Monday Forum: December 23, 2013

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1,191 Responses to Monday Forum: December 23, 2013

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  1. Motelier

    She can recall conversations held years ago.

    Every woman has that “gift”. It’s always about a grudge she’s still holding.

    That “gift” is never about a grudge, always about the funny things that happen, but I do guess the other things are filed away ready to be used when necessary.

  2. JC

    Good ol’ Jesse. Is still around? I recall just after the Clinton/Monica scandal, it came out that Jesse was boning his personal assistant and she had a kid to him.

    So what does Jesse do, he says he needed to time to reflect on his sinfulness and take out from his “ministry”. The reflection was one entire weekend. That’s it.

  3. Gab

    She can recall conversations held years ago.

    Wish I could. I can’t remember what was said to me three days ago, let alone years ago. I’m no good at that holding grudges stuff because I forget what the argument was about. On the other hand, you can certainly trust me with your secrets becuase I forget them.

  4. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Wow ! I want to be secretary of the fan club

    Given the name of the proposed band, your sacrifice would be appreciated……..

  5. Motelier

    She can recall conversations held years ago.

    …….
    On the other hand, you can certainly trust me with your secrets becuase I forget them.

    Uhhhhmmmm. Maybe not. I think you have sharper knives in your draw than I. do.

    😀

  6. Motelier

    ZK2A

    Nah,

    They will need a manager. Hmmmmmmm can I volunteer?

  7. johanna

    This woman doesn’t have it, JC.

    I can remember our phone number when I was in primary school, though. It was LB 5284.

    It’s interesting how people’s memories work. I have a “barrister’s brain” – can quickly get across complex material and use it accurately at the time. But a year later, it’s completely gone. Very handy for passing exams. I’m OK at remembering concepts over time, even if I have to look up the specific references now and then.

    A friend has a memory like a calendar – she will recall events from years ago along the lines of “then on the Tuesday, XXX happened.” But she’s hopeless at conceptual thought.

  8. Tintarella di Luna

    Given the name of the proposed band, your sacrifice would be appreciated……..

    I’ll start practising, let me know the lineup and first gig and I’ll get cracking.

  9. Tom

    They’re still doing the no-talkies thing, so we’ll have to judge them on what they actually do:

    RESOURCES, infrastructure and road projects worth $400 billion have been given the green light as the Abbott government demolishes objections from the Greens and moves to reverse a predicted fall in mining investment that could drag down the economy for two years.

    Environment Minister Greg Hunt has taken decisions on 125 projects in the Coalition’s first three months in office, including approving 29 major projects, which the government estimates are worth $400bn. The decisions – the latest of which was Clive Palmer’s giant Waratah Coal/China First coalmine and railway line to the Abbot Point coal port – could spark a new wave of development.

    Mr Hunt also has approved the $1.4bn Abbot Point coal terminal expansion, which paves the way for the creation of the world’s biggest coal export port.

    But the approvals – particularly coalmine approvals in the Galilee Basin and the expansion of the Abbot Point coal port – have sparked allegations of “development at any cost” from the Greens and environment groups.

    Good. About frigging time.

  10. Tintarella di Luna

    Goodnight gatti, hope you all had a lovely Christmas Day and Boxing Day.

  11. Tom

    Queensland Greens senator Larissa Waters has described the approval as a “terrible Christmas present for the planet” and has raised concerns about its impact on underground water aquifers as well as its impact on combating climate change.

    Bwaaaaaahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!!!

  12. Motelier

    Johanna,

    We are all different.

    I find internet banking passwords easy to remember, and networks easy to set up.

    Mrs M is really Mrs Not Techmologically Literate.

  13. Motelier

    Tom,

    The greens can stand in front of a mirror and complain for all I care.

    Bring on the investment.

  14. Motelier

    And the bus has arrived.

  15. Beef

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha and the Antidisestablishmentrianiasms

    I’ll start practising, let me know the lineup and first gig and I’ll get cracking.

    I’d like to sit in on a jam session,
    guitarist, rusty requiring motivation-been known to get cracking

    Fender Strat—Marshall Mini Stack Amp—Zoom effects pedals/processor for noisy mind numbing repetetive venting or,
    Ibanez Hummingbird Acoustic for picking (Intense cracking)/Rhythm.
    Homemade bongos from a musical worksop.
    Blues Harmonica in ‘E’, thats for anyone but me
    Casio electric piano with light up keys to follow

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha and the Antidisestablishmentrianiasms featuring Tintarella di Luna with Beef 🙂

  16. Beef

    Ran into an old school mate today, 30 years, gidday ‘notso’ I said without thinking, how have you been doing etc etc.
    His wife, who I’d never met, also called him ‘notso’, It’s surprised me that the nickname he’d had since kindergarten had stuck with him. His surname is ‘Bright’. He’s an Electrical Engineer.

  17. johanna

    Mark Steyn on declining fertility in the West:

    http://www.steynonline.com/5361/the-lesson-according-to-luke

    “If the problem with socialism is, as Mrs. Thatcher says, that eventually you run out of other people’s money, much of the West has advanced to the next stage: it’s run out of other people, period. Greece is a land of ever-fewer customers and fewer workers but ever more retirees and more government. How do you grow your economy in an ever-shrinking market? The developed world, like Elisabeth, is barren. Collectively barren, I hasten to add. Individually, it’s made up of millions of fertile women, who voluntarily opt for no children at all or one designer kid at 39. In Italy, the home of the Church, the birthrate’s somewhere around 1.2, 1.3 children per couple – or about half “replacement rate.” Japan, Germany and Russia are already in net population decline. Fifty percent of Japanese women born in the Seventies are childless. Between 1990 and 2000, the percentage of Spanish women childless at the age of 30 almost doubled, from just over 30 percent to just shy of 60 percent. In Sweden, Finland, Austria, Switzerland, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, 20 percent of 40-year old women are childless. In a recent poll, invited to state the “ideal” number of children, 16.6 percent of Germans answered “None.”
    ——————————————————-
    Since there is no sign that men are losing interest in spreading their sperm around, why is it that women who have a choice don’t want to have lots of children?

    It’s a question that bears further investigation.

    And please, don’t hit the reflexive “feminazis” button. The statistics are similar in places where that factor was irrelevant.

  18. C.L.

    Great work, Vlad.

    Last month, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a law banning abortion advertising. Some members of the Duma (the Russian state assembly), are talking about going even further and banning the procedure itself. The Russian Orthodox Church, whose numbers are swelling with converts and “reverts,” is weighing in as well. One Orthodox prelate called abortion a “mutiny against God.”

    Russia Considers Banning Abortions as Abortion Decimates Its Population.

  19. C.L.

    IVF industry uses reverse gender selection case as propaganda to overturn gender selection ban:

    Mum of three sons who spent $40,000 to have girl supports push to overturn sex selection ban.

    A MOTHER of three boys who travelled the world, spending more than $40,000 in a successful bid to have a daughter, has applauded calls by a leading IVF pioneer for the legalisation of sex selection of babies.

    The Melbourne mum, 39, who has just celebrated Christmas with her daughter, does not want other families to have to go to the same lengths she did in going overseas to get around an Australian ban on the practice.

    “It’s really tough,” she said. “We had to leave our children to travel, which was probably the hardest of all.”

    A Morgan Gallup poll of 650 Australians showed four in five were against using IVF to choose the sex of babies in order to gender-balance families.

    But despite commissioning that poll, IVF pioneer Professor Gab Kovacs has stepped up the push to overturn the sex selection ban.

    Writing in the International Journal of Reproductive Medicine, Prof Kovacs said preimplantation genetic diagnosis, or PGD, should be allowed, but not be encouraged.

    “I do not believe that sex selection should be advertised by those who offer the service … or that it should be encouraged. But it should not be prohibited,” Prof Kovacs said.

    Two tricks here: 1) it’s really about having girls! And 2) ‘no no, we won’t go too far; no advertising, promise.’ That’s the meaningless concession – there is always a meaningless concession – to short term, soon-to-be-overthrown sensibilities.

    She said few people had understood her desperation to have a girl.

    “I felt the hypocrisy,” she said.

    “They said ‘You should just be grateful. You’ve got three happy children.’

    “And I was grateful. But it doesn’t mean I didn’t feel that unbalance.

    “I just didn’t feel complete. I didn’t have that peace.”

    What an idiot.

  20. wreckage

    Pretty simple. Kids are a massive impediment to your career. Moreover we encourage people to not think of themselves as adults until 35+, by which point you’re heading into fertility decline. Even if an individual isn’t, people who might have had 3 or 4 kids only have time for 2.

    Housing costs are probably a factor, too.

