A big dumb ox

a big dumb ox

There is a ferocious debate going on in the US at the moment over a book written by an American journalist of the right, Diana West. The book is titled, American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation’s Character and to give you its essence, is about how communist infiltration of the Roosevelt administration ultimately meant that America’s war aims during World War II were, for all practical purposes, determined in Moscow. But what is most peculiar about the book is that it has created such a major and intense schism on the right between those who agree with West and those who think everything she wrote is delusional.

To give you some idea of the nature of this debate, there has been a furious correspondence at The New Criterion following its publication in December of a review of the book. The editor has now published a defence, not so much of West herself, but of the importance of maintaining an open mind. His editorial is titled, Premature historical closure: Why it’s important to continue debating the historical record, in which he refuses to take sides. The correspondence that follows the editorial, which is different from the correspondence found in the magazine itself, is generally quite dismayed at this evenhanded approach since if you are the type of person who subscribes to The New Criterion you are not apt to find it all that farfetched to hear that Roosevelt’s White House was riddled with communists or that it made a difference in how the war was fought.

As it happens, I read the book myself before it had become quite as controversial as it now has and wrote a review of it that has just been published in the January-February issue of Quadrant. At the start of the review, I write what I feel even more to be the case now that I have witnessed this continuous harassment of West by others who one would have thought would be on her side, our side.

No book has ever frightened me as much as American Betrayal. The only thing wrong with reading it is that you find yourself so surrounded by impossible odds that it seems there is no way you can go that isn’t in the wrong direction. Trying to fix things is as bad as just leaving them alone. But because the story the book tells is so incredible, you realise just how unbelievable her thesis would be unless you had read the book yourself.

And while the issue is narrowly about Soviet infiltration of the American foreign policy apparatus, the book has much wider implications that not only matter in the present but will remain a concern as far into the future as one might try to look. As I say in the review, I don’t wish to tell you what the book is about since it is the breadth and detail that matter. It is over 400 pages long with every fact footnoted and referenced. By the time you are finished, you will know why I have titled the article, “America, the Big Dumb Ox”. And if you read the book, you will also see what makes me so fearful about the future of the Western world.

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102 Responses to A big dumb ox

  1. C.L.

    Together now: McCarthy was right.

    100 percent right.

  2. C.L.

    … I have witnessed this continuous harassment of West by others who one would have thought would be on her side, our side.

    The nadir must surely be a US ambassador brutally slain and dragged through the streets – an act of war having been committed on US territory – and the so-called Commander-in-Chief in bed asleep, waking hours later to tell a complete lie about an “offensive” video being the cause. The (innocent) film-maker was arrested in the night, the Secretary of State repeated the lie standing next to the ambassador’s coffin. Stated simply, Obama and the American left are on the side of the terrorists who did it.

  3. Pedro

    If you find yourself describing a book as incredible and unbelievable then maybe you take the hint. No, I’ve not read the book and I’d easily accept that some commie sympathisers were in the White House, but still, a commie plot? I’m not surprised people are scathing.

  4. daggers

    I’ve always wondered why the allied armies did not push the soviets back after Hitler had been defeated. Patton had calculated it would take six weeks and argued repeatedly that they should do it. He died in a suspicious car accident. How much better it would have been for Europe if that had happened. So now we know why it didn’t.

  5. bel Marduk

    Anyone who thinks that there was not a concerted, co-ordinated effort at infiltration of the West by communist regimes is in deep denial and not worth the effort to convince.

    Great review, Steve, thoughtful and realistic but a tad pessimistic.

    People shook off the tyranny of communism as soon as they were able.

  6. .

    Patton was assassinated?

    FFS…

    Anyway.

    The British Empire and France ought to have declared war against the USSR as well in 1939, being swift in action (paticularly in seizing strategic assets and choke points) would have ensured victory.

  7. David

    The nadir must surely be a US ambassador brutally slain and dragged through the streets – an act of war having been committed on US territory

    Love ‘em or hate them [the Americans] what happened in Behghazi was an act of war against the US and deserved a swift and terrible retribution as strength is all the Religion of Peace understands.

    Their current President is not up to the job.

  8. Alf

    It sounds like an interesting read. Why people need to go nuts over someone’s writing of history is a mystery. If they are demonstrably wrong, say so and cite the evidence. If they have meticulously footnoted their work, then respect the scholarship, even if you disagree with the thesis.

    Stalin was a ruthless operator and it is quite conceivable that he tried to influence US policy. Whether he succeeded or not, I don’t know. But by Yalta, Roosevelt was ailing, Britain was broke and Stalin was poised to take Berlin. Roosevelt always had some sympathy for the Russians in WWII, knowing that they bore the brunt of the fighting against Germany and suffered far and away the heaviest losses. That said, a great many who fought in the Red Army, weren’t actually Russian. Churchill never trusted Stalin, and warned the Americans not to. Perhaps it was less a communist driving of US policy, than a combination of the facts above. Sounds like this book holds some of the answers. In any case, 300,000 Red Army soldiers were killed in the Battle for Berlin, the Western Allies were at least spared that.

  9. David

    That should have been “Benghazi” – sorry Uncle [he went there as a tourist in WW2 with the AIF]

  10. .

    …and not waited for Germany (or her allies) to come for them, rather, quickly hitting or otherwise seizing Rome, Vladivostok, Murmansk, the Rhineland, Elbe Valley, Kiel, Baltic sea, Dardenelles, Sevastapol, etc would have set the Axis and USSR up for failure. The concept of unconditional surrender should have applied from the beginning as well. Japan would have been vulnerable with a Allied controlled port etc so close to the home islands.

