Bring back “british bulldog” and reduce bullying

A school in New Zealand has found that allowing the kids to play previously banned “rough” games has reduced bullying and improved classroom behaviour. h/t Dr G Hogbin.

Chaos may reign at Swanson Primary School with children climbing trees, riding skateboards and playing bullrush during playtime, but surprisingly the students don’t cause bedlam, the principal says.

The school is actually seeing a drop in bullying, serious injuries and vandalism, while concentration levels in class are increasing.

Principal Bruce McLachlan rid the school of playtime rules as part of a successful university experiment.

“We want kids to be safe and to look after them, but we end up wrapping them in cotton wool when in fact they should be able to fall over.”

Letting children test themselves on a scooter during playtime could make them more aware of the dangers when getting behind the wheel of a car in high school, he said.

“When you look at our playground it looks chaotic. From an adult’s perspective, it looks like kids might get hurt, but they don’t.”

Bullrush is a namby pamby version of British bulldog.

“The kids were motivated, busy and engaged. In my experience, the time children get into trouble is when they are not busy, motivated and engaged. It’s during that time they bully other kids, graffiti or wreck things around the school.”

Society’s obsession with protecting children ignores the benefits of risk-taking, he said.

Children develop the frontal lobe of their brain when taking risks, meaning they work out consequences. “You can’t teach them that. They have to learn risk on their own terms. It doesn’t develop by watching TV, they have to get out there.”

It was expected the children would be more active, but researchers were amazed by all the behavioural pay-offs. The final results of the study will be collated this year.

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99 Responses to Bring back “british bulldog” and reduce bullying

  1. Rabz

    “The kids were motivated, busy and engaged. In my experience, the time children get into trouble is when they are not busy, motivated and engaged. It’s during that time they bully other kids, graffiti or wreck things around the school.”

    I’m not meaning to be dismissive, but gee, what a statement of the bleeding obvious.

    Well, it is to everyone except lobotomised leftists and narcissistic helicopter parents (and yes, there would be a massive overlap in those two societal subsets).

  2. Megan

    It took a university study to work this out? I could have told them that for free.

  3. Petros

    Kudos to the principal.

  4. .

    rabz – what is that acerbic right wing comic of a left wing family where the poor kids cop insufferable idiocy from the parents?

  5. squawkbox

    Dot, I think it’s Viz’ “The Modern Parents”

  6. Gab

    t was expected the children would be more active, but researchers were amazed by all the behavioural pay-offs.

    Rather a dumb bunch of “researchers” then. Perhaps they are qualified in paleontology for all the insight they provide on centuries old knowledge about kids, play, boys, aggression and concentration, not to mention that feeling of freedom that liberates us all when unconstrained by stupid rules such as no playing in the playground lest Shantelle gets a bruise.

    Still, the “researchers” were savvy enough to get some of that taxpayer lucre.

  7. Turtle of WA

    The Modern Parents from Viz. Classic.

    The state education departments spend their whole life ‘covering their arse’, I am told. Bureaucrats don’t like risk, otherwise they’d be in the private sector. The lawyers have a lot to answer for too.

    The real risk is kids hopping in a car at 17 years old without ever experience risk.

  8. Has anybody found the paper that goes with this?

  9. It took a university study to work this out?

    Consider for a second that universities consist of near solely lobotomised leftists for a second.

  10. The incredible thing is that this study got past the review board of two universities.

  11. Rabz

    dot – squawks and the Turtle have got it.

    Viz is just bloody hilarious. Here’s the full gallery of rogues.

  12. C.L.

    “Safety” was always just a pretext, though, wasn’t it?

    The real agenda was always to attack boys and masculinity.

  13. calli

    [clings desperately to the Hills Hoist]

    Bar!

  14. Johno

    Hallelujah. Sanity prevails.

    Nothing like a good run around in the playground to settle you down for the classroom.

  15. Robert Blair

    When I was a boy in rural Queensland (Granite Belt to be precise) the entire primary school, grade 1 up to grade 8, would play British Bulldog at lunchtime.
    I loved it, even when I was little – being small didn’t stop you getting through, if you were nimble.

