Day 5 of a broken promise

Abbott - no taxes under a govt I lead

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268 Responses to Day 5 of a broken promise

  1. Token

    Has the Conservatives & Libertarians in the government learned their only chance to win another term is to ignore the cowardice of the Labor-Lite & agrarian socialist factions yet?

  2. Blogstrop

    Seeing so many advocating a return to Labor convinced me that I was among mentally diseased people here.

  3. Senile Old Guy

    VO is very variable, but sometimes is on the mark:

    Sometimes as a journalist you wish you could break the confidence of your sources to outline for readers just how scathing Tony Abbott and Joe Hockey’s parliamentary colleagues are about this deficit tax (a levy is just a tax by another name): “A joke”, “mind numbingly stupid”, “beyond belief”, “it makes no sense”. These are just some of the remarks Liberal MPs have made to me in the past 72 hours.

    Pragmatically, it represents a clear broken promise from the election not to introduce new taxes. It thus damages the government among swinging voters. As Abbott said: “We’re about reducing taxes, not increasing taxes. We are about getting rid of taxes, not imposing new taxes.”

    I wonder how the Prime Minister’s 16 lower house MPs on margins of 3 per cent or less feel about the new deficit tax, which kicks in at an annual salary of just $80,000 by the way. Let’s spell it out in pure electoral terms. If the government loses these seats, it comfortably loses its majority.

    If the tax comes in, the Coalition is out.

    I’ll go a bit further. If the tax comes in, in any form resembling what we have been hearing about, the Coalition will plummet in the polls, there will be a spill and Abbott and Hockey will be gone.

    [Reposted from old thread.]

  4. Senile Old Guy

    And that should be PVO.

  5. Combine_Dave

    Seeing so many advocating a return to Labor convinced me that I was among mentally diseased people

    You should take it up with Abbott, Hockey, your local etc as to why they wish to return Labor to office so soon, not to mention gifting Labor by implementing many of their favoured polices.

    I don’t want Labor back. They are absolute economic vandals. But if the LNP stays the course this is what will happen.

    BTW; The Audit report was excellent, however as the LNP are acting in a decidedly Labor manner I can only expect that none of it’s recommendations (critical for this country’s success) will be implemented.

  6. lem

    Abbott is gone. People had difficulty voting for him to start with, it was an election Liars lost, not coalition won. Shorten must not be able to believe his luck. He has just had a reprieve, that is if he stays out of prison.

  7. Rabz

    No one on this blog has been advocating a return to labor. They have been citing the consequences of Abbott and Hockey’s almost indescribable stupidity and what a tragedy it is for the country.

    There is a difference.

  8. struth

    I was always weary of Abbott. I was always advocating for Julie bishop……..I don’t want to say I told you so but……..some here really got up me and others who were worried about him right from the start. Unfortunately in this case there is no joy in being right. This will put the LDP in the fore sooner.

  9. Token

    No one on this blog has been advocating a return to labor. They have been citing the consequences of Abbott and Hockey’s almost indescribable stupidity and what a tragedy it is for the country.

    There is a difference.

    We are underlining the fact that considering the headwinds they have against them:

    * A crap government economic position
    * A bloated and highly partisan bureaucracy
    * Stifling regulation on so many levels directly impeding entrepreneurial innovation
    * The media highly invested in getting Labor / Greens re-elected
    * An Australian economy coming down from the commodities boom
    * A fragile global economy with belligerent autocrats & moronic Keynesians.

    They should not fall for the “easy option” and play the old soak the rich game. It will not fix the problem, rather it just punishes their base.

  10. This cartoon sums it up nicely. If Abbott increases taxes or brings in a new tax, he will immediately become as unpopular as Gillard. For the same reason.

    And by the way, increasing the scope of GST counts as a tax hike.

  11. egg_

    Abbott is gone. People had difficulty voting for him to start with, it was an election Liars lost, not coalition won. Shorten must not be able to believe his luck. He has just had a reprieve, that is if he stays out of prison.

    Precisely, as I said: “toast”.
    Unfvckingbelievable Olympian* class stupidity.

