Guest Post: Tintarella di Luna – Dealing with Centrelink

Shortly before my son with severe disability turned 16 Centrelink, unsolicited mind you, forwarded a full set of forms addressed to our son who can neither read nor write, for him to claim the Disability Support Pension.

I didn’t tell him about them and just ignored the presumptive effrontery. My older son who was not disabled did not have anything sent to him,or didn’t need to do anything just because he was turning 16. I paid for all his needs and I wanted to do the same for our son who is severely disabled. After all he was just 16 and still at school and we his family wanted to support him as we had done for our other son. We wanted to wait until he was 18 for him to go on the DSP.

It got better. He was getting reminders addressed to him and I was calling Centrelink and telling them that at this point in time we were attending to all our son’s needs and told them to politely butt out.

Eventually what the fascistic bureaucrats did was cancel his medicare and his health benefits card, which meant his very expensive PBS medications were now costing $120 instead of the reduced amount which was manageable for us.

Of course there are some people with disabilities who need financial assistance as do their families but at that time we felt able to support our son financially until he turned 18 and left school. We did not want the interference of government at all, we didn’t need it. But it would seem bureaucracy is incapable of flexibility or any nuance whatsoever.

So in the end we were forced to lodge a claim for our son to go on the DSP otherwise his medical benefits and concessions would be unavailable. Oh, and I have to be his nominee which means that Centrelink sends out 2 letters every time there is something to be sent to our son, one for him which he cannot read or understand and one for me so I can make enquiries, correspond etc.. with Fascist Central. Thank you to the taxpayers of Australia if only you knew.

By the way making the application for the DSP itself was another form of punishment which is a story all on its own. If only I’d had the good sense not to have a disabled child.

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82 Responses to Guest Post: Tintarella di Luna – Dealing with Centrelink

  1. pete m

    The DSP process is designed to reduce even the most patient saint into a raving homocidal maniac. And yet some 800,000 people have been successful jumping through the so-called hoops. God only knows how.

    Best wishes to you brave lady.

  2. Tintarella di Luna

    The DSP process is designed to reduce even the most patient saint into a raving homocidal maniac.

    Quite, but only if you are honest and candid

  3. Delta A

    But Tinta, you have to understand that these are the experts and they’ve spent many hours and squillions of tax-payer dollars to work out what is best for your boy. What would you know, for heaven’s sake? You’ve merely raised him for 16 years, anguished over his troubles and celebrated his successes. These people know what is best for you, your son and for the whole damn world.

  4. Delta A

    Congratulations on your down to earth, commonsense attitude, by the way. And don’t let the bastards get you down.

  5. Biota

    Tinta, my sympathy/empathy. Our son died fro cancer a few years ago and while he was in the early stages of treatment and unable to work he applied for DSP. One of the questions was “is your illness terminal”. Well, how do you answer that! Here we were living in hope that it wasn’t and have to deal with that question.

  6. Tintarella di Luna

    These people know what is best for you, your son and for the whole damn world.

    That’s why the NDIS terrifies me because the bureaucrats built it following the blue-print of the Labor party who had nothing else on which to hang their tattered asshats.

  7. Tel

    Eventually what the fascistic bureaucrats did was cancel his medicare and his health benefits card, which meant his very expensive PBS medications were now costing $120 instead of the reduced amount which was manageable for us.

    I think that’s actually normal if he turns 18 and he was on the family card before that but afterwards he needs his own card. If you already got him onto his own card and the cancelled that then it’s weird but those guys are smart enough only to prey on people weak enough not to fight them.

  8. Leigh Lowe

    Graffiti in Exhibition St Melbourne a few years ago ….
    “Dealing with Centrelink is working for the dole”

  9. Delta A

    Sincere sympathy on your loss, Biota. What a wicked lack of sensitivity you had to deal with.

  10. Tintarella di Luna

    Our son died fro cancer a few years ago and while he was in the early stages of treatment and unable to work he applied for DSP. One of the questions was “is your illness terminal”. Well, how do you answer that! Here we were living in hope that it wasn’t and have to deal with that question.

    My sincere condolences Biota – I often wonder if those who prepare those forms are trained at the Adolph Eichmann School of Form Preparation.

  11. A Lurker

    And yet some 800,000 people have been successful jumping through the so-called hoops. God only knows how.