    Of course our other main sport was to play “Pirates” – opposing teams would would ascend into the row of massive Norfolk Pines and pelt the other team with green pine-cones until they they surrendered …

  16. twostix

    Rather a dumb bunch of “researchers” then. Perhaps they are qualified in paleontology for all the insight they provide on centuries old knowledge about kids, play, boys, aggression and concentration, not to mention that feeling of freedom that liberates us all when unconstrained by stupid rules such as no playing in the playground lest Shantelle gets a bruise.

    January 1 1975 was day zero Gab. Nothing that was known before that day is relevant now unless it can be prefaced by “studies show”. Unless “studies show” it it is false and laughably , folksy, old fashioned “1950′s” and grossly incorrect.

  17. Turtle of WA

    “Safety” was always just a pretext, though, wasn’t it?

    The real agenda was always to attack boys and masculinity.

    Spot on.

  18. Turtle of WA

    Do you have the Magna Farta, Rabz?

  19. There wasn’t a lot of difference, but we played it as “Red, Red, Rover”
    A pretty secondary game.

    “Cowboys & Indians” was number one, daylight second, “War” third, “red red rover” came in about 7th.

  20. Rabz

    No Turtle, but having just looked it up, I may have to obtain a copy.

  21. Jimp51

    I loved the principals comment, “We let kids be kids”. Beauty mate

  22. Geoff Hogbin

    Rafe’s h/t to me was somewhat inappropriate in two respects.

    First, I had forgotten to tell him that I was passing it on from James Paterson in the IPA’s weekly Hey…what did I miss?

    Second, I failed to complete a PhD and, as Keynes is reputed to have said, after being introduced in the US as Professor Keynes:
    “Really, Sir, without the emolument I cannot suffer the indignity”

    Which leads to another point. I’ve become skeptical of anything that comes out of a university even when accords fully with my prejudices.

    Which of course

  23. thefrollickingmole

    I have a wonderful story of British Bulldog from my Private Catholic schooldays..

    There was a huge game going on, about 100 kids when the principal Brother “frog/Kermit” came out and started ordering us to cease and “come here”…!!

    Me and 3 of my best mates ended up right in front of him, along with 80 of the slowest to scatter kids.

    He then started his lecture to us, somewhat tragically with the immortal line..

    I want you boys to stop pulling on each other”!!

    You could have heard a pin drop, then in an unusually inspired move (for me) I whipped out my Haney and sneezed/laughed into it.. Which set off all the rest of the kids..

    I got an acidic look but was let off, it was up to my mates to explain “what was so funny”…

    Good day.

  24. tomix

    Bulldog was banned at our primary school in the sixties. The preferred student then was a hat and uniform wearing conformist. But they couldn’t watch you all the time.

    That School had 3oo students, 8 staff and an a/h cleaner.

    Current numbers?- 410 students and “about 40 staff”.

  25. Tel

    Principal Bruce McLachlan rid the school of playtime rules as part of a successful university experiment.

    Completely wrong, he actually returned everything to where it started after a very long series of failed university experiments.

  26. lem

    Read the article, haven’t read the above comments, but a big DURRRRR to the whole nannying concept and the fact that childhood rough and tumble builds resilient adults.

    But as always the left, who cannot learn once from history (I cite Stalin, and rest my case) must keep turning the reinvention wheel…well it greases the gravy train of all those “professionals” who otherwise would have to…(self edit)

    I do believe , and have observed, that those who don’t bother themselves with ideology ( the normal folk) couldn’t give a flying f for what nanny says anyway and will do what they please and what works. Good on em.

  27. Des Deskperson

    Viz is just bloody hilarious. Here’s the full gallery of rogues.

    ‘Drunken Bakers’ is brilliant, beyond the mere comic; horror, seediness, alienation and boredom, sort of Beckettian, if there is such a word.

  28. Stateless, free and happy

    One study proves nothing.

  29. Gab

    Four schools in Auckland were involved in the experiment and all reported similar findings. The results have been so successful, Swanson Primary has opted to make the changes implemented during the experiment permanent.

    Hopefully the other schools will do so as well. They’d be mad not to.

  30. No, testosterone must be suppressed, otherwise young men will release it in the streets of Kings Cross!!!

  31. Andy's

    In primary school in the ’60s (Sydney) we played Bullrush pretty much as described. Never heard of British Bulldog or Red Red Rover.

