steve

    For the legal eagles out there. What are the chances of the Essendon players winning in the supreme court if ASADA penalises them for something that they had no knowledge of and no control over? There are no positive tests.

  2. steve

    News Alert – Rugby League match has crowd of more than 10,000

  3. Codicil to the above: Rugby League fans are aware of an invention known as “television”.

    This is expected to catch on in Victoria sometime in the next 30 years.

  4. steve

    We all remember the good old days when you could park your car on the boundary and toot your horn when your team scored…..oh wait, you can still do that

  5. Louis Hissink

    Think of it as a confected political distraction that has since gone down the path of unintended consequences.

  6. AFL is in danger of becoming an indoor sport.

    Those who care for the game; now is the time to wrest control from the Greek/ALP mafia. Otherwise the game will go the way of boxing.

  7. Bill

    I would think ASADA would lose if it could not produce actual evidence and the club would probably get compensation of all sorts of things including but not limited to defamation, libel injury to reputation etc etc. Hird and the others who have been vilified by all this would also then be in a position to recommence their action against not only ASADA but also the AFL and in particular its CEO.

  8. David

    News Alert – Rugby League match has crowd of more than 10,000

    Definitions.

    Rugby League – a thugs game played by thugs.

    Rugby Union – a thugs game played by gentlemen – and incidentally the game played in heaven.

    AFL – “yawn” [even though they get big crowds]

    Soccer – a branch of the Australian Academy of Dramatic Arts.

    :-)

  9. steve

    That is true, we are indeed in a difficult time, unlike the NRL………hello, Cronulla

  10. the sting

    The AFL is like Animal Farm,some animals are more equal than others.

  11. steve

    David, Rugby League and Rugby Union? Do you like strawberry ice cream or chocolate ice cream? It’s all ice cream.

  12. steve

    Bill, I was thinking along the same lines, which may explain why there has been no final report yet.

  13. SteveC

    Sinc, you are running the risk of looking a bit silly if ASADA do prove charges against quite a few players. You can’t get out of it by saying, “well it was a star chamber, what do you expect”. The AFL have certainly done a very poor job – suspending someone but forgetting to stipulate it’s without pay – but that doesn’t mean there isn’t a serious case. I seriously doubt Hird will be back at Essendon after his 12 month suspension.

  14. sparky

    “..and now turning to sport, in the annual brawl between England and Australia, a game of rugby monetarily broke out.

  15. David

    G’day Steve,

    I prefer the more sophisticated ice creams ergo I follow Union.

    “Sophisticated” – Bloody Hell I can’t believe I typed that in relation to ice cream let alone Rugby. I’d better go and have a stiff rum – real Pusser’s Rum not that crap from the hillbilly State that is one hour and thirty years behind the rest of the East Coast.

    However I am certainly not a fan of gelato no matter where it hails from.

  16. David

    monetarily broke out
    LOL
    Senior moment, Freudian slip or intentional dig at the ruling body of Union Steve?
    :-)

  17. Sinclair Davidson

    SteveC – I’m happy for the authorities to demonstrate in open court that wrong-doing has occurred. Until then I’m calling “Bullshit”. Even then I’d still call “Bullshit” because drugs offences are a mechanism to keep the authorities busy and away preventing/solving from real crimes. That’s called a win-win for me.

    So irrespective of what ASADA finds or doesn’t find the AFL will always looks like a bunch of idiots, and so too will John Fahey.

    To be blunt I’m not surprised. We’ve got a whole bunch of people who are long on authority and short on accountability handing out rough justice and getting found out.

  18. steve

    David, obviously I support AFL, but I really don’t mind the “thug’s game”s as you call them. I do wish that in your flavour we won occassionally. We do not seem to be very good at it.

  19. steve

    monetarily broke out
    wasn’t be Dave, was an electrician and I mean that internationally we don’t seem to win much

  20. David

    monetarily broke out

    Apologies Steve – it appeared in Sparky’s comment. It’s more applicable to AFL anyway where there seems to be a never ending series of monetary mishaps.

    The mob to beat in Union are the bloody Kiwi “All Blacks” – though it is a wonder the PC Brigade haven’t gutted them for being raaaacist for using that as a team name.

  21. steve

    How about John Fahey? He says he got his info from newspapers and then gets unsubstantiated crap put in the very newspapers that he gets his info from………circle, circle, round, round

  22. steve

    It has always seemed an incongruity to be watching white anglo saxons doing the haka:-) but then they beat the crap out of us…….again

  23. Just out of interest, how can the Fat Greek ban Jimmy Hird from attending a club Christmas party?

  24. Martin

    When the fit hits the shan somebody’s going to have to stay behind after school.