    I suspect somewhere out there is a Cert3 course in ‘Filling Out Pointless Government Forms and Dealing with Uppity & Fascist Bureaucrats at Centrelink’

  12. Tel

    I suspect somewhere out there is a Cert3 course in ‘Filling Out Pointless Government Forms and Dealing with Uppity & Fascist Bureaucrats at Centrelink’ …

    They teach it somewhere in New Zealand.

  13. blogstrop

    They are so caring …

  14. Tintarella di Luna

    I think that’s actually normal if he turns 18 and he was on the family card before that but afterwards he needs his own card. If you already got him onto his own card and the cancelled that then it’s weird but those guys are smart enough only to prey on people weak enough not to fight them.

    Thanks Tel, perhaps I misunderstood what the Chemist said at the time and understood that his medicare was also cancelled which really sent me into a spin because he was seeing doctors all the time. But definitely the Health Care Card which allowed him PBS medication was cancelled. I tried to resist that but his meds at the time were very expensive and he was on quite a few so resistance weakened in the face of financial distress.

    He is still on our family medicare card I guess he’ll have to have his own when he turns 25 so that’ll be another round of form-filling which will be an experience to add to the rest.

  15. LordAzrael

    Here’s another piece of related stupidity. I was made redundant last year and thankfully had unemployment insurance attached to my home loan. The catch ? They wouldn’t pay until I was registered with Centrelink. And Centrelink won’t register you till you’ve made an appointment, which takes at least two weeks. Meaning the mongrel insurance company ended up avoiding a month’s payment thanks to Centrelink’s incompetence.

  16. Biota

    so resistance weakened

    Resistance is useless! In the tinny voice of Centrelink daleks

  17. LordAzrael

    And more stupidity. Centrelink will arrange an “appointment” for you. However this is not an actual appointment. People are still served in the order that they turn up. Meaning that if you turn up for your 2pm appointment, everyone who arrived before 2pm will be served before you. A Centrelink staff member admitted that the only purpose of making “appointments” was to avoid everyone turning up at 8:30am when the doors open.

  18. A Lurker

    My theory is that most bureaucracy has been designed by talentless, non-creative people who are desperately trying to justify their degrees.

    It’s clear that most bureaucrats don’t possess even a modicum of common sense.

    p.s. Sorry for your loss Biota, it’s always hard when a child passes on. My sympathies.

  19. LordAzrael

    Tel
    #1213458, posted on March 5, 2014 at 8:30 pm

    I suspect somewhere out there is a Cert3 course in ‘Filling Out Pointless Government Forms and Dealing with Uppity & Fascist Bureaucrats at Centrelink’ …

    They teach it somewhere in New Zealand.

    I think they probably opened an office on Manus Island under the previous administration.

  20. Mike of Marion

    Tinta, against all that has been placed upon you, there is no doubt in my mind that you have maintained your dignity and your very strong character. Well done Tinta.

    Mike

  21. Tel

    He is still on our family medicare card I guess he’ll have to have his own when he turns 25 so that’ll be another round of form-filling which will be an experience to add to the rest.

    I don’t pretend to know the system, just now and then go drinking with some of the Cert3 graduates. My Medicare card has expired a number of times through lack of use and generally the medical center gives a wink and a nod. I would guess that once a few hundred dollars is moving across the counter they probably get a bit more picky (or maybe I just live in a different kind of suburb to you).

  22. JohnA

    Delta, ” And don’t let the bastards get you down” usually goes nil carborundum: “don’t let the bastards grind you down!” but I agree.

    There are times when I think Centrelink could displace US military might and bring the rest of the world to heel just with their paperwork.

  23. Mayan

    Mum, who is receiving some aged pension, went into the nearest office to update some details. The woman who was doing triage, for lack of a better word, looked at Mum, then at me, then handed me forms to act as her guardian. Mum is quite alert and well and is not in need of such an arrangement. She and I found the attitude implied in that moment to be rather appalling.

    I have resolved that, even if it means some pain, I will never deal with Centrelink, even should I reach an age that would qualify me for a pension. The loss of dignity is simply not worth it.

  24. Tintarella di Luna

    I had occasion back in 2009 to contact the Minister for Human Services (one Ms Pleberserk) about Centrelink wanting particular forms filled out every three months just in case a miraculous cure had rendered my son NOT severely intellectually disabled. It does wear you down when every three months you are reminded just how severe is the disability and how that condition makes him forever dependent on others for assistance for all of his life. .