  32. Mk50 of Brisbane, Henchman to the VRWC

    ooh, I remember British Bulldog. And catch and kill – like hide’n'seek with teeth. But the best game you ever can play as a group is ‘hunt the kettleboat’.

    Of course, you need ASW frigates, helicopters, MPA and a nuclear attack submarine…. so it ain’t for just everybody.

  33. Mr Rusty

    Viz is just bloody hilarious.

    Scary thing is that at one time many of the more “real” characters (i.e. ones without giant testicles, underpants or runaway flatulence) were parodies of fringe lunatics and satirised to absurd lengths. Now it’s like the characters have stepped out of the pages and live amongst us – Millie Tants, Student Grants, Modern Parents, Spoilt Bastard…make up about 3/4′s of the left these days.

    Ironically it was one of the earliest to satirise the encroaching political correctness and got done for making fun of gypsies when they complained about the ‘Thieving Gypsy Bastards’ characters.

  34. 3d1k

    My kid was educated in the Steiner system for most of the primary years – benefits late start to academics, strong art focus and most importantly freedom to play. The year ones were encouraged to learn to climb an ancient weeping peppermint tree and all did. It was quite a sight, kids on every limb swinging confidently to another and to the best of my knowledge not a broken bone to be seen.

    A move resulted in a traditional primary where a newly minted teacher argued the merits of an electronic whiteboard over a climbing web. Of course I argued in the web’s favour alas spurious notions of ‘my kid’s an Einstein’ ruled the day. The whiteboard was rarely used (beyond the technical ability of most of the staff) and the school is now fundraising for a climbing web.

    Our primate past is not so distant.

  35. Abu Chowdah

    I’m still going to have my 5 year old wear a bonce protector until she’s as steady as the bigger kids on her treadly, IF it’s all the same to you.

  36. Abu Chowdah

    ooh, I remember British Bulldog. And catch and kill – like hide’n’seek with teeth. But the best game you ever can play as a group is ‘hunt the kettleboat’.

    Of course, you need ASW frigates, helicopters, MPA and a nuclear attack submarine…. so it ain’t for just everybody.

    Sounds amazing. How many did you kill in your career?

  37. Aliice

    Hallelujah

    Does that mean they will finally bring back three legged races and monkey bars and decent swings and slippery dips without wondering whether someone will sue?

    OMG have you seen most modern urban playgrounds?….so tame they are lame.

    No fun at all.

  38. Aliice

    You know falling over when you are a kid is fun and 99 times out opf 100 no damage is done!!
    Anyone remember those spinning things where everyone got on and held on to a rail and one or two kids spun it really fast from the ground until everyone fell off on the dirt after they got so dizzy?

    The nofun police got rid those.

  39. Aliice

    my favourite was the breakout of occasional casinos in the school grounds which always got cancelled when some kid got their marbles or swap cards or pieces all stolen…and then back to boring lunchtimes.

  40. Gab

    Playgrounds in the 1960s.

    Oh the horror!

  41. Combine_Dave

    I’ve not heard of british bulldog prior to this post (familiar with bullrush, red rover, ‘kill the dill with the pill’)。

    Is it a pre50/60s children’s game?

  42. Hey Sinc,

    Just had a few beers, pure chance, with Cam from the office next to yours. We spoke about many things, including just this topic. What a wonderful person he is and what a life story.
    Thank you very much for the common thread.

    Cheers

  43. Pete of Perth

    In 75 a classmate brought a lawn mower to school. At lunch time we would head off to the nearest underpass and fire it up – no muffler of course.

    yr6 Flynn Primary

    lat -35.205160°
    lon 149.044437°

  44. A principal with good sense instead of just a change agent mindset. Hallelujah.

    There is a coordinated effort all over the world to hype bullying and then push positive psychology programs as the remedy. Especially Mark Greenberg’s work out of the US. You end up with what are called SWPBS-School Wide Positive Behavior Systems.

    Plus when I was researching Austalia’s anti-bullying campaign I found they had hired Nel Noddings of Stanford (who also wants a caring economics) and CASEL-the social and emotional learning curriculum center. Again these programs are not to fix deficits but are to be imposed on all students.

  45. Bob

    Gab,

    My name is not Shantelle, it’s Felicity Seagull.

