Is this the future of Toyota Australia?

Alan Moran alerted me to this development in the US.  The Seattle Boeing workers have narrowly approved a number of major concessions to ensure that the new 777X Jetliner will be built in Washington state.

There are a number of interesting features to this story, including:

  • The division between the local branch of the union, who bitterly opposed the deal, and the national union, whose main objective was to secure union membership;
  • The backdrop of the right to work states (voluntary unionism) which would be more than happy to lure the company to set up a plant;
  • Recall also the previous political interference of the National Labor Relations Board, stacked with left-leaning Obama appointments, that attempted to block Boeing from setting up a plant in another (right-to-work) state, South Carolina, a ruling that was overturned.

Here is the piece from the Chicago Tribune:

SEATTLE/NEW YORK (Reuters) – Boeing’s machinists on Friday narrowly approved a crucial labor contract that secured thousands of jobs and billions of dollars of economic activity for Washington state but will cost workers their pensions.

The vote of 51 percent to 49 percent to accept the deal means Boeing Co will build its new 777X jetliner and wings in the Seattle area, where Boeing has built aircraft for more than 90 years.

Had the workers rejected the offer, Boeing would have considered making the successor to its popular 777 widebody jet elsewhere, and had received offers from 22 states interested in hosting the new factory.

“This decision means Boeing hopefully will stop pursuit of another site for its 777X program,” said a somber Jim Bearden, administrative assistant to machinist District 751 President Tom Wroblewski.

“They held a gun to our head and our people were afraid,” said Lester Mullen, a District 751 council delegate who works on the current 777 wing production line.

Boeing’s reaction was in stark contrast to the mood in the Seattle union hall where the results were announced.

“The future of Boeing in the Puget Sound region has never looked brighter,” Boeing Commercial Airplanes Chief Executive Ray Conner said in a statement. “This will put our workforce on the cutting edge of composite technology, while sustaining thousands of local jobs for years to come.”

NO STRIKE BEFORE 2024

In clinching the agreement, Boeing secured the location favored by analysts and investors, who saw far lower risk in using the factory and workers who now build the 777.

Boeing also ensured that the machinists won’t have an opportunity to strike until 2024, when the new contract expires.

The decision drew praise from political leaders who had brought pressure to bear on the union to approve the deal.

“I’m very pleased that the best place in the world to build jet airliners for decades will continue for decades to come,” said Governor Jay Inslee in a brief media conference in the state capital Olympia. “This has been a long road, and I respect everyone who has worked on it, but now’s the time to come together, go build this airplane. I’m happy about that.”

Addressing a concern raised by union members, Inslee said there were safeguards in recently passed state legislation giving $8.7 billion in incentives to Boeing and the industry to ensure the plane maker keeps 777X jobs in Washington state and doesn’t open a second line in another state, as it did in South Carolina with the 787 Dreamliner.

After winning the incentives and the contract vote, “it is time for Boeing to hold up its end of the bargain,” said Rep. Rick Larsen, whose congressional district includes the 777 factory. “Washington has shown that we stand behind a strong aerospace industry. Boeing should make the same commitment to our state.”

Workers had argued that with Boeing earning healthy profits, and its share price at a record high, it should not be demanding that its workers give up past contract gains.

The choice Boeing offered had opened deep rifts between the local International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM), which opposed the contract, and its Washington, D.C.-based leadership, which forced a vote on the proposal.

It had also revealed cleavages between younger workers open to the deal and older workers dead set against it. Some 49 percent of the machinists are 50 or older, the union said.

In November, two-thirds of machinists voted against Boeing’s first offer, which would have replaced their traditional defined-benefit pension with a defined-contribution savings plan, one of two retirement plans the workers receive.

The union’s national leadership negotiated that deal. But local leaders opposed it, saying the take-aways were too great.

In the vote on Friday, members approved an eight-year contract extension that the union said provided $1 billion in additional benefits beyond the prior offer, but that will halt pension contributions in 2016.

SHARP DIVISION

About 600 votes separated yes from no, union officials said. Some members wanted a recount, but the national leaders would not allow it, said Wilson Ferguson, vice president of District 751.

Ferguson said about 8,000 members did not vote, up from 5,000 in the prior ballot in November. The union has about 31,000 eligible members.

Before the vote, a member filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board taking issue with the timing, just after Boeing’s traditional closure between Christmas and the New Year, when many workers were away, the union said. The union allowed online absentee voting.

The divide between the local leaders and their national counterparts is mirrored by divisions over the contract that appear to cleave along age lines.

