Flight 370 II

The WSJ reports:

Aviation investigators and national security officials believe the plane flew for a total of five hours, based on data automatically downloaded and sent to the ground from the Boeing Co. 777′s engines as part of a routine maintenance and monitoring program.

If that is the case then the search area is vast.

where is MH flight

The bottom line is that nobody really knows where the plane is and the demands of a 24/7 news cycle are exacerbating the situation. Much of the criticism of the Malaysian authorities is somewhat unfair – nobody can know what happened until the plane is found. In the meantime all we can really know is that the passengers and crew are dead.

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269 Responses to Flight 370 II

  1. Leo G

    I think the mobile phone thing is a furphy, in a lot of Asian countries (especially those like Malaysia, Vietnam, Indon) mobile coverage is patchy, it’s hard to imagine mobiles working over the south china sea at 39,000 feet.

    The verified accounts about the mobile phones still ringing out for many hours after the disappearance, then reverting to switched off status, may have a technical explanation.
    But in the absence of that explanation it suggests that the cellphones were stationary and within range of a cellphone district- ie either the plane crashed on land, or it landed somewhere, or the cellphones were ejected.
    Together with satcom signals showing the plane progressing out over the ocean suggests that the cellphones separated from the aircraft at some point.
    Were they collected from passengers and ejected over land?
    We may find however, that some of the contradictory evidence is the result of preplanned deception or of misinformation, wilful or otherwise.

  2. egg_

    Cellphone info for the lay:

    <a href="

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1092894/answers-to-questions-about-cellphones-in-flight-mh370

    “>Answers to questions about cellphones in flight MH370

    CMTS handsets are virtual and were ‘internationally roaming’, don’t forget.

  3. egg_

    If the radar info is a furphy (as I suggested from the outset), who’s to say that the plane didn’t crash in China and no one’s owning up?

  4. Combine_Dave

    If the radar info is a furphy (as I suggested from the outset), who’s to say that the plane didn’t crash in China and no one’s owning up?

    I am sure China would have realised this, and then in turn be happy to blame Malaysia for the crash.

    Besides, you mean if the radar data AND the engine data are furphies.

    I have seen reports in the media that calling a mobile internationally could result in a dial tone even if the persons mobile was off (or submerged as is likely in this case).

  5. I’m struggling with the “phones ringing” event.
    How would it come to pass that a majority of the handphones got somehow switched on, but not one outgoing call or sms was sent?

  6. Combine_Dave

    Re hypoxia – we can only speculate on the knowns and it has the highest contention – how it may have happened is of course open to speculation but it cannot be discounted – especially by the ‘lack of precedence’ BS.

    So to reiterate your hypothesis, there was a leak on the plane and pilot, crew and passengers suffered from hypoxia. This then resuted in various coms/transponders being switched off , a new flight path, no attempts to call for help (or to reach for the oxygen). This is despite the maintenance of the plane being uptodate, no instances of this occurring in a 777 (due to safety features developed due to this occurring in less sophisticated planes ages ago)?

    Sounds plausible.

  7. candy

    Some 9/11 hijacked passengers sent messages to family during the hijack.
    It would be interesting to know when the last communication was from a passenger on MH370.

  8. Grigory M

    If the radar info is a furphy

    egg- – it seems that the transponder being switched off by someone, followed by the engine monitoring system ‘pinging’ the satellite for 4-5 hours later, has made the radar info obsolete. The primary scenario now looks like a highjack/attempted highjack has occurred. The US and India’s deployment of additional search resources in the Indian Ocean/Andaman Sea suggests that this scenario is being taken seriously.

  9. egg_

    “So to reiterate your hypothesis, there was a leak on the plane and pilot, crew and passengers suffered from hypoxia. This then resuted in various coms/transponders being switched off , a new flight path, no attempts to call for help (or to reach for the oxygen). This is despite the maintenance of the plane being uptodate, no instances of this occurring in a 777 (due to safety features developed due to this occurring in less sophisticated planes ages ago)?”

    FTFY, yer Honour.

    What’s your verdict on cabin pressurisation inadvertently set to ‘manual’ pre/in-flight?

    You daily sit above a CAN bus network and hydraulics labyrinth, non?
    Any intimate knowledge of same, or just a ‘passenger’?

  10. egg_

    “Besides, you mean if the radar data AND the engine data are (may have been) furphies.”