    Italy may well have crumbled with a direct attack on their weak Army and absurd dictatorship.

    Mc Carthy may have been right about a generality. There are many more far worthy anti communists to have priase for.

  11. .

    Roosevelt always had some sympathy for the Russians in WWII, knowing that they bore the brunt of the fighting against Germany and suffered far and away the heaviest losses.

    They also were ruled by a totalitarian dictator who allied with Germany to start the war and carve up Poland.

    The Communists aided and abetted the Holocaust.

    There is nothing desireable about a knucklehead wearing a Che Guevera shirt.

  12. Alf

    That’s all true Dot, but Roosevelt was more sympathetic to Russia than Churchill and that’s all I was saying.

  13. Noddy

    Now you should read ‘Fabian Freeway’ by Rose Martin and ‘None Dare Call it Conspiracy’ by Gary Allen. The West is losing the war that never ended to ‘leaders’ like Obama, Blair. Ban Ki Moon, Angela Merkel and dozens of others. Read ‘Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing”.
    Google ‘War is a Racket’ by Smedley D. Butler.
    Of course, you will be abused by the ‘useful idiots’ as a conspiracy theorist.

  14. JC

    Italy may well have crumbled with a direct attack on their weak Army and absurd dictatorship.

    From what I recall reading, Patton saved Italy from the commies. He told the sovs if they crossed over into Italy from Yugoslavia he was going to kick the living shit out of them. I think I read he actually had tanks pointed directly towards the soviets at point blank range.

  15. I would like to read this book and make up my own mind. But I’d like one tiny spoiler: I wonder if the author goes into/touches on the Communist infiltration of MI5, the Foreign Office and other key government agencies in the UK in the same period as well.

  16. David

    JC if you do a little bit of research you will find Patton was removed from command after the slapping incident in Sicily. He did not return to a battlefield command until after D Day.

    The campaign in Italy managed without him.

  17. .

    The UK got ‘pwned’ by Soviet intelligence, because of treason. In my opinion (which, is open minded given the evidence), it was so much more serious than in the US, bar the Rosenbergs.

    Such a shame it happened to the nation which broke Hitler’s codes.

  18. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From bel Marduk at 10:20 pm:

    “Anyone who thinks that there was not a concerted, co-ordinated effort at infiltration of the West by communist regimes is in deep denial and not worth the effort to convince.

    Great review, Steve, thoughtful and realistic but a tad pessimistic.

    People shook off the tyranny of communism as soon as they were able.”

    … but then it evolved, re-badged and emerged for another go, from within, bel Marduk. There is much going on about which one needs to be sometimes cautious and sometimes alarmed.

    I am occasionally beset by the fear that the popinjay in the White House is merely the spruiker preparing us for the main show. The fact that Washington is just one big Democrat office block, where they all dine comfortably together in the staff cafeteria concerns me, as does the fact that Americans haven’t noticed and simply accept it is the equally appalling Hilary’s turn next – to celebrate wynmminses.

    I’ll certainly be reading American Betrayal, following Steve Kates’ recommendation.

  19. .

    Why worry about this when we have misanthropic, anti technoligical, anti progress, anti prosperity deep Greens (one of whom is an ex Soviet payrollee) in our Senate?

    The threat of Communists wielding influence is much more close to home for most authors and commenters on the Cat!

  20. C.L.

    I don’t even see where the debate is.

    Roosevelt and Truman were weaklings who handed Europe to the Soviets.

    This is banal fact.

  21. Alf

    Or C.L. was it that Stalin used his massive strength to get his own way when the western allies could do nothing about it? He lied to them about his intentions and expected to have to fight them, but they weren’t in a position to stop him and there was no widespread enthusiasm for a new war against the Soviets in 1945.

  22. lotocoti

    What Churchill must have thought has never been revealed, but there can be little doubt he would have had grave suspicions about what was happening around him.

    His frustration with Roosevelt’s cavalier attitude towards Stalin and his subsequent sidelining at Yalta speaks volumes.

  23. Piett

    Out of curiosity, for you guys who think WW2 should have been continued against the Soviets to liberate Eastern Europe, how many millions of dead would you think acceptable to achieve this goal?

    Consider Poland. If the Western Allies had (somehow) been able to push back the huge and well-equipped Soviet Army, they would undoubtedly have occupied the Polish cities and dug in. Allied forces used firepower to avoid casualties on the offensive, so shifting Ivan out of Poland would have entailed massive bombing, artillery and/or nuclear weapons. And thus huge Polish civilian casualties (in a country that suffered more in % terms than any other in WW2). You guys OK with that?

  24. C.L.

    One of the most oddly lionised orations of modern times must be Churchill’s 1946 speech in Fulton, Missouri.

    “From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the Continent.”

    No shit.

  25. No shit.

    Well, yes, but he put it more elegantly.

  26. Aristogeiton

    C.L.
    #1151046, posted on January 14, 2014 at 9:42 pm
    Together now: McCarthy was right.

    100 percent right.

    http://thediplomad.blogspot.com.au/2014/01/proud-owner-of-cold-war-mentality.html

  27. Louis Hissink

    Additional perspectives will be gained from studying Victor Suvorov’s books, some of which have been translated to english – Icebreaker, and the The Chief Culprit, both on Kindle. Actually one needs to go back to the 19th century to gain an overall perspective.

    The topic is close to impossible to discuss fully because of existing thought crime laws etc that exist in the EU, the US, Canada and Australia. Just remember who formed the bulk of the Bolshevikis during the WWI and its immediate aftermath. The setting up of the US Fed in 1913 was a necessary policy implementation for WWI, which is why one needs to look to earlier times. In fact one could start from the times of the industrial revolution and the indignation of the ruling elite that they had to start paying their tenant farmers comparable wages to the factory workers etc.