Younger machinists had voiced strong concern that failing to vote for the contract would cost them their jobs as Boeing moves the work elsewhere. The 777X is the last major development on Boeing’s books for the next 15 years. If the plane was built elsewhere, it would have slowly eroded aerospace jobs in Washington. The average wage is $29 an hour.

Many older workers, however, had said the pension was sacred and was worth risking job loss.

“There’s plenty of aviation work in the world,” said Kevin Flynn, an aviation maintenance technician inspector, who has filed a separate complaint against the national union leaders with the National Labor Relations Board for holding the vote against the wishes of a majority of members.

“I’ll just have to move to where the work is.”

Tom Captain, head of the global aerospace and defense practice at Deloitte, said the difficult decision the union faced reflected the fact that aerospace work can be moved to new locations and that price competition between Boeing and rival plane maker Airbus is fierce.

“Although painful tense and emotional, it is clear that there is a sober recognition of the new reality in commercial aerospace manufacturing,” he said.

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70 Responses to Is this the future of Toyota Australia?

  1. Notafan

    At least in the US workers can follow the jobs to the right to work states like North Carolina and Tennessee, some big manufacturers down there now including Volvo if I recall correctly.. Here they will cut off their noses to spite their faces.
    What would it be to see another car manufacturer come in to Australia and employee people on the award and no more. A local manufacturer of a small vehicle that was competitive internationally would be nice. It would take one state government to emulate the right to work states. Not impossible.

  2. Rabz

    How on earth is it any of bronco bummer’s business where Boeing sets up a plant?

  3. H B Bear

    This story highlights the almost complete absence of competitive Federalism present in Australia.

    A combination of centralist Federal governments (including the so called Liberals), the High Court and UN treaties, results in very little competitive tension between State jurisdictions – other than direct bidding to spend taxpayer funds on relocation and set-up expenses. Long gone are the days when those Victorian manufacturers that could would flee to the low tax jurisdiction of Joh’s Queensland.

    If Abbott was looking for a “narrative” for his government he could do a lot worse than restore the balance between the States and Commonwealth. Having caved in to Gillard on Gonski he has no opportunity to get the Feds out of school education altogether. Health remains an ever growing mish-mash of overlapping responsibilities and buck passing.

    Like most things Abbott, I wouldn’t hold my breath.

  4. H B Bear

    The divide between the local leaders and their national counterparts is mirrored by divisions over the contract that appear to cleave along age lines.

    Unions everywhere are the enemy of the young. Particularly in Europe.

  5. stackja

    They held a gun to our head and our people were afraid,”

    they might lose their jobs?

  6. stackja

    H B Bear
    #1136046, posted on January 5, 2014 at 11:35 am

    Australian people voted in 2007 against reform. Why should TA do anything until the people demand reform?

  7. Brett_McS

    Why should TA do anything until the people demand reform?

    Indeed. The right has its own form of AbbottAbbottAbbott.

  8. deiseal

    The sad thing is that the industrial culture of Australia has not moved on from the Harvester Case. It would be good to have a government which did not stand in the way of employment but sadly that would require a change in the political calculus. Until the people of Australia see the impact directly nothing will change and even then I am not sanguine.

  9. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    Toyota Australia has a future?

  10. Mike of Marion

    Rabz
    #1136021, posted on January 5, 2014 at 11:25 am

    A lot of people forget Obama put his appointtees on the GM Board after Bankruptcy to protect the UAW

  11. Petros

    Great comment H B Bear re the states. I’ve often wondered how good manufacturing would be here if the unions could only operate at a state level. No national strikes. Would introduce competition within Australia.

  12. Bruce

    Had the workers rejected the offer, Boeing would have considered making the successor to its popular 777 widebody jet elsewhere, and had received offers from 22 states interested in hosting the new factory.

    Heh, perfect democracy: you vote with your brain or we vote with our feet.

  13. johanna

    Even if unions were restricted to State level activity, braindead politicians would still offer bribes of taxpayers’ money. The fact that they are dudded (even on the face of the figures) in almost every case does not deter them. After all, it’s not their money.

    At the Federal level, pork-barrelling via things like sending ship-building contracts to Adelaide continues apace.

    Unions play their part, but it’s a bit simplistic to blame it all on them.

  14. Andrew

    Australian people voted in 2007 against reform. Why should TA do anything until the people demand reform?

    I’m not entirely sure WHAT people voted against in 2007, other than themselves. I’ve never seen, met or heard of a single person adversely affected by WorkChoices666. The fact that union ads showed examples of unlawful dismissal (eg sacked for taking a day to care for sick kids) suggests they couldn’t find real examples either.