    KRudd was faux Howard-lite but went for popularity.
    Haven’t these cretins figured out that Howard-lite might actually work, FFS?
    The Gillard model is toxic.
    Thanks for nothing, (no-)Cred•lin.

    *c/- Faustus.

  12. Token

    And by the way, increasing the scope of GST counts as a tax hike.

    I liked Bob Day’s view on the idea of expanding the GST base.

  13. Hamish

    You lot are quite mad, who gives a rats about broken promises except political tragics and they count for Jack Shit come election time.
    Elections are decided by the dopey masses who have already bought the meme that the Libs need to make tough decisions for Oz to recover from the wasteful RGR regime, so just relax and talk among yourselves for a bit…
    Do you think the lefty whiners would be saying good things about Abbott if he wasn’t breaking promises, no, their constant drone is always there so people just tune out ,by the time the next election comes around Labor will still be campaigning on bringing back the boats and the carbon tax., good luck to them with that.

    So stop complaining about the Libs doing exactly what they need to do in their first budget to secure three terms, if you really don’t like it you can always move back to Utopia, where Pollies don’t speak misspeak truths and Cat bloggers rule the world.

  14. candy

    Another day of Abbott hate dawns at Catallaxy …

  15. egg_

    The case against Peta Credlin

    “At least three senior Coalition ministers have had key staff appointments vetoed by a committee run out of Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s office.. The committee is chaired by Social Services Minister Kevin Andrews and includes Special Minister of State Michael Ronaldson, Mr Abbott’s chief and deputy chief of staff Peta Credlin and Andrew Hirst, and Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss’s chief of staff, David Whitrow.

    Mr Hockey’s choice for a personal adviser on foreign investment decisions, former Victorian state MP Victor Perton, was overruled by Mr Abbott’s office in October…

    On your shoulders, sis.

  16. dover_beach

    The illustration for this post is too much.

  17. Combine_Dave

    former Victorian state MP Victor Perton

    Sounds like we dodged a bullet.

  18. CatAttack

    What you’re up against. Colleague at work.
    The man on TV said that they are dismantling Medicare.
    What the treasurer?
    I don’t know. I’ll find it. Yes here it is. Bill Shorten.

  19. Sir Fred Lenin

    There is Absolutely no need for this Tax increase,the solution long term lies in cutting spending,we cannot affiord all the luxury givernments have created,
    1. Abolish NDIS,gonski,NBN,
    2, cut foreign aid to the bone,resign from u.n.
    3. Abolish all green subsidies and carbon tax,
    4, abolish rants to useless things,
    5. Cut PS and poliypticians salaries and perks by minimum60 per cent.
    6. Cut out all firmer pollies pensions and perks ,if they didnt steal enough in office ,TOO BAD,
    7. Cut out all political funding.
    8. Compulsory ID when voting,all votes recorded ,7 years jail min,for cheating.
    9. Abolish senateand state upper houses, max term3 years
    10. MP s restricted to ine term every 12 yearswith no pensions or superannuation.
    That would syart to improve things rapidly,remember its OUR MONEY not Theirs!

  20. Combine_Dave

    Another day of Abbott hate dawns at Catallaxy …

    In the interests of fairness does the following;

    * Kicked Labor out of office.
    * Stopped the boats.
    * Signed some great FTAs (with another likely to follow)
    * Is making moves to end green tape/waste.
    * Union RC
    * Telling some rent seekers to take a hike (Palmer, Holden, AMWU).

    Balance out;

    * A great big new tax.
    * Implementing Labor’s wet dreams
    * No chance of IR reform.
    * Lowering the GST threshold (unconfirmed)
    * Appointing crazy destructive leftards to plum government positions.
    * Telling some rent seekers they are welcome (cabury, mercedes)
    * Not taking the axe to the leftards in Trsy.

  21. Uber

    Let’s call it by its real name: The PPL tax.

  22. Rob

    “Another day of Abbott hate dawns at Catalaxy …”

    Why don’t we just give it all up and hand government back to Labor.
    All this whinging and ugly negativity is no substitute for constructive commentary but it certainly helps Labor’s cause.
    Current opinion polling clearly indicates Labor is back in favour.

