Thursday Forum: February 13, 2014

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661 Responses to Thursday Forum: February 13, 2014

  1. Tintarella di Luna

    Airports in the US frozen to a standstill and you can barely make out the Great Lakes they’re frozen over too. This global warming has a lot to answer for.

  2. Token

    Chemists who don’t want to fill contraceptive prescriptions can put up a notice in their shop stating this.

    Soul Paterson is like most Australian quisling companies. Only a fan of free speech when it comes to allowing offensive language and images.

    You can bet they would make an exclusion if the product had pork and the pharmacist was in Auburn.

  3. sdfc

    If there are no intellectual property rights, those movies you download won’t be produced.

  4. Token

    Why don’t the providers focus their efforts to ensure the product can get to market as cheaply as possible instead of lobbying government to act in way which will ensure more consumers who legally purchase product will experience like the Michael Smith is getting with Chrome?

    Like drug smuggling & dealing, piracy won’t be legislated out of existence.

  5. calli

    Pop! The sound of happiness…dearest has just opened a bottle of Mumms.

    Happy Valentine’s Day cats and kits. Love is in the air.

  6. 2dogs

    If there are no intellectual property rights, those movies you download won’t be produced.

    Not quite – for example, many great operas were produced before the introduction of copyright law.

    The absence of copyright makes for high contracting costs, but not the problems are not insoluble.

  7. Grigory M

    Heh. Your fault, calli. Happy Valentine’s Day.

    Love is in the Air

  8. sdfc

    Pretty hard to steal an Opera performance. Unless you sneak in.

  9. Bruce of Newcastle

    Airports in the US frozen to a standstill and you can barely make out the Great Lakes they’re frozen over too. This global warming has a lot to answer for.

    History repeats. Back in 1952-1953 the UK had bad floods and storms. The US in 1954 had as near a carbon copy of superstorm Sandy as weather allows. What is special about those years? They are about 60 years ago, when the AMO was in the same down phase as now.

    Add to the equation the effect of the Sun. Winter in 2010 was very cold in the UK because of jet stream changes due to solar minimum. The solar Ap index is currently bouncing around on 5 and 6 this northern winter, which is very low.

    I wish Hammy was around to explain just how global warming, which will ensure that “children will not know what snow is”, can cause an increase in very cold weather.

  10. harrys on the boat

    Sdfc has been drinking again.

  11. 2dogs

    The performance, no. The score and lyrics, quite easily.

  12. Demosthenes

    Intellectual property laws have to take technology into account. The digital revolution made digital copying and distribution virtually free. Such powerful economic forces are shifted only by government intrusion on a massive scale. The latest rumblings from the government are worrying.

  13. sdfc

    Who will invest in movies or televise sport if there is no money to be made?

  14. Notafan

    Didn’t composer’s rely on patronage for income in pre copyright days?
    Unless one has a private income (or an art’s council grant) writers, composers etc do need to get paid for their work.

  15. Leigh Lowe

    Tell me what aspects of my military record I’m faking – I’d love to know…….

    The bit where you claim that the other blokes talked to you.

  16. Leigh Lowe

    Most of the teachers of my acquaintance maintain some sort of form of ‘running notes’, if not to start with, then through timely advice or bitter experience

    I kind of believe this.
    Most of his inmates are barely ambulatory uncommunicative types.
    Not much to report.
    “9:15 Jimmy pissed his pants ….”
    “10:45 Achmed fell out of his chair ….”

  17. Numbers – you famously misled the commentariat about serving within earshot of the Cambodian bombing campaign, which directly contradicted official records.

    Show me where in the official records that it states that B52 strikes near the Cambodian border could not be heard in Phuoc Tuy province in March 1970.

  18. DrBeauGan

    It’s obvious there aren’t too many people here who write programs, books, articles or make movies for a living. If you do, having your work stolen because ‘knowledge should be free’ doesn’t look a good idea. Sdfc is pointing out the bleeding obvious.

  19. nic

    Most of the teachers of my acquaintance maintain some sort of form of ‘running notes’, if not to start with, then through timely advice or bitter experience

    I suspect you mean with regards to incidents or things likely to become complaint based. I cant imagine High School teachers keeping daily notes on each kid they teach.

  20. srr

    For those who don’t do Facebook, Larry Pickering’s latest piece, in full –

    CREDIT WHERE CREDIT’S DUE… 1984 style

    Ominous changes to information held on your credit file will come into effect from the 12th of March this year. Now, this won’t affect me because I don’t use credit cards and nor do hold a driver’s licence.

    I have not had an accident nor committed a driving offence in 60 years and I never drink and drive. I simply have a personal objection to the State holding information about me that can be misused. But that’s just me and I don’t advise others to do the same.

    What is most concerning about these new credit file laws is that credit providers can issue an “opinion” on whether you genuinely intend to repay a loan… and without your knowledge. That “opinion”, may be arrived at by a snotty nosed kid who doesn’t like the colour of your eyes and that “opinion” may ruin your life without you knowing why.

    Information and an “opinion” about you can, and will, be exchanged between credit providers and banks. There is also no doubt that employers, police, lawyers, partners, media, private eyes and the next door neighbour will be able to access that information without you knowing.

    “Oh, we promise we will keep the data to ourselves”, say the credit providers. I say, “What a load of frog droppings!”

    Forget Dun & Bradstreet, for less than $1,000 I can find out everything I need to know about you right now, and that’s without these new laws!

    So, next time you apply for credit, be nice to the snotty nosed kid taking down your details because his/her “opinion” of your future intentions matters. And if you have a bad credit rating, $1,000 could change his “opinion” of you altogether.

    Of course credit providers do explain that this new information they will hold on you should lead to overall lower credit card rates.

    Wanna bet?

    [A reassuring, feel-safe overview is here... don’t believe it!]

    http://creditsmart.org.au/what-has-changed#included

  21. candy

    Sdfc is pointing out the bleeding obvious.

    I agree with that. Think of young musicians, as an example, trying to make a career, and being denied the financial proceeds from their own original tracks.

  22. Empire Strikes Back

    Sorry, but just because something is on the internet doesn’t make it outside of the law or outside of the reasons we have laws.

    Point me to where I said that Sed.

    Enforcing the law may have its unpleasant consequences, but the consequences of not enforcing the law far out-weight them, forcing ISPs to actively deny access to prohibited material may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but without anyone suggesting another solution, what else is there?

    What possible justification could there be for imposing a policing function on the ISP? Do we oblige Transurban to prevent drunk drivers from using toll roads?

  23. blogstrop

    A while back it was nasty bastards pirating for download music. Now I can listen to as much music as I like, as often as I like, for nothing – or for $12/month to get better audio and no ads.