    I think people voted to save the planet by ratifying Kyoto. But when they realised AUS would face fines for not hitting the same targets that already voluntarily existed under Howard666, a distinct “WTF?” went thru the population. And then gasps of horror at “carbon price” when it was themselves being fined.

    “Fixing” race relations with an apology but no action.

    They certainly voted against a return to Labor spendocracy and boatocracy – that’s for sure. Rudd had to rule those out, luckily. Imagine what we would have got if he had a mandate for spending and SIEVs?

  15. Bear Necessities

    http://www.bls.gov/news.release/union2.t05.html

    Washington State is one of the most unionised states in the US. But this only means around 20% of the workforce is unionised compared to 11% nationwide. The above link takes you a table which shows the union membership in each of the 50 states. You can see why unions in the US hate right to work laws. Nearly all states with RTW laws have union membership below 10%.

  16. Andrew

    Has anyone examined the role that Tony Abbott has played in this?

  17. Tel

    But this only means around 20% of the workforce is unionised compared to 11% nationwide.

    Those stats don’t always show what you think they do. In the USA unions can claim payments from non-members in some situations. The procedure is that 51% of the employees can vote for a collective bargain agreement and then the employer must use the same agreement for 100% of those employees and the 49% of people who didn’t want it still pay the union (or resign if they prefer to).

    You should really show the percentage of the workforce that is “Represented by unions” which includes those who don’t want to be a member, but end up having no choice in the matter. The percentage for 2012 is 12.5% (down from 13% in 2011) over the whole of the USA.

  18. Empire Strikes Back

    Unions play their part, but it’s a bit simplistic to blame it all on them.

    Correct. Industrial gangsterism won’t survive long without a willing host. That host is crony capital. Crony capital can’t survive without a benefactor. That benefactor is the state.

    So the blame lies at the feet of all three.

    Grace Collier is the only MSM journo who both understands this and is prepared to say it loud. She is a welcome breath of fresh air and has street cred’ ’cause she was once a union organiser.

    She’s also hot until she opens her mouth.

  19. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From Empire Strikes Back at 3:08 pm :

    “Grace Collier is the only MSM journo who both understands this and is prepared to say it loud. She is a welcome breath of fresh air and has street cred’ ’cause she was once a union organiser.

    She’s also hot until she opens her mouth.”

    I had a look and found she is flat out keeping her head in the correct alignment … has to hold it in place, evidently.

    1. http://images.theage.com.au/2013/02/12/4025755/ds_collier2b_20130212133233761871.jpg

    2. http://s3.amazonaws.com/webstore.2gb.com/styles/article-articlepage-300/s3/field/image/20130523/grace_collier.jpg?itok=pHAbzl8g

  20. johanna

    Andrew, good point. No doubt it has been raised elsewhere, though.

  21. Bear Necessities

    http://www.bls.gov/news.release/union2.t05.htm

    Hi Tel,

    Here is the table which has union membership and union representation.

  22. Tel

    Bear, in most cases about 1% difference, but in some up to 3% difference.

  23. Bear Necessities

    Indiana and Michigan have only in the last 2 years become RTW states. The unions in those states are trying to fight rear guard actions. It will be interesting to see what happens in those states in the next 5 years.

  24. Petros

    Maybe Campbell Newman can make any union active in Qld subject to the same reporting requirements and accounting standards as publicly listed companies. Might help.

  25. Tom

    Thank you, Bear at 3.32pm. The Cat turns up at least one of these brilliant references per day.

  26. Empire Strikes Back

    Mick Gold Coast QLD
    #1136324, posted on January 5, 2014 at 3:17 pm

    That don’t bother me none Mick.

  27. Habib

    Word from the import industry is that Toyota’s already packing its bags, even FORS is apparently shutting down ADRs, and going to world standards. By 2018 there’ll only be emission testing here (still costs near 30 large), and you’ll be able to bring in anything not currently imported full volume.

    Better, but still too much gummint interference. No word on duty yet. Still, I can hang on for a couple of years for my NSX-R.

  28. .

    Habib you’ve been wanting one of those for years.

    Can I get my BMW m5 duty free? In the USA they retail for 92k. Here they retail for 230k.

    It will be really frustrating if they keep ADRs and tariffs, paying more than double to protect a non existent industry.

    Keep us posted.

