How a civilization commits suicide

The sense that we in the West, our entire culture of freedom and individual rights, are under mortal threat is not an uncommon theme. Adding to this is an article, a long article, from Camille Paglia:

‘What you’re seeing is how a civilization commits suicide,’ says Camille Paglia. . . . The military is out of fashion, Americans undervalue manual labor, schools neuter male students, opinion makers deny the biological differences between men and women, and sexiness is dead.

And why does all this matter?

‘The entire elite class now, in finance, in politics and so on, none of them have military service—hardly anyone, there are a few. But there is no prestige attached to it anymore. That is a recipe for disaster,’ she says. ‘These people don’t think in military ways, so there’s this illusion out there that people are basically nice, people are basically kind, if we’re just nice and benevolent to everyone they’ll be nice too. They literally don’t have any sense of evil or criminality.’

An interesting article, commented on here where it was picked up by Powerline, linked to at Instapundit and mentioned prominently at Drudge.

Perhaps a slow news day, but going to the movies yesterday which started with a trailer for Nelson Mandela, the movie, and then watched a film as some Englishman becomes best mates with the chap who tortured him in a Japanese prisoner of war camp – and let me not forget the man who the Americans have elected president – you really do wonder whether we have what it takes to survive as a culture.

This entry was posted in Cultural Issues. Bookmark the permalink.

91 Responses to How a civilization commits suicide

  1. Rabz

    Don’t forget that wonderful “religion of peace” lurking in the background, watching the West not so slowly committing civilizational suicide.

  2. Tel

    Don’t worry so much Steve. The USA is sure to hit the skids before we do in Australia, so we will get the benefit of the valuable learning experience (I hope).

  3. Baldrick

    Who needs to have military service anymore when the new ‘vibe’ of the progressives is green activism.

  4. Notafan

    Thankyou for ensuring I don’t bother going to see The Railway Man, Nicole Kidman was cancelling out Colin Firth but I was still tempted. The article reminded me of Slut Walk and the daft article about How Not to Raise a Rapist. Unfortunately rape isn’t confined to girls who go out wearing fishnet stockings, anyone can be vunerable despite tender or advanced age or gender, in the right (wrong) circumstances. Evil exists and there will always be some who prey on others. Some people are just way too good at rationalising their behaviour.

  5. Mike Farrell

    Couldn’t agree more about the lack of military service of our politicians, Australian or American. I loved my school cadet experience in the late 60s/early 70s, which Whitlam basically abolished. I learnt respect for my peers and superiors, learnt discipline as well as how to dish it out. Then in the early 80s, I joined the Australian Army Reserve – another great experience, but short-lived due to the impending nuptials.

    The last ALP government boasted about Dr Mike Kelly’s extensive military experience. Mike got his doctorate compliments of the Australian Army on their time and dime. Col. Kelly was, in the end, in charge of the military legal unit. He led his troops with a yellow legal pad. They even reckoned he carried a rifle. Never seen an officer carry a rifle on the parade ground.

  6. steve

    My uncle was in Changi. I never knew him that well, but from what I hear, he hated the Japs til the day he died. Some can forgive, some choose not to.

  7. Phillip from Bowral

    Was dragged along by the wife to see The Railway Man. No my kind of movie for the most part, but I did appreciate the realism of the torture scenes, especially the water-boarding. I dont think the wife realized what she was letting herself in for.

  8. 1735099

    You really do see the world upside down and backwards, Steve.
    Civilsation is more likely to survive if reconciliation trumps militarisation.
    Christanity, the greatest civilising influence for the last 2000 years, has precisely that message.

  9. Megan

    Camille has nailed it. And has been a lone voice of gender sanity for a very long time. Shame so few are willing to listen, let alone understand what she has been trying to tell us and what the long term implications might be.

    My own experiences in the Army Reserve gave me skills and values that I still use every single day.

  10. entropy

    Civilisation, when it all boils down to it, is about knocking off or constraining the rougher edges of mankind. Not so much the women, of course, as they are already civilised and a civilised society is one where women’s options are maximised.

    It certainly could go too far and remove the military though, every civilisation needs its guardians, men that would not be accepted by the more self satisfied parts of society.

