What’s hot and what’s not

It is not just commercial media organisations that are feeling the heat generated by the great digital disruption.

Screen Shot 2014-01-16 at 9.02.48 AM

Click through to app

The top selling iPhone app today is Vic Fires, closely followed by SA Fires, NSW Fires and TasFires produced by P4G.

They match data from the Victorian Country Fire Authority RSS feed and wind data from the Bureau of Meteorology with the GPS location of the user.

Until now, ABC local radio has justifiably prided itself as the leading source of emergency information.

Indeed, the dedication of ABC staff in past bush fires has been exemplary.

Apps such as these, however, have the potential to provide localised information that radio cannot match for an investment of a mere 99cents, less than the cost of a daily newspaper.

A former regional ABC radio journalist told me by text this morning:

What does the fact that thousands of people go to A 99c App for important info tell us about the level of  trust the new generation has for the National Broadcaster?
I suspect that it is not necessarily that they have lost trust in the ABC, but that they have now come to trust others more…

On technological grounds alone, the case for a review into the ABC is unanswerable.

It is more than 30 years since the Dix inquiry that produced changes in the ABC Act. Back then there were five television stations broadcast with analogue signals and no domestic internet connections whatsoever.

The abundance of content on subscription television and the internet now provides many of the services we once relied on the ABC to deliver.

While the ABC is insulated from digital challenges by a government stipend, the commercial sector is forced to adapt to survive.

Instinctively, I suggest, there is a case for public investment in broadcasting. But with the ABC drifting who knows where, it is increasingly hard to say what it is.

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63 Responses to What’s hot and what’s not

  1. Julie Novak

    Hi Nick. Just another example, and a fine one at that, of what folks such as Arthur Seldon, Jeffrey Tucker, and so many others have referred to as the growing irrelevance of governmental services wrought by technological change. Let the change roll on!

  2. Dan

    I find this post odd as I think the only useful function for a government broadcaster is to run continuous emergency announcements when something is up. Radio is more reliable than 3G coverage and radio batteries last longer than mobile phone charges.

  3. steve

    I don’t think we should scrap the ABC. We should just sack 50% of their employees and replace them with conservatives to even it up.

  4. phil

    This is not a good example. Given the history of fire alert web site failures and the vulnerability of cell phone towers to fire and overloading during the real thing, you cannot beat old-fashioned radio. And I say that as a commercial app developer.

    There are many other, more valid reasons for a thorough look at the ABC and its funding.

  5. But with the ABC drifting who knows where,

    Nick, you obviously haven’t been reading Catallaxy.
    The ABC has been taken over by the GLWC*.
    Along with the schools, the universities, all the media (except for Catallaxy), all the government agencies, the ADF, the BOM, many large retailers (Aldi, for example), the Christian churches, the CSIRO, the Australian Antarctic Division, and the Office of the Governor General, to list just a few of the major culprits.
    *Great Left Wing Conspiracy.
    There is a remedy.

  6. Tom

    Damn. You’ve written only half the story, Nick. What, instinctively, is the case for government investment in broadcasting? What necessitates government ownership of broadcasting equipment that can’t be achieved by subsidising commercial media in the case of “market failure”?

    Technology has revolutionised media delivery in less than two decades. And government funding inevitably creates organisations protected from market reality that are captured by the left. That cannot be avoided by regulation or accountability; it’s just what happens.

    Government broadcasting is not and never will be “independent”.

    By the way, Nick, welcome to the Cat. That means there’s an even bigger target on your back!

    PS: I’m also in the MSM scribbling business.

  7. Up The Workers!

    There’s no need for apps anyway.

    Everybody knows that Tony Abbott starts all these fires on Total Fire Ban days.

  8. Percy

    What is the ABC needed for?

    Until now, ABC local radio has justifiably prided itself as the leading source of emergency information.

    That’s 50% of it. The other is to broadcast into remote areas that commercial radio doesn’t reach. Anything more is merely intruding into the commercial market.

  9. .

    Julie Novak #1153024, posted on January 16, 2014 at 9:14 am
    Hi Nick. Just another example, and a fine one at that, of what folks such as Arthur Seldon, Jeffrey Tucker, and so many others have referred to as the growing irrelevance of governmental services wrought by technological change. Let the change roll on!

    That’s what I’m talkin’ bout!

    That and BitCoin.