  23. Senile Old Guy

    Let’s call it by its real name: The PPL tax.

    No, the PPL Levy is a quite separate tax. Of course, taxpayers will ultimately bear the cost for that too.

  24. Combine_Dave

    Three new taxes thus far?

    PPL, Deficit and GST threshold. Missed any?

    The PPL Levy, I can stomach (it was their declared policy prior to the election in any case.)

    The new deficit tax, not so much. Especially if it’s not coupled to big cuts in the ABC, the Federal APS in general, or the privatisation of AusPost, whats been built of the NBN and the last of Telstra.

    Also have they relaxed the Qantas ownership laws yet?

  25. egg_

    All this whinging and ugly negativity is no substitute for constructive commentary but it certainly helps Labor’s cause.

    Those anti the thread topic are the ones that have no solution/make no argument, note.

  26. egg_

    former Victorian state MP Victor Perton

    Perhaps, but the point is the inteference in the Treasurer’s Office* from the office of central planning, komrade.

    *The current issue of policy contention.

  27. Uber

    Ah yes of course, the ‘big business’ levy to cover the PPL, an electoral no-brainer (everybody hates the evil Lord Business). So the government went into the election promising no new taxes as well as a new tax. Interesting strategy, no wonder Abbott has popularity issues.

  28. C.L.

    I’m sure the idiots will up the price of cigarettes to about $50 a packet in the budget as well.

    That’s a given.

  29. Token

    Another day of Abbott hate dawns at Catallaxy …

    Another person who can’t tell the difference between constructive criticism and blind partisan barracking.

  30. Let’s call it by its real name: The PPL tax.

    Direct Action Tax; or alternatively the NDIS tax.

  31. C.L.

    The general vibe I’m getting about Abbott day-to-day is that’s he’s a weakling.

    Also that he doesn’t mean what he says and doesn’t say what he means.

    I actually find it painful watching him being interviewed.

    So different to the wham bam up-yours Sam Scott Morrison.

  32. dover_beach

    Telling a friend he’s being a fuckwit and that he needs to straighten-up isn’t hateful, it is being a true friend.

  33. The general vibe I’m getting about Abbott day-to-day is that’s he’s a weakling.

    Also that he doesn’t mean what he says and doesn’t say what he means.

    I actually find it painful watching him being interviewed.

    This is word for word my experience. I wish it was otherwise.

    And as for all the Credllin-bashing from some quarters, keep in mind that Abbott appointed her and keeps her in the job.

  34. calli

    Telling a friend he’s being a fuckwit and that he needs to straighten-up isn’t hateful, it is being a true friend.

    Yep. Tony and Joe have had a skinful and we’re just pinching the car keys for a few hours so they can come to their senses. That’s what friends do.

  35. Rabz

    I’m sure the idiots will up the price of cigarettes to about $50 a packet in the budget as well.

    Or they could simply bring forward that dickhead Rudd’s massive hikes.

  36. A Lurker

    This will put the LDP in the fore sooner.

    For a few days now I’ve been reading, but not commenting – trying to absorb the information, and to be honest I’ve been put off by all the hysterics that I’ve been observing.

    The LDP might be an alternative one day, but it would take them years, maybe even a decade or three to become a major party. Unless a Palmer-like billionaire becomes their new best friend giving them lots of money to fund candidates and election expenses, then they will remain a minor player with minor influence, and all the Cat votes won’t change that outcome in the short term. So spoiling ballots, voting for Indies, staying home on election day, and having a general dummy spit is not going to get the LDP into power any sooner – and will likely put Labor in power instead – and that will really stuff up the country for a very long time.

    Look, I don’t like this levy either – it doesn’t impact me directly, but I don’t like the broken promise aspect of it, and Abbott was foolish to bind himself with promises not to cut stuff that really ought to be cut. In my opinion the best thing Abbott can do (without the media yelling Liar! Liar! at him), is to say “Look, we’d love to bring in the PPL, Direct Action, and the NDIS and it was our honest plan to do so, but given the mess that Labor has left us, we simply cannot afford them for a couple of years and so we will put them on the backburner until we can afford them. Until then, and to help get debt under control, we’ll all have to tighten our belts a bit, a lot of Government spending will stop or be reigned in, and to show that we’re serious about all this – all current Parliamentarians and staffers will be taking an immediate 10% wage cut, as well as a five-year wage freeze, and we’ll be reducing benefits to all current and past Parliamentarians as well – and because we want the economy to grow we’ll be reducing taxes right across the board as well.”