  11. andy

    now that the lefties have emasculated the australian military,on the basis that if gillard flirted with obama,she could strip the military budget and nestle under american military capacity–australia is one bad day away from finding out how well the deserts slow down power projection from the north. the lefties have decided that without borders,the military is not needed,and the money can be spent on helping the refugees instead. somehow the left have decided that opening the borders,and building massive shantytowns the size of bombay and shanghai and capetown on the australian coast will result in a population of sixty million tree worshipping non christian non english speaking non tory feminists. not one shantytown in the world has these values,so why do the left persist in the blind faith that their shantytowns will be different

  12. ChrisPer

    Not all pollies are improved by military service. A substantial proportion of those with some form of experience are REMFs, button polishers, seagulls and/or total nigels. Someone who claimed to have been a classmate told me the new Member for xxxx, an old boy of Duntroon, had repeated Year 12 private school despite high marks, to collect more gold stars for his chosen career. If that doesnt make him a button polisher and a nigel, I dont know what would.

    John Kerry also comes to mind, for some reason.

    (All this superiority delivered from someone who did his overseas service on Rottnest Island.)

  13. C.L.

    Not so much the women, of course, as they are already civilised and a civilised society is one where women’s options are maximised.

    Modern Western women are no more civilised than men.

    Indeed, their acceptance of killing unborn children may in fact mark them as the truly barbarous sex.

  14. entropy

    It all reminds me of Sir Walter Elliott’s views on the military

    I strongly object to the Navy. It brings people of obscure birth into undue distinction and it cuts up a man’s youth and vigor most horribly!

  15. 1735099

    Name me one Australian PM with operational service (with the exception of Gorton who inherited it) who committed us to dodgy military intervention for the old empire (British) or the new empire (USA).

  16. .

    (with the exception)

    So you admit your argument is bogus.

  17. srr

    We were warned that the Peace Freaks would destroy us:


    Jeremiah 6:13-15
    King James Version (KJV)

    13 For from the least of them even unto the greatest of them every one is given to covetousness; and from the prophet even unto the priest every one dealeth falsely.

    14 They have healed also the hurt of the daughter of my people slightly,
    saying, Peace, peace; when there is no peace.

    15 Were they ashamed when they had committed abomination?
    nay, they were not at all ashamed, neither could they blush:
    they shall fall among them that fall:
    at the time that I visit them they shall be cast down, saith the Lord

  18. .

    Kind of dumb, numbers.

    You imply that soliders would be less likely to be over the top militarily if they become politicians, then decide to have more influence from the military is militaristic, backwards etc.

  19. (with the exception)

    So you admit your argument is bogus.

    No – Gorton’s attitude strengthens my argument -

    During Gorton’s term as Prime Minister defence was a compelling national issue. The Gorton government inherited Australia’s commitment to the war in South Vietnam and to the defence of Malaysia and Singapore from Communist insurgents. Gorton himself was ambivalent about what was then called ‘forward defence’. He opposed any increase in the size of the Australian contingent in South Vietnam above the 8000 already there. In his view, Australia would be better and less expensively served by building a mobile force based on Australian soil.

    At the end of 1970, the Gorton government began the Australian withdrawal from South Vietnam when it did not replace the 8th Battalion when it ended its tour of duty. This was by no means a clear decision. With army chiefs hostile to any hint of withdrawal, Cabinet reached the decision reluctantly and against army advice. The army’s Cabinet submission in response was, in the view of one senior official, ‘argumentative, impudent and wilful’.

  20. Gab

    God Lord, we’re back to Vietnam again!

  21. .

    So you’re saying a PM with operational service is good, but influence from the military is backwards?

    Don’t know how you can reconcile those ideas, numbers.

  22. James B

    Individual rights died in Australia when Howard banned guns and everybody loved it.

    Fuck this country and fuck you stupid ignorant collectivists.

  23. .

    All roads lead to Hue. Or Hanoi…or Saigon.

  24. 1735099

    No – I’m saying that old men who have seen operational service will think twice before they send young men(and these days young women) off to war.

  25. Name me one Australian PM with operational service (with the exception of Gorton who inherited it) who committed us to dodgy military intervention for the old empire (British) or the new empire (USA).

    Name me just one US president with operational service who committed troops to action…….. oh wait.

  26. No – I’m saying that old men who have seen operational service will think twice before they send young men(and these days young women) off to war.

    Name me just one French leader with operational service who committed troops to action……. oh wait.