    The situation is best summarised by the phrase, he who has the gold, makes the rules. I would also look to cultural/religions that divide people into those who are divinely ordained to rule. And then wonder why free speech is somewhat specious these days.

  28. Abraham

    Ari …

    Loved the article at the link.

  29. Louis Hissink

    Steve,

    That picture is not one of an ox :-)

  30. Abraham

    We are indeed facing an interesting future. Having recently watched a documentary on Stalin, what astounded me was the total destruction he wrought in order to create Russia in his own image. The hunger for power and control exists amongst all ideologies whether communism, fascism, socialism, capitalism, etc.

    Underestimating the enemies of liberty lurking within our own country would be disastrous. Imagine the influence a Lee Rhiannon could exert in a hung parliament? Communism isn’t dead, it’s just continuously rebranding itself.

  31. alan moran

    Dot
    “Why worry about this when we have misanthropic, anti technoligical, anti progress, anti prosperity deep Greens (one of whom is an ex Soviet payrollee) in our Senate?”

    This is the contemporary point, – it is less the wish to install a communist dictatorship that now poses the threat but the many anti-capitalist, anti-progress green leftoids who dominate the bureacracy as well as large swathes of the political establishment. Although not seeking to deliver the nation to a foreign power, their idelogy would deliver us and is delivering us markedly lower incomes.

  32. Louis Hissink

    Richard Ebeling discusses pre WWII China and how inflation, fiat money, destroyed its economy

    http://www.thedailybell.com/editorials/34926/Richard-Ebeling-Chinas-Great-Inflation-Helped-Bring-the-Communists-to-Power/

    and led to the Chinese/Japanese conflict.

    We seem to know not even the half of it :-(

  33. Tel

    Roosevelt and Truman were weaklings who handed Europe to the Soviets.

    There was nothing weak about FDR, he was the guy who took the gold out of the hands of the American people, and shifted their economy towards a central planning model with his alphabet soup agencies. He looked after the labour unions and very likely he quite admired Stalin’s approach.

    FDR also positioned the USA to be the world’s foremost superpower with Europe divided and crippled, and the best scientists and engineers emigrating for a decade. FDR is the architect of modern America (such as it is) and if he happened to cooperate with communists in the process then so be it.

  34. Tel

    Out of curiosity, for you guys who think WW2 should have been continued against the Soviets to liberate Eastern Europe, how many millions of dead would you think acceptable to achieve this goal?

    Guaranteed less than the number that Stalin killed after the war, but you can’t plan an invasion retrospectively.

  35. Token

    Roosevelt always had some sympathy for the Russians in WWII, knowing that they bore the brunt of the fighting against Germany and suffered far and away the heaviest losses.

    How the world would be different if Roosevelt had not broke the tradition set by George Washington and handed over the presidency in 1940 like every predescessor. Indeed, Roosevelt did not trust his VP which he was elected with in 1940 and had him bumped for Truman in 1944 when his health materially declined.

    If Roosevelt had not broken the tradition (and the US establishment had stood up to his play at being a dictator for life) the US would’ve had a healthy and vital president instead of a man who was ailing and was unable to stand up to Stalin.

    Roosevelt was too much of a vein crony capitalist to be a communist, but his totalitarian tendencies left the world (especially Eastern Europe) to the preditorial communist Soviet state for 5 decades.

  36. Louis Hissink

    Tel,

    FDR believed in convergence, that the capitalist US would in time converge with the USSR politically. But who was really driving US policy? And what ideology informed that policy?

    Whatever, this has now happened, but the origins of this go back to Woodrow Wilson and ‘Colonel House’. The communists/fabians/statists absolutely need the monopoly power to print money and hence how far back do we go? Bank of England? Purpose? To fund government borrowing; for what?

  37. Abraham

    Alan …

    Although not seeking to deliver the nation to a foreign power, their idelogy would deliver us and is delivering us markedly lower incomes.

    Where do you think these “anti-capitalist, anti-progress green leftoids” will draw the line in their pursuit to redefine society?

  38. Token

    There was nothing weak about FDR, he was the guy who took the gold out of the hands of the American people, and shifted their economy towards a central planning model with his alphabet soup agencies. He looked after the labour unions and very likely he quite admired Stalin’s approach.

    FDR was powerful enough to pack the threaten the US High Court in 1937, to the effect they created rulings which invented rules which restrained trade. This was possible by the cowed and docile press too eager to please the leader of their team, and not willing to stand up for the people of their country.

    Obama echoes FDR in many ways. You can bet that if the amendment to the constitution to limit the terms of a president (a direct response to the dictatorial attitude of FDR) Obama would be going for re-election in 2016 & 2020 and even 2024.

  39. Louis Hissink

    Incidentally it was at the end of WWII that Churchill finally realised that the Allies had killed ‘the wrong pig’, and apparently said so to FDR after one of the last meetings with Stalin.

  40. .

    FDR was powerful enough to pack the threaten the US High Court in 1937, to the effect they created rulings which invented rules which restrained trade.

    Wickard v Filburn is an appalling injustice that continues to be applied today.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wickard_v._Filburn

    A farmer, Roscoe Filburn, was growing wheat for on-farm consumption in Ohio. The U.S. government had established limits on wheat production based on acreage owned by a farmer, in order to drive up wheat prices during the Great Depression, and Filburn was growing more than the limits permitted. Filburn was ordered to destroy[citation needed] his crops and pay a fine, even though he was producing the excess wheat for his own use and had no intention of selling it.