    That’s my opinion – and yes, I’ve sent three separate emails to the Government about my displeasure as well.

  37. sabrina

    This is not Abbott hating, it is about forcing him to think rationally, do the right for the country longer term and not spin around with tax/levy semantics. There is no chance of Labor returning in the forseeable future from where these vandals are.

    I think he/Hockey is testing the public mood with all these selective releases prior to the budget, and this is our opportunity to force him rethink.

    Also, I do not know if what is written about Peta C’s influence is correct. But even if part of it is right, this is not good.

  38. GK

    Abbott is showing, like O’Farrell after he was elected, that they are more left leaning than what they projected before the election. Are there any real Liberals in the the LNP or is politics simply attracting socialist to all parties. They all like to spend other peoples money and then tax the rich. I cannot beleive that I am even contemplating the PUP for the next election.

  39. Andrew

    He has just had a reprieve, that is if he stays out of prison.

    The what now? Oh, you mean about the stuff in the RC into unions…

  40. CatAttack

    The trouble with “testing” the public mood is that shit sticks. Even if they were to abandon the idea of a tax tomorrow it’s out there and Shorten will claim victory for it not proceeding.

  41. Up The Workers!

    How about I.C.A.C. investigating a Court trial where an acknowledged thief, embezzler and criminal was allowed to KEEP the $20 million he thieved from the pockets of the lowest-paid workers in Australia, apparently just because he was the former Federal President of the A.L.P.?

    Any mug who knocks off a lousy $20 from a corner milk bar, would not be allowed to keep his ill-gotten gains; but if you happen to be the Federal President of the crooked A.L.P., you are allowed to keep every last cent.

    How does that work out?

  42. Andrew

    Another day of Abbott hate dawns at Catallaxy …

    Why wouldn’t I hate him? If an employer assured me categorically that on achievement of a specific objective I would be paid $2X and then paid $0, I would feel betrayed and like $X had been stolen from me (after tax). And I’ve been in that position, and I hated him and continue to hate him. In fact, I subsequently destroyed his life.

    Why should Abbott666 NOT receive the brunt of my hatred? I voted for him on the basis of no taxes – then he stole $X from me (after tax). Personally, his Regime has been more destructive to my wealth than R-G-R’s tax increases such as the WBCT and the abolition of healthcare rebate.

    That doesn’t mean I plan to advocate for a Plibersek-Milne govt in 2016, but I know how the people who will do so feel. I’m extremely angry.

  43. eam

    I volunteer in an Op Shop. All the talk yesterday was about how terrible it was that you wouldn’t be to collect the Age Pension till you were 70. They had no idea that retirement age would be lifted gradually until 2035 and by that time, most people should have enough in their Super account to support themselves. They didn’t realise that the Old Age Pension age for women will finally be 65 after 1st July this year, and then from 1st July 2017, every 18 months, the pension age rises by 6 months till it reaches 67 for men and women in 2023. Wouldn’t dare mention that was Labor’s ‘baby’.

    The actual years 2035, 2017 and 2023 I ascertained from research this morning, but I knew the rise in age was gradual.

    Sorry about no Linky. I’m on the Android. I can’t master Win 8. I want my stolen laptop back.
    There was no mention of the of the Deficit Tax Levy because that’s for rich people.

  44. Rabz

    Shorten will claim victory for it not proceeding.

    Then he’d be lying, the useless sack of shit, as bloody usual.

    If this utter madness is stopped it will have been due to the reaction of the Liberal base – the exact same reason for Lord Turnbull being dumped.

    And neither Abbott nor Hockey are safe if the “levy” is stopped. Hockey in particular, should be dumped as soon as is practical.