  27. .

    1735099
    #1126833, posted on December 29, 2013 at 11:37 am

    No – I’m saying that old men who have seen operational service will think twice before they send young men(and these days young women) off to war.

    Yes, and you are criticising Steve for supporting Paglia wanting politicians to have such pragmatic views.

    Make up your mind.

  28. lotocoti

    Civilsation is more likely to survive if reconciliation trumps militarisation.

    There’s me thinking civilisation was famously saved when militarisation eventually trumped reconciliation.
    As Heinz Guderian said after it was all over:

    “If you French had intervened in the Rhineland in 1936 we should have been sunk and Hitler would have fallen.”

  29. lotocoti

    All roads lead …

    The Thread Without Joy (apologies to Bernard Fall).

  30. steve

    don’t forget “guns don’t kill people, people do”

    we would all be OK if we could just find a way of separating idiots from guns……….but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t blow up the bad guys, if only we could all agree on who they are

  31. stackja

    Steve

    ‘These people don’t think in military ways, so there’s this illusion out there that people are basically nice, people are basically kind, if we’re just nice and benevolent to everyone they’ll be nice too. They literally don’t have any sense of evil or criminality.’

    Reminds me of:

    Australia in the War of 1939–1945. Series 1 – Army – Volume I
    Volume I – To Benghazi (1961 reprint) Author: Gavin Long

    Chapter 1 – Between the Wars

    Soldiers and soldiering were in particularly bad odour in the late ‘twenties. From 1927 onwards for four or five years, a sudden revival of interest in the war that had ended ten years before produced a series of angry war novels and memoirs of which Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front, Graves’ Good-bye to All That and Arnold Zweig’s The Case of Sergeant Grischa were among the most popular.
    The object, conscious or unconscious, of all these books (one contemporary critic wrote) is to simplify and sentimentalise the problem of war and peace until the problem disappears in a silly gesture of complacent moral superiority, and the four
    years of war are shown idiotically as four years of disastrous, sanguinary and futile battles in which everything was lost and nothing gained, a struggle begun for no purpose and continued for no reason. 2
    Whether this criticism was right or wrong, these books and the plays and moving pictures that accompanied them undoubtedly did much to mould the attitude of the people generally and particularly of the intelligentsia to war and soldiers, and produced rather widely a conviction that wars are always ineffectual, are brought about by military leaders and by the large engineering industries which profit by making weapons, and that if soldiers and armaments could be abolished wars would cease.

  32. Tom

    Paglia:

    The only place you can hear what men really feel these days, she claims, is on sports radio. No surprise, she is an avid listener. The energy and enthusiasm “inspires me as a writer,” she says, adding: “If we had to go to war,” the callers “are the men that would save the nation.”

    She has a thousand times the intellect of the scatterbrain airhead Greer and the dullard Summers and a million times more courage.

  33. Jessie

    Steve at 10.46

    FYI an interesting blog discussion on airbases, bicycles, water storage and seaward pointing guns.
    Also this and this.

  34. Ralph

    G’day,

    I think Steve & co need to meet a few more rednecks. I would be interesting to interview Ms Pagila and Mr Phil Robertson from Duck Dynasty together.

    ta

    Ralph

  35. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    My uncle was in Changi

    One of the Two Alpha ancestors “worked for the Imperial Japanese railways” as he put it – it was 1982 before he would even buy a Japanese made car.

  36. Paul

    “Not so much the women, of course, as they are already civilised and a civilised society is one where women’s options are maximised.”

    I was playing in a Pub in Cairns last night, and I can assure you all that this statement is generous at best. There seemed to be plenty of maximized options being bandied about, but civility never entered the room.

    Actually, I guess that makes it a great night.

  37. Paul

    “Individual rights died in Australia when Howard banned guns and everybody loved it.”

    Self reliance and the right to protect oneself and one’s family/loved ones also died that day. What do they say in the US? “when seconds count the Police are only hours away”?

  38. “When seconds count the police are only minutes away” <— I think this is the original saying, but the meaning isn't any different.

    Unless you're able to carry an "equaliser" the only outcome of someone trying to murder you is the police will hunt for your killer. Quite likely they'll catch the perp.

  39. Tintarella di Luna

    Modern Western women are no more civilised than men.

    Indeed, their acceptance of killing unborn children may in fact mark them as the truly barbarous sex.