    Where’s the Movie equivalent? They’re still back at the stage we were at with Napster Mk.1 – namely it’s bad to download movies for free. Less so in the USA, where Netflix comes with Apple TV.

    All this means is that the movie industry hasn’t arrived at a fair and reasonable method of distributing movies here in a timely and affordable fashion via the internet. They may get there one day.

  24. Cold-Hands

    Enforcing the law may have its unpleasant consequences, but the consequences of not enforcing the law far out-weight them, forcing ISPs to actively deny access to prohibited material may not be everyone’s cup of tea, but without anyone suggesting another solution, what else is there?

    The problem is that mandatory internet filtering, even of only selected sites slows access, is expensive and does not do what it is supposed to do. It offers no solution in preventing piracy via peer-to-peer sharing which is the way most files are pirated. Given that it won’t work, will cause harm (slower speeds, increased costs and a false sense of security), the A-G’s efforts would be better directed elsewhere.

  25. Bruce of Newcastle

    Think of young musicians, as an example, trying to make a career, and being denied the financial proceeds from their own original tracks.

    IP is a tough area. When it comes to patents I support the current system because when you file a patent and proceed to examination the patent application gets published in a searchable form. Very few patents ever make money, and very few are even used. But being easily searchable it means other people can explore them and mine them for ideas. If there was no patent protection there’d be a vast amount of useful information hidden in filing cabinets and hard disks all over the world, never to be seen. Humankind would be worse off.

    The music industry is different. Recorded music sales are becoming less valuable to bands – instead the EP’s are becoming advertisements for live gigs, which is where they now get their money. I don’t know whether this is good or bad for the bands, but its a problem for the middlemen in the labels that’s for sure.

    For drama it is OK – people needing scripts will just pay the scriptwriters. Novels though are a problem, except I can’t see novels staying in their same form for too long. Ereaders are great – but they feed to older readers like me. The kids may not get into novels in the same way.

    I don’t know what this piracy plague will do – things will change. Good? Bad? I don’t know. But I would like to see people who creatively generate music and novels and games and movies get enough money that they will keep on making nice stuff I want to read, listen or watch.

  26. twostix

    Why not just fire all the police officers we have and revert to voluntary policing of ourselves, I am sure if we all promise we won’t do anything bad they’ll let us roam free.

    Do you even understand what’s been proposed?

    If somebody is distributing copyrighted material there is already an avenue to seek redress for that. Entertainment companies, some of the biggest subsidy whores and abusers of copyright law around, are seeking to short circuit the law and get the government to give them the power to compel private ISP’s to punish their customers.

  27. All this means is that the movie industry hasn’t arrived at a fair and reasonable method of distributing movies here in a timely and affordable fashion via the internet. They may get there one day.

    We do pretty well with an Apple TV here. Biggest issue we find is that tv programs often have to wait until it is shown on free to air here, which is an annoyance.

    Still, that is what torrents are for.

  28. sdfc

    All this means is that the movie industry hasn’t arrived at a fair and reasonable method of distributing movies here in a timely and affordable fashion via the internet. They may get there one day.

    With no IP rights the income for those producers will be zero. Where is the incentive to produce?

  29. srr

    There is also no doubt that employers, police, lawyers, partners, media, private eyes and the next door neighbour will be able to access that information without you knowing.

    “Oh, we promise we will keep the data to ourselves”, say the HEALTH providers. I say, “What a load of frog droppings!”

    Forget Dun & Bradstreet, for less than $1,000 I can find out everything I need to know about you right now, and that’s without these new laws!

  30. blogstrop

    Leftists movie makers can all starve as far as I’m concerned.

  31. candy

    But I would like to see people who creatively generate music and novels and games and movies get enough money that they will keep on making nice stuff I want to read, listen or watch.

    Definitely. Creativity should be valued, it’s very special.

  32. srr

    Yeah, but lets all fight for and/or against rights for movie pirates…oh, and STFU about how often Police IT ‘problems’ get people killed.

  33. Leigh Lowe

    8/189 but bloody de Villiers still in.

  34. twostix

    What possible justification could there be for imposing a policing function on the ISP? Do we oblige Transurban to prevent drunk drivers from using toll roads?

    Worse, do we give Sony the power to demand Transurban ban Joe from driving on their road because he copied a DVD and had it in his car?

  35. blogstrop

    Creativity should be valued, it’s very special.

    The burning question is “how special”?
    I’d say there are a lot who get filthy rich beyond most of our wildest dreams, probably beyond a cost/benfit analysis, and a lot who end up with nothing much. Who’s to say which group had the more deserving creativity? OK, the market. So druggie death metal and rap with the silent c do well, Mozart dies a pauper.

  36. Notafan

    Do ISPs self police? for say child porn and snuff movies?
    Or is that another layer of the internet?

  37. A H

    The majority of the software that is used to provide the functionality that makes the internet ‘work’ is open source. And in most cases that means the software is free to be used for any purpose, including making a derived piece of software and selling it.

    How do people make money? They provide something, hopefully, of value.

    Take this blog. The blogging platform is WordPress, which is free. WordPress is written in PHP, which is free. The server Operating System is Ubuntu, which is free. The web server is nginx, free. I assume the database is MySQL, free (maybe it is postgres, also free). The web browser I am using is called Chromium, which is free, derived from WebKit, which is also free…. I could go on.

    So where are people making money? ‘Ozblogistan’ is using cloudflare for hosting. Cloudflare are taking all these free software components and creating a hosting service, for which they charge a fee.

    Imagine if every hosting company had to buy their own Operating System licenses, databases licenses, blog platform licenses… etc… (there are actually thousands of tiny pieces of free software in use here but I only mention the main ones)…. this would mean that the cost of hosting a website would be much, much more expensive.

    Where would the extra cash go to? To people holding IP for the software… rent seekers. But the result would be far less content being published on the internet….

    Yes…. the internet actually demonstrates how a greater profit can be created by allowing enabling technology to be free.

    How is it that the above things I mentioned are free? Users of free software can create enhancements, fix bugs and so on, and submit these to the creator. By sharing the new code with everyone, bugs or enhancements in that new code can be created by anyone.

    And this is why open source software is generally superior in quality to closed source software. And this is why businesses that wish to develop quality software will generally open source as much of it as possible.

    Now, imagine if the same practice was applied in pharmaceuticals. Instead of competing to develop a drug first, pharmaceuticals would collaborate on the R&D. This would reduce the cost of drugs across the board.

    As for creative endeavours… I really think that no force on earth is going to prevent a genuine artist from engaging in the act of creation….

  38. barry

    What is Brandis doing?

    Focus on repealing 18C you clown!