    Mummy and Mummy thought it was exciting, vibrant, inclusive and diverse.

  46. iamok

    “Brandy” was another favourite. The object being to “brand” and capture the other team’s members with a wet tennis ball thrown at near terminal velocity as they ran from one side of the playground to “home” on the other. Oh the pain, the pain.

  47. Mater

    ‘Kill Ball’ was also a winner. For those wondering, it was exactly the same as Dodge Ball (as made famous by the movie). As unbelievable as it may seem in this day and age, it was an accepted activity during PE lessons in the Gym (our PE Teacher was American).
    As long as the sides were chosen appropriately, it was also great way to settle any fracas without the need to take it into the yard.

  48. JohnA

    Well, as long as they don’t try to force it on every student in every school, expecting to replicate the results everywhere.

    A) It will do wonders for the kinesthetic learners, but be less successful for the auditory and visual learners.
    B) They will have to allow for the Hawthorne Effect

  49. PoliticoNT

    My kids are currently attending a Bayside (public) primary school in Melbourne. Late last year a group of kids were running around having a ball when a teacher stormed out onto the playground and began haranguing them. Apparently some of them had been playing British Bulldog. The children were identified, segregated from the others then screamed at/lectured.

    It was a nasty piece of bullying of small children, and makes my blood boil to this day.

  50. Fibro

    Common sense for sure………..but I can imagine the lawyers offices already hunting for the first kid that gets a bloody knee and the pro-bono case against the school.

  51. Jazza

    So, uni researchers aren’t parents, or if they are, they do not provide their own children with trampolines, pushbikes,skateboards and roller skates or scooters, or take them to a park where they might climb trees?

  52. OldOzzie

    Combine_Dave
    #1172780, posted on January 31, 2014 at 12:29 am
    I’ve not heard of british bulldog prior to this post (familiar with bullrush, red rover, ‘kill the dill with the pill’)。

    Is it a pre50/60s children’s game?

    Combine Dave,

    In Australia the game was called Cocky-Lorum, and I remember playing it in 1950 when in Kindergarten at Fairfield Primary. I was a small red-headed lad, but b-quick and won a number of rounds, even against kids up to year 6.

    I gained lots of scrapes and bruises and torn clothes from the bitumen playground, and was the despair of my Aunt and Uncle, who had no kids, and with whom I was living at the time.

    It was a great way to expend energy.

    To thefrollickingmoleThere was a huge game going on, about 100 kids when the principal Brother “frog/Kermit” came out

    Were you at Mosman?

  53. Jazza

    Mater, your Kidball reminds me of just how effective getting back “legally” can be–I was teaching a grade 5 class (in Vic)years ago when one lass began to ignore me and almost disobey anything I said. I couldn’t work out why for some weeks,when parent teacher talks arrived and her mother said “Susan used to love you but lately she’s only said once that you are unfair as you accused her of talking during class when it wasn;t her”
    Funnily enough, the very next day,while on yard duty, I found my entire class playing Tiggy ball, and when I saw Susan in the group, although i knew she was quite athletic I accepted a child’s invitation to join in.
    She “got” me three times, and harder than she ever hit one of her mates,ouch! but I didn’t flinch just held up the thumb sign to her and smiled–and I just took it and remained calm.
    In class I once again had my “good” student back on board!True!
    Some children have a heightened sense of outrage or call it fairness if you like, it might even be stubbornness, but you never win by loud arguing or fighting with them, I’ve found,some calm method of resolving the conflict should always be sought..

  54. Mundi

    I had no idea how over regulated our schools where. When I was in state primary in very early 90′s we played tackled rugby and a game called ‘bashball’ that was like dodgeball, but after being hit you had to run through the opposite team without being tackled to the ground and ‘bashed’. Even girls played.

    The kids there now aren’t even allowed to play touch rugby unless its during sport time!

  55. My name is not Shantelle, it’s Felicity Seagull.

    Do you bug complete strangers for chips?

  56. Fleeced

    In Australia the game was called Cocky-Lorum

    I always that it was “Cocky Laura” – that’s what we used to call it as kids, anyhow. Maybe it’s a regional thing (western Sydney?).

  57. Bob

    The Beer Whisperer
    #1172925, posted on January 31, 2014 at 9:16 am
    My name is not Shantelle, it’s Felicity Seagull.