    Behold the modern liberated western woman

  40. Tintarella di Luna

    Name me one Australian PM with operational service

    I think Gough Whitlam was in the RAAF: Whitlam trained as a navigator and bomb aimer, before serving with No. 13 Squadron RAAF, based mainly on the Gove Peninsula, Northern Territory, flying Lockheed Ventura bombers. He reached the rank of Flight Lieutenant from that impeccable source – Wikipedia — don’t know if he actually took aim and hit anything

  41. Oh come on

    Sometimes I wonder if Paglia’s a deliberate contrarian. I read a long interview that she gave prior to the 2012 POTUS election, in which she bagged the crap out of Obama and sung Romney’s praises. BUT she couldn’t bring herself to vote for a candidate from the GOP, a party that had almost nominated Santorum (which is not a well-considered reason to not vote for someone, but let’s move on). So she endorsed Jill Klein from the Green Party.

    In this interview I see she dutifully voted for Obama.

    Disappointing.

  42. JC

    OCO

    It’s not saying much, but the American Greens Party wasn’t as lunatic as ours from memory. They once ran a campaign for a flat tax and no deductibles.

  43. Oh come on

    Oops, Stein not Klein. JC, my problem is not that she voted for Stein. It’s that she didn’t.

    IIRC, at the time I thought Stein’s platform was better than Obama’s and much of Romney’s.

  44. John Comnenus

    Gorton was a combat veteran being a fighter pilot who crashed thrice in WWII over Indonesia. Lucky to be alive really. Tim Fisher was a Vietnam Veteran as a former Platoon Commander including service at the battle of ‘Coral’ from memory. Fire Support Base Coral was almost over run by the NVA at once stage with hand to hand fighting in the mortar base plate area well within the base. At the same time the artillery ammunition had caught fire and LT Don tait put out the fire whilst under fire. Finally 2LT John Salter won a Military Cross leading Australia’s last ever bayonet charge. Now that was combat experience.

    The LNP junior minister for Defence is an Afghan Veteran and Senator Fawcett a former Army Test Pilot.

  45. DrBeauGan

    Numbers confuses two very different things. On a personal level he is right; Christianity is about loving your enemy, about forgiveness and reconciliation. It makes for individual happiness. At the level of civilsations it is nonsense. If a culture is not prepared to fight for its values against the different values of another culture it is doomed. It was not until Charlemagne that the Christian west was prepared to fight back against Islam and other forms of barbarism and until then it was losing.

  46. JC

    IIRC, at the time I thought Stein’s platform was better than Obama’s and much of Romney’s.

    Lol, it wasn’t really that bad, was it. I’m not kidding, but in the 90′s they ran on a platform of 17.5 flat tax for personal and corporate income. I actually took notice.

  47. stackja

    Rt Hon Viscount Bruce, CH, MC. (1914-17: Capt, Worcester Regt and Royal Fus.) Prime Minister 1923-29; High Commnr for Aust in London 1933-45; Pres, League of Nations Council 1936. B. Melbourne, 15 Apr 1883.

    Rt Hon Sir Earle Page, GCMG, CH. (1st AIF:Capt AAMC.) Min for Commerce 1934-39, 1940-41; Min for Health 1937-39; Prime Minister Apr 1939. B. Grafton, NSW, 8 Aug 1880.

  48. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Rt Hon Viscount Bruce,CH,MC

    Military Cross, awarded at Gallipoli, if memory seves….

  49. Oh come on

    You only need a cursory knowledge of history to invalidate Numbers’s ridiculous claim, as it’s littered with leaders who have seen active service and nevertheless sent their armies to war, often rashly.

  50. .

    It was not until Charlemagne that the Christian west was prepared to fight back against Islam and other forms of barbarism and until then it was losing.

    I’d give credit to his ancestor, Charles Martel.

  51. mareeS

    An interesting book to read is: “How Civilisations Die (and why Islam is dying too), by David P. Goldman, 2011.

    And Numbers is about to get an uppercut when Major-General Peter Cosgrove is appointed Governor General. He would have been serving in Vietnam around the same time, but certainly has outperformed the resident chest-beater.