    The Abbott government is considering a major crackdown on online piracy, including forcing internet service providers to block websites that allow users to illegally stream or download movies, music and television shows.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/george-brandis-signals-government-crackdown-on-online-piracy-20140214-32q62.html#ixzz2tHsXA5ro

  39. candy

    Well, Mozart’s music lives on forever – not sure about death metal, but!

  40. 7/197, Leigh Lowe; those bloody South Africans are gaining wickets now.

  41. Notafan

    What motivates people to do the free stuff on the internet? They still have to have an income source.
    A novelist typically takes a year of full time work to write a.book, I just cannot see why they wouldn’t be paid.
    I don’t see why creativity should be effectively only a hobby.

  42. srr

    Do you even understand what’s been proposed?

    If somebody is distributing copyrighted material there is already an avenue to seek redress for that. Entertainment companies, some of the biggest subsidy whores and abusers of copyright law around, are seeking to short circuit the law and get the government to give them the power to compel private ISP’s to punish their customers

    yet we are also told that murders, rapists and other deadly violent bail breaking criminals are too often left free to kill, because the Police can’t work out an IT system that Networks with other Government Agencies to FLAG NAMES and Identifying details of people everyone agrees should be behind bars.

  43. Infidel tiger

    If there are no intellectual property rights, those movies you download won’t be produced

    Wank.

    In August, Jeff Bewkes, the CEO of Time Warner – the parent company of HBO – praised the show’s “word of mouth” buzz and even spoke positively about the effect of piracy on its popularity. “Our experience is that it leads to more paying [HBO subscriptions],” he told Adweek. “I think you’re right that Game of Thrones is the most pirated show in the world. That’s better than an Emmy.”

    Similarly, director David Petrarca, who has helmed two Game of Thrones episodes, shrugged off illegal downloading. In February, The Sydney Morning Herald reported that the director drew a correlation between piracy and “cultural buzz” in a panel interview at Perth’s Writers’ Festival. Regarding how shows like Game of Thrones capitalize and benefit from social commentary, he said, “That’s how they survive.”

    Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/news/game-of-thrones-breaking-bad-among-the-most-pirated-shows-of-2013-20131226#ixzz2tHvX6NeZ
    Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

  44. Yep, I looked at the ABC’s ball by ball, wherein an eight wicket is recorded, yet the main scorecard still records 7 for.
    We can’t even trust their ABC to get cricket scores right any more.

  45. Bruce of Newcastle

    Now, imagine if the same practice was applied in pharmaceuticals. Instead of competing to develop a drug first, pharmaceuticals would collaborate on the R&D. This would reduce the cost of drugs across the board.

    That analogy doesn’t work.

    The example is antibiotics. The pharmaceutical companies cannot make enough out of a new antibiotic to pay for the development, trials and permitting.

    So they don’t bother.

    I am a R&D chemist, not pharmaceuticals but with relevant experience. Open source does not work in pharmaceutical development. Truth.

    We have enough problems with fake pharmaceuticals now. Do you want to go back to the days when TB killed you? We are nearly there, because the economic landscape does not stimulate development of the right chemicals.

  46. Great, a ninth wicket is taken so the ABC scoreboard now lists 8 for 202.

  47. Leigh Lowe

    So druggie death metal and rap with the silent c do well, Mozart dies a pauper.

    If this Mozart dude had signed up Malcolm MacLaren or Harry M he would have had a couple of good paydays.
    Sure, agents take a cut but they can swing some sweet deals.
    Penny wise, pound foolish Mr Mozart.

  48. ABC now records the score as 8/206 even though the South Africans are all out.
    Good one, Grandstand.

  49. Now, the ABC is not quite so far behind; a couple of minutes after the end of the innings, the ABC has upgraded the score to 9/206.
    Our billions at work.

  50. A H

    Further to this… let’s look ‘a few’ years into the future, at 3d printing and automated assembly.

    Right now, you can buy a 3d printer at a consumer level price that is capable of print a small plastic toy. The designs for these toys can be shared over the internet, potentially, for free. People can collaborate on these designs.

    Ok… so a few years into the future, you have a 3d printer that can print a car. Or maybe there is a such a device at the local ‘print shop’, and they rent out the use of it by the hour.

    Ok, so they designs for the car are collaborated upon via the internet… the designs are available for free. Anyone can modify the designs and print his own personal car.

    What about guns? Yes, anyone can download gun designs and print them on an inexpensive personal device.

    Any tool or implement can be downloaded and manufactured in this way. The designs may be modified to exactly fit the desired purpose.

    This is all on the way. IP law becomes irrelevant whether you like it or not. So let’s not go about complaining that we don’t have horse and buggies driving down the road any more.

  51. twostix

    Do ISPs self police? for say child porn and snuff movies?

    They blacklist some sites. It’s effectively impossible for them to ban childporn or snuff movies going through their network without crippling the network and spending enourmous amounts of money for what is still an easily circumventable “filter” that will only catch a little bit.

  52. Thanks, Mike of Marion. It’s a sad reflection on the ABC that its scorers could add the runs scored to the scorecard but, somehow, forgot to the add the odd wicket as it was taken. I mean, it’s not like wickets are important, or anything.

  53. Mk50 of Brisbane, Henchman to the VRWC

    And again Richard Fernandez hits the nail on the head.

    The genius of the Left — Chavez’s for example — is that it destroys things from the inside out. They pervert religion, collapse the mores, abolish the family, shred the constitution and gradually expropriate the property. The differences from one day to the next are apparently imperceptible, but it is harder and harder to go back until finally there is no reversal of ‘progressive gains’ possible at all. The public is finally faced with the stark choice between chaos or authoritarianism. And most people will chose the Boss over the Mob.

    The problem with Venezuela is that Chavismo has left people with nowhere else to go. It’s burned the bridges. There’s no reopening the car plants or restarting the factories, or even repairing the power plants. The engineers have all emigrated to Alberta, Canada. The same can be said of Syria. Who wants to open a store in Homs? In ten years nobody left in Homs will even remember how to do it. A whole generation of children is now growing up who know nothing other than war.

    One reason why Japan recovered relatively quickly after the Second World War was while the massive aerial assault leveled Japan’s cities it did not destroy the cultural and social institutions of Japan. When the smoke cleared the Japanese were still there and they rebuilt. By contrast destroying culture is so much more lethal. Detroit was untouched by the war. Not a bomb fell on it. But years of public education worked their magic. It dismantled the culture and social institutions which once built its factories.

    And this the left is doing here, too.

  54. A H

    “The example is antibiotics. The pharmaceutical companies cannot make enough out of a new antibiotic to pay for the development, trials and permitting.”

    That’s probably an argument against compulsory drug trials.

    But imagine if the development cost was shared (on a voluntary basis) by everyone… as it is by open source software…. so it doesn’t then depend on the resources of one company alone.