    After much to-ing and fro-ing it is now the case that provided you send in letters from experts who can tell the bureau-beasties once and for all that the condition is permanent and will not improve then those three-monthly tiresome forms no longer need to be completed. So that’s for everyone now, not just my boy. Small things but they count greatly.

    It’s not the disability that is the problem it is dealing with bureaucrats and ancillary filled-out-form-requirers, the process is the punishment. One thing for sure is that I would never have done the things I’ve done, I would never have been the person I am were it not for my son with disabilities.

  25. Delta A

    John A, I’ll see your nil carborundum and raise you an illegitimi.

  26. blogstrop

    Good on you, Tinta.

  27. Ripper

    Tinta, against all that has been placed upon you, there is no doubt in my mind that you have maintained your dignity and your very strong character. Well done Tinta.

    +1
    I have a theory that is in fact there is a God, He seems to pick truly exceptional people for the job of rearing the disadvantaged. I know of two Downs syndrome babies in my small town that could not have picked better parents

  28. Tintarella di Luna

    would guess that once a few hundred dollars is moving across the counter they probably get a bit more picky (or maybe I just live in a different kind of suburb to you).

    Touch wood since my son has become a big hairy adult man (he’ll be 23 in a couple of weeks) he has been very very well and healthy. In the last year he has been fit as a mallee bull, is on no medications except for when there are changes to routine, that is a real killer, his anxiety skyrockets with any infinitesimal change in routine but we deal with that when necessary. So going to the doctor is now every 6 months, same with the dentist – if I were a woman of greater financial substance and immortal they could all get stuffed, but mortality is my great failing.

  29. Tintarella di Luna

    It’s clear that most bureaucrats don’t possess even a modicum of common sense.

    I think the French had the right idea – we need a spring clean of revolution, change of government means nothing the bastards are still there

  30. Tel

    …about Centrelink wanting particular forms filled out every three months just in case a miraculous cure had rendered my son NOT severely intellectually disabled…

    I used to work with a guy who had to fill out those forms along with proof that his missing eye hadn’t grown back (the remaining eye was somewhat cloudy, which also needed suitable documentation, just in case the clouds cleared that day). He handled it with good humour all told. Better than I would have done.

    The problem is you have the cases of headache, bad back, anxiety, chronic fatigue, etc which probably are devastating in some situations but are very difficult to measure objectively. Over the years someone has had a bright idea of how to stop the scammers and of course it doesn’t work, but it keeps people busy and Lord Keynes is happy. The taxpayer never sees exactly how their money is wasted so they just feel a big, broad weight to carry and they stare at the ground and trudge on.

  31. Tintarella di Luna

    Gee thanks, lovely people I just don’t want to whinge but given that Julie Novak wrote about the DSP I thought I tell you about the uselessness of resistance — but of course the Cat knows that already.

    I must say I am very blessed because my husband is still with me and has done all the heavy lifting when it comes to the finances, it was very hard financially, I had my own business which I established when I was a very young girl with big plans, wanted to go to Uni and finish my degree, but there are some things more important than what we think important, re-arrangement of priorities comes easy when you have to.

  32. Tel

    I think the French had the right idea – we need a spring clean of revolution, change of government means nothing the bastards are still there

    The French had a military dictator within the space of a few years, then followed by conscription, then wars across most of Europe, which they eventually lost.

  33. Tintarella di Luna

    He handled it with good humour all told. Better than I would have done.

    I can tell you there has been much humour in my life, it is a black comedy. In my back freezer in the laundry is a slab of wedding cake, we have had about 5 changes of fridge over the last 35 years but that slab of wedding cake is still kicking around. My darling boy is partial to cake and one day got into the usually locked laundry, his brother found him munching away and called me expressing concern he might get sick and the cake looked quite tattered – a metaphor for the marriage perhaps? but at least we’re still hanging in there.

  34. Gab

    I cannot even fathom being in your shoes for a second, Tinta.

    Eventually what the fascistic bureaucrats did was cancel his medicare and his health benefits card, which meant his very expensive PBS medications were now costing $120 instead of the reduced amount which was manageable for us.

    I can’t decide whether they were using blackmail to get your son on the DSP or if they just cancelled his health cards out of spite. Probably the latter.