  45. Hendrix

    Rob
    #1289831, posted on May 3, 2014 at 8:54 am
    “Another day of Abbott hate dawns at Catalaxy …”

    Why don’t we just give it all up and hand government back to Labor.
    All this whinging and ugly negativity is no substitute for constructive commentary but it certainly helps Labor’s cause.
    Current opinion polling clearly indicates Labor is back in favour.

    Well, it takes a special kind of incompetence to make Labor electable seven months after they were kicked out on their arse

  46. whyisitso

    What a disgusting lot you all are. With “friends” like you, who needs enemies? We’re on the brink of introducing a one-party totalitarian regime in this country. All the ALP/Green/Communist mob need to do is block supply and we’ve got another 1975 in reverse. Cosgrove will never be hated like Kerr of course – he’ll be deemed a hero.

  47. Hendrix

    *no, I do not intend to vote labor.

  48. H B Bear

    Abbott is showing, like O’Farrell after he was elected, that they are more left leaning than what they projected before the election.

    Abbott is showing his roots – as a big government conservative, who learned at the foot of the master J W Howard. At best, there is only ever a small group of economic dries inside the Liberals and rarely do they ever get their hands on the fiscal levers or have a major influence on policy.

    Minchin was probably the last one that wielded any real influence. Costello says he was rolled on spending decisions by Howard – which seems plausible but may just be him talking his own book. Howard and Costello were flooded with tax revenue that allowed them some easy decisions on -reduced tax rates. Howard was also the father to some of the worst excesses of non means-tested middle class welfare based on his 1950s view of the social world.

    Hockey seems to be making all the right noises. However, I expect he will disappoint on Budget night. Deep down you just know Abbott doesn’t have economic convictions.

  49. tomix

    Are you suggesting the Abbott Gummint is an ALP “suicide Squad”? Sounds more plausible every day.

  50. I volunteer in an Op Shop. All the talk yesterday was about how terrible it was that you wouldn’t be to collect the Age Pension till you were 70.

    The suggested pension changes are completely muddying the message about this budget and this financial year.
    Yes, I know it’s about forward estimates, but the long term projection does not have to be fixed in one budget, nine months after coming to office. Swan specialised in rosy forward projections. He basked in the applause of predicting surpluses. Why model themselves after Swan?
    Fix this budget and worry about the long range stuff next year.

  51. The political class never understood how toxic Gillard’s political methods were outside of Canberra. They only figured it out belatedly when she went out to meet the public and was met with barrages of hate. But they never really understood why she was hated so much, and never internalised the lessons.

  52. It’s almost like someone in treasury convinced them to change the pension age immediately because ‘it has to be done right now.’ (while laughing up their sleeve).

  53. egg_

    We’re on the brink of introducing a one-party totalitarian regime in this country.

    On the brink?
    It’s here.
    (Missed the caricature at the top?)

  54. .

    All Abbott needs to do is scrap or trim some ALP promises and give minor tax cuts to the rich, middle class and poor and he’ll be very well viewed by most.

    How much savings are there in the COA report? $60 bn per year for ten years?

    He could easily pay off Commonwealth debt and cut taxes within one-two terms with tax hikes and balance contingent liabilities in the future.

    It is amazing he can’t see this for a fuck up. Or he is going to throw the mother of all sucker punches, but I’m sure that is wishful thinking on my part.

  55. MemoryVault

    shit sticks. Even if they were to abandon the idea of a tax tomorrow it’s out there and Shorten will claim victory for it not proceeding.

    That’s the whole point the Abbott Admiration Society seems to miss, CatAttack. No matter what happens now, the damage is already done. If the levy is introduced, then Abbott has cast himself into the very same “liar” role as Gillard, complete with the “it’s a levy, not a tax” pathetic spin.

    If it is not introduced in the life of this government then the threat of it will become a central plank in Labor’s next election campaign: “A vote for Abbott is a vote for a debt tax”, and we can expect to see a lot more of the cartoon at the top of the page, and many more like it.

    Either way, it was a disastrous blunder that is going to cost dearly.
    Workchoices Mark II.