    The idea of motherhood as failure has been simmering in our culture for decades: barefoot and pregnant, for example. The morality that many preach to their daughters, screw around but you better bloody not get pregnant… again: becoming a mother is failure. Success is money. Success is A Career (like they bloody well exist for 90% of the population anyway!). Success is not having children until after you get the sudden lurching realization that you might have left it too late. Success is a huge house, with each kid having a bedroom and a playroom, and knowing you can afford to send them to university.

    Unconscious social norms are driving, too. How many people do you know with 3+ children? People try to be average.

  21. C.L.

    The developed world, like Elisabeth, is barren. Collectively barren, I hasten to add. Individually, it’s made up of millions of fertile women, who voluntarily opt for no children at all or one designer kid at 39.

    Silly old Pope Paul VI, hey?

    Predicted the whole catastrophe 45 years ago.

  22. wreckage

    Presumably she felt peace by conceiving and then discarding as many disposable boys as it took?

  23. wreckage

    CL, he was clearly right about that, but you can’t put the genie back in the bottle.

  24. Fisky

    Putin is doing a magnificent job of ruining the Left. In fact, he’s perfect for the job, because having been a Soviet most of his adult life, the Left can’t really go after him the same way they’d run down a Newt Gingrich. The legacy of anti-Americanism on the Left ironically works in favour of a staunch defender of the West.

  25. Fisky

    Also, Hungary’s Victor Orban, arguably the torch-bearer of the Fisk Doctrine who is killing the Left in the polls, and doing a terrific job at stacking the government with non-Leftists, censoring Leftist speech and making Leftism a career-killing proposition.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/10/23/hungary-rally-orban-idUSL5N0ID3AY20131023

  26. johanna

    The thing is, if we don’t work out a way to convince women in the West to have more children, the endpoint is going to be very ugly.

    As a relatively affluent Western woman, the downsides of having children are very clear. It costs you a fortune in foregone income and super, and if you have any brains at all you are relegated to conversing with people with an IQ in single, or low double, figures, for years. While cleaning up their wee, poo and spew. It’s not something that most men would volunteer for.

    It’s an issue to do with people getting rich enough to have choices, as well as cultural values, IMO. Rich women throughout history have always paid others to do the dirty work with regard to raising their kids. Perhaps it’s just that this trend is moving through a larger segment of the population – along with the option of not having them in the first place.

  27. C.L.

    As a relatively affluent Western woman, the downsides of having children are very clear. It costs you a fortune in foregone income and super, and if you have any brains at all you are relegated to conversing with people with an IQ in single, or low double, figures, for years. While cleaning up their wee, poo and spew. It’s not something that most men would volunteer for.

    I think you’ve answered your own question about today’s less than courageous, less than spiritually deep women and what they (suppressed yawn) want. Motherhood – even as you just caricatured it – is 100 times more important than anything else a woman can do.

    Our culture has become poisoned by feminist dogma to the extent that we’re now unable to describe women’s flaws as readily as every advertiser in the Western world so casually describes men’s. Certain facts are taboo. For example, that today’s Western women are the laziest, most easy-living whiners in the entire history of humanity. And 98 percent of what makes their lives so easy and comfortable was given to them by men. They are adolescently prone to the messaging and myth-making of image-makers, advertisers and pushy feminist life coaches. Every man in the Western world knew why the heroines of Sex In The City couldn’t find a decent man. It was because they were promiscuous, shallow sluts.

    The other new thing in the contemporary West is that neither men nor women see themselves as part of a continuum of history and culture. The fate of ‘the Western world’ or of Christendom or even of their family line is of no interest to people who cannot imagine having a third child because it would spoil their already accessorised 50s.

  28. Fisky

    As a relatively affluent Western woman, the downsides of having children are very clear.

    Abbott’s approach is perhaps the only thing that will turn things around – throwing 50K/annum at middle-class women to have kids. If that doesn’t work…

  29. johanna

    Well, C.L. , your idealistic version of how the human race works may keep you warm at night. But, I repeat, rich women from the earliest recorded times have paid others to do the shit work with regard to looking after their kids. That is across cultures, and thousands of years of history.

    Why? Because most women, like most men, find it to be brain-dead, grinding and unrewarding, if they have the option of doing something else. Unless, of course, they are being paid for it and also happen to like children.

    It’s a serious problem for the West, but harking back to some imaginary idealised time where most women just adored pregnancy, childbirth and spending their lives cleaning up bodily fluids doesn’t cut it.

  30. johanna

    In re previous discussion about the usefulness of scanning metadata, I submit this excerpt from Hayek’s address on the occasion of him being awarded the Nobel Prize:

    “In some fields, particularly where problems of a similar kind arise in the physical sciences, the difficulties can be overcome by using, instead of specific information about the individual elements, data about the relative frequency, or the probability, of the occurrence of the various distinctive properties of the elements. But this is true only where we have to deal with “phenomena of unorganized complexity,” in contrast to those “phenomena of organized complexity” with which we have to deal in the social sciences. Organized complexity here means that the character of the structures showing it depends not only on the properties of the individual elements of which they are composed, and the relative frequency with which they occur, but also on the manner in which the individual elements are connected with each other. In the explanation of the working of such structures we can for this reason not replace the information about the individual elements by statistical information, but require full information about each element if from our theory we are to derive specific predictions about individual events. Without such specific information about the individual elements we shall be confined to what on another occasion I have called mere pattern predictions – predictions of some of the general attributes of the structures that will form themselves, but not containing specific statements about the individual elements of which the structures will be made up.”

  31. dover_beach

    johanna, there was nothing ‘idealistic’ in what CL wrote above.

  32. entropy

    Unconscious social norms are driving, too. How many people do you know with 3+ children? People try to be average

    Society certainly frowns on having more than two ankle biters. Gaia will be unhappy. SUVs are a sign you hate the planet, aren’t a real driver and also hate pedestrians.

    Also, family tickets only ever allow for two kids. Right there is one big impediment to having more than two. The mega fortune required to take the 3+ kid family to any event.

  33. kae

    Having children is unrewarding?

    I doubt there’s anything more rewarding than having a child cuddle you and say “I love you, Mummy.”

    Unfortunately I didn’t have children. By choice and not by choice. I always wanted children however I married late and my spouse was happy not to have any children (and as we’ve been apart for over 12 years I am now happy that I have no ties to him and his family). And he lied to me about wanting/having children.

    It was always very important to me that if I became a mother there would need to be a father in the picture, it was not a job that I felt I could do on my own.

  34. Combine_Dave

    The thing is, if we don’t work out a way to convince women in the West to have more children, the endpoint is going to be very ugly.

    True. Wouldn’t the PPL have this covered and also the wymminss vote..

    As a relatively affluent Western woman, the downsides of having children are very clear. It costs you a fortune in foregone income and super, and if you have any brains at all you are relegated to conversing with people with an IQ in single, or low double, figures, for years. While cleaning up their wee, poo and spew. It’s not something that most men would volunteer for.

    I understand the point about foregone income, it’s a hard choice between dollars coming in and going out to daycare vs staying home to care for the kids and having no income (depending on how generous your employer is).

    But I utterly reject your point on caring for your kids being somehow a negative mind numbing task. I really enjoy the time spent with Combine Dave junior even if that time is spent changing liquid poo nappies (his mother refuses to change him).

    Yes there’s plenty of low IQ mums and dads staying home on welfare and being full time parents with 10 kids. Due to our welfare system people like these are a serious threat to social stability.

  35. Tintarella di Luna

    “They said ‘You should just be grateful. You’ve got three happy children.’

    “And I was grateful. But it doesn’t mean I didn’t feel that unbalance.

    “I just didn’t feel complete. I didn’t have that peace.”

    I have a friend, an eminent foetal surgeon who does a great black comedy routine of wealthy women wanting abortions because the foetus’ head looks too big (OTT) but the excuses for abortions are sickening, He related to us the story of a wealthy couple who had three gorgeous daughters, wanted a son (for the balance) three abortions later (they were all girls) unto them was born a son who unfortunately had severe disabilities. Man oh man, some people are just beyond pleasing. This is not a vengeance wreaked vengeance but a sad happenstance.

  36. blogstrop

    Why? Because most women, like most men, find it to be brain-dead, grinding and unrewarding, if they have the option of doing something else. Unless, of course, they are being paid for it and also happen to like children.
    Brain-dead and unrewarding? I know a number of women (Mrs. B among them) who are thankful they were able stop work for all the years it took to look after their family in the way they preferred to do. In Mrs. B’s case that was ten years at home, three children, and she only went back to part time work when she was good and ready.
    Let’s not be prescriptive about this sort of thing.

  37. Tintarella di Luna

    I know a number of women (Mrs. B among them) who are thankful they were able stop work for all the years it took to look after their family in the way they preferred to do. In Mrs. B’s case that was ten years at home, three children, and she only went back to part time work when she was good and ready.