    Do you bug complete strangers for chips?

    No, Mummy and Mummy taught me compassion for strangers.

  58. Aliice

    Gab found a picture…this thing was one of my favourites..

    http://www.pinterest.com/pin/188095721910150371/

  59. Empire Strikes Back

    Der.

    Every morning I spy with pride the scar above my right eyebrow, courtesy of a head to head collision playing British Bulldog as an 8 year old. My first stitches and a right of passage.

    The real agenda was always to attack boys and masculinity.

    It would seem so CL.

  60. Fleeced

    Anti truancy

    LOL… that’s a send-up, right? Please tell me it’s satire.

    Exploding kids – isn’t that a lefty/global warming tactic?

  61. rebel with cause

    Used to play British Bulldog or Brandy (a chasing game that involved being hit with a hard rubber ball) nearly every lunch hour at my country primary school with the other boys. Great fun.

    I can’t recall anyone ever being bullied, although there were a few occasions where cross words were said and idle threats exchanged. But of course then a new game would start and the squabblers would have to team-up and new alliances formed etc, only for it all to begin anew next lunch-hour.

    Try as I might, I cannot remember for the life of me what the girls in the class did during breaks – it was coed in the class room but strict (and completely voluntary) gender separation during play time. Boys were allowed to be boys and girls were allowed to be girls. I suspect a modern education academic would have been horrified (and certainly not believe that all boys were happy to play with the boys, and the girls happy to play with the girls) and set about creating all sorts of ways to make the kids ‘play nicely together’. All of which would only serve to make the kids miserable.

  62. Jannie

    I played Red Rover, kind of rugby without a ball. It started with one kid in the middle of the field v everybody else. That kid would challenge individuals to get past him, to the other side without being tackled and held. If the runner got through, then everybody else got a chance to run through at the same time. One by one the guys in the middle would be held and increase in number until it got really hard to get through. When you got across you would shout to the rest “I’m over, Red Rover”, and then they swarmed across.

    My kids never heard of it, it was banned by the time they got to school in the mid 80′s.

  63. Dan

    In primary school there was a bit of bush land down the back of the oval, so we built a cubby house. Properly lashed together and post holed. We decided to put a second story on so we could keep an eye on the Witch who lived in a house down there. It took us months to complete. Teachers eventually shut it down after a bunch of us fell off the second floor and winded ourselves.

    Some lunchtimes teachers used to make us play bull rush on the asphalt quad for no apparent reason, I think they were bored or a staff meeting in progress so they wanted us all in the same place. Chock ball was a great experience. Properly soaked tennis ball kept in a bucket for weeks. Seniors used to wrap the soaked ball in gaffer tape for a bit extra. Catch and kiss has gone the way of the dodo as well.

  64. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    from Pickles at 9:58 am:

    “Anti truancy”

    Too funny, as are the viewer comments.

    On truancy – a few years daughter No 2 accompanied me to John Flynn Hospital for some investigative poking around on a lower back isssssue. At reception I had to draw my cheque book from my pocket and use it, which was a difficult manoeuvre at the time.

    Little Missy in her early-mid 20s reached over and did it for me – including my self opiniated, elaborate, ostentatious, complex signature perfectly.

    I had four teenagers flying solo during my peak corporate years and we had to rely on their self discipline and trustworthiness a bit. It turned out that this little one had been the signatory on “he’s / she’s too sick for school today” letters on occasion, after they met in committee to consider the risk worthiness of the proposed infraction.

    That studied skill has since come in handy in business in two states, and she has become family boss from No 3 in the pack.

  65. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    from rebel with cause at 10:48 am:

    “I suspect a modern education academic would have been horrified (and certainly not believe that all boys were happy to play with the boys, and the girls happy to play with the girls) and set about creating all sorts of ways to make the kids ‘play nicely together’.”

    I am fairly certain the “modern education academic” would be taking them through to the next step, after successfully demanding they demand counseling for everything from hearing about the minor car crash outside school yesterday to Granny carking it.

    Learning to enjoy and develop their latent p00ftery is compulsory now, isn’t it?