    The Supreme Court interpreted the United States Constitution’s Commerce Clause under Article 1 Section 8, which permits the United States Congress “To regulate Commerce with foreign Nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian Tribes”. The Court decided that Filburn’s wheat growing activities reduced the amount of wheat he would buy for chicken feed on the open market, and because wheat was traded nationally, Filburn’s production of more wheat than he was allotted was affecting interstate commerce. Thus, Filburn’s production could be regulated by the federal government.

  41. Shane

    Even with compelling evidence ,concepts that are just too disturbing to contemplate ,are dismissed as Conspiracy Theory,usually by ad hominem attacks of smearing the messenger.
    Unfortunately ,there is just so much evidence to support the white anting of Western Culture .

    The game plan was set out in the 1930′s to seek cultural hegemony over all western institutions

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonio_Gramsci

    A bit of incidental evidence ,not widely known ,is Major Jordan’s Diaries detailing the wartime shipping of american atomic materials to the USSR,

    http://www.americandeception.com/index.php?action=downloadpdf&photo=PDFsml_AD/From_Russia_With_Love-Col_Jordan-1952-28pgs-POL.sml.pdf&id=171

    For an even more disturbing book written by a Russian ,who had access to the secret archives back in the Glasnst days, that should challenges every thing out there that you thought you knew about WWI ,& after ,where the Soviets were backing the rise of German militarism & Hitler, while also acting as consultants to the Nazis in how to build & run concentration camps right upto the start of The Great Patriotic War when Nazi Germany went against the USSR,just in time to pre empt a Soviet offensive against their German ally.

    http://www.jrbooksonline.com/PDF_Books/icebreaker.pdf

    Where did the US go for consultants for setting up Homeland Security ,but to two retired KGB generals.

    The Truth is really different at every level ,
    ,but there are too many who literally cant handle it .

    Suspect ,it maybe game,set & match, but time will tell ,but it doesnt look good after looking at all the useful idiots around the place both here & overseas.

  42. Tel

    Ah the commerce clause, is there anything it doesn’t do?

  43. Token

    Wickard v Filburn is an appalling injustice that continues to be applied today.

    Thanks Dot. That ruling would not have been possible if the US checks and balances were working and the US senate & house followed their roles as assigned by the US constitution.

    I remember reading a LBJ biography which highlighted how the wave elections of 1932, 34 & 36 replaced a lot of good members with flunkies with no power base too dependent on the Speaker & President.

  44. Peredur

    Additional to Diane West’s book see also: Paul Kengor’s “Dupes, How America’s Adversaries Have Manipulated Progressives for a Century” ISI Books, 2011, a compendium of infiltration and “active measures” that belongs, along with the Christopher Andrew / Vasily Mitrokhin “The Mitrokin Archive” on any list of eye-opening calls to attention.

  45. Combine_Dave

    Now you should read ‘Fabian Freeway’ by Rose Martin and ‘None Dare Call it Conspiracy’ by Gary Allen. The West is losing the war that never ended to ‘leaders’ like Obama, Blair. Ban Ki Moon, Angela Merkel and dozens of others. Read ‘Wolves in Sheep’s Clothing”.
    Google ‘War is a Racket’ by Smedley D. Butler.
    Of course, you will be abused by the ‘useful idiots’ as a conspiracy theorist.

    Somehow I don’t think Merkel deserves to be on your list, just because you’re not a “useful” idiot doesn’t mean you’re not an idiot…

    From the below article:

    her [Merkel's] financial aides claimed that signs that Europe’s long recession had recently become less severe had proved that its austerity policies were working.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/24/world/europe/vote-for-merkel-seen-as-victory-for-austerity.html?_r=0

  46. Boambee John

    “#1151197, posted on January 14, 2014 at 11:03 pm
    Such a shame it happened to the nation which broke Hitler’s codes.”

    The British work was based on early work by the Poles, which was passed to Britain when Poland was “going under” as a means to help “the cause”.

  47. JB5

    “The difficulty in understanding the Russian is that we do not take cognisance of the fact that he is not a European, but an Asiatic, and therefore thinks deviously. We can no more understand a Russian than a Chinese or a Japanese, and from what I have seen of them, I have no particular desire to understand them except to ascertain how much lead or iron it takes to kill them. In addition to his other amiable characteristics, the Russian has no regard for human life and they are all out sons-of-bitches, barbarians, and chronic drunks.”
    George S. Patton (8 August, 1945)

    And died from injuries received in a car accident on 21st December 1945. Shit happens I suppose.

  48. .

    Thanks for that John, I never knew that. Perhaps like the Free French, the Polish contribution to the war is not well known to members of the general public.

  49. .

    So far two people have implied that Patton was bumped off in a conspiracy theory.

    Please tout this nonsense elsewhere unless you have any evidence.

  50. Paul

    Anyone else been watching SBS’s hatchet job on ASIO? All I’ve learned so far is that ASIO were definitely doing there job, and some of the targets were smarmy, egotistical smartarses who still haven’t outgrown their Socialist Uni days.

  51. Burnt Stump

    I’ve read the book.

    For me the most thought provoking discussions were around the second world war.

    Why remove allied troops from Italy (Europe) to invade France (Europe)? This led to the some of the most battle hardened troops been the furthest most distance from the Russian armies (eg British 7th Armoured Division). Take a look at a map of Europe. Why move troops from northern Italy with its proximity to Eastern Europe?

    Secondly, the policy of unconditional surrender. Why encourage the Germans to fight to the bitter end? The book presents credible evidence that elements within the German elite hoped to collapse the western fronts with one condition only, namely the right to move their armies intact to the East. The major winner from this policy was Stalin.