    Mind you, what right did these fascist b&$*hes (for I’m tipping they were females ) have to cancel his cards without his or your consent, Tinta?

    Thanks for writing about your “adventures” with Centrelink and the DSP.

  35. Tintarella di Luna

    The French had a military dictator within the space of a few years, then followed by conscription, then wars across most of Europe, which they eventually lost.

    You’re right Tel, I forgot my bad, yeah and look at France today, still French

  36. Des Deskperson

    Back in the ‘oughties’ when Centrelink was still a separate agency – it’s now I think a division of Human Services – it used to spend a great deal of energy promoting its image within the broader APS as the most innovative, enlightened, flexible and downright ‘with it’ agency in the service. It even boasted of its own ‘virtual university’ for learning and development its own ‘dean’. It used to win all the public service prizes and awards for innovation, family friendliness, diversity, etc, mainly because it submitted many more entries than any other agency.

    So it was always a shock when one had to deal with Centrelink employees – including at senior levels – and find out that they were the same old grey-cardiganed (metaphorically but sometimes literally) rule-bound dolts that used to run ‘Socials’ -the old DSS – for decades.

  37. nic

    And yet some 800,000 people have been successful jumping through the so-called hoops. God only knows how.

    Dr. Abdullah will see you now…

    Tint, all power to you. Best wishes to you and your family.

  38. Go Tiges

    If we were living in a third world country, where the whole operation worked on the smell of an oily rag, you could kind of understand this sort of treatment. But the department of human services receives over $4 billion every year, (page 5 at the link) just to run the place (ie rent, and wages). For that kind money, we really ought to have better service than Tinta and Biota (deepest sympathies for your loss) have had to put up with.

  39. Tintarella di Luna

    Thanks for writing about your “adventures” with Centrelink and the DSP.

    Actually applying for it when the forms were filled out was surreal beyond belief and that experience has stayed with me. As you can see by my new look I’m getting ready to go all Ephesians 6:14-17

  40. Leigh Lowe

    . One of the questions was “is your illness terminal”

    Firstly, what is the relevance of that question?
    If you say no, do they assess your cause as unworthy (despite doling out the DSP to muzzies with learning difficulties)?

  41. candy

    We still are a lucky country to have this welfare, though, right where it is needed.

    (apart from the rorting and administrative nightmares of anything Centrelink).

  42. calli

    Tinta, best armour plating ever…it’s served me well for 44 years and the best thing…no need for Brasso.

    Just a little daily maintenance is all that’s required…and even if you miss that, grace takes care of it.

    Oh, and the breastplate is made to measure, thankfully.

  43. Tintarella di Luna

    Oh, and the breastplate is made to measure, thankfully.

    I had to send mine out for a bit of adjustment but all tickety-boo now.

  44. felicity

    Ripper you said” I have a theory that is in fact there is a God, He seems to pick truly exceptional people for the job of rearing the disadvantaged. I know of two Downs syndrome babies in my small town that could not have picked better parents”. In fact I believe having a disabled child builds you into an exceptional person LOVE give you the strength to fight for the needs of your child and you grow with the fight, no one is prepared for what is necessary.

  45. lem

    Great post Tinta, great attitude more importantly, and Cats… showing their soft side…nice.

  46. Tintarella di Luna

    When my big boy was a still a little fella we had to fill out some kind of forms every year — We didn’t fill them out for quite a while – guess we were in denial, it was to help with physiotherapy and other therapies needed to get his legs and hands working — the forms had particular syndromes – the one my son has is lifelong, there is no cure and the form had Syndrome X (if six years or under) as if by six it was cured. Another bureaucratic adjustment which has served every other Syndrome X child since.

  47. felicity

    Tinta we have all had different experiences with centrelink, mine was relatively easy except for identifying my son, how many intellectually disabled people have the necessary forms of identification to apply for the DSP

  48. Tintarella di Luna

    Tinta we have all had different experiences with centrelink, mine was relatively easy except for identifying my son, how many intellectually disabled people have the necessary forms of identification to apply for the DSP

    Excellent point felicity and that is why families have to start very early first thing they should do is open a bank account for their child, that’s a very good place to start and maybe a tax file number when they’re 15.

  49. Not Sure

    S00ooo…

    You ask government to “butt out” and “did not want the interference of government at all”

    They comply.

    You cry foul at paying a fair market price for medication.

    Oh the irony.