    Your other problem here is that drugs are subsidised and given out at reduced prices by governments, distorting market signals and creating scarcity.

    Another problem is that natural pain killers such as marijuana are illegal.

  55. Leigh Lowe

    All out Deadman.
    The frigging Cricket Australia website was also showing 7 down in the summary, but only 6 victims in the detailed scorecard for about 15 minutes.
    How hard is it?

  56. Leigh Lowe

    Second that Mike.
    ESPN Cricinfo is on the ball.

  57. Demosthenes

    IP laws have some justification, but I challenge anyone to defend creator’s-death-plus-70-years in terms of incentives.

  58. sdfc

    That’s a long way from him saying my product should be free IT. Tell me again why would anyone invest in making a movie if the end product was free.

  59. Leigh Lowe

    ABC now records the score as 8/206 even though the South Africans are all out.
    Good one, Grandstand.

    As Joe the Cameraman said …. “Can’t bat, can’t bowl, can’t count”

  60. Bruce of Newcastle

    Ok… so a few years into the future, you have a 3d printer that can print a car. Or maybe there is a such a device at the local ‘print shop’, and they rent out the use of it by the hour. Ok, so they designs for the car are collaborated upon via the internet… the designs are available for free. Anyone can modify the designs and print his own personal car.

    AH – I like what you’re saying in a lot of ways but you are oversimplifying again.

    You understand just how specialised the alloys in an engine are? Or in the shocks? Or the polymer formulation of the tyres?

    It will never make sense to produce a humungous 3D printer that can perfectly apply all the required metals in the right proportions, forge them correctly and get the crystal structure correct. But yes, there are some neat things that can be done with them – parts for planes are already 3D printed. But they aren’t ones which require careful metallurgical modifications.

    You did the same with the pharmaceutical industry. Be careful extrapolating one system, like open source software, to a different industry. It may work, but usually it doesn’t.

  61. Carpe Jugulum

    what is still an easily circumventable “filter” that will only catch a little bit.

    Not to forget how can a system ‘filter’ P2P sites.

  62. Leigh Lowe

    Thanks, Mike of Marion. It’s a sad reflection on the ABC that its scorers could add the runs scored to the scorecard but, somehow, forgot to the add the odd wicket as it was taken. I mean, it’s not like wickets are important, or anything.

    Nelson Mandela sympathisers?

  63. Infidel tiger

    That’s a long way from him saying my product should be free IT. Tell me again why would anyone invest in making a movie if the end product was free.

    WTF are you talking about? Are you still drinking Export from old cans you found at the dump?

    You can charge what you like for your product.

  64. sdfc

    If there are no intellectual property rights you obviously can’t.

  65. Leigh Lowe

    Christ …. Australia 1/1.
    Rodgers gone.

  66. Infidel tiger

    Second that Mike.
    ESPN Cricinfo is on the ball.

    Cricinfo is amazing. Best cricket commentary going around, although Justin Langer wasn’t too happy when they referred to him as a “gnome”.

  67. Tom

    Mk50 of Brisbane, Henchman to the VRWC
    #1189720, posted on February 14, 2014 at 9:00 pm

    And again Richard Fernandez hits the nail on the head.

    The genius of the Left — Chavez’s for example — is that it destroys things from the inside out. They pervert religion, collapse the mores, abolish the family, shred the constitution and gradually expropriate the property. The differences from one day to the next are apparently imperceptible, but it is harder and harder to go back until finally there is no reversal of ‘progressive gains’ possible at all. The public is finally faced with the stark choice between chaos or authoritarianism. And most people will chose the Boss over the Mob.

    Finally the non-left real world has wise, articulate people to tell them what the dregscum are setting out to achieve and how they’re doing it.

  68. Bruce of Newcastle

    That’s probably an argument against compulsory drug trials.

    AH – Did you think when you wrote this?

    Who is going to allow poorly tested drugs onto the market? Even now some bad drugs get through permitting, like Vioxx. The cost of permitting is not related to the law, it is related to the testing needed to avoid this sort of thing. No pharma CEO in the West would sign off on commercialisation without that type of test regimen. They would be uninsurable and would risk massive lawsuits killing the company.

    Tin pot operations in India would cheerfully commercialise drugs without testing. In their case if adverse reactions occur they would just close themselves down and disappear. That is not possible for big Western companies…and increasingly big Chinese pharmaceutical companies too. Being executed by the Communist Party because of a bad drug would ruin your whole day.

    As I say, I like a lot of what you say, but please consider before you say something.

  69. cynical1

    How do people make money? They provide something, hopefully, of value.

    Take this blog. The blogging platform is WordPress, which is free. WordPress is written in PHP, which is free. The server Operating System is Ubuntu, which is free. The web server is nginx, free. I assume the database is MySQL, free (maybe it is postgres, also free). The web browser I am using is called Chromium, which is free, derived from WebKit, which is also free…. I could go on.

    So where are people making money? ‘Ozblogistan’ is using cloudflare for hosting. Cloudflare are taking all these free software components and creating a hosting service, for which they charge a fee.


    A lot of them make their living as admins using the open software that companies are reliant on for
    their internet presence.

    All the big names eg:Amazon, Ebay etc run on open source.

    The gurus ain’t volunteers…

  70. nilk, Iron Bogan

    Even why Catallaxy only ever suffers minor infestations from the left. Contempt and strength work.

    These are damaged people, that deal with threats by grouping against the source. If you can force them out of their group, isolate them, they wilt, and even better, if you can do it repeatedly, they learn.

    Yes. Read Mamet’s The Secret Knowledge, he skewer’s the groupthink. Also, Evan Sayet.

    When children who are called “annoying” by their peers then whinge about having their feelings hurt and finding that offensive, then the leftards have been running the Education Show for too long.

    Time to take your kids back and teach them about the real world.

    On the plus side, our kids will be able to cope with unexpected occurrences, so when the faecal matter hits the rotating air mover they’ll do better than a lot of other poor little tackers.

  71. Infidel tiger

    Who is going to allow poorly tested drugs onto the market? Even now some bad drugs get through permitting, like Vioxx. The cost of permitting is not related to the law, it is related to the testing needed to avoid this sort of thing. No pharma CEO in the West would sign off on commercialisation without that type of test regimen. They would be uninsurable and would risk massive lawsuits killing the company.

    What you’re saying is right. There is absolutely no reason for the FDA. A company that kills or hurts its customers will go under due to market forces.

  72. Uh oh

    Thanks MK50. Most insightful article from Fernandez.

  73. Mk50 of Brisbane, Henchman to the VRWC

    I think Fernandez is one of the best Essayists around at the moment. Whether or not you agree with him, he makes you think.

    His The Three Conjectures from 2003 really brought him to attention, as he caused the largest mass-soiling of lefty underwear in modern history.