    American Betrayal is well worth the time. I can’t recomnend it highly enough.

  52. jupes

    The British Empire and France ought to have declared war against the USSR as well in 1939, being swift in action (paticularly in seizing strategic assets and choke points) would have ensured victory.

    Dot that is the second dumbest thing you have ever posted.

  53. sparky

    @NODDY #1151162 10.45pm
    I am surprised you neglected to mention John A Stormer’s book ” None Dare Call it Treason” , which preceded Gary Allen’s book by 8 years ( 1964).It is passing curious that Allen has pretty much copied John Stormer’s book title.
    Stormer’s original is out of print but has been has been updated “… 25 years on”
    He addressed the insidious creep and infiltration of communism in all walks of life in America.
    Far from being a conspiracy theorist, ” None Dare.. is a careful compilation of facts from hundreds of Congressional investigations of communism and dozens of authortitave books on the communist- socialist conspiracy to enslave America.”
    My copy has an index and is carefully referenced.
    You can put this book on your must read list as well, if only to see the magnitude of the problem we all face.

  54. jupes

    What do you think of this:

    I think it’s rubbish Frank.

    So instead of sending Patton home, Ike had him assassinated? Yeah right.

  55. rafiki

    Alan Moran – “many anti-capitalist, anti-progress green leftoids (who) dominate the bureacracy”. One might add that working alongside such people are many who, while not consciously anti-capitalist or anti-progress, have had their world view shaped by their educational expereince such that they have no alternative view point to the anti-capitalists. The inability of many bureacrats to think in ways that would promote a capilatist system and what it entails by way of freedoms is excacerbated by their sheer incomptence, a result partly but significantly due to appointment and promotion policies that reward a person’s identity (female, nesbian, aboriginal etc) rather than talent.

  56. .

    jupes
    #1151820, posted on January 15, 2014 at 10:01 am

    The British Empire and France ought to have declared war against the USSR as well in 1939, being swift in action (paticularly in seizing strategic assets and choke points) would have ensured victory.

    Dot that is the second dumbest thing you have ever posted.

    No, it is not.

    Furthermore, it is not a stupid comment.

  57. PT

    Did not Bella Dodd testify about this long ago?

  58. C.L.

    FDR is the architect of modern America …

    He sure is.

    A lazy socialist nincompoop who failed the bar exam seven times, he never had a job, never served in uniform and was totally ga-ga by the closing years of the war.

  59. daggers

    More on Patton and the book about his death:
    It’s a thoroughly researched book that raises many questions about a general that many people are familiar with through the 1970 multiple Oscar-winning movie “Patton” starring George C. Scott as “Old Blood and Guts.”

    “Patton” the film was based in part by a book by Ladislas Farago, Wilcox tells us, one of the many writers who delved into the accident which left Patton with a broken neck and partial paralysis, although no one else in the big Caddy received more than a few scratches and bruises.

    What was the driver of the 2 1/2-ton GMC Army truck, Specialist Robert L. Thompson, doing out on a Sunday morning and what happened to the two men who were in the truck’s cab with him — in violation of a regulation that limited the cab to a driver and a passenger?

    Among the issues Wilcox raises are:

    * What happened to the five known accident reports on the Dec. 9, 1945 crash involving a four-star general? The reports are nowhere to be found.

    * Patton was making a remarkable recovery in a German hospital when he suddenly had a relapse and died on Dec. 21, 1945. The death certificate lists “pulmonary edema & congestive heart failure” as the cause of death. Why was there no autopsy?

    * Patton’s life had been threatened earlier in several odd incidents, including a fender bender and a road incident with a farmer’s cart. Patton had been warned that he was on a hit list and he told his family that he didn’t expect to leave Europe alive.

    * What happened to the Cadillac that Patton was riding in? The car in the Patton Museum at Fort Knox, Kentucky, is a 1939 export model that is made to look like the ’38 Caddy that Patton used, according to a Cadillac expert Wilcox employed to examine the museum car. The museum car has a “Body by Fisher” emblem — but the Series 75 car Patton used was built by Fleetwood.

    * Why was Patton the only one injured in the crash? The driver of the Cadillac, Horace L. “Woody” Woodring, wasn’t injured in those pre-seat belt, air bag days, nor was Gen. Hobart Gay, Patton’s hunting companion.

    * Why was truck driver Thompson spirited out of Germany?

  60. jupes

    Furthermore, it is not a stupid comment.

    So Britain and France who were smashed by the Nazis a few months later, should have not only attacked Germany’s strategic assets and ‘choke points’ but taken on the five million or so strong Soviet army at the same time, thus winning the war?

    Ok General Dot, if you say so.

  61. HRT

    Steve,

    In your Quadrant review of Diana West’s book, you quoted the following passage:

    “Barack Hussein Obama, by associations, by actions, by stated beliefs—by rights—should not have been given a government security clearance. Short of having been elected president, the shocking paradox is, it is extremely unlikely he would ever have received it”.

    The same could be said for Gillard.

    It is perverse that a potential member of the ADF, and many other government organisations, must have a security clearance but, aspiring politicians do not.

  62. Token

    The British Empire and France ought to have declared war against the USSR as well in 1939, being swift in action (paticularly in seizing strategic assets and choke points) would have ensured victory.

    The French Third Republic was falling in upon itself as the leftist in France were as commited to communism as the left in the US was. It was not possible.

    It is a marvel that the Tories were able to build a Coalition with Labor in the UK to fight the war.

  63. .