    I absolutely loved the time I had at home with my children, I wish we’d had more children but that was not to be.

  38. Tintarella di Luna

    Since there is no sign that men are losing interest in spreading their sperm around, why is it that women who have a choice don’t want to have lots of children?

    I think the West is relying on the new SSM phenomenon – according to my obstetrics clinician SIL there’s a projected increase in homosexual couples ‘having’ children – apparently the Gays will save the West

  39. Megan

    Well, I was home full time for more than ten years and part time for seven raising my three children. I made that choice because when I was teaching I could see that there were definite advantages to children with a full time parent and we were lucky enough to be able to afford to do that. I’d do it again in a heartbeat.

    As for the “brain dead, grinding and unrewarding” parts of it? They were no more and no less brain dead, grinding and unrewarding than many components of paid work I have experienced, or the long grind of my husband’s forty years of self employment. Even though he loves it.

  40. Tintarella di Luna

    It was always very important to me that if I became a mother there would need to be a father in the picture, it was not a job that I felt I could do on my own.

    kae that is a profoundly thoughtful comment and I’m sure you have other blessings that fill that void.

  41. Token

    The Australian editorial picks up on the High Court engaging in judicial activism it was not engaged to do:

    Lawyers have been stunned to find the judgment offered an elegantly developed argument for a redefinition of marriage, arguing both a historical and a constitutional basis on which the commonwealth parliament could pass a same-sex marriage bill.

    It is cleverly interwoven with its consideration of the ACT act. Here, critics say, is the latest proof of the court’s predisposition to judicial activism.

    It is time for recall elections on such “justices”:

    The judgment went on: “The 19th-century use of terms of approval, like ‘marriages through Christendom’ or marriages according to the law of ‘Christian states’, or terms of disapproval, like ‘marriages among infidel nations’ served only to obscure circularity of reasoning. Each was a term which sought to mask the adoption of a premise which begged the question of what ‘marriage’ means.”

    This completely disingenuous argument destroys itself by its own circularity. Moreover, it exposes the meddling intentions of the learned justices.

  42. Leigh Lowe

    Isn’t it a beautiful word, Tinta? What a great name for a band: the antidisestablishmentariansists.

    You won’t fit that on the bass drum.

  43. Token

    Why? Because most women, like most men, find it to be brain-dead, grinding and unrewarding, if they have the option of doing something else.

    My wife is a bit different, but most of her friends thought this & delayed having children until mid 30s.

    Then when they had children they realised this perception is a lie. They find a special fulfilment in being a mother which exceeds & enhances career success. Many do better in their dual role than they did in their previous life.

    The lie sold be the wymynses is taking more from women than they realise.

    We can see it when we engage with lost childless women who can not find fulfilment in their careers.

  44. JC

    Overtaking Germany? Really?

    In an upbeat assessment of the country’s prospects, the CEBR said Britain, the sixth biggest economy in the world, will see its GDP grow from £1.59 trillion to £2.64 trillion by 2028.

    In the same period, Germany’s output will grow more slowly from £2.2 trillion to £2.69 trillion, with growth hampered by a weak euro, an ageing population and the prospect of future Eurozone bailouts. It puts Britain on course to surpass Germany by 2030.

    Britain is also due to overtake France by 2018. Its global ranking is set to slide as Francois Hollande’s high tax regime and weak exports suffocate growth.

  45. Motelier

    Regarding the topic of rearing children.

    Mrs M and I have two boys, both adults now.

    We were never blessed with another.

    We shared the role of doting parents with both of them whether they were infants or now as adults. Watching a four year old playing with blocks and realising that three rows of three equals nine more than makes up for the nights pacing the floor with a sick and miserable baby.

    Changing nappies and feeding at midnight fitted into our lifestyle as we were both studying externally.

    Both of us are proud of the fact that both boys are now well on their way to achieving their ambitions. Each little victory they have reflects on us.

    Would I do it again. Absolutely!

  46. That’s a weird time to be checking.
    No. Many children with severe Autism have bizarre sleep patterns.
    Parents and carers are often required to sleep in shifts to ensure safe supervision.
    Similarly, parents of children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy never get a full night’s sleep.
    These kids get uncomfortable in the night, but are unable to turn themselves in bed.
    One parent has always to be awake to help.
    It’s similar to having a permanent newborn in terms of disturbed sleep.
    Most boys with Duchenne don’t live into their second decade.
    Think about that – endless sleepless nights – until your loved child eventually dies…..

  47. JC

    Well, C.L. , your idealistic version of how the human race works may keep you warm at night. But, I repeat, rich women from the earliest recorded times have paid others to do the shit work with regard to looking after their kids. That is across cultures, and thousands of years of history.

    Johanna

    If you’re talking about “rich” women, let me tell you a few things about one cohort I was familiar with. Women who I worked with on Wall Street were perhaps the highest paid group of”ladies” in the world at the time. Those who had kids were miserable about having to work and would rather have been home, which is possibly why they are/were perhaps, other than NY female lawyers, the most miserable, unhappy bunch of human beings on the planets…(yes plural).

  48. Token

    Think about that – endless sleepless nights – until your loved child eventually dies…..

    Thank you for the considered post Bob.

    We all wish you would spend your time here posting in the same spirit.

  49. JC

    In any event staying at home isn’t a bad deal when you think about it. Get the kids to school or play group, go to gym, have lunch or a coffee with friends, do a little cleaning for about an hour or so, pick up the kids and get the dinner ready, or buy takeout.

    If someone’s supporting you financially I can’t think this sort of life is hell on earth. Sorry, but I don’t.

  50. srr

    I was surprised to hear an ‘IVF Father’, on talk-back radio, care to warn of the 20% of children born through IVF, being born with serious health issues.

    What is this insanity that flushing, aborting and trashing millions of children who don’t fit vain, selfish and foolish people’s Designer denying, personal designs, is fine, but we aren’t allowed to talk about the obscenely high percentage of IVF children allowed to be implanted, carried and born, who suffer for their lives, because it’s somehow supposed to be ‘insensitive’?

  51. JC

    The BDS haters are basically the anti-Semitic hard left. The science is in and the debate well and truly settled.

    Auschwitz meant that six million Jews were killed, and thrown on the waste-heap of Europe, for what they were considered: money-Jews. Finance capital and the banks, the hard core of the system of imperialism and capitalism, had turned the hatred of men against money and exploitation, and against the Jews. . . . Antisemitism is really a hatred of capitalism.
    —Ulrike Meinhof, left-wing German terrorist of the 1970s1

  52. Motelier

    Morning JC

    Good to see you in festive spirits.

    🙂

  53. srr

    Why do women need good men?

    To protect them and their children from other women.

  54. Tom

    The leftard airhead knowall Jessica Irvine aspires to be:

    Laura Tingle, Australian Financial Review, January 31:

    CRITICS argue that by announcing the election date from a position of weakness, Ms Gillard will only stir the pot of resentment among voters who just want the government gone now. But there are strong arguments in support of the decision . . . By putting the date out there, the Prime Minister maximises the time in which, as she put it, she looks like she is governing rather than campaigning. The time when she can look like a prime minister in control of events rather than hostage to them.

    On second thoughts. Tingle, Australian Financial Review, December 20:

    JULIA Gillard’s unprecedented decision to announce the election date nine months early only crystallised voter exasperation with the government. Voters just wanted the election out of the way and the government gone . . . Voters just ponder what is needed to break the political competence drought.

  55. Token

    To protect them and their children from other women.

    2 people working together to raise children allow specialisation therefore astronomically better better results than one person. A male female combo provides a mix of skill & an ability to view problems from different angles.

    Our society should do everything possible to allow as many children as possible to have this through their childhood.

  56. Token

    When is Stutch going to put the hapless hyper-partisan out to pasture?

  57. Motelier

    Our society should do everything possible to allow as many children as possible to have this through their childhood.

    +1

    We can afford it. Society that is

  58. incoherent rambler

    Parents overrate their impact on their children.

  59. Combine_Dave

    2 people working together to raise children allow specialisation therefore astronomically better better results than one person. A male female combo provides a mix of skill & an ability to view problems from different angles.

    Plus 1.

    Although problems can occour if one side doesn’t chip in.

  60. Combine_Dave

    Parents overrate their impact on their children.

    I disagree. I think parental impact; in terms of whether the kid gets edumacted, has clothes on its back, is safe from abuse, setting an example, well fed etc is pivotal to rearing a child.

    It may be correct to state that other factors however are often underrated; peer group, bad school/neighbourhood, influence of teachers, media, society’s general culture.

    How many times do you hear of a good kid led astray?

