The rest of Chris Turney’s life mapped out

Organiser and leader of the failed Spirit of Mawson voyage, Chris Turney, is in a pickle. Having charged a significant fee for other passengers, of up to $7500 per person for the first leg and $18,900 per person for the second leg, Turney has become the poster boy for the next episode of Climategate. This fool has just provided further evidence of the paucity of science in the anthropogenic global warming industry.

But Turney’s promise to fully offset the CO2 emissions from the AAE should keep him planting New Zealand kauri (Agathis australis) for the remainder of his lifeTurney has promised

A total of 800 kauri trees will be planted which during the first 50 years of their life will offset more than the total carbon used to fuel the AAE.

Well the MV Akademik Shokalskiy is a 1982 Finnish built ice-strengthened ship with a gross tonnage of 1,764.

The fiasco has led to the redirection of at least three ships (Xue Long, gross tonnage 14,997; Aurora Australia, gross tonnage 6574 and L’Astrolabe, gross tonnage 1753), the use of helicopters for the rescue and the potential loss of Akademik Shokalskiy.

Rather than 800 kauri trees, Turney may need to plant 30,000 trees to offset the carbon emissions of his voyage. He may as well move permanently to the Kauri museum at Matakohe, Northland, New Zealand.

About J

J has an economics background and is a part-time consultant
This entry was posted in Global warming and climate change policy. Bookmark the permalink.

55 Responses to The rest of Chris Turney’s life mapped out

  1. Tel

    Does anyone want to start a book on how long it takes for the tree planting promise to be forgotten?

    I’ll put by flag at 3 months.

  2. Derp

    I find your lack of faith disturbing.

    3 days after landing in Tassie, there will be no mention of the promised indulgences after that.

  3. Angus Black

    How is it that when a Warmie suggests a Direct Action Plan in re climate change the guardians of politically correct thinking applaud as the ball hurtles through to the keeper while, when Tony Abbott suggests an equivalent approach more generally the audience screams for a referral to the DRS?

    Besides how could anyone take a Professor Turkey seriously anyway?

  4. Jessie

    Mapped out long before my friend, hypothesis testing well funded. Type 1 or Type 11 error you say?

    CarbonScape
    Nick Gerritisen ? and Associates

  5. Add in the carbon emissions actually planting the trees and it would be 60,000 trees.

    You get a good sawlog out of a Kauri.

  6. Louis Hissink

    The goal of the global warmers isn’t to reduce the earth’s temperature but to redistribute wealth from the US to the rest of humanity. Socialists only know how to plunder wealth, not create it.

  7. manalive

    A total of 800 [30,000] kauri trees will be planted which during the first 50 years of their life will offset more than the total carbon used to fuel the AAE …

    For that ‘offset’ to work, once the 30,000 trees mature you have to bury them — deep, forever.
    There has been no observed temperature trend, perhaps slight cooling, in the Antarctic for 57 years.

  8. There’s bound to be a government department that finds a use for his skills! LMAO We’re in so much trouble aren’t we?

  9. calli

    Add in the carbon emissions actually planting the trees and it would be 60,000 trees.

    And getting them to a plantable size ie. tubestock. Unless they are magic kauri trees, of course. In that case Gaia will handle the propagation and repotting, and the elves will plant them overnight.

  10. entropy

    Honestly, guys, surely you understand that an indulgence is to pay for your direct action, not anything that might be associated with the indulgence itself.

  11. Token

    This term explains the lefty view on the process of systemically bilking taxpauers:

    …Australian climate scientist Chris Turney, the carbon entrepreneur and head of climate science at the University of NSW…

    That tree scam is a regular game. Does anyone know who can do a Project Veritas type review of the tree planting “promise”?

    PS: ignore any malicious website warning on tbe Project Veritas site. Another example of lefty censorship

  12. M Ryutin

    I may be a little bit premature on this, but this “Ship of Fools”, as Scott Johnson so aptly put it on Powerline the other day, has caused the biggest public relations nightmare to the climate change alarmist PR campaign since Climategate 1 in November 2009.

    From 5.24am (Sydney time) on 17 November 2009 when the now-famous whistleblower posted as RC on Climate Audit that “A miracle just happened” only George Monbiot of the Guardian instantly recognized the significance, even whilst the Team at Real Climate and others were fiddling and minimizing the effect.

    This shambolic Antarctic fiasco might well be not being widely reported in the main stream media but we can we well assured that the symbolism and easy-implications of this laughable amateur-hour expedition will go on and on and on. Thanks to Climategate itself, of course, the new versions of the email chains of the rorters then , Journolist-like , will be planning the propaganda response to minimize the effect as much as possible (more alarmist Antarctic ‘studies’ to be rushed out is a given) but like Climategate, the symbolism of this joke-expedition will be here for years.