    “Should”….it would have been utility enhancing. Could have – probably not. The British Empire possibly could have but it may have gambled a lot, relying on the dominions to tow the line, if they didn’t the home islands may have been toast. If they took poorly defended ground in Germany early and ports as well they may have gained such a strong strategic advantage. Italy was a paper tiger.

    It still begs the question should have the British invaded Germany from France. I’d be interested to know if France kyboshed any such idea.

    This is just as hypothetical and Patton smiting Stalin after Germany’s defeat.

  64. Piett

    Dot,

    (1) It still begs the question should have the British invaded Germany from France.

    Even in 1940, after almost a year of preparation, the British armoured strength in France consisted of about 100 tanks, most of which were Mark I infantry tanks (armed only with machine-guns), plus some Mark II ‘Matildas’. They actually mounted a little counter-attack against the German advance which was modestly successful. And then they ran for the coast.

    But invade Germany in 1939? Nowhere near the strength. They’d have had to take everything from the Western Desert, and abandon the Suez Canal to the Italians. And Britain wasn’t willing to gamble with the entire British army and RAF.

    And an attack on Germany would have entailed moving through the densely populated areas of the Ruhr, where even German reserve divisions would have slowed them down, without air superiority. And when the good German divisions and air groups shift back west, god help the Allies.

    (2) As for your suggestion of more landings by sea, keep in mind that they did try two in the early war: Norway and Greece. Both failed in the face of German air power.

    In the case of Greece, the Brits lost all the combat troops involved. The support troops got out to Crete, where they too were captured a bit later. (And where, in a personal note, my grandfather was shot down in a RAF aircraft bringing in supplies. Very fortunately, a RN destroyer was just below to pick up him and his mates.)

  65. wazsah

    I have just bought the Diana West book at abebooks.com for US$25 mailed.
    While fiddling in Google I found that Herbert Hoover wrote a book that sounds similar -
    Author Hoover, Herbert, 1874-1964.
    Title Freedom betrayed : Herbert Hoover’s secret history of the Second World War and its aftermath / edited with an introduction by George H. Nash.
    http://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?bi=0&bx=off&ds=30&recentlyadded=all&sortby=17&sts=t&tn=Freedom+betrayed+%3A+Herbert+Hoover%27s+secret+history+of+the+Second+World+War+and+its+aftermath&x=37&y=9

    Author
    Hoover, Herbert, 1874-1964
    Description Stanford, Calif : Hoover Institution Press, Stanford University, 2011
    Summary
    The culmination of an extraordinary literary project that Herbert Hoover launched during World War II, his “magnum opus”–at last published nearly fifty years after its completion–offers a revisionist reexamination of the war and its cold war aftermath and a sweeping indictment of the “lost statesmanship” of Franklin Roosevelt. Freedom Betrayed: Herbert Hoover’s Secret History of the Second World War and Its Aftermath originated as a volume of Hoover’s memoirs, a book initially focused on his battle against President Roosevelt’s foreign policies before Pearl Harbor. As time went on, however, Hoover widened his scope to include Roosevelt’s foreign policies during the war, as well as the war’s consequences: the expansion of the Soviet empire at war’s end and the eruption of the cold war against the Communists. On issue after issue, Hoover raises crucial questions that continue to be debated to this day. Did Franklin Roosevelt deceitfully maneuver the United States into an undeclared and unconstitutional naval war with Germany in 1941? Did he unnecessarily appease Joseph Stalin at the pivotal Tehran conference in 1943? Did communist agents and sympathizers in the White House, Department of State, and Department of the Treasury play a malign role in some of America’s wartime decisions? Hoover raises numerous arguments that challenge us to think again about our past. Whether or not one ultimately accepts his arguments, the exercise of confronting them will be worthwhile to all.

  66. Toiling Mass

    That picture is not one of an ox

    What a load of bullocks.

  67. stackja

    Google ‘Korean War and Burgess and MacLean’ many articles on similar to ‘Burgess’s defection had a devastating impact during the Korean War.’ Also Google ‘Dean Acheson and the Korean War’ many articles on similar ‘countless South Koreans still hold Acheson responsible for igniting this fratricidal conflict.’

  68. Piett

    Regarding Europe post-1945, I’m a glass half-full kind of guy. Despite massive inferiority on land, the West kept Greece and Turkey and Italy, the better half of Germany, and everything to the west. Austria and Finland too were kept out of the Soviet clutches, albeit neutralised.

    There were two big confrontations with the Soviets over northern Persia and Berlin. In both cases, Stalin backed down.

    I see all this as a major success, not failure.

    But there were limits as to how far you could push the Russians. They wanted a buffer zone in the event of another attack. (Their seizure of eastern Poland in 1939 — evil and murderous as it was — nonetheless may well have saved them in 1941 by forcing the Germans to start further westwards.)

    I really think the forces of the USSR would have fought to the death in 1945 over Eastern Europe.

  69. wazsah

    Sorry but I can not see how an invasion by the west, Brits/France etc of Germany in early WWII would have had a snowballs chance in hell.
    A WWII enigma for me is why Nippon/Germany missed the with hindsight strategic no-brainer to send some of the substantial Manchuria based Army up the Trans Siberian rail in late 1941. All the force had to do was tie down enough Soviet forces to assist the Germans take Moscow. Whole new ball game.
    Instead Nippon ended up sidetracked by the Pearl Harbour option that had been stroked up by the IJN for at least a year.