  10. Ant

    I have thisie here app that has a GPS link directly to Christine Nixon’s cell phone.

    In bushfire situations you click on the little button and it tells you the safest place to run when the firestorm starts bearing down on your location.

  11. Gab

    So it’s a ‘Find you local restaurant’ app, Ant.

  12. Old Salt

    Hi All,

    I doubt that any action will be taken against the ABC no matter how disgracefully they act. See part of the text of a letter to my local Federal MP (LNP) – needless to say, no reply has been received for two months.

    ‘I do not claim any knowledge of the law; however, during my service with the RAN I was made aware of Section 79 of the Crimes Act 1914 – Official Secrets. The act is quite clear when it comes to the handling of classified material. It is an offence to communicate classified material to anyone who is not authorized to receive it and carries an imprisonment sentence.
    I would be grateful to hear your views on the legal implications of the ABC’s publication of the material and what the Government intends to do to enforce the law.’

  13. KC

    The State has no role in broadcasting. Technology has developed in a manner that permits the convenient transmission of information and entertainment. All it is doing now is ‘crowding out’ the ability of the Fairfaxes of the world to provide services to luvvies. No market failure – no role.

  14. Ant

    Close, Gab.

    It’s a link to the nearest ‘All You Can Eat’ restaurant.

  15. Rabz

    While the ABC is insulated from digital challenges by a government stipend, the commercial sector is forced to adapt to survive.

    The commercial FTA channels display no evidence of this ‘adaptation’ whatsoever. In fact, their obvious contempt for any idiots still mad enough to watch them grows by the day.

    To add insult to injury, they received a massive cash bribe government stipend from those criminal labor idiots several years ago.

    Let. Them. Die.

  16. Andrew

    Govts SHOULD intervene in market failure. Now while Greens own the Greenian online meeja, no Green owns TV stations. Therefore it’s totally appropriate for the govt to return the 0.1% of GDP paid in tax by this 8% of the population. This way they get to enjoy 700 hrs a week of Abbottabbottabbott, carbon tax campaigning, pro refugee smuggling, anti mining, CAGW fabricating and “Islam is misunderstood but Christians are rapists” programming.

  17. Cato the Elder

    Government broadcasting is not and never will be “independent”.

    And that’s the counter argument to the ABC doing anything that involves news, commentary, analysis or opinion.

    Why not take a leaf from the USA approach and require licensees to make broadcast time available for government announcements in time of emergency?

  18. jack

    a one stop emergency portal ,accessable from mobile phone is so much better than having a confused abc speaker ramble a generalised ‘declaiming liability’ warning,and misprouncing local placenames. not value for a business losing one and a quarter billion dollars a year.

  19. Empire Strikes Back

    I find this post odd as I think the only useful function for a government broadcaster is to run continuous emergency announcements when something is up. Radio is more reliable than 3G coverage and radio batteries last longer than mobile phone charges.

    Agreed the cell network is not adequate for natural disasters Dan, but that doesn’t mean we need a full time public broadcaster. The AM spectrum currently allocated to ABC radio could be reserved for this purpose in times of emergency.

  20. boy on a bike

    The ABC is actually a colossal example of market failure.

    Take Q&A as an example. One line of reasoning for why it is on the ABC is that there is no market on a commercial channel for this sort of show. ie, it is claimed there is a “market failure”, and the ABC must make good.

    Bollocks.

    If a product is to survive in a free market, the cost of producing that product must be lower than the revenue gained from flogging that product. For a TV show, advertising revenue from attracting eyeballs needs to exceed the cost of putting the show to air. But it’s not enough for a show to turn a profit – it has to be more profitable than the alternative shows that can be run in that timeslot.

    The lack of a Q&A on any commercial channel tells me the following:

    1. The potential audience is too small for it to pull in enough advertising to cover costs
    2. The audience make up is unattractive to advertisers, so whilst advertising could be sold, it would be at a low price – which means costs would not be recouped
    3. The show is too expensive to produce. Given Snowcone’s salary, this is not surprising
    4. It might be profitable, but it might have an ROI of only 1% compared to say 10% for alternative shows

    A failure to put it to air is not market failure. It is in fact the market in operation – price signals from many actors are telling the broadcasters that it just won’t work. If revenue won’t exceed costs, why would it be logical to run the show? How is making a loss on a show a “market success?”