  56. Gab

    Another day of Abbott hate dawns at Catallaxy …

    No, Candy, just another day of disappointment and alarm that Abbott is turning out to be the fiscal socialist numpty we were all warned about. And criticizing his budget measures, which have been pointedly leaked, does not mean he is hated personally. That’s as silly as saying becuase you don’t agree with same-sex “marriage” then you must be a gay-hater.

  57. egg_

    Workchoices Mark II.

    The No Cred(lin) Tax.

  58. calli

    With “friends” like you, who needs enemies?

    Works both ways. Even with the whisper of the new tax, the phones have stopped ringing. My business relies on discretionary spending from the very people who are about to be taxed.

    I don’t intend to roll over and be considered ‘collateral damage’ by the very people I supported.

  59. calli

    Whoops…repetition there. Shows I’m a tad cross.

  60. Dan

    We’re on the brink of introducing a one-party totalitarian regime in this country.

    We already have it!!! A political class completely comfortable with ME paying 50% of my income (at the margins but approaching that overall) to fund COMPLETE AND UTTER BULLSHIT. How much more strongly can I put it. They are my enemies. They are taking income from my family for I repeat COMPLETE AND UTTER BULLSHIT purposes. Whyisitso, why should I be comfortable with that? How is the LibLab coalition in any way whatsoever representing my interests or the country’s? It is an incontrovertible and demonstrable fact that this country is utterly doomed financially with no way out.

  61. Whyisitso makes a good point. I’m pretty sure that if the Labor coalition could block supply, force us to a DD, they’d win.
    Now, I’m not sure of the mechanics of it all, but it looks like TA has had a shot at a bunny, the cartridge has misfired and he’s looking down the barrel to see where it’s gone.

  62. Gab

    Oh how we vented when the gillard government started calling people “rich” and “wealthy” on a salary of $90,000. Class warfare! Now Abbott and Hockey are saying the same about people earning $80,000. It’s class warfare all over but hey, let’s not criticise them for that becuase they’re Liberals? Please. That’s hypocritical.

  63. Dan

    My clients already pay 5% of their AFTER tax income in health insurance, which still doesnt cover the fees I need to raise, and they can’t afford any more tax. Can we all go on the fucking NDIS? Because that is the future. I’m not one of these people claiming they will leave the country but thank goodness I have that option if need be.

  64. Oh how we vented when the gillard government started calling people “rich” and “wealthy” on a salary of $90,000. Class warfare! Now Abbott and Hockey are saying the same about people earning $80,000. It’s class warfare all over but hey, let’s not criticise them for that becuase they’re Liberals?

    bingo.
    And don’t forget that the rich have to start ‘paying their share.’

  65. egg_

    Now, I’m not sure of the mechanics of it all, but it looks like TA has had a shot at a bunny, the cartridge has misfired and he’s looking down the barrel to see where it’s gone.

    The hole in his shoe might be a clue?

  66. CatAttack

    Interesting now that Abbott is scaling back the PPL the ABC suddenly discover there aren’t that many woman in that boat anyway.

    Of course Shorten’s paying millionaires just feeds into this whole business and then labelling people earning more than $80000 as rich and in cahoots with billionaire miners becomes the new normal. I don’t give a shit how much people earn as long as they do it honestly and pay tax.

  67. candy

    Greens and Palmer would block supply and I think Bill Shorten would half be inclined, if he thinks the anti Abbott sentiment is great enough. They’d would get back in, at this stage of the game.

  68. MemoryVault

    It is an incontrovertible and demonstrable fact that this country is utterly doomed financially with no way out.

    It doesn’t have to be that way, Dan. There’s plenty of low-hanging fruit to put in the savings basket, without any new taxes, broken promises, or throwing pensioners and cripples out into the street. I gave just one example a couple of days ago.

    In 1998 Howard “privatised” the Commonwealth Employment Service, and gave birth to the “Employment Service Provider” industry. Less than 200 CES offices with about 3,000 public servants nationwide has now blossomed into 7,000 plus EPS offices employing 30,000 plus totally untrained and unqualified “Employment Advisors” who do little else than duplicate what is already available at the internet kiosk in every Centrelink office in Australia.

