Santa is a conservative

That Santa Claus is a conservative is conclusively shown on this post. There are thirteen pieces of evidence but I’ll only list numbers one and eleven:

1. Did you ever hear Santa wishing someone a ‘Happy Holidays?’ No, for the man in red, it’s always ‘Merry Christmas’ – no matter who it offends.

11. The naughty or nice list also shows an objective moral compass. Santa apparently rejects liberal relativism or explaining away bad behavior with pop psychology and ‘culture’ issues.

And not a government handout to Santa’s workshop anywhere to be seen.

Merry Christmas!

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29 Responses to Santa is a conservative

  1. ChrisPer

    Help your elf to some awesomeness!
    Merry Christmas!!

  2. stackja

    Rudolph (Red-Republican Party-Nosed Reindeer) with your nose so bright, Won’t you guide my sleigh tonight?

  3. Chris M

    Nope quite the opposite, he’s a cross-dressing transvestite – so a Green voter.

  4. johninoxley

    Having had the most wonderful day of my life with some of the people I love , I reflect on the, shall I say people whom nothing is right with the world. They are sad examples of humanity. I observed, and commented on to my felllow travellers , we are in safe hands with the future . Of the 14- 21 year olds, 89% bullshit detector on, (1 thought melbourne uni was good, had a troubled childhood). What a relief to see the discussion on the ‘ Future’. It does not include the Left, only the benefits of a community that is diverse, definitely not a a Fruit Salad Society. The hi-light of the day, if not the year, was to tell the LOVE OF MY EXISTENCE, I loved her. I think the Left only consider what is good for themselves…….. Sad really. Sorry for the facts, get over it without a subsidy or a grant. The Left are more pathetic than realised. Thankyou Sinc for providing an avenue for our musings, Judith especially (nearly equal to my wife, no mean feat.) Some of the contributors, mostly female, have more to say that is relevant. Come on guys, including myself , pull finger.

  5. Notvelty

    Good lord, the media is sick. Even in what is considered the bastion of conservatism, they can’t come up with a dozen silly false equivilencies without pandering to half-smart leftist ideals. No wonder you quoted only some… most of the rests are strawmen.

  6. blind freddy

    A belated Merry Christmas
    Andrew Klavan Traditional Christmas vs. Progressive Christmas
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iqk8NR7xVd4

  7. Santa might be Conservative but is God is a Libertarian?

    Why Christians Make Great Libertarians

    Big Government a Danger to All Men -Part 1 of 3 By Ian Huyett

    (This is Part 1 of a 3 part column on the history of liberty in Christian tradition. Parts 2 & 3 are linked at the bottom of the article. Please share and leave your thoughts below.)

    In 1932, the Christian apologist G.K. Chesterton expressed concern that many people were according the government with a trust and reverence that ought to be reserved only for God. Chesterton’s admonition was not only prophetic, but rooted in the deepest mainspring of Christianity’s past; he was echoing words spoken by the prophet Samuel nearly three thousand years ago.

    1 Samuel 8 tells how the Israelites, having grown weary of deferring to their local judges, decided to centralize power and crown a king. The great judge Samuel, upset by the nation’s desire for an earthly ruler, prayed to God for guidance. God replied by telling Samuel that, by demanding a human king, the Israelites “have rejected me from being king over them.”

    This equation of statism with idolatry is alive and well in modern Christendom. In particular, Christians in the United States have – since before Bush left office – been moving away from federal advocacy and towards political decentralization. Whenever someone suggests that Christians cannot be a viable force for liberty, I know that person has been long out of touch with America’s Christian culture. The believers I speak with increasingly feel put upon by the earthly state and simply wish to be allowed to live as they see fit in their own communities.

    These libertarian Christians stand on solid ground. A well-established body of Christian scripture and tradition rejects the rule of limited human beings in favor of God’s majesty. In the words of F.A. Hayek, “Individualism, in contrast to socialism and all other forms of totalitarianism, is based on the respect of Christianity for the individual man.” Christians are, for the reasons I’ll explore here, especially predisposed to becoming passionate libertarians – and libertarians would do well do bear this in mind in their outreach.

    The Doctrine of Original Sin

    The NSA’s surveillance of the entire US population offers a prime example of the conflation that Chesterton warned against. If only one group in American history has imagined that the government is God, it is surely those who argue that “if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear.” This assertion assumes that the environment of government will create an immutable benevolence in our rulers.

    Conversely, Christians have warned mankind about its innate limitations for millennia. Any Christian with even a cursory understanding of original sin could have told you that granting the NSA unchecked power was a horrible idea. Verses like Ephesians 2:3 – which says that we are “by nature children of wrath” – remind Christians that governments are made up of fallen human beings who will inevitably abuse whatever power they are given. Sure enough, the Senate Intelligence committee recently discovered that NSA employees have used the agency’s vast resources to spy on their lovers.