  52. Major-General Peter Cosgrove is appointed Governor General

    Aha… MareeS, but is Major-General Peter Cosgrove a conscript? NO! Furthermore… Major-General Peter Cosgrove attended a private school, even worse… a catholic school. Furthermore…. Major-General Peter Cosgrove is a company director, sitting on the board of listed companies, and helping to run… private enterprise!

    Numbers will have a field day “proving” that Major-General Peter Cosgrove is Satan.
    The opportunities to bring up Vietnam/conscription/state vs private edudation…. the opportunities will be endless.

  53. Mr Rusty

    Saw The Railway Man this weekend, thought it was pretty good, they could have gone “harder” on the PoW camp scenes though, I’ve read and heard of worse (from a “Guest of Emperor Hirohito” as he puts it) than what was depicted in the movie.

    I sometimes parallel the fanaticism of the Japanese in WWII with the left, there is a lot in common; slavish devotion, collective thinking, irrational, belief in their own superiority and converse notion that “others” are beneath them, rat cunning, pure vindictive hatred, genocidal levels of mass murder, easily offended, worship of the state…

    Of course, they had their arses kicked in the end.

  54. Saw The Railway Man this weekend, thought it was pretty good, they could have gone “harder” on the PoW camp scenes though

    They’d do well to equal the book, which is very very good.

  55. .

    I thought Cosgrove was promoted to CA and eventually CDF, thus a Lieutenant General and ultimately a ‘four star’ General.

    The opportunities to bring up Vietnam/conscription/state vs private edudation…. the opportunities will be endless.

    Thinking people would pull their kids out of the public system.

  56. I thought Cosgrove was promoted to CA and eventually CDF, thus a Lieutenant General and ultimately a ‘four star’ General.

    Good point Dot. You caused me to wikipedia him. Wikipedia says we are both demoting him, he is listed there as “General” Peter Cosgrove.

  57. By “both” demoting General Cosgrove I meant MareeS and silly me.

  58. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I may be quite out of date on these matters, but since when has the A.D.F. have ‘four star’ generals?

  59. John Comnenus

    Numbers is wrong again of course re old veterans sending the young off to war. Read Troublesome Young Men or the Guardsmen about those who engineered the overthrow of Chamberlain in order to fight Hitler’s Germany. Almost to a man they served in the front lines in the trenches in WWI. And Harold Macmillan was wounded on a number of occasions. They knew exactly what was ahead of the men.

    To paraphrase the immortal words of British PM Palmerston: ‘War is a terrible thing and peace always most excellent. But there are more important things than peace and worse things than war.’ A leader understands what is more important than peace and what is worse than war.

  60. John Comnenus

    We have always had one, two, three and four star officers. We just call them by their proper rank.

  61. DrBeauGan

    “Charles Martel”…
    As with Alexander and his dad to some extent. There’ always room for quibbling in history but you have a good case.

  62. .

    ZK2A – hence why I used scare quotes.

  63. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Thank you both – when your service career peaks at the rank of lance corporal – unloved, unwashed and unpaid, you tend to try to stay out of the way of such exalted beings.

  64. Oh come on

    JC: of course, the devil is in the detail when it comes to the (Australian) Greens. I agree with many of their ends, but think their means will make the cure worse than the disease.

    In that respect, I doubt the US Greens are radically different to their Australian counterparts.

  65. Combine_Dave

    You only need a cursory knowledge of history to invalidate Numbers’s ridiculous claim, as it’s littered with leaders who have seen active service and nevertheless sent their armies to war, often rashly.

    There was that funny little German guy too, right?

    And there’s that guy from Corsica who eventually led france on the war path (he had military experience prior to becoming emperor)

  66. wreckage

    It was not until Charlemagne that the Christian west was prepared to fight back against Islam and other forms of barbarism and until then it was losing.

    And it adopted the philosophy, tactics and attitude of the Greeks and Romans, economically, politically, and militarily. It’s the most effective approach to almost everything that has ever been devised. Enterprise, trade, democracy (at one level or another) mass production, and a mode of warfare that values swift and total destruction over drawn out campaigns or elaborate stratagems.

  67. Noddy

    You can have the best army in the world but if your politicians are rat shit then your country is stuffed. Ask the Rhodesians.
    Right now Australians are at war and we are losing the battle to the leftist morons and green/commo watermelons who are being led by the socialist inspired United Nations.
    Political correctness hinders the fightback.
    Tell them all to get stuffed!