  66. Brian of Moorabbin

    h/t Dr G Hogbin

    That’s a strange way of spelling my name, Rafe……

    (This article was first reported on the Cat by me at 9.59am on January 28… As I also noted to Token at 5.09pm.)

  67. calli

    Enough to give today’s Nannies conniptions.

    Scroll down past the daredevil children almost upside down on massive swings to the glider…there was a beauty in a park at Willoughby that could seat about 20 children, sideways like a toastrack tram. Naturally this was removed in the mid 70′s and replaced with…nothing. Safer that way.

  68. Mark

    My son started playing rugby two years ago for the U10s … at the end of each training session the coach gives them two rounds of british bulldog. They love it. They love it more than the rugby. And despite their passion no one has broken a bone or done a serious injury.

    Whats the point in denying kids the ability to engage in games that they get such enjoyment out of.

  69. boy on a bike

    It’s all about allowing a certain level of violence in a controlled environment, rather than trying to stamp out violence altogether. We are a violent species – we are designed and programmed to hunt animals, fish and birds and kill them in order to eat them. You can’t deprogram that overnight.

    Bringing back boxing as a compulsory school sport would probably help.

  70. Hugh

    Best game at school we invented in year 11 & 12 as a variation on the Aussie Rules ruck. Usually played inside on rainy days (but well out of the teachers’ sight) when there was no other way to let off steam. About 10 or so lads g0t together in a tight pack and a jelly bean was lobbed over it. The winner was the one to catch and eat the jelly bean. You could do anything to stop him – wrench or even kick it out of his hand, force his face to the floor to stop him getting it into his mouth … whatever it took. Sometimes we were piled five or six high on top of each other wrestling for the bean. Lots of ripped shirts, buttons lost, bruises etc. A mum’s nightmare. But hilarious to play or watch and exhausting. I can understand how the Eton Wall Game might have evolved.

  71. Des Deskperson

    We played hoppo-bumpo, sort of like British Bulldogs only with, well, hopping and bumping.

  72. Rabz

    By Yr 12 we were over all the mad rushing around in the playground during breaks became a bit inventive as necessary. We played a game called ‘ratbottle’ which involved compressing a moove container into a square, stringing up a net of sorts on the upstairs verandah and then basically playing three a side volleyball. The team I was on was called “the Reform Justice Devils”.

    Another game called ‘rollercoin’ was banned by the brothers after the DP retreat’s glass door was smashed. We copped a right chewing out for that one.

  73. thefrollickingmole

    OldOzzie

    Geraldton, St Patricks college was the old school, closed down now.

    Lets see the headmaster was brother Kermit.
    The oldest teacher was Brother Skull, or VD (his initials)
    The was fat Brother Puggle
    And the derangedly violent and alcoholic Brother POD
    Oh and the metalwork teacher, an evangelical type we called “the preacher from the black lagoon”..

  74. Rafe

    A bit of Utube Eton Wall Game.

    Something more sedate for the cricket lovers.

  75. boy on a bike

    When it was wet, we used to play indoor cricket inside the boarding house.

    Using pool balls instead of cricket balls.

    The number of smashed flouro tubes and windows was horrific.

  76. I played Red Rover, kind of rugby without a ball. It started with one kid in the middle of the field v everybody else. That kid would challenge individuals to get past him, to the other side without being tackled and held. If the runner got through, then everybody else got a chance to run through at the same time. One by one the guys in the middle would be held and increase in number until it got really hard to get through. When you got across you would shout to the rest “I’m over, Red Rover”, and then they swarmed across.

    The exact same game was what we called “British Bulldogs” in WA.

  77. By the time we got to high school our games had gotten less complex. The most popular game by far in high school was just punching each other in the bicep as hard as possible to see if you could generate a bruise.

  78. stackja

    I left school in 1961. I do not remember it being rough.

  79. Alfonso

    Essentially non contact football like AFL and Soccer certainly limit the adventurous experience necessary to the proper development of youth.

  80. calli

    I left school in 1961. I do not remember it being rough.

    Good man! Neither do I! :)

  81. Empire Strikes Back

    Essentially non contact football like AFL

    Either you’ve never played it, or you were avoiding the contest.

  82. sdfc

    Aussie footy is not only as tough as any other form of football, it also requires more initiative from its players than either form of rugby.