    On the other hand parents can control the area in which they live, the school their kid goes to, and at an early age the media, the peers, other people their child will learn from.

  61. Mike of Marion

    Are the Greenfilth scum, via their mouthpiece Fairfax setting up an AbbottAbbottAbbott666 gotcha???

    Pushing Cosgrove as GG

  62. Tel

    Why do women need good men?

    To gather resources and make opportunities for the children. Women seek wealth and power; read “The Red Queen” by Matt Ridley.

  63. C.L.

    Well, C.L. , your idealistic version of how the human race works may keep you warm at night.

    What a dumb comment.

    I posited no idealistic version of how the human race works.

    As a matter of biological reality, however, women must have children.

    I’m sorry if this comes as a shock to you.

  64. srr

    A male female combo provides a mix of skill & an ability to view problems from different angles.

    Yes. Also, the male should be masculine.

    “Wait until your father gets home.”, in a sound, loving, healthy home, is the comforting declaration that there are two who care for each child enough to work together to raise the children to being their best for themselves and everyone else.

  65. C.L.

    Attorney-General Eric Holder finally acts on of “knock-out game”:

    Federal authorities charge white ‘knockout’ suspect with hate crime.

    Federal authorities said Thursday they have arrested and charged a Texas man in connection with the “knockout game,” accusing him of a hate crime for targeting a black man for a vicious street attack.

    Most knockout victims that have appeared in news reports have been white, but the Justice Department said in this instance the victim was a 79-year-old black man, and stepped in with federal charges.

  66. candy

    “do a little cleaning for about an hour or so … buy takeout.”

    That’s pretty funny, JC 🙂

  67. Beef

    Are the Greenfilth scum, via their mouthpiece Fairfax setting up an AbbottAbbottAbbott666 gotcha???

    Been pondering this also Mike.

    Just waiting for the ‘expose’ by David Marr and his ilk on a young cadet throwing punches at walls near other cadets who wouldn’t pay to use his secret peep hole into the female admin toilets.

    It’s flippant but until the luvvies have something negative to dredge/make up from his past I will reserve judgment.

    I know little of him other than he’s a retired General, got asked to do do stuff and did it well with few complaints. But who knows what little pissant the luvvie media will dig up from his past to discredit him

  68. Tom

    The far left’s headless howler monkeys demand their daily hate so today’s fucktard Get Abbott rant at ShakeMyHead.com to inflate the online traffic is brought to you by the Muslim Brotherhood’s Waleed Aly, aka Animal from the Muppets band.

  69. JC

    Morning JC

    Good to see you in festive spirits.

    Yep. always in a good mood getting stuck into the left.

  70. JC

    Shipping rates are moving up. Could be a pointer to some serious shit going on in the global economy in 2014. Look at the rates for Capesize vessels.

    http://www.dryships.com/pages/report.asp

    Ordinarily if this was seen as temporary it wouldn’t impact so much on the shipping stocks, but this time it has. I reckon world GDP could be back to plus 4% the coming year.

  71. C.L.

    Via Instapundit:

    Lawyers for phony Nobel Laureate Michael Mann acknowledge that he is indeed a fraud.

  72. srr

    Tel, are you aware of how many women, hide, stalk, hunt and take, the “resources and opportunities made for the children” by good women?

    Good men protect their families from those ‘Dianna’s’, not allowing them to creep in and sow seeds of doubt, envy and personal, prideful lusts and desire’s, in the minds and hearts of the women they chose to bear and raise their children.

    Good men ensure their good women are in no doubt that they are rare and treasured.

    Good women thank God for their good men.

    Such good men and good women working together in their natural roles, bless their children and humanity.

    Women who only hunt men to fund their personal pride in children to boast of, are a curse to all.

  73. JC

    If any of you leftwing imbeciles are around like Spuds, Fatboy or Stepford… Even you Keroboy. You know how you’re always pushing for socialism and shit like that. Would you mind explaining how you would place global shipping under a command and control model, as it’s one of the most complex industries I’ve ever encountered.

    You dim bulbs. You morons.

  74. Tom

    Would you mind explaining how you would place global shipping under a command and control model

    Simple. It’s one of the industries the Australian left had abolished, in the same way they are now abolishing manufacturing.

  75. JC

    Via Instapundit:

    Lawyers for phony Nobel Laureate Michael Mann acknowledge that he is indeed a fraud.

    Ever seen him? My bet is is that he’s not going to be seen as one of the most illustrious scientists of the past 100 or so years.

    He’d easily fit into your pocket.

  76. Beef

    “Wait until your father gets home.”

    This statement made me shudder reading it.

    I detested this when threatened to me as a child and I detested even more when my wife would use the same “threat”.

    As a child it steeled me for the coming onslaught. The negative impact it had on my relationship with my father was profound. I only saw him as a demon who would inflict pain without, in my mind, any just cause.
    I still recall the time I wore my new slippers outside and trod in a puddle, the willow branch broke not only itself, It broke me. I hated him.

    I did not want for my children to be afraid of their father when he came home exhasted from work, wanting only to see friendly smiles.

    If my wife had an issue with the children she could not manage and wanted my intervention, she was to speak to me first, that we may discuss her and the childrens problem. Together we would issue ‘threats’ but never physical.

  77. JC

    Simple. It’s one of the industries the Australian left had abolished, in the same way they are now abolishing manufacturing.

    It makes me angry, really angry that these scum were allowed to get away with the big lie that the price of energy wouldn’t impact on energy intensive industries. Any of them making such a suggestion again should be harpooned.

  78. srr

    Shipping rates are moving up. Could be a pointer…

    …as were those miles and miles of new suburbs earmarked for and filling up with shipping depot’s and warehousing.

  79. JC

    I don;t get your point. Are you saying there’s still overcapacity?

  80. JC

    Hey Fatboy. You know how only about 10 or so weeks ago you were posting comments here during the government close down that the GOP was headed for oblivion and that this was almost a “scientifical” fact?

    Recall how some of us were saying that you ought to get off the sugar high and stop posting nonsense.

    Remember, you big idiot?

    Poll: Republicans Widen Lead in Generic Ballot

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2013/12/26/poll_republicans_widen_lead_in_generic_ballot.html

    It was during the time you went on your honeymoon and because you spent two or so weeks in the US deluded yourself into thinking you were some sort of US political expert. You fat idiot, monster.

  81. kae

    “Wait until your father gets home” is a copout.

    Discipline should be consistent and both parents should deal with naughty children as the bad behaviour occurs.

  82. JC

    Lol.. Hopey change.

    President Obama’s approval rating has been dropping in national polls, and he could be a drag on fellow party members next year. The CNN poll found that 55 percent of voters say they are more likely to vote for a candidate who opposes the president, while 40 percent say they are likely to chose a candidate who supports him.

    Read more: http://www.realclearpolitics.com/articles/2013/12/26/poll_republicans_widen_lead_in_generic_ballot.html#ixzz2ocywD0mb
    Follow us: @RCP_Articles on Twitter

    Open bet that The Kenyan closes his miserable term in office with polling below Bush.

  83. Beef

    From JC’s link

    Republicans have an advantage in this gap: 36 percent of GOPers say they are enthusiastic about voting, compared to 22 percent of Democrats.

    This sounds encouraging for mid terms, depends on how many registered voters per side I guess. The scare campaign about losing free stuff should tighten these numbers

  84. incoherent rambler

    It makes me angry, really angry that these scum were allowed to get away with the big lie that the price of energy wouldn’t impact on energy intensive industries.

    The “lie” is a little industry in itself. Cheap power builds industry and jobs Cheap power comes when you have lots of capacity, cheap coal (or nukes).

    See http://papundits.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/epa-attacks-only-coal-fired-power-generation/

  85. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Listening to the piping voice of a nearly-four year old sing ‘We wish you a Merry Christmas’ perfectly to the Christmas company at table was a joy to all. Children are just lovely, as they grow and as they learn, each child a tiny miracle which we celebrate at Christmas, and should remember all year.
    Time spent with them is golden time for both men and women. I am sorry for mothers, the bearers of such beauty, who do not think this, and even more so for women who would like to spend more time with their children but who are unable for various good reasons to do so. It’s often tough and an ‘ideal’ of childrearing won’t be available to all. Having said that though, I’d encourage mothers to consider staying home with their kids as a good option. But not everyone has my luck; I didn’t have this option for my first two and made-do with a job (which I short-changed) and a patchwork of childcare.

    I add too that all women need a break, and some time for themselves, and that children need time away from just the one carer as well, so that they can explore the world of other people, slowly. Families make their own decisions on all of this. Let them alone, and leave women the freedom to also decide.