    The noise of bowel-evactuations and imploding lefty heads as their brains filled their jocks was deafening and amusing, (and they ignored the entire concept that an article entitled “The Three Conjectures” was in fact… conjectural), what he showed was a logic and clarity rare these days.

    He’s well worth reading.

  74. Yes. Read Mamet’s The Secret Knowledge, he skewer’s the groupthink. Also, Evan Sayet.

    Will have a look.

  75. sdfc

    There is absolutely no reason for the FDA. A company that kills or hurts its customers will go under due to market forces.

    A few die or because dodgy untested drugs are all they can afford and that is alright by you. Extremists are almost always fuckheads.

  76. Shelley

    Where’s Tim Blair? Was he off on hols?

  77. Bruce of Newcastle

    There is absolutely no reason for the FDA.

    I wish I could agree with you…but Infi you didn’t add what I said next. Phoenixing construction companies is one reason why an ABCC is needed here in Oz. In a jurisdiction like India there are effectively no real controls.

    A slim and competent FDA is needed to police the drug supply and eradicate counterfeiting, which is getting worse and more sophisticated, and to find and squash the Indian shonky generics producers or Chinese counterfeiters who operate grey…like the meth village which was found recently

    I don’t know how you make a FDA behave. But you have to have a watcher with teeth. The normal cops won’t do it.

  78. Infidel Tiger

    I wish I could agree with you…but Infi you didn’t add what I said next. Phoenixing construction companies is one reason why an ABCC is needed here in Oz. In a jurisdiction like India there are effectively no real controls.

    Who the fuck cares about India. Don’t buy drugs made in crazy countries.

  79. Mk50 of Brisbane, Henchman to the VRWC

    Some idiot:

    A few die or because dodgy untested drugs are all they can afford and that is alright by you.

    Hey, we just test them on creatures with infinitely less value than laboratory rats.

    Y’know, people like you, members of the greenfilth, senior union leaders, ALP front benchers… you know, human cockroaches.

  80. Infidel Tiger

    A few die or because dodgy untested drugs are all they can afford and that is alright by you. Extremists are almost always fuckheads.

    Guess what turd burglar, hundreds of people die each year from meds despite the massive bureaucracy attached to the pharma industry.

    The chinks and the elephant jockeys can counterfeit all they want already. No amount of patent stacking, IP or copyright law is going to stop that.

  81. Motelier

    Whew! I am so glad the Valentines day is over for another 365 days.

    Restaurant full, $50.00 pp, for a three course dinner including a glass of Cabernet Sauvignon or Chardonnay.

    30 tables of hand holding and just me and the chef running around to get them through as fast as possible.

    I need a beer.

  82. feelthebern

    3d printing is cool.
    But holograms are better.
    Apparently it’s in built in in the iPhone 7.
    Will boost Blue Nile sales exponentially.
    On Monday I read about it on Bronte capital.
    Today I had a demo from a start up.
    Philippino kid working from his mums sewing room (apparently they still exist)
    Very very cool.
    Will change on line retailing.

  83. Leo G

    Show me where in the official records that it states that B52 strikes near the Cambodian border could not be heard in Phuoc Tuy province in March 1970.

    The nearest Communist base area to Phuoc Tuy that was targeted as part of Operation Menu was Base Area 352- a minimum distance of 175km. At that time however, most of the action was much closer to Phnum Penh.
    I would concede that under some atmospheric conditions the sound from major detonations could travel 175 km or more- there are a lot of precedents in WW2 and in peacetime incidents. Normally though, about 60 km would be the limit for the 750 lb high explosive GP bombs often used in the operation.

  84. calli

    Restaurant full,

    Music to my ears, Motelier. Enjoy that beer!

  85. feelthebern

    Where arc you, Mot ?
    50 per head is pretty decent.

  86. feelthebern

    New economy = Star Trek.
    If Gene R thunk it, it’s a coming.
    Any business that isn’t Star Trek ready is not going to survive.
    Motelier, I believe you will be fine as long as you call your place 10 forward,

  87. sdfc

    The terminal stupid Mk50% and welfare dependent IT team up to make a point.

    God knows what it is.

  88. feelthebern

    Johnstons ball to de villiers was definitely a Brett lee style chuck

  89. Infidel Tiger

    Oh yes, this will be good. Pray tell what welfare do I depend on?

  90. Rabz

    Peoples!

    Yaapies in trouble – this test is beyond redemption (for them) if the Aussies have a lead over 400.

    They’ll go for it, though. One of the great aspects of test cricket over the last 15 years or so has been the record breaking fourth innings.

    Johnson is waiting, new cherry in hand.

    C’mon, Smithy, pull yer weight!

  91. feelthebern

    I feel like Doc in Back to the Future 3.
    Telling you what the world will be like.

  92. Motelier

    Where arc you, Mot ?
    50 per head is pretty decent.

    I am in the Rocky motel.
    The chef and I did the lot tonight.

    We are now doing the dishes with a beer each.

  93. Empire Strikes Back

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #1189709, posted on February 14, 2014 at 8:46 pm

    That analogy doesn’t work.

    The example is antibiotics. The pharmaceutical companies cannot make enough out of a new antibiotic to pay for the development, trials and permitting.

    Who knows if that’s really true? There is no free market for pharma in this country. You want to sell any (sanctioned) drug in volume? The only buyer is the state, according to state rules.

    Of course, the guilt ridden numpty with the chip on his shoulder supports this state of affairs. It’s only ever fair if we are all subject to the same level of mediocrity.

    Personally, I stopped believing in the Fairness Fairy about the same time as the Easter Bunny.

  94. Empire Strikes Back

    Bruce – obviously, I wasn’t referring to you.

  95. Gab

    I am in the Rocky motel.

    Hope your other one is called Bullwinkle motel.

  96. Motelier

    Any business that isn’t Star Trek ready is not going to survive.

    So my beds have to have anti-gravity springs in them? The mind boggles.

    I mean only last year someone asked me about mirrors on the ceiling.

    The year before that it was chandeliers.

  97. Slayer of Memes

    If you (or Kev) or anyone else has documentary evidence, produce it.
    I won’t call it a “lie” which is what anything I post that doesn’t toe the party line is called here.
    I’ll simply call it an unverifiable anecdote……

    Having said that, Keechy has long owned a copy of my book, where the incident in question is clearly outlined. We actually discussed it at the reunion in Melbourne in August 2012. It was recounted with great amusement.

    While I won’t call this a “lie”, I am somewhat concerned that you and (former RSM) Tony Keech laughed about an incident in which a fellow soldier had his nose (or part thereof) blown off – which was then ‘waved off’ with a bogus AAR.

