Gonski must be shown the door

Today in The Australian

“As Labor’s grasp on power was slipping, Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd entered into school funding agreements with the states that will entrench disadvantage and perpetuate poor performance. If the state premiers are genuinely committed to quality education, now is the time to scrap those agreements and start again.”

About Henry Ergas

Henry Ergas is a columnist for The Australian newspaper and the inaugural Professor of Infrastructure Economics at the SMART Infrastructure Facility at the University of Wollongong. The SMART Infrastructure Facility is a $61.8 million world-class research and training centre concerned with integrated infrastructure solutions for the future. Henry is also Senior Economic Adviser to Deloitte Australia. Prior to these concurrent roles Henry worked as a consultant economist at NECG, CRA International and Concept Economics. Henry's previous career was as an economist at the OECD in Paris, where amongst other roles he headed the Secretary-General’s Task Force on Structural Adjustment and was Counsellor for Structural Policy in the Economics Department.
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28 Responses to Gonski must be shown the door

  1. Ivan Denisovich

    Gonski must be shown the door

    David Warren argues the state should be shown the door:

    http://www2.canada.com/ottawacitizen/columnists/story.html?id=3e6cdde4-3cf6-4d7f-92a8-b145c8b265ad&p=1

  2. Blogstrop

    The unseemly scramble to put together a “consensus” of state premiers before the election, the reckless throwing around of money to buy another “we got it done” piece of tawdry window dressing, was typical of our last government.
    Back when they were in opposition and state premiers were mostly Labor, they spent just as much effort getting the premiers to reject the Howard government’s Murray Darling plan – not for any good reason apart from denying Howard a positive achievement. The media made sure Howard got as little out of the APEC meeting too, with their constant harping about security arrangements, and the Chaser japes playing right into that mene.

  3. Cold-Hands

    Christopher Pyne needs to educate the public. Just throwing money at education has failed to lift standards over the last twenty plus years and this is obvious from the empirical data. He needs to get this message through to the electorate and explain how using the money already allotted can lift outcomes without the nebulous Gonski crap. Repeating the past’s mistakes , spending more money doing the same ineffective things is a lesson in futility. If this means vouchers, charter schools and breaking the teachers’ union then so be it.

  4. Rabz

    Repeating the past’s mistakes , spending more money doing the same ineffective things is a lesson in futility.

    Sounds more like insanity, which is exactly what throwing more money at the state education system would be.

  5. Token

    Sounds more like insanity, which is exactly what throwing more money at the state education system would be.

    When one listens to Glen Reynolds discuss how his teen daughter got a high school education via an online institution while working, and hearing how easy it is to access that education, one suspects the state education system as we understand it is at a point of change.

    The question what will happen when parents, children & ultimately employers start making their preference for education certified by other juristictions known

    (I know the higher ed system we already have that as a MBA from the prime US universities crap all over domestic degrees).

  6. Paul

    STill can’t work out what Gonski was meant to do other than provide flowery prose during re-election campaigns.

  7. srr

    Indoctrination is expensive.

    Incentives, bribes, rewards and awards must keep flowing.

    They cost dearly, and must keep increasing in ‘value’/expense, to simply maintain incentivising power.

    Education doesn’t cost much at all.

    Compare what Grade 3 children in the age of blackboards, pen, paper and recycled text books, knew and understood, to what a University student babbles today.

  8. danzig_misfit

    Labor knew they were going to lose the last election so rammed Gonski and the NDIS through as a ‘screw you’ to the budget bottom line. LNP were too scared to not support them as they feared it might cost them the election.

    Since all states never agreed while Labor were in power, Gonksi should be scrapped and start again. It is worth going just to see the lefties explode.

  9. srr

    STill can’t work out what Gonski was meant to do other than provide flowery prose during re-election campaigns.

    It’s meant to leave no, ‘Centre of Learning’, free from propaganda peddling the UN’s Religiously Believed Doctrines and Dogmas.

    It the National Curriculum plot, juiced up with more of other peoples money, to get to their intended hell on earth, faster.

  10. The Pugilist

    It is only when the funding is given directly to the parents/students will they start questioning the absurd outcomes that a ‘funding model’ like Gonski produces. At the moment, families just take it on trust that more money is going into education and that’s a ‘good thing’…

  11. Bear Necessities

    Whilst Gonski funding is an issue, another big issue is the centralised cirriculum. Why do we need a centralised national cirrculum? All it does is dumb down learning to the slowest learners level.
    Schools should be allowed to set their own cirriculum based on how best they can educate their enrollment. It seems that the Abbott Government wants to move public schools to be more independent in operation and funding. That is all good but if you are still required to teach the same crap then you are not reaping the full benefits of independence.

  12. Bear-it’s not a centralised national curriculum, it’s a centralized international curriculum with UNESCO, the OECD, Pearson, and the quality assurance process of education all actually standardizing ed globally. UNESCO even says it is doing it as “Task Manager under Agenda 21.”

    The word “quality education” has a particular meaning unappreciated by the lay reader but well known to all these institutions and quite consistent. http://www.invisibleserfscollar.com/quality-education-shapes-what-will-be-valued-and-provides-unifying-concepts-to-guide-political-consciousness/ It is tied to a push to use education to ignite political transformation without bothering to look to the ballot box.

    Token-I am glad on-line ed worked out well for Glenn and his family, but Competency is yet another unappreciated global euphemism with unappreciated political meanings. I would argue that the door he is using is closing and the World Summit on the Information Society +10 meeting last September in Sakhalin, Russia backs up my concerns. What bothers me is regarded by Statists and Transformationists as a positive. They were also quite graphic on where they intend to see ICT use in education going and openly laid out the primacy in the 21st century of what is called MIL–Media and Information Literacy. Not in addition, that’s to be enough. Genuine knowledge as we would call it can just be accessible via database.