  50. MemoryVault

    One of the questions was “is your illness terminal”
    Firstly, what is the relevance of that question?

    Unfortunately, these days the question is very relevant – to the department – for all the wrong reasons.

    Back when the Invalid Pension was expanded out to the DSP, a section of the Act was expanded, and an additional requirement for DSP was created. This required that the disease, illness or injury was likely to last at least 24 months. The purpose was self-evident – to eliminate claims for conditions likely to clear up within two years. In these cases Sickness Benefit was considered more appropriate.

    Since then various governments of all political flavours have abused used the DSP to artificially deflate unemployment statistics. Standing orders, under both LNP and LABOR governments, especially around election times, has been to transfer as many as possible off Newstart, onto DSP.

    Now that the politicians are finally coming to terms with the fact that they have created a monster, the new word is to reject DSP claims wherever possible (with a few special exceptions regarding new arrivals, but that is another story).

    So elements withing the department have decided to interpret the “24 months” requirement as meaning the applicant is going to live for at least another two years. Where the treating doctor will not give a written guarantee that the applicant will live for at least another two years, the application is rejected. Since no GP of sound mind would give such a written guarantee for a patient with a terminal condition, all such claims are automatically rejected.

  51. C.L.

    I’ve said it several times … good luck to any bureaucrat or politician who takes on Tinta.

  52. Tapdog

    …but mortality is my great failing.

    My inner contrarian suggests that also it is potentially if painfully, your great opportunity Tinta.

  53. Squirrel

    I do hope the systemic issues come to the attention of Kevin Andrews, and his Office – self-reliance should be encouraged and facilitated, not smothered by inflexible bureaucracy!

  54. Perfidious Albino

    More power to you Tinta (and your family), your pragmatism in the face of the unthinking bureaucracy is remarkable.

  55. Felicity

    Tinta is the General I am one of her infantry women and I would follow her into hell she is one of the most magnificent women I have known, I consider myself lucky to call her friend

  56. Tintarella di Luna

    My inner contrarian suggests that also it is potentially if painfully, your great opportunity Tinta.

    And you know Tapdog I am making the most of every opportunity, particularly if it will also benefit others in the same boat.

    I don’t know if any of you remember Hugh Borrowman

    He is a great inspiration to me. The man who is our Ambassador to Vietnam is a champion who has really made a difference for others. He would not have an exception or exemption. He wanted the law changed and would accept no less than a change that benefited others as well.

    That’s class. And that ladies and gentlemen is why Julia Gillard and Bill Shorten and their confected concern for people with disabilities was as nauseating as it was fake. Neither can fake sincerity because I’ve seen them up close and personal.

  57. Gab

    Tinta, your second link is the same as the first.

  58. nilk, Iron Bogan

    Tinta, thanks for the sharing. My adventures with Centrelink would bore anyone with half a brain to death, but they are also boringly straightforward and to do with the pecuniary fun of single parenting.

    I also agree with Ripper. I have a friend with a young disabled son, and the challenges are enormous. I honestly don’t know if I could juggle what she does with her son and other children while remaining so cheery.

    Biota, I have no words. I’m sorry.

  59. Tintarella di Luna

    Tinta, your second link is the same as the first.

    Ooops sorry I’ll try again

    Hugh Borrowman – The man who is our Ambassador to Vietnam is a champion who has really made a difference for others. He would not have an exception or exemption. He wanted the law changed and would accept no less than a change that benefited others as well.

    That’s class. And that ladies and gentlemen is why Julia Gillard and Bill Shorten and their confected concern for people with disabilities was as nauseating as it was fake. Neither can fake sincerity because I’ve seen them up close and personal.

  60. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I used to work with a guy who had to fill out these forms with proof that his missing eye hadn’t grown back

    Supposed to have been an infantryman who lost a leg in the war that we dare not speak it’s name. Some bureaucrat wrote to him saying that he would have to go on filling out forms every three months to continue receiving a pension.

    He is said to have written to them saying that, when he grew a new left leg, they would be the first to know.

    Tintarella, I don’t think fascists is too strong a word to use.

  61. .

    I have avoided centrelink at all costs. After reading this, I believe it was a wise choice.

  62. Tintarella di Luna

    I have avoided centrelink at all costs. After reading this, I believe it was a wise choice.