  86. struth

    Just about the having kids issue.
    I look at a few things and wonder.
    If the pill had been around a couple of hundred years ago, what would the birth rate have been like then?
    Besides the “rich” women talked about here , deciding not to have kids, what about the other end of the financial spectrum and even the middle?
    I have noticed that as our western values in many areas, crash down around us, many young people are having complete disfunctional relationships and finding it very hard to get anything serious going ,that is not one big soap opera. Usually fuelled by laziness and a lack of moral guidance.
    What role does instant porn play, on the internet, with young men?
    Our society is becoming obese and an older fellow like me notice that good looking young girls are more fewer and far between, due to the potential for attractive in many taken away by them rolling in fat, and injecting ink into it. The boys have been programmed to be political correct wimps and are not great catches themselves.
    Roles are confused.
    Young men are withdrawn and really both sexes don’t offer each other much in any way .
    They are lethargic and it’s all too hard.
    Look at how long they are now staying with mum and dad.
    I generalize of course, and there are still many great young people having a go.
    But I wonder, how those factors play out in the statistics.
    The lack of having kids in my view has been caused by the nanny state, making life teadious and un exciting for young people. Young men have been told who they are and what they feel must be controlled as it is wrong.They have almost given up. They don’t like the left wing dominated society they find themselves in and don’t know any different.

  87. srr

    “Wait until your father gets home” is….choosing to ignore the whole quote and it’s context.

    How about, “And don’t expect your father to say, ‘Ignore the crazy bitch’, like your friends fathers do.
    We aren’t like your school friends parents. We both agree on what is right and wrong and we both care about you enough to teach you the difference.”

  88. Tel

    Cheap power builds industry and jobs Cheap power comes when you have lots of capacity, cheap coal (or nukes).

    Isn’t exactly working for France right now…

  89. srr

    Sad to, that the mention of masculine fathers makes so many instantly think of hard working, tired men, being bullied by little women into using weapons against little children.

    I think of welcomed and rested fathers overseeing the labour of making restitution for the wrong (they agree with the mother), the child committed and needs to learn does not pay.

  90. nanuestalker

    Isn’t exactly working for France right now…

    The stupidity hurts … shouldn’t you be on the road to Burke?

  91. srr

    “Cheap power never works”, … where Leftist, “don’t you dare offend Greenies and their fellow caveman mentality Islamists”, UN owned and controlled States bow to The Religions of Bullshit.

  92. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    To gather resources and make opportunities for the children. Women seek wealth and power; read “The Red Queen” by Matt Ridley.

    An interesting take on it, Tel. Do you mean ‘The Red Queen’ by Philippa Gregory, which is about Margaret Beaufort, great grand-daughter of John of Gaunt by his mistress Katherine Swynford (later legitimated), and the last of the Lancastrian line? The Red Queen who plotted and schemed for the throne all her life for her son Henry Tudor, sired by an upstart Welshman, a mere Royal servant. Henry the Seventh’s claim to Royalty was somewhat distant, even spurious, but Margaret never gave up on promoting her son, winning the throne for him in the end with all her plotting and alliances.

    Her grandson, Henry the Eighth made his motto “Dieu et mon Droit”. To emphasise his ‘right’ by Royal blood, because Margaret had organised for her son marry into the York line, bringing this Royal blood to Henry VIII, thus resolving the old Cousin’s Wars (Wars of the Roses).

    Yes, women by nature look to advantage for their children. And for good fathers for them, providers. Our genes though are the prime movers and say that these things lie in men’s muscle and brains and sex appeal. Our culture says they lie in men’s character and wits, their education and earning capacity. So it is a minefield and many of us make mis-steps along the way. If we are lucky we manage to combine both when we find our own Hairy Ape.

    Even if it takes a few tries. 🙂

  93. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    In any event staying at home isn’t a bad deal when you think about it. Get the kids to school or play group, go to gym, have lunch or a coffee with friends, do a little cleaning for about an hour or so, pick up the kids and get the dinner ready, or buy takeout.

    If someone’s supporting you financially I can’t think this sort of life is hell on earth. Sorry, but I don’t.

    hahaha. Some women will always want more, JC. Including me. A little self-actualisation creeps in here and there for most women. In one of the most popular women’s books of recent years, “Fifty Shades of Grey” the heroine has it all, including an insanely wealthy husband, but still runs her little sideline publishing job as a hobby. Similarly, IRL, I give you Jacqueline Onassis.

    And Candy is right – again! It is more than an hour of housework and other work a day, even with paid help. I think only recently on the Cat here, when you thought women should be deprived of driving, I handed over one of my afternoon pick-up sessions to you. You’ve never got back to me. How did you go??

  94. JC

    Sums it up beautifully.

    Pope Francis knows little about economics, and appears to be under the misapprehension that the Obama-style cronyism he observed in Argentina constitutes free enterprise. Naturally, his comments on matters economic have been lapped up by the press.

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2013/12/pope-francis-speaks-out-for-persecuted-christians.php

  95. calli

    Lizzie, if you like tales of John of Gaunt and his family, you might enjoy Geogette Heyer’s ‘My Lord John’, published posthumously in 1975. It is unfinished, but well written, and worlds away from her light ‘Georgian’ fiction. It gives a little window onto what eventually became full blown (excuse the pun) as the Wars of the Roses.

  96. calli

    Georgette, but you knew that.

    Yes…the dreaded school pickup and activity run around. I juggled that and the family business. I was younger then!

  97. Tel

    The stupidity hurts … shouldn’t you be on the road to Burke?

    Shouldn’t you be listening carefully for that popping sound as you pull your head into the daylight?

    Not wanting to upset you with facts or anything but employment in France is kind of crap right now and they are one of the major producers of cheap electricity in Europe (nuclear power and hydro).

  98. Jessie

    Viv Forbes of the The Carbon Sense Coalition posts an overview of the action by the termite generation at WUWT.

  99. Tel

    Do you mean ‘The Red Queen’ by Philippa Gregory, which is about Margaret Beaufort, great grand-daughter of John of Gaunt by his mistress Katherine Swynford (later legitimated), and the last of the Lancastrian line?

    No, I don’t.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Red-Queen-Evolution-Nature/dp/0060556579

  100. calli

    And following on from the ladies who marry rich and influential men, here is a medieval crown which once graced the head of Richard II’s queen.

  101. kae

    Liking sparkly things as I do, that crown is amazing.

  102. H B Bear

    After a largely meaningless century in the last Test, Watto begins another 12 months of under-performance at number 3. Terrible shot to get dismissed for a top order batsman.

  103. Motelier

    the cricket is on.

    Thanks HBB

  104. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    That’s a weird time to be checking.
    No. Many children with severe Autism have bizarre sleep patterns.
    Parents and carers are often required to sleep in shifts to ensure safe supervision.

    Numbers, I’ve no argument with you when you confine your comments to things like the above, where you do have knowledge and a point of view worth listening to. Even very mild autism, as with my eldest, can mean a first three years of hell for the carer/s. My good news is that things can improve greatly, with a lot of structure, familial stability and patience; often sadly lacking in poorer homes where the condition is often undiagnosed and misunderstood.

  105. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Thanks Tel. You can’t trust a title these days. I’ll magik it down from Amazon and have a read.

  106. Beef

    Thanks Tel. You can’t trust a title these days. I’ll magik it down from Amazon and have a read.

    Scott McGoodwins summary of the book if you’re interested.

  107. C.L.

    It is more than an hour of housework and other work a day …

    Yes, today’s Australian women have it a lot tougher than, say, the 12 year old boys who worked in coal mines in the nineteenth century. Poor things.

  108. Even very mild autism, as with my eldest, can mean a first three years of hell for the carer/s. My good news is that things can improve greatly, with a lot of structure, familial stability and patience; often sadly lacking in poorer homes where the condition is often undiagnosed and misunderstood.

    My nephew the ManChild is on the spectrum. He has his – usually unexpected – strengths and weaknesses, and even though he’s now almost 16, we are still finding them out!

    Yes – early diagnosis, and committed parenting makes a world of difference. My sister has done an amazing job with her son from when he was around 2 1/2 years old and was initially diagnosed. And yes, the first three years or so were very, very hard. The next two weren’t a walk in the park either.

    By the time he got to Grade 1, he was just – just – speaking a little. Today, he lectures me on politics, but can’t remember what the date of his birthday is …

    They are all individuals.

  109. JC

    lol

    Yea like with loading the washing machine, the dryer, dishwasher. There’s hardly anytime for “yourself” like going to the hairdresser for cut or color. even getting nails and feet done properly.

    “Yourself” is the often used term for “me time” gals like to use.

  110. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Thanks, Calli. Heyer’s unfinished, after Tel’s ‘Red Queen’ it is then. Although as far as John of Gaunt is concerned, I am a complete sucker for Anya Seton’s ‘Katherine’.