    Another hypothetical seeing we are throwing these ideas around – in 1940 with the blitzkreig on the Channel coast – IMHO if Hitler had thrown airborne forces over to Blighty nothing could have prevented a serious lodgement and with their usual skill and determination could they have taken London and a few aerodromes – get some Luftwaffe over there where the short range of their fighters was not a handicap. Whether a German pocket could have been sustained in the face of the RN coming south into the Channel – big units being exposed to G bombers. I wonder if it has been properly war-gamed?
    Reality was H’s mind was already on the USSR and I think he expected the Brits to come to sensible terms.

  70. Frank Brus

    Dot
    “So instead of sending Patton home, Ike had him assassinated? Yeah right.”

    I don’t think it was necessary for Eisenhauer to have known about any plot.

  71. Frank Brus

    In fact there are good records of Eisenhauer having railed against the “military/industrial complex” Here is one example:
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=8y06NSBBRtY&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D8y06NSBBRtY

  72. jupes

    IMHO if Hitler had thrown airborne forces over to Blighty nothing could have prevented a serious lodgement and with their usual skill and determination could they have taken London and a few aerodromes

    How many airborne forces did Hitler possess and how many would be required to take London?

    A. Not many and plenty.

    Airborne forces are – certainly they were in 1940 – light infantry. They are valuable to lodge behind enemy lines to harass enemy lines of communication but could only be self-sufficient for a short time until larger forces arrived. See how airborne troops were used on Operation Overlord.

    Germany did not have the means for the Wehrmacht to cross the channel after the fall of France. The plan was to use barges which were not yet in France in sufficient quantities. Also the RN and RAF were too strong for the Germans to attempt a channel crossing until they had air superiority. Hence the Battle of Britain.

    German paratroops would have been on their own and therefore slaughtered if they had attempted to drop into England.

  73. jupes

    I don’t think it was necessary for Eisenhauer to have known about any plot.

    At least one of the conspiracy theorists had Ike in on it. Hence my call of bullshit.

  74. Louis Hissink

    Toiling mass

    very droll :-)

  75. but still, a commie plot?

    What’s the difference between a plot and a common hidden agenda?

  76. Token

    In fact there are good records of Eisenhauer having railed against the “military/industrial complex”

    Modern readers do not consider how Ike was the first Republican president since Hoover over 2o years earlier and faced an entrenched system of capitalism/bureaucracy linked to the DNC electoral machine.

    I have heard comment that is what Gerald Ford was referring to that “gaffe” about Democrat wars.

    It was only in the 1990s the congress finally went back to the republicans, and much of that was due the patronage machine linked to public spending Roosevelt and Speaker Sam Rayburn put together in the early 40s.

  77. Token

    …and much of that was due to the break down of the patronage machine linked…

  78. Token

    Whoops, it was VP candidate Bob Dole in 76, not Ford.

  79. Piett

    Whether a German pocket could have been sustained in the face of the RN coming south into the Channel – big units being exposed to G bombers. I wonder if it has been properly war-gamed?

    Some friends of mine at a wargaming club had a go a while back. IIRC, problem for Germans is that Luftwaffe wasn’t set up properly in 1940 for anti-shipping. No AP bombs or aerial torpedos (they would come into service later on, but too late for Sealion).

    Stukas could sink destroyers and light cruisers with standard HE bombs, but they might not be very effective against capital ships. And even one BB getting in amongst German troop barges would wreak merry havoc.

    So Sealion was never a realistic possibility, thank God.

  80. J.H.

    Pedro
    #1151068, posted on January 14, 2014 at 9:53 pm
    If you find yourself describing a book as incredible and unbelievable then maybe you take the hint. No, I’ve not read the book and I’d easily accept that some commie sympathisers were in the White House, but still, a commie plot? I’m not surprised people are scathing.
    ——————————————————————————————————————–

    Socialism isn’t a plot Pedro, it’s a real Ideology. It perpetuates its own success in the actions of every single person that simply pursues its tenets. In many respects. Plotting is unnecessary.

    That is why Ideologies are so effective and why Liberalism must promote itself just as resolutely. Otherwise, Socialism will sweep all before it. It already owns one third of your adult working life and the ideological dictates of socialism will ensure the spending of that tax on your enterprise to achieve even more enslavement.

    The conspiracy against the public lies not within the participants of a competitive free market, it lies within the unelected bureaucracy that seeks to regulate and control our very lives…. and it has placed itself firmly between that public and its elected representatives.

    That bureaucracy needs to go and our money and freedom returned to us. Or we are lost.

  81. Pedro

    Churchill said in his memoirs that he prayed nightly that the germans would launch their invasion. The local destroyers would have been enough to stop it.

    The paratroop theory is also crap. They did successfully invade Crete with the paratroops, but basically chewed up the force in the process and thus didn’t really use them again.

    The idea that the western allies should have invaded the USSR is nuts. You don’t recall those dancing in the street photos from the end of the war.

  82. Pedro

    J.H., this sounds more like a plot than an ideology
    “The book is titled, American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation’s Character and to give you its essence, is about how communist infiltration of the Roosevelt administration ultimately meant that America’s war aims during World War II were, for all practical purposes, determined in Moscow.”

  83. (female, nesbian, aboriginal etc)

    “Nesbians”, lol.

    Nesbians nove nicking, apparently :)

  84. Jannie

    I might have to read the book. But its long been demonsrtated that FDR was a dupe, a natural useful idiot who wrongly thought he understood Stalin better than Churchill did. Its also pretty easy to conclude that FDR was deceived by his staff, who leaned more to the Left than FDR’s aristo elite Leftism. Churchill thought FDR was a New Deal Leftist suckered in by Stalin, but he was prepared to praise even Stalin if he helped the war against the Nazis. Wrong Pig maybe, but the thought of a victorious Western/Nazi Europe is worse that the Commie one we got. They were an odd mix who just happened to be there at the time when the shit hit the fan. But conspiracy?