    The logical responses to make it commercially viable would be:

    1. Keep the format, cut production costs (ie, employ an $80k host rather than a $350k host, relocate from the expensive Ultimo studio to the Rooty Hill RSL, cut the number of cameras, simplify the set etc etc)
    2. Adjust the format to attract an audience that advertisers want to reach (there just aren’t enough companies flogging yoghurt weaving looms)
    3. Adjust the format to reach a larger audience

  21. lotocoti

    Why not take a leaf from the USA approach …

    There’s no need.
    The commercials already do this as part of the never ending competition between news rooms.

  22. Token

    I find this post odd as I think the only useful function for a government broadcaster is to run continuous emergency announcements when something is up.

    Dan, the ABC can not provide tailored localised information. I’ve been able to manage my way around a blocked motorway in the past month using localised information that the ABC local radio considered too small beer to cover.

    Fact is the ABC remains part of the process, but as a very dull blunt instrument needed only in themost extraordinary circumstances.

  23. Wallace

    The ABC failed last night in its duty to inform as emergencies unfold. Melbourne radio 774 advertises itself as an emergency broadcaster, but the sport broadcast of the tennis at 10PM continued past the pips without any break for the news or the expected emergency broadcast. This was while violent thunderstorms were starting fires in the Grampions and elsewhere, and the CFA incident report was being updated by the minute.
    None of this information was available from the so called ABC emergency broadcaster, even though I listened for it from 9.45 to 10.15, then gave up in disgust.

  24. jack

    does anybody think that commercial media would fail to cover a massive emergency of vital interest to their audience? making emergency information provision a condition of a broadcasting licence for commercial media would remove this excuse for the abc/sbs losing one and a half billion dollars a year. regional coverage by the abc is now simply an excuse for the better sort of abc presenter to lash out at rednecks anyway. the abc is just ramming transnational vegan socialism down the rednecks throats on the taxpayer dollar,and loving it.

  25. Leo G

    The logical responses to make it commercially viable would be:

    ….. Ensure that a public broadcaster can’t offer the same product?

  26. Baldrick

    Why governments need to be broadcasting television, or radio for that matter, is beyond me.

    If its now good enough for governments not to be involved in banking, airlines, utilities, telephones etc etc why in this day and age do we still need a government funded broadcaster on television and radio? Particularly one that has increasingly stepped-back from information and now provides more fact-checking, opinion and comment than anything else!

  27. wreckage

    This is why I have always said that universal mobile coverage is far, far more important than universal fast internet. At the moment we still need the ABC as emergency broadcaster because there are thousands of square kilometers of inhabited and productive land that have no mobile coverage.

    Practical considerations like avoiding bushfires and floods, or calling an ambulance when you get bitten by a brown snake, have taken a back seat to fantastical pie-in-the-sky vanity projects.

  28. stackja

    What’s hot and what’s not

    I do not listen to the ABC nor have any apps.

  29. Mayan

    jack: why so hard on vegans? I’m a vegan because I hate plants. I’m also a member of the IPA because I hate it when the state won’t leave me to the quiet enjoyment of my life.

  30. .

    Baldrick and others have said it well (on other threads too) – anti-competitive, out of date, obsolete, politicised, taxpayer funded promotion of the priviliged political class, condescending, exclusive, out of touch, smacks of big brother, a lot of low quality pap and this hippo is being beaten by the cheetahs.

    Just give it away as a mutualised company to Australians, gift them shares in an ASX listed comapny, sell it off at tender or wind it up and divest.

    It is well past the use by date.

  31. incoherent rambler

    This is why I have always said that universal mobile coverage is far, far more important than universal fast internet. At the moment we still need the ABC as emergency broadcaster because there are thousands of square kilometers of inhabited and productive land that have no mobile coverage.

    The AM radio band (if it was not corrupted by government regulation) could be used for internet data transmissions. This would solve the problem of mobile network unreliability (as mandated by government). Land based communication towers do not make much sense in flood prone and fire prone areas. Satellite based communications are (largely) impervious to fire and flood, and they can accommodate mobiles services.
    A 100 billion spent on the NBN will not improve the situation.

  32. Peewhit

    It does seem counter intuitive for a government to financially support a broadcaster that opposes it at every turn.

  33. Anthony

    @ Token: “Dan, the ABC can not provide tailored localised information.”
    It’s very different in regional and rural areas, Token, where locals often feed in very specific information that supplements official reports and where I dare say a majority of people don’t have smart phones or consistent 3G coverage to support them.