  83. Alfonso

    Bwaaaa AFL….they’re know as ‘bodice rippers’ nth of the Murray because of the girly contact and the declaration of ‘tackling’ as illegal, waist grabbing encouraged, watch that guersney grabbing your bodice might get ripped.

  84. sdfc

    So you’re telling me high contact is fine in rugby. Is that right?

  85. Aliice

    Calli

    Enough to give today’s Nannies conniptions.

    Oh what wonderful monkey bars. I remember the first time I made it from one end to the other hand by hand with no pathetic soft fall fake turf underneath.
    God sakes we have gone made. Slippery dips two inches off the ground. Swings that really dont reach the sky. Nowhere for kids to climb and develop their motor skills because they master the equipment at 3 years old and after that its boring. Try to play casino games and the schools confiscate the contraband and shut the casino down. Guess all that left is to tag your name in secret on a wall somewhere?

  86. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Funny, but I am more protective of my younger two than I ever was with the older ones. Must have caught the Zeitgeist. I am trying to ease up on the protectiveness. Da Hairy Ape is a great help in that regard. But I still draw the line at roughhouse on the ride-on mower. Today from our beach house verandah I saw four teens and pre-teens riding bikes down our very quiet street not wearing helmets and looking so happy and free. Made me nostalgic for a different time… lovely to see them.

  87. JC

    Aussie footy is not only as tough as any other form of football, it also requires more initiative from its players than either form of rugby.

    It’s been pansified, SDFC. Their top players are now terrorizing 13 year old girls in order to score Australian of the year awards. Give it up. And the head of the comp is a big fat overpaid leftwing Greek douchebag. Stay away from it.

  88. Alfonso

    Head / Neck contact? Errr no…high contact illegal in all codes, the classic below the panties in AFL leg tackle is the perfect tackle and chest ‘ball and all’ just normal……why do AFL crowds roar loudest during a game with some pathetic guernsey pulling soccer tackle (sic)….?

  89. sdfc

    JC
    Footy is tougher now than it’s ever been. There is no tougher sport.

    So Alfonso you acknowledge that legal contact in rugby is the same as in Aussie Footy. Only in footy the contact can come from any direction.

  90. JC

    Footy is tougher now than it’s ever been. There is no tougher sport.

    Agreed. 13 year old girls are really tough opponents.

  91. sdfc

    JC
    So your argument is that there is not enough violence in children’s sport.

  92. JC obviously never played footy. I played country and suburban footy all my life and it’s a tough game. The AFL is a different story since they have ridiculously heavy penalties for violence in comparison to the grass roots level, and when you’re earning 500k a year to play, you’d have to be a moron to play rough and jeopardise that.

  93. Alfonso

    “So Alfonso you acknowledge that legal contact in rugby is the same as in Aussie Footy. Only in footy the contact can come from any direction.”

    Errr ….what? Surely you jest. Original classic Rugby Union / Rugby League thigh, knee, ankle tackling is totally illegal in AFL, as is chest under armpits. AFL requires waist grabbing and guernsey pulling…..
    “From any direction”? That differs how from contact football codes?

    Yet the loudest roars I hear during any game at the AFL are for some halfarsed girly waist grab….louder roars than high marks are reserved for the tackling embarrassment of your code. The first AFL coach to introduce real crash tackling even around the waistypanties will make an impression on your game.

    AFL has a slimy rule that penalises a tackler for not releasing the tacklee instantly, its purpose to ban real tackling, in practise genuine non metrosexual tackling requires grounding the opponent, it takes a few
    seconds.

  94. sdfc

    Alfonso

    Errr ….what? Surely you jest. Original classic Rugby Union / Rugby League thigh, knee, ankle tackling is totally illegal in AFL, as is chest under armpits. AFL requires waist grabbing and guernsey pulling…..
    “From any direction”? That differs how from contact football codes?

    In Aussie footy you can tackle anywhere between the shoulders and the knees. In short no high shots and no tripping. I’m not sure how tripping is particularly hard arse.

    Footy, unlike rugby, is a 360 degree game. You can get hit from anywhere. In rugby you know where the hit is coming from. You do know rugby has an offside rule?

    Yobbo

    The snipers aren’t tough guys, they’re cowards. It’s the ball players who have the courage.

    The AFL is tougher than it’s ever been.

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