    Chesterton, perhaps hyperbolically, called original sin the “the only part of Christian theology which can really be proved.” It is also the part of Christian theology which most squarely defeats political authoritarianism. It leaves us with no reason to expect that governments will be virtuous, nor to expect that they will tend towards increasingly moral choices as they grow to include more human beings.

    John Adams said that he distrusted rulers because he perceived “danger from all men.” We should be glad that Adams had this cynical temperament; otherwise, we might be even less free than we are today.

  8. Brett_McS

    Although P. J. O’Rourke had this take (back when he was funny, 20 years ago or so):

    “God is a Republican and Santa Claus is a Democrat”
    (Parliament of Whores).

  9. Gab

    Andrew Klavan at his finest, Freddy.

    is God is a Libertarian?

    I doubt it given the Libertarian stance on abortion and euthanasia. In any case, I don’t believe we mere mortals can label God as belonging to any of our mortal political cabals – that’s divisive and quite contrary to His teachings.

  10. gabrianga

    Cue an early January meeting between Santa ,”Chainsaw” and gun negotiator Combet.

  11. Alfonso

    So Cosgrove gets a guernsey. Abbott’s mother in law was a better choice and the comrades, consistent as always, couldn’t possibly complain.

  12. Robert O.

    Actually I got this one right about six months ago: I think he will do a good impartial job as GG.

  13. JohnA

    Grigory Potemkin #1123898, posted on December 25, 2013 at 11:33 pm

    Santa might be Conservative but is God is(sic) a Libertarian?

    Why Christians Make Great Libertarians

    Christians are, for the reasons I’ll explore here, especially predisposed to becoming passionate libertarians – and libertarians would do well do bear this in mind in their outreach.

    An excellent post. I am about to read part 2, but my first comment is that the word “libertarian” is in a dangerous position – it has become loaded with a particular set of meanings, which do not always accord with what Christians (or others) think of as “aspects of liberty worth fighting for”.

    It has become a label for a certain political position, and I believe is currently being bent towards “freedom from all restraints” by including sexual and moral liberties, including the “freedom of choice” package of the feminist agenda, and the “redefinition of marriage” package of the activist homosexual agenda. The danger is that it will be hijacked to the anachist end of the political spectrum.

    On to part 2.

  14. JohnA

    Grigory Potemkin #1123898, posted on December 25, 2013 at 11:33 pm

    Santa might be Conservative but is God is(sic) a Libertarian?

    Why Christians Make Great Libertarians

    From Part 2 a most insightful comment:

    In other words, Lord Acton was not quite right when he warned that absolute power corrupts absolutely. Rather, absolute power attracts the absolutely corrupt.

    Which point was made in a different way by Douglas Adams in “Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” – paraphrasing: “anyone who volunteers for a position of power should be ipso facto disqualified from the job”.

    The author goes on to say:

    “It’s unfortunately true that some Christians, apparently not having read the verses mentioned above, believe there is a scriptural case to be made for government force.”

    but then limits his discussion to the oft-misquoted passage in Acts used to support “Christian socialism” (a di-oxy-moron, with thanks to the Cat who coined that very useful term!)

    There is a Biblical case for Christians to make regarding legitimate government authority backed by force. Acts 13:4-7 provides a mandate for civil authority in respect of law and order, and civil and military defence. That mandate DOES NOT include health, education, welfare, income redistribution, income protection, broad occupational licensing and regulation, or economic management. It assumes a Biblical moral framework which is fixed, and not open to amendment by government either.

    In this area Christian liberarians would part company from modern political libertarians who aspire to almost no government, and mixed-economy pseudo-socialists who talk like Paul Keating about government “having its hands on the economic levers”.

    To Part The Third.

  15. JohnA

    Grigory Potemkin #1123898, posted on December 25, 2013 at 11:33 pm

    Santa might be Conservative but is God is(sic) a Libertarian?

    From Part 3, the author’s defence of the separation of Church from State:

    Libertarianism follows necessarily from any coherent reading of scripture or grounding in the Christian tradition. For this reason, those who hold both beliefs are not merely Christian libertarians, but libertarian Christians. They have little faith in government because they have such great faith in God.

    He demonstrates why Christians are the most persecuted group on the planet – because they hold to a Higher Authority than the government of the day, whether that is an all-powerful emperor, caliph, king or even a “Christian” President.

    The principle of Separation of Church and State is uniquely Christian, being founded on a mono-theism of a God with character, universal power and moral force. It does away with petty animist gods to be appeased by the tribal witchdoctor, national gods to provide kings to lead them into victorious war, or the panoply of mythical gods, heroes, titans and demi-urges battling one another in the heavens and using humanity as a plaything.

    Christendom sets apart religion so that it is no longer an arm of government, and the separation is meant to prevent the government from interfering with the Church, not as presently understood, to remove all vestiges of Christian influence from public life.