  34. FlyBoy

    Mayan – State exists to help harass (tax) us. ABC downright patronising! SELL IT NOW before it is too late and has lost all value.

  35. philip j. fry

    I last 30 seconds listening to ABC in Melbourne in the car.

    That’s how long it takes for my Bluetooth to connect to my phone, then I have my own music.

    I need it because by then I’m screaming at the radio.

  36. Jannie

    Its been years since I watched or listened to the ABC bar the odd clip picked up on a link. I am getting too old to argue or explain anymore. Just kill it, and lets move on.

  37. O Dear

    Yes Nick We Do Trust Others More Especially Over Hacks Like You And Your News Limited Mates

  38. Infidel Tiger

    I like the way you capitalise every word. Girls used to do that at my primary school in Year 3.

  39. Empire Strikes Back

    The AM radio band (if it was not corrupted by government regulation) could be used for internet data transmissions.

    IIRC, some upper MF near the AM radio band is already reserved for digital data. Ultimately, radio frequency spectra is a finite common resource. There are legitimate public goods that necessitate monopoly access to bandwidth (Eg. emergency services, air/sea comms & nav, defence signals etc.), but in principle it should be auctioned on a leasehold basis to the highest bidder.

  40. Empire Strikes Back

    We Have A Title Case Trotsky In The Building.

  41. A H

    What is this “Instinctively, I suggest, there is a case for public investment in broadcasting.”?

    Every government dollar is stolen coercively through tax. There is no case for that.

    Perhaps there is a place for a nonprofit television channel, funded through voluntary contributions.

  42. pete m

    lol troll spotting is far too easy when they capitalise every word.

    no sport in that!

    Should government spend any $ on any media. no.

  43. FlyBoy

    Hey IT – you are better than personal slanging …..or is it game, set and sale.

  44. Dan

    Token
    #1153124, posted on January 16, 2014 at 10:53 am
    Dan, the ABC can not provide tailored localised information. I’ve been able to manage my way around a blocked motorway in the past month using localised information that the ABC local radio considered too small beer to cover.

    Fact is the ABC remains part of the process, but as a very dull blunt instrument needed only in themost extraordinary circumstances.
    Wallace
    #1153150,
    None of this information was available from the so called ABC emergency broadcaster, even though I listened for it from 9.45 to 10.15, then gave up in disgust.

    I’m talking about local(?state) bands on AM which are silent if there is no emergency and where the only fulltime staff are the technicians testing the equipment thru the year and perhaps someone to talk into the mike. I mean, it’s not my field but something along these lines.

    And I agree completely regarding the failure of the ABC to even cover emergencies now. I was supposed to be driving to the Mornington Peninsula during a grass fire and couldn’t get any information from the local ABC channel who were running show on caffe lattes or kwinower or something.

  45. Hot Dog

    Hey Phil,
    Thanks for your point, I agree we need as much accurate information out there as we can get out there. But I can also remember the Port Lincoln (SA) situation about ten years ago, when bush-fires cooked all the local radio transmission towers as well as all the mobile coverage.
    Along with this, the technical managers of the company which now owns all the ABC’s regional transmission towers routinely power them down during extreme weather, relying on “backup” transmitters. I understand the ABC’s senior people wring their hands about this as they tend to do, but ultimately achieve little or nothing to rectify the problem.
    I wonder if the thing is to ask whether the Federal Government should use its powers under the telecommunications legislation to take over – or at least authorise the various State Emergency Committees to broadcast over the frequencies of all stations, ABC and otherwise. Each state has an “emergency plan” that comes in to play after a declared incident or situation. (I know from my time an emergency services operative that liaising with 20 different media organisations during these things means skating on the edge of disaster.)
    Giving the emergency services committee the power to order a “cut-through” during times of serious emergency or risk would be massively superior to relying on the staff of the ABC and others in the outer reaches of the country, many of whom are young and very inexperienced (assuming they are there).
    This would mean that the broadcast licence holders would have no responsibility to fund the staffing of remote stations, and the messages would be delivered instantly across all available frequencies including UHF and VHF (Citizens Band). Broadcasters which promote themselves as “your emergency services broadcaster” are asking for a nasty, nasty civil suit if things go wrong, the messages don’t go out, or they get it wrong.
    The only concern would be from those producers and presenters who might wish to choose the timing of their announcements to protect the “flow” and sound of their shows. I really don’t think that’s important in this context.
    In a serious emergency, the relevant authorities should simply take over the airwaves and broadcast from a central point in the Communication Centre of the relevant headquarters. All of the radio stations do something similar with their centralised news services now, and it is absolutely a cinch to do.
    This would relieve the taxpayer of the huge bills he ABC now runs up on its “emergency broadcasting”, which, as I said, is a class-action waiting to happen.
    The PM would understand all this, I’m sure.