  29. My favourite reading of late is the lefty blogs/opinion/msm articles/etc banging on about how the “wages & labour agreement” component of a Holden car is “insignificant”.
    Keep repeating this and wanking, lefties/unionists, you’ll eventually beleive it.

  30. Sooner or later Western populations are going to have to realise that “JOBS” is not the answer!.

    Indepenace, self detirmination and entrepreneurship is!

    They’ve just signed to be over a barrel for 10 years!

    Get out of their guys, and get a business up and running!

  31. Alfonso

    From senior Toyota exec …whom I can’t attribute…..at Christmas day dinner….. ” We are finished here within 2 years”.
    Excellent.
    Maybe now I can buy a right hand drive Landcruiser GXL turbo under AU$100,000.00 rent seeking rip 0ff dollars……………..

  32. gnasher

    Dot,

    Can I get my BMW m5 duty free? In the USA they retail for 92k. Here they retail for 230k.

    Sorry to hear you are having a hard time, maybe you should hang around the 150k mark for a cheapish car you poor thing.

  33. Tel

    Can I get my BMW m5 duty free?

    Get someone in the USA to break it up into spare parts. Ship the parts to Australia in separate post-packs. Put the pieces back together again. While you are putting it back together, try to move the steering wheel to the other side.

    It will be really frustrating if they keep ADRs and tariffs, paying more than double to protect a non existent industry.

    The industry they are protecting is guys in Canberra with pocket calculators.

  34. Tel

    Toyota: “We are finished here within 2 years”

    Don’t jump the gun old fella, wait to find out what Japan looks like after another two years of Keynesian Abenomics.

  35. Alfonso

    Sorry Tel…..he/she says the decision has been made.

  36. Dan

    Get someone in the USA to break it up into spare parts. Ship the parts to Australia in separate post-packs. Put the pieces back together again. While you are putting it back together, try to move the steering wheel to the other side

    Those days are long gone Tel

    However, for both Customs Tariff purposes and for the purposes of obtaining a VIA, a road vehicle is not considered to be parts just because it is unassembled, dismantled or incomplete. Before importing any vehicle, including disassembled or partly complete road vehicles you should contact Infrastructure.

    It’s cheaper if you can get a yank to convert it then ship it over, but in all probability you will get hit with the LCT. Could be cheaper to import a Japanese motor, say 2nd hand GTR

  37. Tel

    Dan, yeah you probably need to buy some second hand bomb in Australia and then slowly replace all the parts a bit at a time until you finish with a brand new m5. That way, officially it is still a clapped out second hand bomb.

    Our import rules are nuts, they don’t even slightly make sense.

    Wait until they find out people can buy a generic piece of hardware for low $ in Australia but it is crippled by software license codes. Then you can send the requisite license codes by email from overseas and upgrade your hardware into something totally different.

  38. Relevant reforms:

    Abolish ADRs,
    Change to drive on right hand side of road on July 1 2020,
    Unilateral free trade, no tariffs on used cars,

    Lots more of these we could think of.

    Whenever Electricity Bill makes a major announcement and their ALPBC confects some false outrage AbbottAbbottAbbott666 could just issue a simple press release announcing another reform with no fanfare, just a plain b&w fax first thing next morning.

  39. Notafan

    I know it doesn’t make all that much difference but in most states in the US sales tax would be added to the sale price. I dream of moving to Chattanooga Tennessee where I can buy 6 or 7 houses in a reasonable suburb for the cost of one house in Melbourne

  40. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    Word from the import industry is that Toyota’s already packing its bags, even FORS is apparently shutting down ADRs, and going to world standards. By 2018 there’ll only be emission testing here (still costs near 30 large), and you’ll be able to bring in anything not currently imported full volume.

    From senior Toyota exec …whom I can’t attribute…..at Christmas day dinner….. ” We are finished here within 2 years”. He/she says the decision has been made.

    Please god let it be so.

    Cheaper cars, less wasted money, and another shafting of the useless, rent-seeking, country-hating union movement.

  41. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    Why change the side of the road on which we drive?

    Lotsa left-hand-drive luxury marques being driven around Tokyo, with no problems at all.

    Just let people drive whatever roadworthy car they want to drive.

    Treat them like the adults that they are. Tony.

    And by the way, get rid of Macfarlane. The guy clearly doesn’t Get It.

  42. .

    gnasher
    #1136521, posted on January 5, 2014 at 6:28 pm

    Dot,

    Can I get my BMW m5 duty free? In the USA they retail for 92k. Here they retail for 230k.

    Sorry to hear you are having a hard time, maybe you should hang around the 150k mark for a cheapish car you poor thing.