    FTFY too.
    Hole, shovel.

    Looks like the US DMax engine saga all over again, eh?

  11. Tel

    How would it come to pass that a majority of the handphones got somehow switched on, but not one outgoing call or sms was sent?

    I do actually switch my phone off when in an aircraft, but when glancing at other people, I think a lot of people don’t bother.

    I’m not stupid enough to believe it’s going to make any difference to the flight, BTW, the same security theatre that freaks out if you carry a butter knife allows all electronic devices through the gate without blinking an eye. Obviously they aren’t particularly worried about “Terrorists” activating the radio on their mobile phones.

    Since the phone regularly handshakes with the local tower, the carrier should have logs of when it entered various cells. Those cells are not particularly large either, so you think that might help the search effort. This is presuming the logs have not been lost, or deleted, or whatever.

  12. Tel

    I have seen reports in the media that calling a mobile internationally could result in a dial tone even if the persons mobile was off (or submerged as is likely in this case).

    If the phone was switched off in country A and never switched back on again, how could the carrier know whether this was an international call or not? Activation of global roaming requires that the phone successfully joins a cell in country B.

  13. Grigory M

    egg_ – the hypoxia theory may still be valid. The sequence of events would be different, though. If the plane’s hull (or maybe a flight deck window) was breached during a highjack attempt, the pilot may have been able to drop the plane the 200 metres and commence the turn-back and the highjacker/s may have had time to turn off the transponder before all succumbed to lack of oxygen. Then maybe the plane has simply continued to fly with all on board unconscious (or dead) until it ran out of fuel.

  14. Helen

    Captain tells me that the aerial that sends the ping is located outside the A/C. If so the plane has either landed and had the aerial incapacitated, or crashed.

    One of Captain’s friends crashed and died from that hypoxia thing. His fighter jet flew on until it ran out of fuel.

  15. Helen

    Malaysian military radar continued to pick up the plane as a whole “paintskin” – a radar blip that has no unique identifier – until it travelled beyond the reach of radar, which is about 320 kilometres offshore, the official said.
    From the Oz.
    .. after several course changes …

    The New York Times, quoting American officials and others familiar with the investigation, said radar signals recorded by the Malaysian military appear to show the airliner climbing to about 13,700 metres, higher than a Boeing 777′s approved limit, soon after it disappeared from civilian radar, and making a sharp turn to the west.

    The radar track then shows the plane descending unevenly to an altitude of 7000 metres, below normal cruising levels, before rising again and flying northwest over the Strait of Malacca toward the Indian Ocean, the Times reported.

    That is a lot of stuff that doesn’t tie in with the hypoxia angle.

  16. Combine_Dave

    FTFY, yer Honour.

    What’s your verdict on cabin pressurisation inadvertently set to ‘manual’ pre/in-flight?

    You daily sit above a CAN bus network and hydraulics labyrinth, non?
    Any intimate knowledge of same, or just a ‘passenger’?

    Just a passenger logically piecing events together based on the most recent media reports.

    Of course if any of the experts or events featured in the media are wrong to date then the logical outcome could change drastically.

    They really need to find the plane and figure out what went wrong (even if it’s just human error or deliberate human action) before the next 777 or other plane vanishes.

  17. Mike of Marion

    From the UK!!!

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/index.html

    Police are investigating the possibility that the pilot of missing Flight MH370 hijacked his own aircraft in a bizarre political protest. It is feared that Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah (left), an ‘obsessive’ activist, was profoundly upset when he sat down at the controls of the Boeing 777. Investigators believe that on March 7 he attended the trial of Malaysia’s opposition leader, Anwar Ibrahim (right), whom he supports. Campaigners say the politician, the key challenger to Malaysia’s ruling party, was the victim of a long-running smear campaign and had faced trumped-up charges. Shah’s house and that of his co-pilot (left) has been raided by police, who found a flight simulator Shah built.

  18. Infidel Tiger

    About time the Malaysians blamed Ibrahim. They have been tardy fingering the Jews as well.

  19. Splatacrobat

    One of Captain’s friends crashed and died from that hypoxia thing. His fighter jet flew on until it ran out of fuel.

    That happened to the golfer Payne Stewart

    Government officials said the plane may have suffered a rare pressurization failure. When that occurs at high altitudes such as above 30,000 feet, pilots have a short period of time to don an oxygen mask before slipping into unconsciousness.

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