  68. mareeS

    Oops, apologies to General Cosgrove, my bad.

  69. Chris M

    The military is out of fashion, Americans undervalue manual labor, schools neuter male students, opinion makers deny the biological differences between men and women, and sexiness is dead.

    Well yes, we are governed by baby boomers, they simply don’t know any better. The first uber privileged and Godless generation.

    Tim Fisher was a Vietnam Veteran as a former Platoon Commander

    I respect the Vietnam vet boomers though. And yes I know there are some decent individuals but speaking in a generational sense this one was / is a total dud.

  70. Entropy

    But Tim Fisher. likes trains and rescued Richard Carlton in East Timor.

    Oh, wait, as you were.

  71. Numbers will have a field day “proving” that Major-General Peter Cosgrove is Satan.
    The opportunities to bring up Vietnam/conscription/state vs private edudation (sic) …. the opportunities will be endless.

    You really are a clown, Steve.
    As ought to be apparent from my comment upthread, I’d be supportive of Cosgrove’s appointment as GG. He has a sane attitude to most things, including publicly stating that our commitment to Vietnam was, in hindsight, a mistake.
    He also had enough nous to speak the truth on “Children Overboard”.
    But he praised his predecessor, Admiral Chris Barrie, saying “it took a lot of guts” for him to admit finally that no children had been thrown overboard.
    It sits in the same box as Tim Wilson’s appointment to the HRC.
    There are many here who support that, but want the HRC abolished.
    I support Cosgrove’s appointment, but regard the position of GG a complete anachronism in modern Australia.
    I know you’ll have problems understanding this, but like most on the extreme Right you have great difficulty entertaining two apparently contradictory ideas simultaneously.
    Try very very hard……..

  72. candy

    Speaking of holding two apparently contradictory positions, Ms Bryce obviously is and was a republican all these years, but fulfilled her duties as GG. Only lately did she ‘bite the hand that feeds her’, but she’s an elderly woman now and Tony Abbott graciously let it go. I wonder what he really felt privately though.

  73. MacBeth

    My four years voluntary military service in WW2 taught me that if people say they are going to kill you, it’s a good idea to take them at their word, and deal with them accordingly. I know some fellow veterans are still traumatized, and still suffer; otherwise there’s no point in embitterment and losing sleep over these things in later life. Doesn’t mean you have to love the torturers. It’s for God to forgive.
    The Numbers person’s ten months in the army (I’m guessing) must have been horrific.

  74. There were Paglias around in 1904 -
    Never has youth been exposed to such dangers of both perversion and arrest as in our own land and day. Increasing urban life with its temptations, prematurities, sedentary occupations, and passive stimuli just when an active life is most needed, early emancipation and a lessening sense for both duty and discipline, the haste to know and do all befitting man’s estate before its time, the mad rush for sudden wealth and the reckless fashions set by its gilded youth–all these lack some of the regulatives they still have in older lands with more conservative conditions.

  75. There was also a time when wife beating was considered OK.

    Blackstone in Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765) writes, “the husband also (by the old law) might give his wife moderate correction. [...] But this power of correction was confined within reasonable bounds; and the husband was prohibited to use any violence to his wife, aliter quam ad virum, ex causa regiminis et castigationis uxoris suae, licited et rationabiliter pertinet (other than what is reasonably necessary to the discipline and correction of the wife). The civil law gave the husband the same, or a larger, authority over his wife; allowing him, for some misdemeanors, flagellis et fustibus acriter verbare uxorem
    (to wound his wife severely with whips and fists); for others, only modicam castigationem adhibere (to apply modest corrective punishment).”

    But along came those dangerous individuals with progressive ideas, and over time, it changed.

  76. Rabz

    state vs private edudation (sic)

    So, you’re still at it, you disgusting, pedantic hypocrite?

    :x

  77. Rabz

    The spudpeeler’s ten months in the army (I’m guessing) must have been horrific.

    Yeah, being a REMF must have been hell, as he keeps bleating – oh – and after how many frigging decades now, you staggeringly stupid, syphilis addled, marxist halfwit?

  78. Rabz

    There was also a time when wife beating was considered OK.

    It still is, in most ‘remote aboriginal settlements’, across the country, you fucking syphilitic marxist moron.