    You can be glib if you like, or you can realise that we punish the middle class in Australia and tax them into literally living the lifestyle of the lower class in other western nations.

    If someone has a good year or promotion – shouldn’t they be able to spend as they like?

    No – they should pay more than double for the things they desire!

    For what end?

  43. Tardell G

    ” I dream of moving to Chattanooga Tennessee where I can buy 6 or 7 houses in a reasonable suburb for the cost of one house in Melbourne”
    Oh come on! according to surveys Australia is the BEST PLACE ON EARTH to live and work!
    I read it here in the comments!

  44. Walrus…

    Why change the side of the road on which we drive?

    Cut costs producing two different types of car,
    Most 22nd hand cars in the world are right hand drive.

    Granted a marginal saving, but multiplied over millions of cars it would add up.

  45. Shorter Tardell G:

    ‘Trade Union Party corruption contributes to our high standard of living’.

  46. Tardell G

    ‘Trade Union Party corruption contributes to our high “cost” of living’”.

  47. Dan

    The end of Holden began with the Toyota Lexen. People realised that a local manufacturer was not needed to produce a car of such patriotic value. Plus it looked like a commodore. Why buy a Holden when some japs can make a car that looks almost exactly the same. And cheaper too. People who stuck with commodores looked like denim wearing relics of the past with the music cranked up to Wings

    Dedicated to Ben Lexen. = Bob Hawke, beer, blue collar, stubble shorts, BBQ paradise.

  48. James of the Glen

    Walrus kkk, “And by the way, get rid of Macfarlane. The guy clearly doesn’t Get It”.

    Never truer words spoken, W.

  49. Tel

    Granted a marginal saving, but multiplied over millions of cars it would add up.

    And multiplied over a million council workers diddling around with street markings it would subtract again.

  50. Mike of Marion

    Dan
    #1136644, posted on January 5, 2014 at 8:08 pm

    That was funny.

  51. JohnA

    Forester #1136620, posted on January 5, 2014 at 7:53 pm

    Walrus…

    Why change the side of the road on which we drive?

    Cut costs producing two different types of car,
    Most 22nd (sic grin!) hand cars in the world are right hand drive.

    Granted a marginal saving, but multiplied over millions of cars it would add up.

    If they are right hand drive, the vehicles drive on the left side of the road – correct?

    So if the majority are doing what we are doing now, no need to change, correct?

  52. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    James, Macfarlane was Turnbull’s man for negotiating with Rudd’s government over the CPRS.

    He was upset when Abbott crushed Turnbull and the party room voted to end negotiations and block the legislation.

    As he showed with CPRS, with SPC Ardmona and with Holden, his approach is to solve problems. But he doesn’t get that he should solve problems in a way that promotes Liberal party principles and crushes the party’s implacable ideological opponents.

    You know, like what people voted Liberal for.

    How he got to cabinet I have no idea.

  53. B Grantham

    Dan at8.08pm
    “The end of Holden began with the Toyota Lexen. People realised that a local manufacturer was not needed to produce a car of such patriotic value. Plus it looked like a commodore. Why buy a Holden when some japs can make a car that looks almost exactly the same. And cheaper too.”

    Holden made the Lexen and Toyota badged it as a Toyota. Toyota made the Camry and Holden badged it as an Apollo. This model sharing experiment obviously did not continue.

  54. James of the Glen

    Wkkk, Macfarlane fantasised he was being edgy with Wong. Grotesque, to put it mildly, but he was too in love with the publicity to see how stupid he looked.
    As you say, he was put out by the arrival of TA ending his treachery.

    I’ve become tired of suggesting TA removes Hunt, Macfarlane and Turnbull. Macfarlane loves to ride on the coat tails of others who put in the hard work of ousting Labor, then immediately consorts with the drongos (lately, Combet).
    A lot of hard working Liberals are sick of his runtish behaviour.

  55. I am the Walrus, koo koo k'choo

    I suspect Wong played with him, cat n mouse style.

    She would have done us all a favour if she’d killed his career stone cold dead.

  56. brc

    Can I get my BMW m5 duty free? In the USA they retail for 92k. Here they retail for 230k.

    I have to break web silence on this issue once again.

    The underlying cause of excessive prices in Australia is the parallel import restrictions. Like all stupid laws in Australia, most Australians just accept it as the way things are and don’t seriously question why there should be a restriction on the importation of a motor vehicle, when you can buy a boat, a plane, a painting or a container of bicycles from another country with no restrictions whatsoever.