  25. SteveC

    So Sinc, should Lance Armstrong have been allowed to keep his 7 Tour wins? Should it be open slather on using experimental drugs in sport?

  26. Up The Workers!

    Speaking of “dead men walking”, I see that news.com are saying that Holden have announced that the 2017 Holden Commodore will be fully manufactured in China.

    It is believed that Holden already have a team of experts over there now, studying how to re-write the “Holden Owners’ Manual” into pidgin Chinese-English.

  27. SteveC

    On the “keeping the authorities busy”, remember that doping in sport and drug offences under the Crimes Act are entirely separate, and the authorities that enforce those rules are unrelated.

  28. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    from Louis Hissink at 3:08 pm:

    “Think of it as a confected political distraction that has since gone down the path of unintended consequences.”

    So, so true Louis – we should not forget its genesis.

  29. rafiki

    My understanding is that it is only very recently that ASADA has had power to compel a person – upon pain of a $5000 a day fine – to require a person (such as ‘the Gazelle’) to answer questions and produce documents even if so to do would amount to self-incrimination. This the Star Camber power, and it remains to be seen what its exercise will produce.
    As for the relative uselessness of chasing drug offenders, surely it depends. Some of these people are very serious criminals involved in organised crime. Catching them out on a drug crime may be the only way to put them out of action; compare to Al Capone, incarcerated for tax evasion.
    As to ASADA penalties, I understand that the taking of banned drugs offences are ones of strict liability, with very limited defences, so that whether a player had knowledge of the nature of the drug is irrelevant. Of course, it has to proved that drugs were administered.

  30. steve

    I have a real hard time with the fact that anyone can be punished for actions committed without intent or negligence. These players acted on the advice of experts. If in fact illegal drugs were adminstered, the experts should wear the blame and then only if the drugs were illegal and only if they had displayed negligence by not checking. If ASADA was asked and gave incorrect advice, which is what is claimed, the fault is with ASADA.

  31. Sinclair Davidson

    Stevec – I have no problem with open slather drugs in sport. In fact that would lead to move innovation than almost anything else I can think of.

    While the actual individuals may be separate the effort isn’t. Taxpayer dollars being spent on sports doping is not being spent on inhibiting murder and rape, for example. Statists have worked out that it easier to police white collar crime and middle class activities than suppress violent crime, for example. So that is where they concentrate their efforts.

  32. Sinclair Davidson

    Rafiki – you are far too tolerant of bullshit. If ASADA has evidence of organized crime in sports let them produce the evidence in court along with the accused gangster. But they haven’t, they won’t and they can’t.

  33. JC

    Stevec – I have no problem with open slather drugs in sport. In fact that would lead to move innovation than almost anything else I can think of.

    I think we’ll eventually hit the right spot. There will be various tiers of sport. There will be sectors even within a sport that will allow open slather in terms of drugs and supplements and those that allow nothing at all. Let’s hope we get there soon, so some of this bullshit goes away.

    If people want to take drugs or supplements they should.

  34. JC

    So Sinc, should Lance Armstrong have been allowed to keep his 7 Tour wins?

    I’ll offer an opinion. Possibly not because he went into the comps declaring he wasn’t taking anything or playing around with medical assistance such as drug infusions prior to the comps. In other words he cheated.

    Should it be open slather on using experimental drugs in sport?

    Absolutely there should be as long as it’s declared. There are lots of us who don’t give a toss what people use as long as it’s declared.

  35. rafiki

    Sinclair – when you spoke of misdirected police resources chasing drug offenders, I took it you were speaking generally about drugs (cocaine, various tablets etc). I could cite at least 2 instances where very heavy hitters in Australian organised crime have been caught out on drug offences, so the resources were not misdirected in these cases.
    I am not aware that ASADA has ever claimed that organised crime are supplying drugs to athletes and AFL/NFL players in particular. If they did, that would be very irresponsible.
    My basis point is that it is too early to claim that ASADA investigations have been useless (apart from the hapless Canberra Raider Sandor Earl, who oddly enough trialled for a possible switch to Essendon!) I have grave concerns about Star Chamber powers (and about strict liability offences), but they exist in this context and may yet lead to some serious consequences.

  36. rafiki

    JC – your point if view was stated some years ago by Don Talbot, after he had ceased being an Australian swimming coach. He thought that a level playing field, and consideration of the athletes, could be achieved by regulating the levels permissible. But that may not be feasible of course.

  37. Sinclair Davidson

    Don’t regulate, compete. If big pharma was doing the drugs the results would quickly improve everyone elses lives.