  79. REMF
    First up – that’s a Septic term, never used in the Australian military.
    The Australian term is POGO.
    Secondly, the term POGO is not applied to the posting of Rifleman in an infantry platoon.
    Thirdly – show me any reference I have made to my service as being “hell”.

  80. you staggeringly stupid, syphilis addled, marxist halfwit?
    Congratulations, Rabz.
    In one brief rant you’ve demonstrated complete ignorance, execrable, use of language, and projection.
    You’re doing well………..

  81. Rabz

    show me any reference I have made to my service as being “hell”.

    I didn’t make the original reference, POGO.

  82. Rabz

    spudpeeler – when are you going to get it through your thick fucking skull that I think you are one of the most gutless, syphilis addled, cowardly, would be mass murdering, marxist pieces of shit in human history?

    Do not attempt to engage me in conversation, you fucking moron.

    Every comment you have or ever will post here is excrement – such as your attempted gotcha about wife beating above, which you immediately had thrown back at you in spades in your twisted, monumentally hideous visage.

    Now, do us all a favour, you vile, senile syphilitic coward and fuck off and die.

  83. 1735099

    Do not attempt to engage me in conversation you fucking moron
    Scroll up. I posted a comment – you reacted (as usual) with ignorance and abuse – you engaged me.
    Your attempted gotcha…
    My comments made the reasonable observation that historically, there are always those who see change as threat. The fact that you saw it as an attempted “gotcha” is an indication of paranoia.
    Your response that women are belted on aboriginal communities, whilst clearly racist (women are also belted in other communities) shows that you simply didn’t understand my post.
    I’ll spell it out for you.
    There was a time when wife beating was acceptable. It isn’t now.
    It still happens of course, but these days it can get you a spell behind bars.

  84. Rabz

    Wow – the ridiculousness of Feldmarschall syphilis spudpeeler’s response is almost unquantifiable.

    So, pointing out the all pervasisve, unchecked abuse of women in so called ‘aboriginal communities’ is waaaaacist, you fucking moron?

    There was a time when wife beating was acceptable. It isn’t now.

    NO – it still is, you fucking moron.

    It’s perfectly acceptable and effectively legal in ‘aboriginal communities’ across this country, thanks to evil, hypocritical lobotomised leftist scum (BIRM) such as you, you utterly vile sack of shit.

    FFS, just hurry up and die.

  85. 1735099

    thanks to evil, lobotomized leftist scum
    Domestic violence in Aboriginal communities is one of the most thoroughly researched social issues in this country.
    Nowhere has any of this research attributed causal factors to political influences – from Left or Right.
    One of the most respected pieces of analysis on the problem Violence in Indigenous Communites Report – Memmott et al – 2001 lists a range of factors including Historical circumstances, loss of land and traditional culture, the disempowerment of Aboriginal elders, breakdown of community kinship systems and Aboriginal law, and entrenched poverty and racism.
    As a rule, I pay more attention to serious and thorough research than to the rantings of an extremist.

  86. candy

    Historical circumstances, loss of land and traditional culture, the disempowerment of Aboriginal elders, breakdown of community kinship systems and Aboriginal law, and entrenched poverty and racism.

    Maybe like any other cultures/race/colour too, 1735099, the grog has been a factor.

    I’m no expert, just a thought I’m putting in there in the mix.

  87. Riverina Matt

    Historical circumstances, loss of land and traditional culture, the disempowerment of Aboriginal elders, breakdown of community kinship systems and Aboriginal law, and entrenched poverty and racism

    FFS! This is excuse making for thugs. Treating Aboriginals like stone age throwbacks who don’t know any better is demeaning. If Aboriginal men beat their wifes etc. they do so because excuse makers like you will give them a free pass and blame it all on whitey.

  88. will

    lists a range of factors including Historical circumstances

    all of which are meaningless to any practical solution

    loss of land and traditional culture,

    I have lost my land, I need to go home and bash up the wife. No, actually traditional culture involved wholesale violence and lubracide. Aboriginal remains demonstrate that 30% were murdered, probably the most common form of death in traditional Aboriginal culture.

    the disempowerment of Aboriginal elders,

    who are the worst offenders, especially of pedothingy

    breakdown of community kinship systems and Aboriginal law, and entrenched poverty and racism.

    more meaningless lunar left drivel from numbers

  89. Rabz

    syphilis,

    None of the hideous disfunctionality so evident in your beloved ‘remote aboriginal communities’ existed before the decision establishing the remote camps was made by that poisoned dwarf, aided and abetted by the pernicious equal wage decision – described below by the Pearson:

    The impact of the equal wage decision on Aboriginal labour
    in the cattle industry was decisive. People lost their place in
    the pastoral economy and were forced into the increasingly
    artificial economy of the former missions

    The “former missions” being those Dantesque hellholes so familiar to loathsome lobotomised leftist hypocrites (BIRM) such as Injustice Einfeld.