    That pic you found of the Queenly little diadem was pretty too. I’m with Kae. Love sparkles, so I am very much a Christmassy girl. Sparkles on the tree, and once again, courtesy of Da Hairy Ape, some sparkles on my ears. All the better to hear you with my dear, I josh him with a wink. I am not much good winking though. You in pain, Lizzie? he kindly asks. Are dey da wrong size? Are dey hurtin’ ya?

    As if. He could buy me a breadboard and I’d be happy.

  111. C.L.

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2013/12/pope-francis-speaks-out-for-persecuted-christians.php

    I note that Pope Francis condemned the killing of Christians but refused to name the countries and the religion responsible. So much for the pope’s brave new plain-speaking.

  112. Tel

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B,

    Matt Ridley’s book is about biology, and a little bit of feminism and politics. The title is merely a mnemonic device making reference to the Red Queen from Alice in Wonderland. Connection to any historic queen is quite by accident.

  113. Yes, today’s Australian women have it a lot tougher than, say, the 12 year old boys who worked in coal mines in the nineteenth century. Poor things.

    One of our previous Popes made a statement to L’Osservatore Romano one year, probably on International Women’s Day, saying that the greatest contribution to women’s freedom was the development of the washing machine.

    He was howled down with laughter by the chattering classes, but he was actually dead right. Washing clothes and linen for a household took ALL DAY before mechanisation. All bloody day. And hard physical work, too. And then you had to get the stuff dry.

    I love labour-saving devices. The real challenge is to fill the spare time with really good things like reading and pestering people on the Cat, and not just sitting round doing internet shopping or staring into space, or worse, doing housework.

  114. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Ah, CL, all things are relative. As my relatives could tell you. Even I have fed pigs. I had to carry heavy buckets of meal to them on freezing mornings when I was only thirteen. My right shin bone still bears an indent from where I used to steady the top of the full bucket on my foot on the long slow trek down the paddock heaving my bucket along. Using my leg as a lever to move the bucket was the only way I could do it. I felt so angry about it all that one of my first poems was a ‘Song of the Shirt’ piece of personal projection about the conditions of children in nineteenth century factories and mines. Engels would have been proud of me.

  115. calli

    that the greatest contribution to women’s freedom was the development of the washing machine.

    Followed closely by the sewing machine and the (sigh) vacuum cleaner. And I must have been nice this year because Santa dropped off that object of all foodie desire, a KitchenAid stand mixer (no, not the evil, never to be mentioned evah T machine).

    Now I can make Italian meringue singlehanded. Eating it will be the naughty bit.

  116. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Philippa speaks such good sense. This Christmas I turned the dishwasher over completely to Da Hairy Ape. He sees it as me giving in to his better engineering of the stacking (a constant source of conflict between us) but I see it as my cunning plan to place him centre-stage in household appliance management. Thin end of the wedge, to advance him indoors and beyond just the ride-on mower.

    Da women are on da move, JC.

  117. kae

    When I was little Nanna, who looked after me while Mum worked, used to sweep the carpet using a straw broom and damp tealeaves.

    I’m glad I knew about that as for a while in the 80s I had no vacuum cleaner and that was the only way I could clean the carpet (until I could afford a new vacuum cleaner – trust me, it wasn’t long before I got a new vacuum cleaner!).

    Nanna’s laundry was up the back, a separate building. In it was a copper. She used to wash the old way. While I was little she got one of those big round washing machines with the black wringer on top.

    I’m sure she still boiled the clothes (no hot water in the laundry, either). That would have been in the late 50s.

    She worked very hard, but she did live to 93 to see so many amazing new things, like the Harbour Bridge being built, washing machines and so on coming into common use.

  118. Lizzie, thanks to my recent secondment to a higher level of pay, a good tax refund and a bit of doing without, we are getting a New Kitchen early next year. It will include a Dishwasher. We are only three in the house, and we don’t make a huge mess, but it will free up precious after-work time when we are all tired.

    I am quite secretly thrilled.

  119. .

    JC
    #1124824, posted on December 27, 2013 at 10:27 am

    If any of you leftwing imbeciles are around like Spuds, Fatboy or Stepford… Even you Keroboy. You know how you’re always pushing for socialism and shit like that. Would you mind explaining how you would place global shipping under a command and control model, as it’s one of the most complex industries I’ve ever encountered.

    You dim bulbs. You morons.

    I am sure the MUA can help us out here, JC.

  120. Nanna’s laundry was up the back, a separate building. In it was a copper. She used to wash the old way. While I was little she got one of those big round washing machines with the black wringer on top.

    I’m sure she still boiled the clothes (no hot water in the laundry, either). That would have been in the late 50s.

    I grew up with a copper in the laundry of our ancestral pile, and my Mum still used it as well, especially for sheets and towels. There was also a Trough next to it, in which I bathed from time to time until I was too big to fit in it (around the age of 9, being on the small side).

    Thankfully I was never boiled in the copper, although I think Mum was tempted sometimes.

  121. Motelier

    Careful catehs!

    Or you will end up with all sorts of “useful” tools.

    Have you had a close look at your better half’s man shed?

  122. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Connection to any historic queen is quite by accident.

    Tel, I do get that. I have checked the Ridley book on Amazon and will read it. I got a straight 100% in my Human Genetics assignment at university, so I am obviously interested. I also know and admire Ridley, just didn’t know he had written a book of that title. Regardless of the mix-up, Margaret Beaufort is an exemplar of the things Ridley discusses.

  123. C.L.

    CL, all things are relative. As my relatives could tell you.

    I have relatives of my own, Lizzie.

    And no, backbreaking work is not relative. It is conceptually absolute. As in: Australian women doing house work does not = the labours endured in times of old (mostly by men).

  124. calli

    Coppers, troughs and mangles…my first home still had the copper on its stand with the fireplace below and the chimney above. One power point in the house and no hot running water. This was 1979, and we were flat broke after raising enough money to make the deposit.

    My daughters wouldn’t dream of making do with this sort of stuff. Times have changed.

    The copper goes with me from house to house as we move. It makes a great tub for Louisiana iris.

  125. Infidel Tiger

    I know women with dishwashers, thermomixes, robovacs, gardeners, cleaners, pool boys, au pairs and nannies who still claim they are overworked and need more help. One would almost think that women are fond of a whinge.

  126. C.L.

    The copper goes with me from house to house as we move. It makes a great tub for Louisiana iris.

    Coppers are by means obsolete. People want them. They’re useful for lots of things

  127. Tom

    I am quite secretly thrilled.

    That reminds me of an absurdist pre-internet cartoon by Bernie Kliban of a lumpy female and her dorky boyfriend. The caption: “Lucille was secretly thrilled when Norman sucked her toaster.”

  128. Pedro the Ignorant

    Have you had a close look at your better half’s man shed?

    Sshhh Motelier. Secret mens business.

    The womenfolk think we need all that stuff just to keep up the home maintenance projects.

  129. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    As in: Australian women doing house work does not = the labours endured in times of old (mostly by men).

    Agree, CL.

    Anyone who really disagrees, go to Great Orme in Wales, a Bronze-Age copper mine where small children mined in very confined spaces mostly in complete darkness. Or the Roman salt mines. All unbearable, but borne by toiling humanity, right down through the ages.

  130. duncanm

    Not wanting to upset you with facts or anything but employment in France is kind of crap right now and they are one of the major producers of cheap electricity in Europe (nuclear power and hydro).

    I think the term you’re looking for is Necessary, but not sufficient

  131. candy

    I tend to think if a woman with husband and young children at home does only one hour of housework per day, may be living in a bit of a ‘pigsty’ with unmade beds and living on junk food and not cooking etc, and grubby floors.

    One hour per day is very little time to tend to home and hearth decently. Getting young kids dressed for school, making lunches etc is a fair proportion of that one hour already done.

  132. Pedro the Ignorant

    Antique coppers and old 18 gallon beer kegs (with the end cut out) are great for cooking crabs and crayfish.

    Just try to buy either a copper or keg at an auction and see the ridiculous prices they fetch.

  133. stackja

    Have old copper but no element!

  134. kae

    Aren’t the profits and losses of the drug trade already privatised and socialised, respectively?

    Who pays for the consequences and who makes the money?

  135. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    the greatest contribution to women’s freedom was the delevopement of the washing machine

    My grandmother maintained all her life that electricity, refrigeration and the telephone liberated more women in rural Australia than “THAT Greer female” ever did.

  136. JohnA

    kae #1125073, posted on December 27, 2013 at 2:18 pm

    Aren’t the profits and losses of the drug trade already privatised and socialised, respectively?

    Who pays for the consequences and who makes the money?

    Yes, they are, but legalising the drug trade would be enshrining it in the law, and protecting the situation, without changing the present flow of monies.