    The Christian libertarian has a God big enough to overwhelm the political categories we use. So Santa is a myth, but God is not merely a libertarian. Instead he requires Christians to exercise their liberty responsibly, for the benefit of others:

    Galatians 5:13 You, brethren, were called to be free. But do not use your freedom to indulge the flesh[corrupted human nature]; rather, serve one another humbly in love.

  16. JohnA

    [Dismounts from portable soap-box, packs it away and resumes lurking.]

  17. Adam d

    What’s the libertarian stance on abortion? I assumed it was anti abortion as in don’t infringe on the right if a child to live? Can you shed some light gab?

  18. Gab

    Here you go, Adam

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian_perspectives_on_abortion

    Individual liberty and a woman’s right to be in control of her own body. No mention of the unborn baby’s body. That doesn’t count apparently.

  19. dd

    What’s the libertarian stance on abortion?

    This is a bit of a split.
    The cool ‘left libertarians’ are pro abortion because they believe in the woman’s right to choose; the ‘right libertarians’ are anti abortion, as they believe in the child’s right to live.

  20. JohnA

    dd #1124070, posted on December 26, 2013 at 11:20 am

    What’s the libertarian stance on abortion?

    This is a bit of a split.
    The cool ‘left libertarians’ are pro abortion because they believe in the woman’s right to choose; the ‘right libertarians’ are anti abortion, as they believe in the child’s right to live.

    Which is why I pointed out the danger of Christians hitching their wagon to a libertarian star.

    Biblically the command is:

    Deuteronomy 30:19
    This day I call the heavens and the earth as witnesses against you that I have set before you life and death, blessings and curses. Now choose life, so that you and your children may live

    The libertarians who want abortion (and euthanasia) part company with the Biblical standard.

  21. dd

    Which is why I pointed out the danger of Christians hitching their wagon to a libertarian star.

    It’s a lot better than the big-state progressive star.

  22. Here’s the P J O’Rourke extract in full, and I have to say, I agree with him. Santa is a big lefty.

    St Nicholas, on the other hand, was just a very charitable bishop, but he gave away HIS money, not other people’s. (Shades of Margaret Thatcher and the Good Samaritan …)

    I have only one firm belief about the American political system, and that is this: God is a Republican and Santa Claus is a Democrat.

    God is an elderly or, at any rate, middle aged male, a stern fellow, patriarchal rather than paternal and a great believer in rules and regulations. He holds men accountable for their actions. He has little apparent concern for the material well being of the disadvantaged. He is politically connected, socially powerful and holds the mortgage on literally everything in the world. God is difficult. God is unsentimental. It is very hard to get into God’s heavenly country club.

    Santa Claus is another matter. He’s cute. He’s nonthreatening. He’s always cheerful. And he loves animals. He may know who’s been naughty and who’s been nice, but he never does anything about it. He gives everyone everything they want without the thought of quid pro quo. He works hard for charities, and he’s famously generous to the poor. Santa Claus is preferable to God in every way but one: There is no such thing as Santa Claus.

  23. Adam D

    Thanks Gab, wikipedia was actually pretty helpful. Looks like there is no general position for abortion amongst libertarians as I originally thought.

  24. Gab

    Well if that’s your understanding of it, then I can’t help you.

  25. struth

    johninoxley #1123864, posted on December 25, 2013 at 10:02 pm
    Come on guys, including myself , pull finger.

    I’m not falling for that. Especially after your big christmas dinner.

  26. Des Deskperson

    One Christmas figure whose behaviour and demeanour really ought to shatter ‘progressive’ heads is Frosty the Snowman.

    After all he’s (a) white and therefore a symbol of colonialism and oppression to all people of colour, (b) he smokes a corn cob pipe, so he’s an agent of Big Tobacco, (c) he has a button nose, probably taken from a garment made by exploited labour in an Asian sweatshop, (d) he’s got two eyes made out of coal, so he’s a pawn of the planet-killing fossil fuels industries, and (e) he wears a silk hat, traditional symbol of rapacious robber baron capitalism. He’s also ‘a fairy tale, they say’, implying that GLBT people tend to be dishonest!!

  27. dd

    Thanks Gab, wikipedia was actually pretty helpful.

    Really? I wasn’t impressed. References include an unsourced claim someone made in a book once. I’m surprised anyone would trust wikipedia for an unbiased opinion on

    a) libertarianism
    b) abortion
    c) the relationship between libertarianism and abortion.

  28. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    I’m surprised anyone would trust wikipedia for an unbiased opinion

    Add ‘on climate change’ to that.
    Wiki is only good as a useful first source for sources, and only sometimes at that.

  29. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Oh dear. Poor old Frosty.

    First they came for Santa, and I did nothing. Then they came for Frosty ……

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