    And so they went, into idleness, drug and alcohol abuse, illiteracy, horrendous violence and total failure.

    I hope you’re proud of yourself, as it was your disgusting degenerate ‘generation’ that condemned Aboriginals to this fate, you utterly vile, lying sack of shit.

  90. First of all, I’ll ignore your pathetic and juvenile name calling.
    It’s amusing, mainly because it clarifies for anyone reading it, your state of mind.
    Thanks for posting Pearson. He writes with passion and logic about the state of his people. It’s a great shame that ill-health has sidelined him recently.
    Whilst it’s difficult to establish any clear train of though in your rantings, it seems that you believe that everything evil that has happened in remote communities can be blamed on Labor governments. Apart from the fact that there have been governments of both persuasions in power since say, 1970 (Gorton/McMahon/Whitlam/Fraser/Hawke/Keating/Howard/Rudd/Gillard/Rudd/Abbott), Pearson simply doesn’t mark the decline of Aboriginal involvement in the pastoral industry as the deciding factor – his thesis is that passive welfare is the major influence –
    the subject gives me any satisfaction that the underlying
    issues have been grasped, let alone confidence that the right
    measures are being taken to change this situation.
    Even as our traditional society was ruptured by colonial
    invasion, our ancestors struggled to keep our Law alive. Our
    traditional values and relationships shielded us against
    loneliness and provided sustenance during desperately mean
    times. They still do. But when we look at our society in Cape
    York today, and the nature of our problems, we see our traditional values and relationships unraveling before our eyes.
    I contend that it is passive welfare that has caused this
    social dissolution.

    Yes, we have always said that we do not want welfare as a
    permanent destination for our people. But we have been
    living in passive welfare dependence for three decades now
    and the social consequences of this condition are devastating,
    as anyone who understands these communities knows.
    Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities that have not
    experienced full-body immersion in passive welfare depen-
    dence do not appreciate how devastating it is. But look hard
    at the social problems in Cape York Peninsula. If my analysis
    is correct, passive welfare has caused some of the worst social
    disasters the world has known

    Decisions made by a succession of governments, and the changes in the pastoral industry (which employs far fewer people in any case – of any race – than it did in the seventies) have all contributed.
    To quote Pearson (from your link) -

    The lower classes in developed countries have lost much
    of their political influence because of the shrinking and
    disorganization of the only powerful group among them, the
    working class proper. The shift in the economy away from
    manufacturing, and economic globalization, which makes it
    possible to allocate production to the enormous unregulated
    labour markets outside the classical welfare states, has
    deprived the industrial workers in the developed countries of
    their powerful position as sole suppliers of labour for the most
    important part of the world economy. The lower classes are
    therefore now unable to defend the welfare state. Nor is there
    any longer any political or economic reason for the influential strata of society
    to support the preservation of the welfare state.

    In fact, if you read that segment closely, you could argue that he sees a place for organized Labour in remedying the plight of his people.

    He concludes -

    We have a right to an economy. We have a right to the
    resources currently tied up in passive welfare. We need to
    apply these resources on real economy principles to lift us out
    of the passive welfare economy. This is the right we have. We
    have the right to demand of government that we have access
    to resources for a real economy.
    However, we have to be as forthright and unequivocal
    about our responsibilities as we are about our rights. Other-
    wise we will eventually get all of our rights and our society will
    have fallen apart in the meantime. The critical insight for
    those concerned with Aboriginal policy, at the highest levels
    and at the grassroots, is that in claiming the right to self determination,
    we are claiming the right to take responsibility.

    Interesting, isn’t it, that Pearson promotes rights and self-determination, precisely the same concerns that drove the homelands movement.
    Unlike you, and others like you, he doesn’t use his people’s plight as a weapon to beat his opponents about the ears, or further one political meme over another.

Comments are closed.