  137. Rabz

    Bwahahahahahaha!

    That industrial grade leftist idiot (BIRM) piers morgan is hopefully just about to have his skull cracked by noted conservative, Brett Lee.

  138. Tintarella di Luna

    …Many children with severe Autism have bizarre sleep patterns.

    Parents and carers are often required to sleep in shifts to ensure safe supervision.
    Similarly, parents of children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy never get a full night’s sleep.
    These kids get uncomfortable in the night, but are unable to turn themselves in bed.
    One parent has always to be awake to help.
    It’s similar to having a permanent newborn in terms of disturbed sleep.
    Most boys with Duchenne don’t live into their second decade.
    Think about that – endless sleepless nights – until your loved child eventually dies…..

    This post speaks to a reality so many families live. I know a number of families whose children have Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, it is rare and punishing,

    – sometimes love as much as you can and as much as you might, but sometimes love just isn’t enough.

  139. Makka

    “without changing the present flow of monies.”

    Of course it changes. Regulated recreational drugs would change the money flow from criminal hands into mainstream , state and corporate hands thus generating ,dare I say, taxes from profits – to the benefit of all. Legalising and regulating rec drugs ensures chemical and quality control, control of distribution and prescribed substance measures, price controls, records of release, education programs, vastly reduced enforcement and policing costs, lower crime rates on innocents/victims.

    Addictive and damaging drugs are already legalised , taxed and regulated in our society. It’s high time commonsense prevailed with recreational drugs in order to minimise the damage being done.

  140. boy on a bike

    This video explains why so few used kegs are on the market. It shows how they are repaired and how long they can last.

    The whole thing is quite good – if you hang around, you can see how hotdogs are made.

  141. Makka

    From personal experience I know that this is flogged to death by beta’s and outright lazy buggers on a huge scale. So many cry like babies at the mere thought of someone urging them to to do what they sign up for and are paid to do. Australia’s workplace today is chock full of mummy’s boys IMO;

    “The creation of a new avenue for Australians to pursue workplace bullying complaints will foster a “sense of entitlement and victimhood” among employees, the head of a large business group has argued.

    The Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s chief executive, Peter Anderson, issued a call for people “to be more tolerant of each other” in the workplace, as the Fair Work Commission prepared to handle a new category of cases from next week.

    The new system, beginning on 1 January, allows workers to apply to the commission seeking a formal order to cease the bullying. The Gillard government law, which passed through parliament earlier this year, defines bullying as an individual or group repeatedly behaving unreasonably towards the worker and “that behaviour creates a risk to health and safety”. It says this “does not apply to reasonable management action carried out in a reasonable manner”.

    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2013/dec/27/bullying-measures-foster-entitlement-victimhood

  142. Tom

    One of Australian cricket’s most colourful characters, Kerry O’Keeffe, has called stumps on his commentary career.

    O’Keeffe has announced that the Sydney New Year’s Ashes Test will be his last in the ABC Grandstand commentary box after 13 summers of entertaining Australian radio audiences.

    He made the announcement during the final session of day two of the Boxing Day Test at the MCG.

    “I’ve thought long and hard about it for a number of years, a number of weeks really. You know when your time is up and after 13 summers with ABC Grandstand I’m retiring from cricket broadcasting,” O’Keeffe said.

    “I’m going nowhere else, not entertaining anything. I’ve just had the best 13 years.

  143. Tom

    THE Coalition government says the boats are “stopping”, as it announced no asylum-seekers had arrived in Australia by sea in the past week.

    Immigration Minister Scott Morrison today said 355 asylum-seekers on seven boats had been intercepted by Australian authorities since the start of December.

    But none arrived in the week leading up to Friday, despite unusually favourable weather during the December monsoon season.

    “This represents a 70 per cent decline on last December, when there were 1149 (arrivals) on 20 boats – so far this is the lowest number of arrivals in December for five years,” Mr Morrison said in a statement.

    “The boats have not yet stopped but they are stopping.”

  144. JC

    Tom

    Watch fatboy claim that as a earwax eater’s success. Conversely, if boats arrived watch the donut king claim it was another example of the catastrophic failure of the Abbott government.

    Isn’t that right, Monster you douchebag?

  145. jumpnmcar

    “The boats have not yet stopped but they are stopping.”

    And not because of the Media Cyclone scaremongery, that just puts off the domestic tourists.

    Xmas Island weather ? –5 to 10 knots, lovely boating conditions.

  146. Tom

    Fauxfacts are refusing to report Morrison’s illegal immigration briefing point blank. Instead it has a whinge by Amnesty International about conditions on Manus Island filed nearly 24 hours ago. Their ABC is hiding the Morrison press conference in the news briefs.

  147. Tiny Dancer

    mOron would love nothing more than a few hundred deaths at sea. Would makes his heart burst with joy.

  148. JC

    Dancer

    It’s going to burst anyway at the rate he’s going. No need for deaths, although a few thousand lungs filled with sea water would warm the cockles of his black fat ladened heart.

  149. wreckage

    In olden times everyone worked till their back broke. Women and men. Keeping a house clean and free of disease required pretty much everything to be boiled, swept, etc. And while men might have worked harder, women died in childbirth all too often.

    Viva la industrial revolution!

    WRT children, there is nothing better, nothing more meaningful, nothing more rewarding, nothing that makes a greater contribution to society, self or the future, than motherhood. Nothing. Not for women, not for men. Sadly, we were restricted to two. Happily, we were blessed with two.

    My sister, perhaps the epitome of the go-getter that everyone imagines must be looking for a management job, has a degree, working on postgrad qualifications, works, and now has 4 kids. She wanted a family, so she made damn sure she got one. Including an outstanding husband who never whines about how much better their financial position would be if she spent less time at home.

    Too many self-made women turn into wimps when it comes to love and family. They would never wait for their education or job to waft in ans settle gently on their lap, but go completely doe-eyed and mushy about their own biological success (check the term, ladies. It’s from biology, not the patriarchy. The children you are forgoing are your children. You are denying yourself, and all the women of your line, back to the very beginning.)

    If you want a family, you need to apply the discernment, care, and drive that you are well capable of, to making it happen. And you have to make it happen soon. You wouldn’t put off your qualification or your fist job til your 40’s, and biology is a far harsher mistress than that.

    Don’t kid yourself, child rearing is hard work. But parenting is far from narrowing your opportunities for growth; it is singly the greatest opportunity anyone can have for growth. Even apart from that, and allowing for the massive time-sink that child-rearing can be, it still allows you time to expand your educational, professional, and intellectual horizons.

    You will find plenty of time to read. It’s a bizarre and tragic circumstance that our society has gone from considering books to be the great feeder and nurturer of the intellect, to rating books as a sad second-best to nattering with fellow borderline illiterate adolescents in coffee shops. There are online courses for everything from law to chemistry to philosophy. Kant, Kierkegaard, Aristotle and Aquinas are all available in full, for free, online. Expand your mind. Don’t wait for a man to do it for you.

  150. wreckage

    First job. Don’t google the mistyped phrase.

  151. calli

    Even apart from that, and allowing for the massive time-sink that child-rearing can be, it still allows you time to expand your educational, professional, and intellectual horizons.

    Too right, Wreckage. I had three under four, worked like a navvy, bought into a business, resumed studies and topped my course (and,sweetest of all, have a wee medal to prove it).

    Result is three reasonably well adjusted, well educated and resilient children, all with families of their own and a work ethic to put the chattering classes to shame. Despite lots of hideous medical hurdles there are no victims chez calli!

  152. C.L.

    Ted Cruz won: GOP 13 points ahead in generic ballot.

    http://pjmedia.com/instapundit/181561/

  153. srr

    It’s been pointed out that Muslims are deliberately avoiding patrolled beaches to prevent their wives and children seeing bikini clad women…and half naked men, openly mixing and mingling as respected equals.

    Better to them to drown in their head-to-toes…

  154. Grey Old Dufus

    They were no more and no less brain dead, grinding and unrewarding than many components of paid work I have experienced, or the long grind of my husband’s forty years of self employment.

    Absolutely. I love my job but not the paperwork that goes with it.

  155. Bons

    Blair wins every award for 2013 – today’s put-down can never be bettered.

  156. jumpnmcar

    WTF did Piers Morgan say about Brett Lee to have Lee belt shit out of him.

  157. jumpnmcar

    The grant winners that are now stuck in ice in Antarctica went there why?