    For all the hippies who crap on about Armstrong cheating the fact is that drugs allowed him to come back from cancer and win the Tour seven times (or six of whatever it was). I have no doubt that every cancer sufferer would love to have those drugs available to them.

  38. SteveC

    Stevec – I have no problem with open slather drugs in sport.

    I think there are two problems with that approach.

    1. It becomes a competition of pharmacology, not sport – the Tour de France is a classic example. The new rules on swimming costumes a good comparison, the new swimsuits made the races a farce, and thus were banned.
    2. The sports people are often guinea pigs for drug experiments, which does seem to be the case in Essendon. For example AOD9604 is not approved for human use.

  39. SteveC

    Actually Sinclair, there is strong possibility it’s the drugs that CAUSED Armstrong’s cancer. I’m quite happy with advances in drug cancer research, but feeding drugs to athletes is not exactly a clinical trial. And treating athletes as experimental subjects is not what I would call ethical.

  40. sparky

    Back again . Sorry guys – crap proof reading. Should be momentarily, although the money angle works.
    Stinking hot here in Perth , which is hurting the Poms. Australia off to a flyer in their second innings.Cheers

  41. Sinclair Davidson

    SteveC – maybe so. He voluntarily took the risks and came back from cancer however it was caused.

    It becomes a competition of pharmacology, not sport

    Yes – so I keep getting told as if there was some significance to this statement. But yes. That is true. And?

    The sports people are often guinea pigs for drug experiments

    Again I keep hearing this too. Nancy Reagan had the answer to this. Nobody is being coerced into being an elite sportsperson. If you don’t like the terms and conditions of the job, get another job.

  42. SteveC

    Then for mine, the sport would become entirely boring. May as well watch robots perform.

  43. SteveC

    There will be various tiers of sport. There will be sectors even within a sport that will allow open slather in terms of drugs and supplements and those that allow nothing at all.

    Interesting idea JC, that would satisfy Sinclair’s and my requirements at the same time. You should drop a line to John Fahey!

  44. Leigh Lowe

    “I have had some general discussions at different stages over the past year with different personnel, none of which have had any detail in it,” Fahey told the Weekend Australian.

    “It has always been my understanding that when they finish their investigation there is a strong likelihood that action will be taken.

    Yeah right.
    Now let’s imagine a truthful conversation. …
    Fahey “So how is that supplements investigation going guys”
    Underlings “Well, John, we’re in a bit of a bind. We have got nothing and it’s going nowhere. Truth is it was supposed to be a 24 hour beat-up to pump up our budget funding and keep McTernan and the Slapper happy. Trouble is, that useless fuckwit Demetriou keeps leaking shit to the Age and the thing just won’t die quietly”
    .
    Hmmm … Best just tell John that charges will happen one day (after his tenure is up).

  45. Leigh Lowe

    Stinking hot here in Perth , which is hurting the Poms. Australia off to a flyer in their second innings.Cheers

    Stuart Broad copped a whack on the foot and it might be broken. Whilst he was hobbling around, unsympathetic Aussie supporters observed that this was nothing new – he has always had trouble walking.
    I love the tactics.
    Sledge them and make them think “broken arm …. broken arm …. mustn’t let them break my arm” – then break their feet.

  46. Siltstone

    In five minutes last week, Tania Hird castrated Andrew Demetriou (sure, there is a dispute as to whether he ever had any testicles in the first pace) and left his torso (sans gonads) hanging in the breeze, fly blown and smelly. Demetriou is the most serious embarrassment to ALF is it’s history. Andrew the Eunuch, go forth and “spend more time with the kids” (the wife wont be much interested). John Fahey is next is he does not wake up.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/sport/opinion/tania-hird-leaves-a-little-egg-on-the-face-of-andrew-demetriou/story-e6frg7t6-1226781039945#

  47. JohnA

    It is believed that Holden already have a team of experts over there now, studying how to re-write the “Holden Owners’ Manual” into pidgin Chinese-English.

    Oh, well, that could be an improvement on the nanny-ling0 of most current manuals, which seem to be written for the vocabulary and comprehension of a fifth-grader.

  48. Token

    Hey, I got a message from M0nty.

    Though it has been a long time since it was used as a distraction in Feb by Gillard for 3 ministers resigning, but the fact is this story is just about to break.

    He’ll be back to sneer at you all when it all happens…any time now…any time…really you will be sorry…any time now…

  49. the sting

    Siltstone,I agree,Tania Hird demolished all the nonsense and lies about this AFL scandal in five minutes.I suspect more people believe her than your castrated Demetriou.

  50. james

    Sledge them and make them think “broken arm …. broken arm …. mustn’t let them break my arm” – then break their feet.

    The Poms self pity all over the Internet is almost sad to behold.

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