  46. Combine Dave

    And I agree completely regarding the failure of the ABC to even cover emergencies now. I was supposed to be driving to the Mornington Peninsula during a grass fire and couldn’t get any information from the local ABC channel who were running show on caffe lattes or kwinower or something.

    This has been said before and by greater minds than me..

    “Shut it [the ABC] down. Fire them all”

  47. Luke

    Let me tell you how the minds of the PS work. There is some new technology making a government service irrelevant. We’ll have to regulate it and, hey presto, we’re relevant again.

  48. Infidel Tiger

    Hey IT – you are better than personal slanging

    I most certainly am not.

  49. JohnA

    Instinctively, I suggest, there is a case for public investment in broadcasting. But with the ABC drifting who knows where, it is increasingly hard to say what it is.

    No ther is not such a case.

    The ABC has a heap of hidden assets in its equipment – over-bought in the days of “consume the annual budget” thinking – of a quality which the commerical for profit broadcasters would be keen to snap up, if it was auctioned.

    So auction off the assets, close it down, and maybe, just maybe keep the record libraries as a public resource.

  50. Token

    It’s very different in regional and rural areas, Token, where locals often feed in very specific information that supplements official reports and where I dare say a majority of people don’t have smart phones or consistent 3G coverage to support them.

    No argument remote areas can not be dependent on smart phones, but given this in a world where twitter (used properly) improves information flows, the ABC should not been seen as part of the broader picture.

    Much of my time was spent in such locations, but like hell I was going to turn on the ABC and spoil my break if I didn’t have to.

    Along those lines, every mobile phone which is switched on can make emergency calls in most locations, so texts to note when people should turn on the radio is part of the integrated system.

  51. hzhousewife

    There was a person I heard interviewed surrounding the Perth fires in the last couple of days
    who whinged that the power was out and so she wasn’t being told anything about the fires.

    Nobody has a tranny with a battery in it any more?? Suppose no-one under 50 uses battery
    operated items. Poor little black ducks.

  52. Token

    A former regional ABC radio journalist told me by text this morning:

    What does the fact that thousands of people go to A 99c App for important info tell us about the level of trust the new generation has for the National Broadcaster?
    I suspect that it is not necessarily that they have lost trust in the ABC, but that they have now come to trust others more…

    On technological grounds alone, the case for a review into the ABC is unanswerable

    It is not just, but including, the ABC that is not trusted. A submission to the QLD flood Royal Commission:

    My name is Neil Pennell. I am a 47 year old medical sonographer with no formal qualifications or training in meteorology or hydrology, although I have to some degree educated myself in these areas through the internet because they interest me. I live with my family in the small rural community of Kalbar and commute to work in Ipswich each working day except Mondays when I work in Gatton. I have lived in the Fassifern valley most of my life and because it is not dissimilar to the Lockyer Valley so far as climate, topography and hydrology are concerned I have a keen interest in and understanding of how particular weather events can effect these valleys. I can really offer no formal evidence of my grasp of these issues except the posts which I have made on weatherzone, in particular this post which I made at 1.10pm on the 10th of January.

    “Anthony, do you think the BOM’s on the case with that cell. If not you probably know who should be told about it. Those rain rates between Esk, Crows Nest and Toowoomba are truly frightening. I fear that there could be a dangerous flash flood very soon, particularly in Grantham. Am I overreacting?” Half an hour later I suggested that, “I live in an area that is equally not used to being so saturated and equally not used to falls of that nature (as opposed to say Springbrook). I just know that 56mm in an hour right now here would produce a flood of frightening proportions and one likely to put lives at risk. Falls higher than this in the immediate area are likely. I repeat my question….Does someone in Esk, Grantham, Toogoolawah need to know what’s possible. Who do we tell?”