    We are going south to:

    gain new insights into the circulation of the Southern Ocean and its impact on the global carbon cycle
    explore changes in ocean circulation caused by the growth of extensive fast ice and its impact on life in Commonwealth Bay
    use the subantarctic islands as thermometers of climatic change by using trees, peats and lakes to explore the past
    investigate the impact of changing climate on the ecology of the subantarctic islands
    discover the environmental influence on seabird populations across the Southern Ocean and in Commonwealth Bay
    understand changes in seal populations and their feeding patterns in the Southern Ocean and Commonwealth Bay
    produce the first underwater surveys of life in the subantarctic islands and Commonwealth Bay
    determine the extent to which human activity and pollution has directly impacted on this remote region of Antarctica
    provide baseline data to improve the next generation of atmospheric, oceanic and ice sheet models to improve predictions for the future

    That’s too funny.

  158. Carpe Jugulum

    The grant winners that are now stuck in ice in Antarctica went there why?

    Jump, HMAS COOK (RAN Oceanographic ship) went down into that area (but not that far south) in April 1986 to study current flow and its effect on the soutern abyssal plains in the oceanographic summer, so the data was already available for the swampies.

    BTW it was a rough as guts and it was freezing cold (-6C before windchill at night) & watch on deck was only allowed 30 minutes on the upper deck at a time at night.

    Happy memories.

  159. jumpnmcar

    Carpe
    Hopefully the Steve Erwin and Bob Barker will help whilst there in the area.
    What a circus that would end up.
    But their too busy saving whales rather than their comrades.

  160. pete m

    Interesting stats on America today.

  161. Carpe Jugulum

    But their too busy saving whales rather than their comrades.

    Ah yes whales, the other red meat. It’s actually quite nice stewed in miso broth.

  162. Tom

    Sven, we expect a whale recipe for New Years Eve. I expect your missus is a seafood expert.

  163. C.L.

    Ahahahaha.

    You’re kidding me, right?

    They went to Antarctica to study the Great Melt and got enstuckened in the ice?

    Gold.

  164. C.L.

    Ah, nurses. I love ’em.

    Local Steven Brook says he rang emergency services after his wife Lisa, a nurse, rushed inside before going back out to help.

    “Coming outside with a coffee and a smoke I saw two people standing on the bank,” she said.

    “I came running out here and started CPR with another RN.

    Sad story, though. Is this relevant?

    The 48-year-old from Beulah Park in Adelaide’s east was in the middle of the group, which had spread out as it moved along Inman Valley Road, when she was hit.

    Some nice police work too; see article.
    Cyclist killed in hit-and-run south of Adelaide, woman charged.

  165. srr


    Exposed: The Soviet Union spent $1 billion on mind-control program

    BY JENNI RYALL
    news.com.au
    December 27, 2013 6:02PM

    …reminded me of this “Ted Talk” –

    HSS HyperSonic Sound TEDTalks (focused ultrasound)
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OCsKF7gC7Mc&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DOCsKF7gC7Mc#/watch?v=OCsKF7gC7Mc&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DOCsKF7gC7Mc

    …which brings us to the question, are Leftist victims of their scrambled conscience, or –

    Directional Sound systems
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gq6nWF1QJ6s

  166. Token

    In other Glow-ball Warming news:

    It’s now been six days since the big ice storm turned off the lights, heat and, in some cases water, to hundreds of thousands of customers in Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada.

    And frustration is clearly growing among the tens of thousands still without power.

  167. duncanm

    CL,

    I think the point is they were spread out down the road, so no-one witnessed the collision.

    Sounds very sad and gruesome: another report

    Mrs Brook said the victim was a midwife at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital and her husband was an obstetrician. The couple’s children were in Goolwa at the time of the crash.

    I’ve never seen so much blood in my life.

    and that from a nurse.

  168. Token

    Exposed: The Soviet Union spent $1 billion on mind-control program

    Was that what the treasonous thief Snowden was blabbering about in that message?

  169. srr

    Apologies for messy posts. I’m still learning to win arguments with a new smart windows phone that randomly assumes it knows what I want, better than I do.

  170. C.L.

    That’s horrible, Duncan. So sad. I can understand how shock might cause a motorist to keep driving but she had a male passenger with her. So, prima facie, flight seems to have been a calculated and rational choice in this case.

  171. Token

    John Hinderaker’s take on Pope Francis’ comments about the Christian killing fields in the ME is interesting:

    Pope Francis knows little about economics, and appears to be under the misapprehension that the Obama-style cronyism he observed in Argentina constitutes free enterprise. Naturally, his comments on matters economic have been lapped up by the press.

    It will be interesting to see whether his other themes are deemed equally newsworthy. Today is St. Stephen’s Day, which honors Christianity’s first martyr.

    JH notes Il Papa did name one country:

    The Pope mentioned Iraq specifically in his Christmas message, which presumably was written before Muslim terrorists in that country murdered 37 Christians on Christmas Day.

  172. srr

    Who knows, Token, but I have my reasons for never trusting any young wanna-be-hero-spies, from any side. Particularly those who also become media darlings, instead of dying alone and unknown. But it is interesting that the headline doesn’t include, ‘and America was doing to’ –

    THE race to put man on the Moon wasn’t enough of a battle for the global super powers during the Cold War.

    At the time, the Soviet Union and the United States were in an arms race of a bizarre, unconventional kind – that has been exposed in a new report.

    Beginning in 1917 and continuing until 2003, the Soviets poured up to $1 billion into developing mind-controlling weaponry to compete with similar programs undertaken in the US.

  173. Carpe Jugulum

    Sven, we expect a whale recipe for New Years Eve. I expect your missus is a seafood expert

    .

    How about Okonomiyaki (Octopus pancake) it sounds off but is absolutely lush.

    For a whale meat recipie try Oden with whale meat

    Dashi soup
    Cubed whale meat (1 – 2cm cubes)
    Quail or bantam eggs
    shredded daigon (Radish)
    musubi kombu (kelp)
    chikuwa fish cakes (takes the fatty blandness off the meat.)
    brown/cane sugar
    sake
    light or sweet soy sauce.
    Garnish with negi (green onion)

    it’s tasty.

    Hope that helps, i’ll get Lady Jugulum to give more detail later.

  174. srr

    I believe the “Whale Saving V Hunting Wars” are only a cover story for….lets call it, stuff that actually matters.
    Likewise, super-trawler carry ons, patagonian toothfish poacher hunting, lies about Antarctic Ice, etc.q

  175. C.L.

    We’ve known about MKUltra for nearly 40 years, SRR.

  176. srr

    Yes C.L. but I didn’t choose to make it a feature ‘news’ article now.

    I simply pointed out that the technology for manipulating what people believe they really and freely perceive, continued to march along after boring old MK Experiments were publicly admitted to.

    Again, how much could this technology explain Leftists “conviction of ‘their’ ‘conscience'” –
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gq6nWF1QJ6s

  177. srr

    He really is a mental, foot stomping, spoiled brat, isn’t he –

    ‘Busy’ Obama sends gay delegate Billie Jean King to Russia’s Olympics

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/world/busy-obama-sends-gay-delegate-billie-jean-king-to-russias-olympics-20131227-hv6z4.html#ixzz2og2MzAQV

  178. C.L.

    What I’ve called weaponised homosexuals.

    He sent one to Australia too.

  179. The womenfolk think we need all that stuff just to keep up the home maintenance projects.

    Whereas you actually use it for… what? 😛

    When you gaze longingly at your new chainsaw, that’s one thing. When you attempt rapturous and manly communion with it, don’t come screaming to me with the tattered remnants of your dick in your hands asking me to fix it. 🙂

  180. What I’ve called weaponised homosexuals.

    I thought those were the Jihadists who hid the bombs in their arses. 😛 Of course there have been other fanatical gay warriors throughout history, but they mainly confined their martial (as opposed to marital) activities to the battlefield.

  181. srr

    Yes, but when Obama sent us a homosexual as their Ambassador, Emily’s List (Australia and America), were still high on having their chosen ones anointed as our dictators, and his appointment was a happy celebration of their controlling influence.

    Sending BJK to Russia’s Winter Olympics is Obama using a lesbian to cowardly ‘spit in Putin’s face’ for embarrassing himself on the world stage while also making Putin more popular.

    It’s basically a selfish, bully, loser of a child having an unfocused, destructive, temper tantrum.

  182. srr

    Numbers was pro-Gonski, wasn’t he; what’s his opinion on this recommendation?

    Teachers should be filmed in the classroom so they can review and improve their performance, a member of the expert Gonski panel says.

    Kathryn Greiner, who conducted a major review of school funding alongside business leader David Gonski, said teachers could gain a fresh perspective on sharpening their skills by watching themselves on video.

    “I have to say it is about time teachers understood that they must be assessed, they must be a part of professional development and I would like to see every single teacher in every single classroom in Australia videotaped,” she told a Mitchell Institute education forum.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/national/call-to-videotape-teachers-at-work-20131227-2zzhd.html#ixzz2ogMx99Id

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