  85. J.H.

    Aye, I haven’t read it so I couldn’t really comment on the book itself…..I just find it strange sometimes that people go looking for involved plots and conspiracies when it is simply a group’s allegiance to ideology that guides them.

    It’s surprising how simplistic people can be when thinking about something. It stuns me when some think that all communists somehow just resided in Russia, China or Korea…. When in fact most actually resided within the freedom of the West and more often than not within Politics, the Press, film, bureaucracy and academia.

    That these people would have contact with their political compatriots in Russia…..? Well why wouldn’t they?…. after all our very own Australian Greens Senator Lee Rhiannon travelled to and was educated in the Moscow based International Lenin School after graduation from the University of New South Wales.

    As for whom controlled whom, as Vaclav Klaus the ex president of the Czech republic said…. the modern EU is indistinguishable from the Soviet bureaucracy, simply minus the police state…. or words to that effect.

  86. .

    Thanks Piett.

    I did say it was a gamble.

    What was the German order of battle like in the Rhineland, or near Kiel or the Elbe?

  87. Toiling Mass

    Regarding the work of the Polish codebreakers who wen to England – I believe there is now a memorial at Bletchley Park dedicated to them.

    Being seconded to central Queensland, as I am, I have been compelled to resort to satellite TV while retreating from the heat. There was a program that recounted the activities of the Poles during WW2. Even allowing for putting events in a light that best empahsises the argument of the program, what they did during the occupation came as a real eye-opener.

  88. Toiling Mass

    Nesbians nove nicking, apparently

    Ah, the nove that dare not speak its lame.

  89. Piett

    According to Alistair Horne, on the Rhineland there were 25 German reserve divisions. No tanks though — they were all in Poland.

    The French actually did advance into Germany in 1939 — the “Saar Offensive” — in which 9 divisions with armour advanced 5 miles up to the Siegfried Line, Germany’s (weaker) equivalent of the Maginot Line. And then they stopped. Horne thinks they should have kept going, because it would at least have given the French troops some experience and confidence which would have helped in 1940.

    Don’t know about Kiel, but the British had got their fingers burned with amphib operations in the past, like Gallipoli, and a landing on the Belgian coast they attempted against Napoleon which turned into a fiasco. In 1942 they tried a raid on Dieppe; that too went pear-shaped.

  90. .

    No tanks in Western Germany?

    I think Horne has quite a valid argument. Holding back the invasion of the low countries and France by more than what it was could have changed the course of the war.

    In the end of the (perhaps much quicker) war, the USSR may have gain far less territory too.

  91. On the breaking of the Enigma codes, I heartily recommend Dilly: The Man Who Broke Enigmas (Londo, 2011), by Mavis Batey. The late Mavis Batey was one of Dillwyn Knox’s assistants, and she too broke important codes, including “cracking the Enigma ciphers that led to the Royal Navy’s victory at Matapan in 1941”.

  92. wazsah

    Re issue of standing up more to the Soviets in 1945 – remember that inspite of all the “bring the boys home” sentiment – the USA had the A bomb and plenty B29′s.

  93. Noddy

    On books to read try ‘Tragedy and Hope’ by Prof Carroll Quigley subtitled ‘A History of the World in Our Times’.
    Find here https://archive.org/details/TragedyAndHope_501
    and here http://www.wanttoknow.info/war/tragedy_and_hope_quigley_full1090pg.pdf
    It is over 1000 pages but you only need to read the first 100 pages to see how you have be duped.

  94. cynical1

    Re issue of standing up more to the Soviets in 1945 – remember that inspite of all the “bring the boys home” sentiment – the USA had the A bomb and plenty B29′s.

    Winning hearts and minds, and all that…..

  95. hzhousewife

    Just saw an enigma machine this afternoon on “Pawn Stars” (Foxtel), beauty of a
    complicated machine. Bletchley is on my list of places to visit in the UK (one day).

    Fantastic list of history books to come across in my future retirement, thanks everybody.

    Someone here recommended “Bergen” the start of the series, SBS, Danish political dram, I am enjoying it a lot, thanks again.

  96. Piett

    Re issue of standing up more to the Soviets in 1945 – remember that inspite of all the “bring the boys home” sentiment – the USA had the A bomb and plenty B29′s.

    Hiroshima and Nagasaki actually used up the entire existing US stockpile of nuclear weapons. One more was in the process of being assembled, and they hoped to have 3 per month coming along from September onwards.

    As for the B-29, Ivan had a vast number of excellent fighter aircraft, including the Yak-11, which some people call the best fighter of WW2. Depending on how far away the nuclear targets were going to be, fighter escort for B-29s might not have been available. (Which was one reason why the Soviets wanted the buffer zone of Eastern Europe.)

    Stalin might well have been willing to play brinkmanship over the issue, particularly given that Western public opinion would have been revolted at the thought of attacking civilian targets in Russia.

  97. daggers

    Patton had worked out a campaign using allied armies and without an atomic strike. He confidently calculated it would take 6 weeks. By that stage he had a lot of experience under his belt and was an obnoxious pest about it to everyone within earshot. He wasn’t talking about invading Russia, just restoring borders.

  98. rafiki

    Beer-whisperer and Toiling Mass –
    I appreciated the jokes , but it was not a mistake.
    “Nesbian” – used in Canberra public service talk to mean a person from a non-English speaking background, and for whom allowance should be made in grading their school and university assignments, and then in public service employment.
    It has added enormously to the difficulty in getting an even well-intentioned public servant to grasp what you are getting at.

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