    Perhaps this is an example of an ‘unverified anecdote’…. of which you seem to tell plenty.

  98. feelthebern

    Serious question.
    Do you rate trip advisor?
    My missus loves it.
    Personally I think it’s a bit eatability & urban spoon-esque
    What’s your view?

  99. Motelier

    Hope your other one is called Bullwinkle motel.

    Gab,

    This is not my other motel.

  100. calli

    Motelier…be very suspicious of patrons signing in as Boris or Natasha…

  101. feelthebern

    Ps trip advisor gives you a big thumbs up.
    From now on, I shall call the rocky 10-forward.

  102. srr

    Belgium votes to legalise euthanasia for all children
    http://t.co/HQdw4jdOnb via @MailOnline

  103. Infidel Tiger

    Serious question.
    Do you rate trip advisor?
    My missus loves it.
    Personally I think it’s a bit eatability & urban spoon-esque
    What’s your view?

    It’s okay. If you here the same complaint or compliment being repeated then I take notice.

    I like reading the negative reviews. They are usually by some tool from India or Singapore who can’t understand why his toilet won’t flush after he has stuffed it with the bathrobe or complaining that the monkeys molested his wife while he had his back turned.

  104. feelthebern

    I stayed at a sky lodge in Bavaria one of their summers.
    They had cross bows on the walls that guests were encouraged to borrow.
    Does the rocky have anything similar ?

  105. Brian of Moorabbin

    Obviously, if Motelier is at the Rocky Motel then bar at the restaurant is called “The Moose and Squirrel”…

  106. Motelier

    What’s your view?

    We use Tripadvisor when we travel. We always disregard the highest and lowest ratings.

    As a business, for us, Tripadvisor is a real pain in the arse. All other consumer ratings systems must prove that the guest has stayed with us. On Tripadvisor, anyone can post a comment on our business.

    The best thing t0 do is to find an on-line deal, read the ratings on the business in question, drop the highest and lowest rating, and then call the business and book direct.

  107. feelthebern

    Hey IT, I’m the same.
    I read the negatives too.
    You find out if the German tourists are allowed to get up at 4 am to hog the beds by the pool all day.

  108. srr

    Until yesterday, the youngest age at which euthanasia was permitted anywhere was 12 – in the Netherlands.

    But last night Belgian MPs went much further. They voted overwhelmingly to scrap age limits altogether

  109. Motelier

    “The Moose and Squirrel”

    BoM

    Do not come here and breath test me now.

  110. feelthebern

    Motelier, my wife swears by it.
    I do what I said above.
    How many greedy German tourists do you get ?

  111. Brian of Moorabbin

    Motelier, it’s too bloody far to drive… you’d be sober by the time I got to rockhampton

    Besides, from what I’ve read, you deserve those beers (and so does your chef)
    ;)

  112. Motelier

    feelthebern,

    It depends on the time of the year,

    International tourists nationalities change through out the year. It is strange but the further north that that originate from, the closer they are to our Australian winters. Asians however prefer to show up anytime..

    North Americans (Canadians and USA persons) show up during our Australian Summer.

  113. srr

    …in Belgium, which legalised euthanasia in 2003, we have seen the killings of patients who have not requested it and we have seen it extended to the disabled, the depressed, to prisoners and now we will see it extended to children. This is an appalling development.’

  114. Of-course ISP filtering may slow down access, however, we routinely slow down highways and major roads in dragnet fashion to catch drink drivers and the like.

    Ultimately the ISPs will find a way of making it work, as it is in their best interests economically, to use the same road analogy, the driver of the vehicle is responsible for everything pertaining to that vehicle including ensuring it is not being used for the purposes of illegal activity, the same legal rationale applies to the ISPs, there is legitimate onus being placed upon them to ensure that their “vehicle” isn’t used for criminal purposes.

    As for saying you can’t get Transurban to police its own roads, well, you can sue the publican who allowed you to get drunk then drive… (And if Transurban thought it could make a buck or two getting the legal powers to ping drivers, they would do so)

    As for stopping the dissemination of child pornographic material, that is a failure of enforcement lacking the ability and the resource to do so, the technology exists to do it.

  115. Motelier

    Motelier, it’s too bloody far to drive… you’d be sober by the time I got to rockhampton

    BoM

    Perhaps I am wrong on this. But you could not charge me anyhow.

    Bugger I have to call the chef a taxi now. 3 crownies will have to put him over 0.05.

  116. feelthebern

    Where you reading this srr ?

  117. Foggyfig

    I read tripadvisor regularly. Read and ignore comments from Singaporeans – they whinge about pathetic things.

    EG they didn’t give me my free bottle of water today, we booked out and found somewhere else to stay ;)

  118. feelthebern

    Sorry just got to link srr.
    To much vino this eve.

  119. feelthebern

    Singaporeans are pusseys.
    I grew up on tank water.

  120. Brian of Moorabbin

    But you could not charge me anyhow.

    Indeed, for several reasons (you’re not driving, you’re drinking in your private permesis, and my authority doesn’t extend outside of Victoria)

    So why were you worried about me possibly breath-testing you again? ;)

  121. Rabz

    Life mottos, peoples.

    This is mine.

    Is very good indeed.

    :)

  122. Nic

    I read tripadvisor regularly. Read and ignore comments from Singaporeans – they whinge about pathetic things.

    lol I thought it was just me who thought that . Aussies have bad spelling and Americans so utterly dumb

  123. Motelier

    So why were you worried about me possibly breath-testing you again? ;)

    I am not worried at all. However it would be good for myself and MrsM to do a test to find out our (0.05) limits.

    However I do have to say, both MrsM’s and my motto is “12 hours between bottle and throttle”.

    Just wondering about what it takes to get us over 0.05. Nope forget that. I will stick to the rule we have up here.

    Peoples – “12 hours between bottle and throttle”.

  124. WhaleHunt Fun

    Belgium votes to legalise euthanasia for all children

    No harm there.
    The world suffers no shortage of Belgians.
    And if it is forcibly applied to so visiting EU parasites, all the better!

  125. Rabz

    Whale – you are a very bizarre pariah, squire.

    Tone down the psychopathy and you may get more peoples acknowledging your existence.

    :x

  126. I read tripadvisor regularly. Read and ignore comments from Singaporeans – they whinge about pathetic things.

    Can’t disagree with the assessment of Singaporeans. It’d take a lot for me to hire one. Been there, done that.
    Tripadvisor, on the other hand, is a “trigger word” for me. If I got three wishes from a genie, one would be to rain pestilence upon the principal of that doofus site.

  127. Brian of Moorabbin

    If you’re really that interested Motelier, there are a range of personal breath-testers on the market that are reasonably accurate.

    They won’t give you 100% results, but they are close enough to give you a general idea.