  13. Squirrel

    “Cold-Hands

    #1200553, posted on February 24, 2014 at 7:54 am

    Christopher Pyne needs to educate the public. Just throwing money at education has failed to lift standards over the last twenty plus years and this is obvious from the empirical data. He needs to get this message through to the electorate and explain how using the money already allotted can lift outcomes without the nebulous Gonski crap. Repeating the past’s mistakes , spending more money doing the same ineffective things is a lesson in futility. If this means vouchers, charter schools and breaking the teachers’ union then so be it.”

    It’s ABC Lateline, but this is worth reading/viewing on the point of money not always being the answer:

    http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2013/s3948371.htm

    Labor turned “Gonski” – remember those tragic “I give a Gonski T-shirts” into a slogan and a chant, while glossing over the inconvenient details about their handling of it.

    Also, +1 to:

    “danzig_misfit

    #1200583, posted on February 24, 2014 at 8:34 am

    Labor knew they were going to lose the last election so rammed Gonski and the NDIS through as a ‘screw you’ to the budget bottom line. LNP were too scared to not support them as they feared it might cost them the election. ”

    The blank-cheque pigeons are coming home to roost.

  14. Here is the U of South Australia laying out its vision of the 21st century changes. With the OECD pushing the vision. http://www.oecd.org/edu/imhe/23280039.PDF

  15. Hubert East

    Why the various State Governments accept the Gonski drivel, without giving it a thorough going over, indicates how bureaucracies mould politicians to their way of thinking. It was never any good; just a series of motherhood prognostications.
    It is interesting how the names of the heads of departments keep popping up in new areas, regardless of which party wins an election. Bureaucracies have become so politicized over the past 40 years (thank you Gough!) that a sensible newly elected head of any government should toss out the old and start with a clean plate.

    The Gonski mess is just one screaming example of this. I thought Pyne would have done something by now.

  16. johanna

    The more things change, etc.

    When I was working for the NSW government, decades ago, Treasury was in a permanent state of anxiety about teachers’ salaries. Every rise (and they were usually at least 3%) added hundreds of millions of dollars to unavoidable Budget expenditure. At the same time, the education lobby were constantly pushing for reduced class sizes, more teachers’ aides and so on. In other words, more and more money for employees, not for students.

    Gonski is just another version of this.

    Many commenters here, who have high standards of literacy, were educated in relatively large classes, and when the expenditure per pupil was a small fraction of what it is now.

    It is very important that Pyne and others push back hard against the meme that $$ = outcomes.

  17. Fred Lenin

    Why take any notice of gonski?who the hell is he? Bossof coca cola amatil trying to bludge 25 million from the Feds! Must have forgottenhis S@G /blackburn /union Mafia guvmint was beaten ,managed to con 25 million off the Victorian Laboral guvmint.Seems the didnt really needthe Feds money,Bloody soshalist Bludgers Wont Work will They!

  18. .

    The problem is we have been raised in a society where schools were equivocated with education.

    End compulsory schooling and everything gets cheaper.

  19. kae

    I heard part of this interview thismorning on the way to the doctor’s.

    Simon Petrie has many valid points, particularly about teaching to a test (NAPLAN) etc, etc, etc.

  20. Cold-Hands

    The problem is we have been raised in a society where schools were equivocated with education.

    You want to put this into English, dot?

  21. hzhousewife

    Arithemetic must have changed enormously since I was a student in Primary school
    ( 1955 – 1961).
    We all entered High School able to do our multiplication times tables backwards, forwards
    and at random, and able to apply them to practical written and verbal problems ( along with addition, subtraction and division).
    Excellent basis for further development. Not tough, kids with no books in the home
    still became competent.
    Far cry from today, I simply cannot understand why the teachers of today think it is too too
    hard to teach to this level today

    And that’s just in ONE subject !

  22. .

    Schooling is not congruent with education.

  23. stackja

    .
    #1201317, posted on February 24, 2014 at 7:01 pm
    Schooling is not congruent with education.

    In geometry, two figures or objects are congruent if they have the same shape and size, or if one has the same shape and size as the mirror image of the other.

  24. srr

    Remember back 30 years, when 1984 came, and then went, and people suddenly stopped worrying about and watching out for The Big Brother of the book, 1984?

    Remember how those who kept watching and warning, were fobbed off as tinfoil hatters who believed stories in books were real?

    Remember how the homeschoolers were cruelly mocked as religious and other nutters?

    Remember how so many tuned in to the TV show, Big Brother, watched it religiously, and at first laughed, then gravely lamented how terribly ignorant the contestants and the shows fans were?

    Remember millions of those Big Brother fans are the same ilk who madly ‘work’ social media, in between voting and getting their Leftist heroes elected to govern us.

    Remember that it is base human nature to join the popular mobs in attacking unpopular individuals who warn against believing popular opinions, such as it being good for everyone to start school as a toddler and stay in school well into adulthood…as the plotters for a global dictatorship [The UN] keep marching towards mandating.

  25. Paul

    I’m getting to like you srr. I suspect there’s areas you also know better than to go to on a site like this one, which is otherwise pretty good.

  26. Tel

    Probably everyone else has seen it already, I don’t know who the young lady is but I don’t think they are intending it personally.

    http://www.evilmilk.com/pictures/Modern_Education.jpg

  27. .

    being good for everyone to start school as a toddler and stay in school well into adulthood

    This is precisely the problem. Precisely the problem.

    JT Gatto says school robs you of your infancy and extends your childhood at the expense of being adult.

    In short, schooling is infantilising.

    Remember:

    Schooling ≠ Education

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