    The first of these posts was, by my reckoning, close to 3 hours before the flash flood destroyed Grantham. I did not make these posts on a whim. I made them because I was very concerned about what I saw on the radar. My experience told me that a dangerous situation had arisen.

    Followed by:

    As I said straight after the event on the forum, I am not trying to line anyone up at the BOM. I think generally they do a fantastic job and I am sure they feel bad enough. Well, I hope they do. I have certainly lost plenty of sleep about it. My feeling is that they were probably incredibly stretched
    manpower-wise during this whole period. It’s likely that no-one in particular is to blame but that doesn’t excuse the failure of the system.

    However, the Bureau’s media responses immediately after the event did nothing to reassure me that there would be a full and open exposition of why there was such an obvious failure of the warning system. A fair bit of mumbling about incredible (and unsubstantiated) rainfall figures (like 200mm+) and plying the Premier with “freak of nature” quotes was completely inappropriate in the tragic circumstances.

  53. gabrianga

    Does this mean that nominations for the Nobel Prize for the “Scariest Weather Forecasters” will now be cancelled?

    I don’t really want to know I could be facing the hottest day in Penrith for at least three months nor that it was the hottest day in Bourke for the past 72 hours.

    It is the accurate forecasting of weather. the provision of alerts that should be the format of reporting not some type of NRL league table with “bonus points” for repetition of “new highs”

    ps my sister in law reckons it was over 40C for three whole days last week but has been so for her lifespan of the score and ten and also experienced by her mother and father.

  54. gabrianga

    Medication fail. 40c in Lake Cargelligo NSW.

  55. wazsah

    gabrianga – IMHO it is a scandal the way ordinary very hot days are being sensationalised with constant talk of this or that record. I think there is a path the Minister could tread to require the BoM to convey less excitement at conditions we have seen at various times in our 160 year history of the weather network. I find it amazing that a coalition of warmists and pinko media get multiple free kicks to undermine Govt policy.

  56. danno

    “Suppose no-one under 50 uses battery operated items.”

    X-Box 360/Playstation controllers, wireless headsets .. why do you ask?

  57. wazsah

    Nick Cater says – [Indeed, the dedication of ABC staff in past bush fires has been exemplary.] I do not think the ABC was very prompt with warnings following ignition of the Kilmore fire on Black Saturday 2009 ~11.30am. This went on to destroy Kinglake 6 hrs later – also migrated NE to Flowerdale. My recollection is that ABC radio first carried news of this fire after 3 to 4pm.
    Maybe somebody here knows. How the ABC with its capacity and people could not have rung bells on this monster smoke plume so near Tullamarine flight paths, not to mention motorists on the Hume. Many people must surely have been mentioning this in phone calls. The plume was showing clear on weather radar from 11.40am. How can it take several hours for the ABC to join a dot or two.

  58. blogstrop

    I’ve had to take a break from listening to and watching the ABC, since observing the constant and nationwide promulgation of traitorous propaganda wasn’t good for my health. I’ve referred to them a lot in despatched for years, so others can continue that work.

    But consider this: market failure (or a paradox) still exists. We have no conservative-leaning TV network, although talk-back radio seems to have no trouble drawing an audience. TV stations need to consider this.

    I’m looking at you, Mr Murdoch, since the rest of them are still doing what Seven did tonight, a good imitation of the ABC-style reporting of “hottest city in the world at this instant in time”.

    Temperature records back to 1900 for Adelaide will no doubt emerge in this forum in due course.

  59. nerblnob

    There would hardly have been a year in which Adelaide at some point during the summer wouldn’t have been “hottest city in the world at this instant in time” .

  60. Fisky

    The Liberals just need to quarantine the ABC for a few years, until all the apps have overrun them. Once enough ABC-loving old people have died off, it’ll be ripe for picking. Shut the whole thing down and burn the archives.

  61. Blogstrop

    The archives should go to the National Film & Sound Archive, where they will be available for analysis of the propaganda content during each decade since the 1920s.

  62. simon Says

    I live in the country 20mins from Hobart CBD. Poor quality mobile coverage. I would not rely on a phone app in making decisions. I sat in a meeting with people who live in the city: they insisted mobile coverage outside was good enough to use mobile services to deliver warnings etc. Scary. Before last election no major party addressed the role mobile plays in modern connected world instead concentrating on NBN technologies that are tied to physical buildings. Crazy.

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