Restoring trust Labor lost its way to sideline Palmer

In The Australian today:
“That affluence can buy influence is hardly news. What makes Clive Palmer different is that he flaunts it. Repeatedly, he tried to seize control of the Liberal Party in Queensland. When that failed, he set up his own political movement.”

About Henry Ergas

Henry Ergas is a columnist for The Australian newspaper and the inaugural Professor of Infrastructure Economics at the SMART Infrastructure Facility at the University of Wollongong. The SMART Infrastructure Facility is a $61.8 million world-class research and training centre concerned with integrated infrastructure solutions for the future. Henry is also Senior Economic Adviser to Deloitte Australia. Prior to these concurrent roles Henry worked as a consultant economist at NECG, CRA International and Concept Economics. Henry's previous career was as an economist at the OECD in Paris, where amongst other roles he headed the Secretary-General’s Task Force on Structural Adjustment and was Counsellor for Structural Policy in the Economics Department.
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18 Responses to Restoring trust Labor lost its way to sideline Palmer

  1. Tom

    Thank you, Henry, for explaining why Sir Cumference can’t block repeal of the air tax: if he did, he would be indistinguishable from the Liars-Greenfilth establishment; his protest voters would never support him again. But, because he is an unscrupulous political amateur, he may have trouble controlling the narrative when, out of naked conflict of interest, he tries to reduce his companies’ air tax bill retrospectively in return for supporting the repeal. How quickly his papier mâché business empire collapses will also be crucial.

  2. CatAttack

    Witness the “buffoon” factor at play and the tendency to dismiss such individuals. Clive is smart, very beguiling and has $$$$. A powerful and dangerous combination.

  3. Alfonso

    Clive is erratic, self serving and plain silly….but at least he’s not a Union MP or Hunt.

  4. Andrew

    Can anybody tell whether he’s a net positive for the Right? If he takes votes from both sides but then votes sensibly he would be a positive – the tax on plants and new mines (but not BHP / RIO) would be a good start. But if he’s just taking votes from the govt and then either random or corrupt (retrospective untaxation for one doesn’t work) then he’s a big problem. I can’t really tell which.

  5. feelthebern

    Clive is sloppy.
    He’ll cross a line, he’ll get picked up on it, he’ll be lucky to see out his term.
    There is no way he’ll keep his Senators together in a bloc.
    I reckon after tonight’s Q&A, the penny will drop (Tas PUP senator is on the panel).

  6. Tel

    Why shouldn’t Clive be self serving? He would hardly be the only one, and anyway it was Wayne Swan who made it personal for blasting Clive and Gina for the outrageous crime of wanting to pay tax like everyone else. After copping a public serve from Swan, there wasn’t much choice left but to go into politics.

  7. How quickly his papier mâché business empire collapses will also be crucial.

    It is just a matter of timing. If he can bridge himself until his Galilee basin mine gets up, he’s home & hosed.
    If his political enemies can bring him down in the meantime, he’s a pauper.

    Twas ever thus in the world of movers & shakers. While many are broken by ideas that didn’t work, as many people are broken by a bank getting cold feet before a project is up & fully running

  8. feelthebern

    If he can bridge himself until his Galilee basin mine gets up, he’s home & hosed.

    His part? Circa 10 years away.
    Can he last til then? Yep, but his health must be a factor, surely.

  9. Sir Fred Lenin

    I wonder if he ,like the millionaire alp strugglers,could withstand a thorough investigation,personal and financial ? Also he must be backed by banks ,are they vulnerable to pressure? If the will is there ,he is most likely a candidate for Centrelink.

  10. Combine Dave

    His part? Circa 10 years away.
    Can he last til then? Yep, but his health must be a factor, surely.

    Surely with his dollars he can afford to cater for any medical problems arising from his bulk.
    An artificial or pig heart should keep him going for a while :)
    - Or he could just copy Hockey and lose some weight.

    I hope his party are more cooperative in the Senate than their words suggest they will be. Much of their policy and stated goals are more in keeping with the Liberals than the Liars-Green Filth Coalition anyway.

  11. Toiling Mass

    We can expect the MSM to run inteference for him as long as he is a thorn in Abbott’s side.

    When the next Labor MP is installed (if Clive is still about in spite of his best efforts to be laughed out of politics) you can expect the hatchets to be brought out.

  12. tomix

    Without Palmer the carbon/mining taxes won’t be repealed. Unlike Hanson, neither he nor his senators have made any race based statements. Like Hanson, he has drawn previously ALP voters.

    Why Abbott would want to “marginalize” him is a mystery. Wouldn’t that be doing the ALP/Greens dirty work?

  13. Baldrick

    Whilst ever Palmer is willing to invest his own money into Australian politics he will be a menace but that will depend on when his ersatz empire finally crashes and burns.

  14. Toiling Mass

    Just noticed a typo in my last post.

    When the next Labor MP PM is installed…

  15. tomix

    Those hatchets would have to be epic. Todays front page of The Australian -Toxic spill risk at Palmer refinery [EXCLUSIVE] in red; Top of page 6 headline: Fears grow over Palmer toxic sludge [EXCLUSIVE]

    Top of page 10: RESTORING TRUST LABOR LOST IS WAY TO SIDELINE PALMER

    Jihad much?

  16. philip j. fry

    Self serving owner of a political party, what, like the union movement?

  17. tomix

    “it’s way” should be “is way”

  18. tgs

    It is just a matter of timing. If he can bridge himself until his Galilee basin mine gets up, he’s home & hosed.

    That’s a big if, and the economics of that mine and necessary infrastructure to bring the coal to market are very, very questionable.

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