    Of course the 12-hour rule is an excellent yardstick too. ;)

  128. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    From calli at 11:01 pm:


    “Motelier…be very suspicious of patrons signing in as Boris or Natasha…”

    Rabz and Gabrielle, Boris and Natasha, Rabz and Gabrielle – yep, there’s nothing in it really!

  129. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    12 hours between bottle and throttle

    I’ll spare you the hoary old chestnut about “Is that 12 hours between bottle and throttle “or is that “No bottle within 12 yards of the aircraft….”

  130. Empire Strikes Back

    the driver of the vehicle is responsible for everything pertaining to that vehicle including ensuring it is not being used for the purposes of illegal activity, the same legal rationale applies to the ISPs, there is legitimate onus being placed upon them to ensure that their “vehicle” isn’t used for criminal purposes.

    There is no rationale to your analogy. The “driver of the vehicle” is the dude driving the browser.

    Ultimately the ISPs will find a way of making it work, as it is in their best interests economically

    How so?

    As for saying you can’t get Transurban to police its own roads

    Verballing, BIRM. Theoretically, the state could have attempted to include this requirement in the tender. Ask yourself why this isn’t a condition of the operating contracts. I’ll give you a clue; VicPol don’t police roads, they police drivers. Roads don’t break laws. Neither do web servers and copper cables.

    As for the “sue the publican” angle, IMO Lord Atkin has a lot to answer for, but you’re talking tort here. Disney et al are free to sue who they please. The only state involvement is providing the institutions to facilitate the settling of civil disputes.

  131. Motelier

    BoM

    The saying goes for both MrsM and I.
    We go out to dinner when we can, so we call 131008 or something similar. You will never see me or MrsM doing the real walk of shame.

  132. Motelier

    However, tonight we had lots of hand hold across tables, oh and a miss “2″ that provided much entertainment showing off her “Dinosaurs”.

    Eat your heart out Clive.

  133. Motelier

    ZK2A

    Nope the saying is “12 hours between bottle and throttle”.

    Where are you coming from my man.

  134. Motelier

    Motelier…be very suspicious of patrons signing in as Boris or Natasha…”

    Oh Mick,

    We never let the likes of those types to check in with out appropriate photo ID.

  135. srr

    Brussels, EU, UK, UN, Hell. On. Earth. …

    New UK reports back EU powers, enrage eurosceptics
    13.02.14 @ 18:23The UK government is publishing 32 reports on the balance of powers with Brussels (Photo: Foreign and Commonwealth Office)
    By Benjamin Fox

    BRUSSELS – EU policies ranging from the single market and trade, to culture and transport, are good for the UK, according to a series of government reports on the balance of power between London and Brussels.

    The findings are contained in eight reports published on Thursday (13 February), which form the second batch of the UK’s “Balance of Competences” review, comprising more than 30 separate studies by a range of government departments.

    The remaining 18 papers are expected to be published later this year.

    The reports were intended to form the basis for a future re-negotiation of the UK’s EU membership.

    Last year, PM David Cameron outlined plans to re-write the UK’s membership terms followed by an “in/out” referendum in 2017 if his Conservative Party wins the next election.

    However, Whitehall’s analysis of the free movement of persons, which is expected to touch on the controversial issues of economic migration and welfare tourism within the EU, has been temporarily shelved.

    Cameron’s Conservative-led government has been embroiled in a long running row with the European Commission over whether economic migrants from other EU countries should be able to claim benefits, and has also mooted the possibility of imposing a cap on EU migration.

    A row between Liberal Democrat members of the coalition government and home secretary Theresa May over the evidence behind her calls for tighter controls on migration is believed to be behind the shelving of the paper.

    Eurosceptics are already unhappy the reports published so far have all offered qualified support for the way that Brussels is using its powers.

    “The whole review has been commandeered by the pro-EU establishment and is going to be a total whitewash that claims EU membership has no downsides and only advantages,” said the UK Independence Party (Ukip) in a statement.

    “But for possibly the most important chapter of all to get held back altogether is totally unacceptable.”

    The reports are based on more than 600 pieces of written evidence from contributors including businesses, trade associations, think tanks and politicians, the vast majority of which have given broad support to the current settlement.

    “Of the 14 reports that have now been published all of them have concluded that the balance of power between Westminster and Brussels is broadly right,” Christopher Howarth, an analyst for the Open Europe think tank told EUobserver.

    “For a Tory-led government this is a bit of a surprise to say the least.”

    The report on trade and investment argues that EU trade policy has been beneficial for UK, despite the proportion of the country’s exports going to the EU falling from 54 percent to 47 percent over the past decade.

    However, the total value of its exports has increased in this period from £130 billion (€160 billion) to £240 billion (€275 billion).

    “The balance of competence for the free movement of goods and IP [intellectual property] works in the UK’s interests,” another report says.

    In a sign of just how surprising the outcome has been, Glenis Willmott, a senior MEP from from the British opposition Labour party, also welcomed the texts.

    “[They] highlight just how important European Union membership is to jobs and growth, showing the positive impact of the EU on the free movement of goods, trade and investment, research and development, tourism, and civil justice,” she said.

  136. nilk, Iron Bogan

    Oh my.

    Is there an unfair stigma attached to being a single parent which exists in the broader Australian community?

    Ah, this one is a little tricky. When you talk to people face to face and you tell them you are a sole parent, you get a great deal of positive feedback. It’s a part of who you are and they may notice it like they notice your eyes are brown – it doesn’t matter much in the grand scheme of things. But online the tone is nasty. There are a great deal of awful comments, mainly directed toward women. Single dads always get positive feedback however. In my personal case, the people who know me, know my story and put no blame on what I have had to do.

    What is that stigma and why does it exist?

    Well, you get these ‘people’ saying things like “you should have kept your legs closed” or “don’t have kids if you can’t afford them”. They’re the most ignorant. When you come back with: “I was married for 18 years and could afford them when I had them” they are bewildered.

    They have this idea that a single mum has kids out of wedlock as a teenager to several different fathers. They don’t correlate ‘single mum’ to the divorce rates of nearly 50%. They do not understand that divorce nearly always puts the woman at severe financial disadvantage and they never, ever blame the absentee parent.

    Emphasis added. There is no apparent awareness that the divorce rate might be something that should be addressed rather than throwing more money at single parents.

  137. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Where you coming from my man.

    It’s a hoary old JOKE, first told me by a Royal Australian Air Force loadmaster…….

  138. Motelier

    It’s a hoary old JOKE, first told me by a Royal Australian Air Force loadmaster…….

    FFSM do not keep me in the dark.

    Tell me the joke.

  139. srr

    So, how long do you reckon, before British parents are convicted under international law, of cruelty for refusing to kill their sick kids?