    You are the wise dot of the Cat, maybe even of the blogosphere, I might change my mind in the morning. Ciao gatti

  63. Paul Templeton

    I spend a lot of time in Centrelink offices as part of my work and while it may be the case in other offices that staff may be disinterested or unhelpful in the offices I work in I have been very impressed by the attitude of staff and their dedication to helping people.

    Unfortunately they are often constrained by policies established at a national level which on an individual level can be very frustrating. There are so many people seeking to abuse Centrelink payments and unfortunately this results in people in genuine need being required to provide all kinds of evidence regarding their eligibility for assistance.

    I can appreciate your frustrations however as an outsider who has a better understanding than most of what is involved in working at Centrelink I can say that in at least some offices the staff are doing a wonderful job in helping the disadvantaged in our community.

  64. Baldrick

    Tinta, thanks for sharing your very touching story. It serves as a reminder that there is a human side to the three letters – DSP, and those that provide the care.

  65. Diogenes

    Having had a child with a very rare (he was the first diagnosed in Brisbane) metabolic disorder, I know exactly where you are coming from. Sadly for us, 13 years ago he passed away at age 11. The forms were as stupid then as they are now, and for my wife to receive the carers allowance, every 12 months we filled out a 48 page form ( I kid you not) that required a report from EVERY specialist he was seeing which IIRC was 6 in number. Of course the referrals had run out so back to to the GP, to get new referrals, then making the 6 appointments, taking him out of school to see the specialist… This of course begs the question why oh why for a lifelong, life limiting, incurable condition do referrals run out?
    Digressing slightly … there was the obligatory 8 hour wait in Emergency every time he needed to be admitted. When the Registrar rang the primary specialist (a Neurologist) the reply was – if the parents want him admitted, for god’s sake admit him – usually after a day or 2 in the general ward was in ICU on Life Support.
    Back to the matter at hand…
    We very nearly lost the allowance one year because he had spent 59 days in hospital (60 was the cutoff) despite the fact that my wife slept at the hospital when he was admitted & looked after his feeds(gastrostomy) & other needs (unlike some parents who dropped their child off, and literally took of on a 10 day overseas holiday)

    The form was fine if had something as “mainstream” as blindness or cerebal palsy – for something rare (by the time he died only 1 other child had been diagnosed in Brisbane & she passed away aged 9 months 6 months before our son) it was a completely different story.

    Oh and did I mention the 20K Satanlink claimed my wife had in savings in a bank in which we had never banked? Every time we were reviewed we had to trot down to that bank, and get a signed letter saying that a search of their records could find no record of anybody with our surname or my wife’s maiden ever having banked with them (We suspect Mrs Diogenes’ TFN was used to open a bank account after she had a tax refund stolen out of our letterbox nearly 30 years ago). But Satanlink would not provide us with the details of the account – believe me we could have used the money to make the bathroom & his bedroom wheely friendly. I suspect that when I retire in 10 years, that 20k will STILL be linked to our name, and retiring sadly means having to deal with Satanlink – honestly I would rather crawl naked over “tiger” wire.

  66. By the way making the application for the DSP itself was another form of punishment which is a story all on its own. If only I’d had the good sense not to have a disabled child.

    I can only imagine the hardship involved, I find it staggering that a medicare card could be cancelled, even by their standards

    My own experience is comparatively trivial but this is the only contact I have ever had with them and hopefully it stays that way:

    I tried to claim ‘Dad & Partner’ pay – purely because there was a sign in the maternity ward and I get very little off the government, foolishly assuming a payment open to all fathers/life-partners worth $1200 for 2 weeks unpaid leave would be fairly straightforward to claim

    The result was I had to sign up for a combined ‘mygov’ account, but because I’d never used a government website I then had to sign up to centrelink to put it in mygov, both involved about 5 passwords/security questions

    Then I had to fill in the tax-return style form, which was irritating enough, as you are supposed to claim before the birth to receive the money on time, but also have to specify the unpaid leave dates, (which must be 14 continuous days and cannot be extended by public holidays), so it couldn’t be submitted until I actually had a date

    Once it was sent off I was required to front up to an actual office with certified copies within 14 days to actually claim anything – the friendly ‘it’s easy’ frog in their ad is a bloody lying toad

  67. Oh come on

    The DSP process is designed to reduce even the most patient saint into a raving homocidal maniac. And yet some 800,000 people have been successful jumping through the so-called hoops. God only knows how.