  13. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    Stupid is as stupid does.

  14. Paul

    He may as well sacrifice a goat in tribute to the almighty Goracle. Atoning for abject stupidity by planting trees. Whatever will they make up next?

  15. will

    note first comment:

    Lease of Russian ship, crew, and supplies: $1,500,000

    26 paying passengers for the trip of a lifetime: $52,000

    Three failed ice breakers: $175,000

    Chinese rescue helicopter: $30,000

    Watching alarmist grantologists spend New Years trapped in nonexistent ice while the world mocks them, PRICELESS!

    Happy New Year to all my fellow pseudoscience deniers!

  16. cohenite

    All very amusing; alarmist fuckwit and merry band of similar fuckwits goes to South pole to show there is no ice and get trapped in ice.

    However, these bastards are costing a lot of money and causing resources to be diverted from real science and downgrading the reputation of science.

    Turney in particular is a disingenuous hypocrite who has tried desperately to prove more sea ice at the South pole is in itself a proof of AGW.

    This is manifestly wrong and calls into question his continued employment as an expert on climate.

  17. .

    The sea ice is becuase of global warming. ABC Newsradio told me so. Discuss.

  18. Toiling Mass

    Unless the trees fall over into a swamp to eventually be turned into coal the CO2 will be removed from the atmosphere for only the trees own life.

    The most tree planting can expected to do is to park the CO2 temporarily. Not really offsettting his own emissions. Not even the extra CO2 he would emit by shivering on the ship.

  19. james

    The sea ice is becuase of global warming. ABC Newsradio told me so

    Must be a memo at our treasured public broadcaster.

    All radio, ABC24 and news bulletins are screaming about how Global warming is even worse than we first thought.

    Very little mention of the good tree planting professor however, and what mentions there are seem to be throat clearings more than anything else.

  20. Token

    Stupid is as stupid does.

    Is there any way to get the passenger manifest so we we can calculate the number of passengers”payimg” with taxpayer funds?

  21. struth

    This is how stupid this carbon neutral business is.
    To get the exact amount of trees required to be planted let’s just take this one fool’s life right from the start. From the carbon required to produce the alcohol that lead to his dad being able to get his mum drunk on the night of his conception, and for everyone else on the expedition, to the farmers that fed the workers in russia that built the ship. You can never ever be carbon neutral. You can never plant enough trees. The tractors and the miners that mined the wire in the fences that go around the farm that grow the seedlings. Blah Blah Blah, you get the point. Anyone who believes in carbon neutrality is quite simply a moron.

  22. Ronaldo

    The sea ice is because of global warming. ABC Newsradio told me so

    ‘Ice we win; no ice you lose’

  23. jumpnmcar

    I don’t care if this has already linked to coz it’s funny.

    Downfall on this topic.
    So funny in fact I may link to it in future.

  24. Notafan

    Correct me if I am wrong but is Carbonscape in the business of making charcoal and buring in the ground or old mining shafts?
    How is that a contribution to the economy? It sounds so utterley useless and a way to make money for doing nothing of value. They got a grant/award from the Clinton Foundation but not sure if any Australian taxpayers money has been thrown at it.
    Looks like another bunch of Al Gore types in it for the money.

  25. cohenite

    He was a funny bloke, that Hitler.

  26. cohenite

    How is that a contribution to the economy?

    It’s not. Nothing from AGW is a contribution to anything except the pockets and egos of the lying bastards who promote it. You watch, this fuckwit Turney will probably become Vice-Chancellor.

  27. Sparkx

    All this crap about carbon foot prints and tree planting begs a question. Why didn’t they find a wind powered ship? There are plenty of steel hulled sailing vessels about(The Eye of the Wind springs to mind). Or, being the clever scientists that they are (not), they could have whipped up a solar powered model. Renewable energy for us but not for them.

  28. Sparkx

    Thanks jumpnmcar, that would have to be the funniest use of that bit of footage yet. Loved it!!

  29. Notafan

    I can’t help but hope UNSW gets a whopping great bill for all this

  30. Andrew

    How is it that when a Warmie suggests a Direct Action Plan in re climate change the guardians of politically correct thinking applaud

    @Angus, you clearly don’t understand Climate Science ™. A person planting trees to offset their emissions (a type of Direct Action) is a fucking stupid, pointless practice sneered at by all intelligent people. It is a front for denialists such as Tony Abbott666 ™ to pretend to help the environment while actually doing nothing, is the most expensive form of abatement and will destroy the planet ™.