    Sure, we have the retarded LCT and a 5% import duty, and the stupid ADRs but these are second-order issues – most countries have taxation regimes – certainly the 20% VAT in the UK bites hard.

    But the reason why an M% costs 2.5 times here than it does in the USA is down to the parallel import restrictions. If I were able to buy an M5 while on holiday, then take care of the importation and ADR compliance and LCT and import duty – then I could still get it for at least $100k below the price at the BMW dealer. I could fly into Hong Kong – place my order with the BMW dealer there- I’m sure they would be most accommodating – and pick it up from the docks. You can do this now if you stay in Hong Kong for 12 months after taking delivery – then just import it. In fact just about every expat with a clue tends to do this, which explains the large numbers of grey import prestige cars in Australia, even though the rules are byzantine and ridiculous.

    Cut costs producing two different types of car,

    At the margin producing two different types of car would cost a little more – but for the most part volume production cars are built on automated assembly lines and are designed by computer. There is no cost difference in building a LHD vs RHD car – robots just do what they are programmed to do. Very low volume cars are usually just built in LHD (or RHD if they are japanese) but for the most part this just isn’t a factor.

    But Autsralia should be like the UK where you can buy and register a LHD car if you really want. As already stated – we are adults, it’s not like we are going to buy a LHD car by mistake.

    These things should be phased out by 2017 (and started now, in case the ALP gets back in)
    * ADRs
    * Parallell Import rules
    * Import Duty
    * LCT

    POlitically the LCT is difficult, but could be approached with the right research. The right approach is to re-index it talking about bracket creep – and making a true LCT cutting in at $200k or more. Wanting to make more imported cars more affordable for all Australians would be the right way to go. I’m sure the Govt would collect more sales tax overall if they dropped the LCT and lit a fire under new car sales.

    But the whole thing would need to be phased so as to no create business-killing disruption a-la live cattle ban.

  57. Change to drive on right hand side of road on July 1 2020

    With Sydney drivers being as they are, i’ll be walking from that date until at least 2021. Besides, if i’m attacked by highwaymen, how will I defend my left with my sword on my right??

  58. Cool Head

    When you’ve got a gun best to hold it to the head…
    Especially the head of leftie unions, job destroyers.
    Wish we had “right to work states”.

  59. Paul

    “Change to drive on right hand side of road on July 1 2020″

    The Swedes did this in the 60s. We could have done it at the time quite easily, but I think we’ve lost that opportunity now. Too many cars, too many specialized roads. On the other hand, lots of recent additions to our population used to driving on that side, or in the case of the third world “refugee” club, any side at all.

  60. WhaleHunt Fun

    The latter drive all over the road to avoid the IUDs. At least that is my explanation of Sydney Taxi behaviour.

  61. Combine_Dave

    The Swedes did this in the 60s. We could have done it at the time quite easily, but I think we’ve lost that opportunity now.

    Remove the import restrictions (hidden or otherwise) and we won’t need to switch sides to lower our car prices (just think of all those cheap 2nd hand Japanese cars).

    Besides all those whinging poms and Indians we import are used to driving on the correct side.

  62. Infidel Tiger

    The Swedes did this in the 60s.

    Samoa did it just recently.

    Men drive on the left so we may hold our sword in our right hand. Take that away and you render us defenceless.

  63. Mater

    WhaleHunt Fun #1137254, posted on January 6, 2014 at 9:38 am
    The latter drive all over the road to avoid the IUDs. At least that is my explanation of Sydney Taxi behaviour.

    IUDs?
    I imagine there could be nothing more frightening for them! :-)

  64. Paul

    WhaleHunt Fun #1137254, posted on January 6, 2014 at 9:38 am
    The latter drive all over the road to avoid the IUDs. At least that is my explanation of Sydney Taxi behaviour.

    I imagine the Harbour Tunnel would be a demolition derby, what with all those IUDs blocking progress.

    Freudian typo of the year goes to WhaleHunt Fun.

  65. .

    IT

    You need to mount your scabbard on your back and practice your drawing and cuts.

    Why you could even take on a shield on your left arm.

  66. Docket62

    “The latter drive all over the road to avoid the IUDs. At least that is my explanation of Sydney Taxi behaviour.”

    I wasn’t aware intra uterine devices were fitted as road furniture, although it could assist explaining Sydney taxi drivers.

  67. Docket62

    “You need to mount your scabbard on your back and practice your drawing and cuts.”

    I’d make a feint from the south east…….. That rabbit is dynamite

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