    Well when it’s a choice between ~$400 a week on the DSP and ~$250 on Newstart, there’s an incentive to get creative.

  68. Pickles

    Sitting in a lawyers waiting room in country Vic recently I was flipping thru a law journal and noticed nearly every newly minted barrister had Admin Law at the top of their specialty list. The hopeful part of me hoped that these babies were on a mission to gut shoot as many public servants and ministers as they could as such work is the Lords work. Then the real part of me realised that they would probably all be touting for Crown work. Becoming part of the apparatus rather than keeping it in check. O well.

  69. Tintarella di Luna

    Diogenes compared to what your family has gone through and come out the other end mine’s an absolute doddle my deepest sympathies – you have had the raw end of the deal, yes the process is the punishment and vice versa.

    Rich on reflection I think the medicare card cancellation was incorrect information from the pharmacist, but I didn’t question it at all given the experience up to that time, I wasn’t going to chance it we had to see so many doctors and allied health people and things became quite strained on the financial front I just caved in,- you have to pick your battles and there have been far greater ones down the way.

    Thanks for all your comments.

  70. Tintarella di Luna

    Pickles I think you may be onto something the altruistic young are interested in defending fish and frogs and trees and shrubs because human beings are the toxic element, so people with intellectual disability aren’t even a blip on their radar. Cheers

  71. Leigh Lowe

    Sitting in a lawyers waiting room in country Vic recently ….

    Did he get you off Pickles?

  72. JohnA

    Delta A #1213486, posted on March 5, 2014 at 8:48 pm

    John A, I’ll see your nil carborundum and raise you an illegitimi.

    :-) then I must fold. I have no more Latin in the bank…

    My final word is that governments can’t do compassion and empathy – it’s simply not in their DNA, because their job is to do with rules and regulations.

  73. Pickles

    No Leigh and I can’t decide if I ought be shocked or dismayed that you would immediately assume I was the accused. I may have been the executor and sole beneficiary of the very large estate of a very old spinster. Better me getting it than some lost dogs home.

  74. 1735099

    Ever considered why so many Vietnam veterans chose to live in SVN?
    There’s a book in that……..

  75. johninoxley

    Brazil is a great movie, not popular though. I think it was advertised due to Terry Gilliam and Michael Palin, being a Python movie.

  76. .

    When I hear the word Vietnam, I reach for my Makarov…

  77. Dianeh

    Tinta, thank you for sharing .

    I was put off enough filling out the carer’s allowance forms which were pages of irrelevant info. There is one rate only for the allowance, so only eligibility needs to be determined but the forms are so extensive that they look at the degree of disability. I could cut that form back to a single page with a second page for the medical details

    I also had a bad experience with the Dept of Ed in NSW that wanted me to get my son’s diagnosis redone. I told them that if they wished to pay for it and to find the medical staff to do it then OK. To redo the diagnosis is not covered under Medicare, and even if it were, the waiting list is nearly 12 months where I live.

    The Medicare Local Austism manager contacted the local paediatrician, who said ‘is this a joke, is there some cure for autism that I missed?’

    I fought the Dept and won. I did not need to get another diagnosis. Theses bastards had made other parents travel to the nearest capital city to get their diagnosis redone, at their own expense.

    I must be a bit like Tinta and threatened to go public with this, and to our politician. Strangely enough the request was dropped and my son continued to get his funding. You should have been in the meeting when went in the attack. They were visibly shocked that someone had called them out it and was informed on exactly what was required.

    Clearly, the regulations did not require a new diagnosis for a lifelong disability, it was just some stupid bureaucrat letting the power go to their head. They were meant to be assisting families that had problems and no diagnosis, to get one.

    Fuckwits.

  78. .

    I also had a bad experience with the Dept of Ed in NSW that wanted me to get my son’s diagnosis redone. I told them that if they wished to pay for it and to find the medical staff to do it then OK. To redo the diagnosis is not covered under Medicare, and even if it were, the waiting list is nearly 12 months where I live.

    Why would they bother? What motivates these people?

  79. Dianeh

    Dot, that is the million dollar question. It was an abuse of power. In retrospect, I should have pursued it and made a formal complaint but I had what I wanted and a contact told me that they were leaving alone the families of children with a medical diagnosis.

  80. C.L.

    Ever considered why so many Vietnam veterans chose to live in SVN?

    Love you long time?

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