    This has nothing in common with a Market Based Solution ™, whereby somebody plants trees to generate Carbon Credits ™ which they buy from Goldman Sachs. Then Goldman Sachs sells the Carbon Credits to offset somebody else’s emissions. This is the cheapest form of abatement, supported by all economists (in fact, any economist who doesn’t support carbon trading through big banks should hand back their degree according to all big bank economists) and is backed by Christine Milne.

  31. Jessie

    Notafan and Cohenite,
    Universities are a protected species supported by industry IT & data software interests.

    Steve McIntyre

    Recently, I made a request to Thomas Bracegirdle, junior partner of Connolley and Bracegirdle, for the model data used in two recent articles: Bracegirdle and Connolley (GRL 2007) about 20th century Antarctic models; and Bracegirdle, Connolley and Turner (JGR 2008) about 21st century Antarctic models. William Connolley is well known in the blogosphere, especially for his zeal in extinguishing heresy at Wikipedia.

    HARRY_READ_ME

    The fact is that they have the expertise on campus to engineer a decent piece of software. I’m not saying it would neccessarily work that way of course. Most of the good practice in design and implementation I have learnt since leaving University, not while I was an undergraduate. In industry you literally won’t have a paycheck if things don’t work.

  32. From WUWT on the Janet Rice blog imbroglio:

    Palmersaurus comments “From what I read in the meeja, 55 or so tourists/passengers escaped from man-eating penguins in Antarctica. Unfortunatey, all scientists were lost according to onboard manifests.”

    I knew it.

  33. Tel

    Universities are a protected species supported by industry IT & data software interests.

    Really? I’m a bit surprised to hear that. I mean Oracle have started their own university, and they are upfront and call it a university as well. That sounds like they are operating directly in competition with other universities.

    Cisco have sort of split the difference, they offer courses and industry certification but they cooperate with existing universities to get Cisco onto the curriculum… mind you I’d say the university is mostly working as an advertising and recruitment agent for Cisco in that case. It’s hardly as if Cisco is bleeding money to prop up the education industry, Cisco get to charge money for those certificates… and then they get troops of Cisco-certified purchasing officers marching into every workplace.

  34. gabrianga

    Turney’s “alternative” company Carbonscape will possibly nowtender to clean up the mess his journo mates and paying guests helped to create now trhat they have stuffed the “scientific expedition” crapopla

  35. Jessie

    Tel,

    Thanks for the overview.
    What industry software deals does UNSW enjoy? And what major banking support?
    SAS, R ? Westpac?

    Many of the universities ‘collaborate’ with State and Local Government departments to achieve projects that purportedly benefit both parties. Data (in all shape and form) flows easily: Health; Education; Infrastructure and Assets; Community Services; Immigration; Welfare; Policing; Gambling, Liquor and Licencing etc etc.
    Treasury, Land/Sea Assets, Mapping and Climate workplaces with the troops of Certificated students and their collaborative networks I will leave in your capable hands.

    SAS was rolled out cross all (to my knowledge) X State depts simultaneous to the integration of datasets (if they could be labelled that) between for eg Community Health: Child Protection and Policing. There are other egs.
    Given the apparent problem Australia has graduating sufficient Maths/Statistics graduates that makes for an interesting scenario.

  36. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    Can’t open the Downfall link.

    Grateful for a re-post. I don’t want to miss this one.

  37. squawkbox

    All this crap about carbon foot prints and tree planting begs a question. Why didn’t they find a wind powered ship?

    Or what about one of those incredibly cool Russian nuclear-powered icebreakers? Surely they must be underused nowadays with all that melting arctic ice we’re told about (sarc)

  38. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    And Philippa, grateful for a link to the Janet Rice thingy.

    Am writing out cheques today, yes! Many thanks to all for the help.

    ‘O God, make our enemies ridiculous’.

  39. Zatara

    Token – “Is there any way to get the passenger manifest so we we can calculate the number of passengers”payimg” with taxpayer funds?”

    Yes, two ways I can think of. Either the ship departure manifest or the arrival declaration of the rescue vessel(s).

    From their brochure –

    The Australasian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) 2013-2014 is
    a celebration of science and adventure, repeating century old measurements to discover and communicate the environmental changes taking place in the south.

    It’s good that is permanently embedded in the net just in case it falls into the forgetery when they try to rewrite the legend for posterity. Perhaps ABC needs to be reminded of that very clear mission statement?

  40. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    Ta Jump.

  41. Tel

    What industry software deals does UNSW enjoy? And what major banking support?
    SAS, R ? Westpac?

    http://academy.ee.unsw.edu.au/

    Seems like they have Cisco on board, but as I said above, that’s a strong mutual benefit because those graduates end up as effective Cisco advocates in industry. There’s no way Cisco makes a loss on that overall.

    I did a search on SAS and found this:

    Thanks to sponsorship from SAS, the School has a new second year course, MATH2871 Data Management for Statistical Analysis. It runs for the first time in S2 2005 and enrolments are now open.