    …and how many bloody pits at the bottom of how many slippery slopes, has mankind wallowed in, since Catholics were first mocked and vilified for warning that contraception was the top of the slide into the hell on earth created by denying that human life is sacred…Too. Bloody. Many.

  140. twostix

    Ultimately the ISPs will find a way of making it work, as it is in their best interests economically

    No, they won’t as there is no way, and no, it isn’t in the least bit in an ISP’s interest to ban, punish and act like a police force for random entertainment companies against their own paying customers.

    As for stopping the dissemination of child pornographic material, that is a failure of enforcement lacking the ability and the resource to do so, the technology exists to do it.

    The technology to do what?

    the driver of the vehicle is responsible for everything pertaining to that vehicle including ensuring it is not being used for the purposes of illegal activity, the same legal rationale applies to the ISPs, there is legitimate onus being placed upon them to ensure that their “vehicle” isn’t used for criminal purposes.

    This is the worst analogy I’ve ever read.

    The “driver” is the user of the computer. The “vehicle” is their computer. The “road” is the network, the ISP is the equivalent of Transurban. Transurban is in no-way liable for what you intend to do with your car, or what you have in your car when you’re on the road, nor does it have the power to “ban” you from using the road just because some business doesn’t like what you’re doing in your car.

  141. “There is no rationale to your analogy. The “driver of the vehicle” is the dude driving the browser. ”

    But the vehicle isn’t your property, you’re only paying to access it, meaning in this instance, you’re driving a rent-a-car. So the analogy stands.

    As for ISPs creating the means to do what we want them to because it is in their interests to, of-course they will. If the government imposes a means of control that slows access, it’ll start the competitive competition between ISPs to implement a filter that allows them to offer the greatest speed in order to retain or grow customer base.

    Image tracking software exists and is being used by various police forces around the world. Applying that at ISP level could provide interesting results, Google in the UK is already filtering search results and images that relate to suspect material without trashing the search functions they provide.

    To simply say it can’t be done is a little bit lazy, where there is a whip there is a way, as the song goes.

  142. johanna

    So, if someone steals your car and uses it to commit a crime, you are responsible?

    What nonsense.

  143. Brian of Moorabbin

    Australia 1 – 166
    Warner 106* (dropped 3 times)
    Doolan 50*

    Lead by 357.

  144. Brian of Moorabbin

    But the vehicle isn’t your property, you’re only paying to access it, meaning in this instance, you’re driving a rent-a-car. So the analogy stands.

    No it doesn’t. That would mean that a rental car agency would be liable for each and every fine from an infringement that was ever issued on a vehicle. No-one would run a rental agency if that were the case.

    That’s why they take a photocopy of your licence, and all your details when you rent a car…. so that the infringement (and fine) is passed along to the person who rented the car.

  145. “So, if someone steals your car and uses it to commit a crime, you are responsible?”

    Are you stealing internet access? If you are, you should probably stop doing that.

    You’re paying to use someone else’s infrastructure and there is reasonable onus on them to make sure they’re not letting you use what is theirs for nefarious purposes.

    ISPs already deny access to a whole host of sites, some they do so voluntarily on their own accord, others by demand of government. Since they’re going to do it anyway why not argue that it should be resourced so that it is done properly?

  146. johanna

    Hey Rabz!

    Yay for the great Ian Dury, a man who had a genuine disability and utterly detested any notion of getting special treatment because of it. He became a rock star instead, and one who will be remembered long after Geldof and his leftie mates are forgotten.

  147. Rabz

    Joh – New thread, Squirette!

  148. johanna

    So, if I rent or buy a car, there is an onus on the vendor to make sure that I am not using it for nefarious purposes?

    Suggest that you observe the Rule of Holes and stop digging.

  149. “No it doesn’t. That would mean that a rental car agency would be liable for each and every fine from an infringement that was ever issued on a vehicle. No-one would run a rental agency if that were the case.

    That’s why they take a photocopy of your licence, and all your details when you rent a car…. so that the infringement (and fine) is passed along to the person who rented the car.”

    Because identity is an element of the offence, not so in this instance, because anyone could be using the connection you have, making enforcement more efficient at the source. Also, if the rental company provides you with a vehicle even though it reasonably suspects you’re using it for nefarious purposes, contractual or not, they can be held liable. (which is why they ask for your details, because if you go through a speed camera in a company car and no-one puts their hand up for it, the company is held liable)

  150. Oh come on

    If you have a big one, 12 hrs won’t be enough.

    Most of the teachers of my acquaintance maintain some sort of form of ‘running notes’

    Well, oco – what say you to that? You wanna check your “running notes”?

    Allow me to let you into a little secret – not just teachers but most professionals keep “running notes” to stay organised at work. It’s generally up to the individual to decide how they do this, and what needs to be noted and categorised. Luckily there are lots of methods and tools to help us working mugs out with this. The lucky few actually employ someone solely to take care of “running note”-related matters.

    Anyway, that’s a bit above the station of most teachers. The only PA they know randomly interrupts them and announces in a scratchy, tinny voice that the lamington drive raised a grand total of $67.94 or that John Farlin needs to report to the sick bay for his shots. Anyhoo, point being that every job requires some degree of housekeeping, and teaching requires a level and types of housekeeping befitting the responsibilities and professional standing of the job (I’ll let you peg that one). It’s not a formalised task in pedagogy like lesson planning, classroom management or reflecting, though.

    Any more questions?

  151. “So, if I rent or buy a car, there is an onus on the vendor to make sure that I am not using it for nefarious purposes?”

    If you walk into Europcar carrying five bags of fertiliser and leave a jerry-can at the door, what are your chances of renting a truck for the day?

  152. Infidel Tiger

    Stop carrying on like a pseud, Sedetionary. You’ve been flogged like a Ba’ath Party apparatchik at Abu Ghraib. You have no Id what you are talking about.

  153. MT Isa Miner

    C.L.

    #1189397, posted on February 14, 2014 at 1:55 pm

    I expect the “harmony walk” will be followed by the “harmony fence paling”, the “harmony star picket” and the “harmony kicking”.

    I’ll put my money on the South-Sea Islanders.

    Infidel Tiger

    #1189398, posted on February 14, 2014 at 1:55 pm

    I expect the “harmony walk” will be followed by the “harmony fence paling”, the “harmony star picket” and the “harmony kicking”

    I hope so. These animals certainly don’t respect the law or other people. A few Tongan Two Steps to the skull might subdue them for a while.

    Now three people have said it , it must be true. A friend that works in criminal legal aid has often said that her grateful Tongan boys ask if there is anything that they can do for her personally: wink wink. Seeing a she’s a plump grandmother I reckon they are not talking about massaging her feet.

Comments are closed.