    The course focuses on managing large volumes of data. Students will learn how to create databases from various sources, manipulate and manage data, query the database and conduct elementary analysis of the data.

    The course is application oriented and uses SAS. SAS is a powerful integrated suite of software that handles data management, data analysis and data reporting. It is in wide use, particularly in the government, financial, insurance and market research sectors.

    The course offers a program of work experience placements in the summer following the course, and a prize of $1000 for best performance and an opportunity for SAS certification.

    I can’t imagine that SAS are losing much out of this sponsorship. I mean $1k prize is hardly going to cover a weekend in a Sydney hotel and as far as I know (very limited details) it’s pretty easy to get a student edition of SAS but I was not able to search out a price in Australia. I did find the price of $246 for the desktop edition of SAS on an educational license in California so let’s say it’s the same price in Australia. All software vendors offer cheaper licenses to students because you WANT people to get familiar with your software. You can be a student pretty much anywhere and qualify.

    By the way R is free to download (search “CRAN download” on google) and there’s no restriction, it has nothing to do with university, it really is Free Software. There’s also a paid-for version of R if you want commercial support from Revolution Analytics, but that’s not compulsory by any means.

    Banking support I have no idea…

  42. Tel

    SAS was rolled out cross all (to my knowledge) X State depts simultaneous to the integration of datasets (if they could be labelled that) between for eg Community Health: Child Protection and Policing. There are other egs.
    Given the apparent problem Australia has graduating sufficient Maths/Statistics graduates that makes for an interesting scenario.

    And I’m sure that SAS gets paid easily enough on that government contract to cover a small loss in sponsoring a university course. Your original statement that, “Universities are a protected species supported by industry IT & data software interests,” just doesn’t hold up. All you are saying is that government can shake slightly more attractive license terms out of the software vendor by giving them a push to collaborate with universities. Why does that make universities a “protected species”? I mean, protected against what?

  43. .

    SAS is overpriced, overhyped and not that special.

  44. Tel

    Dot, personally I prefer R because I find the license terms and price more agreeable :-) , but SAS tends to come out with a lot of industry specific modules. That’s one advantage of high priced software — the purchase price gets ploughed back into development and the Free Software is a little bit behind.

  45. Jessie

    Thanks Tel,

    I hardly imagine $1000 would be of interest also.
    The work experience offered, which crosses so many sectors is a different matter for a student completing a Degree/Certificate and still casually working on tables. And the kudos with this ‘industry prize’ for potential on-going employment. That would be worth quite a bit I imagine, and if the student had a head full of particular software and support persons maintains a very easy transition into the workforce. And minimum wage entitlements.

    Often the employer is provided a lump sum over 26 weeks by the Feds, on the condition the employee remains in the position and completes training. That may be in the Vocational Ed area though, however Degree students are likely supported by industry in the same manner.

    SAS is a powerful integrated suite of software that handles data management, data analysis and data reporting. It is in wide use, particularly in the government, financial, insurance and market research sectors.

  46. Tel

    Jessie, yeah exactly. Those deals are a winner for the vendors and pretty good for the universities. Neither side is propping up the other, they both make a profit.

  47. Jessie

    Apologies, missed your question Tel.

    FOI. The lengthy process to acquire publicly funded information/data is onerous in many instances.
    Or simply, as linked to Steve McIntyre the etiquette of data sharing when interested in a published paper or source. I understand that academic journals and institutions are instituting a more rigorous system to have the source data and methodology avail. Perhaps a requirement of publication?

  48. Tel

    Oh right, protected from FOI. Sorry, I got onto the topic of software n stuff.

    Yeah agree, the whole research with hidden data behind it is a load of cobblers. It’s going to take a whole shift of mindset amongst the researchers themselves… but it is happening. I mean, the core of empirical science is reproducibility. Throw that away and what do you have? Economics, ha!

  49. Jessie

    Throw that away and what do you have? Economics, ha!

    No, they would have no feckin’ job, grant money or spurious kudos. Or malign ‘evidence-based’ policy and we would not have the erosion many of suffer of individual liberties. As discussed in other threads and blogs.

  50. Jessie

    Lastly Tel,

    And potentially useful science if it were not for the corruption, foot dragging and dropping/sidelining of variables choice, crappy data sets; all in the name of ‘competition’ in [some of] our halls or amongst [some of] our academics of western civilisation academia.

    Maybe the economists could use the potentially useful science? Ha!

    As noted by Arnost

  51. Kevin White

    Hi, just re-posting the Downfall link that a previous poster said wasn’t working

  52. Kevin White

    Maybe this link to the Downfall video will work

    http://youtu.be/03SWGkxt72A

Comments are closed.