    Scrap the lot. No legislation required. Nobody inconvenienced except the 30,000 “Employment Advisors” who would have to find real jobs, plus Therese Rein and Sarina Russo, who have both made millions out of it.

    Savings = $3 BILLION plus.

  69. whyisitso

    Whyisitso, why should I be comfortable with that?

    Be as uncomfortable with it as you like, Dan. Just look around the world and see what a real totalitarian dictatorship looks like. Of course you won’t be uncomfortable there – you’ll be shot as an anemy of the State.

  70. Gab

    Greens and Palmer would block supply and I think Bill Shorten would half be inclined, if he thinks the anti Abbott sentiment is great enough.

    Greens already oppose anything Abbott wants passed in parliament, as does Labor. Carbon tax repeal, table for two? And Palmer has objected to anything Abbott does from the outset.

  71. Baldrick

    I don’t believe in ousting a sitting Prime Minister but Scott Morrison should be positioning himself for a challenge at the next federal election, either that or TA needs to get new advisors that don’t copy the Gillard/Rudd model of broken promises and semantic politicking.

  72. Eddystone

    I’m sure TA can remember how he came to be leader of the opposition.

    A vast, spontaneous grass roots campaign that shook the Libs to their core.

    No doubt he is getting the same feeling right now. Let’s hope he is still listening!

  73. Token

    I don’t intend to roll over and be considered ‘collateral damage’ by the very people I supported.

    Shuddup & be a sheeple who salutes the flag or else the true believers will shoot you for being a traitor.

  74. Token

    Greens and Palmer would block supply and I think Bill Shorten would half be inclined, if he thinks the anti Abbott sentiment is great enough.

    It is not in Palmers interest to have Labor back in charge. He will loot the taxpayer in every possible way to benefit his private business (including ways to enforce that contract upon the Chinese state owned entity), then allow Abbott to get his budget through.

    Stop panicking and look at this logically.

  75. Eddystone

    candy
    #1289801, posted on May 3, 2014 at 8:16 am
    Another day of Abbott hate dawns at Catallaxy …

    I don’t hate him candy, but I’d sure like to grab those massive ears and knock his head against the wall a few times.* Might allow some sense to seep back in! 🙂

    *I’d put the usual disclaimer here, except that TA is a conservative, so no harm, no foul, right?

  76. cohenite

    The alp/green filth corrupted the universities, schools, bureaucracies, military, police force, science, media; every fucking thing they touched. And they have opened the floodgates to the religion of pieces.

    Abbott is politically inept but nowhere near the standard of criminal incompetence of the filth and he has higher expectations from people like the commentators here. Sir Fred Lenin has a good wish list above which is worth repeating:

    1. Abolish NDIS,gonski,NBN,
    2, cut foreign aid to the bone,resign from u.n.
    3. Abolish all green subsidies and carbon tax,
    4, abolish rants to useless things,
    5. Cut PS and poliypticians salaries and perks by minimum60 per cent.
    6. Cut out all firmer pollies pensions and perks ,if they didnt steal enough in office ,TOO BAD,
    7. Cut out all political funding.
    8. Compulsory ID when voting,all votes recorded ,7 years jail min,for cheating.
    9. Abolish senateand state upper houses, max term3 years
    10. MP s restricted to ine term every 12 yearswith no pensions or superannuation.

    Now I wonder how many of those Abbott would disagree with privately but the thing is he can’t implement any of them from the opposition and who in the other side of politics right now is going to do a better job?

  77. tomix

    An anenome of the state eh?

  78. egg_

    It is not in Palmers interest to have Labor back in charge. He will loot the taxpayer in every possible way to benefit his private business (including ways to enforce that contract upon the Chinese state owned entity), then allow Abbott to get his budget through.

    Ta for the info, Token.
    I knew self-interest would be at his core, just wasn’t sure how (but knew that he had to be wedging for something).

  79. Be as uncomfortable with it as you like, Dan. Just look around the world and see what a real totalitarian dictatorship looks like. Of course you won’t be uncomfortable there – you’ll be shot as an anemy of the State.

    By your measure anything better than North Korea or Iran is not worth complaining about. In which case, what was the problem with Gillard?

  80. I’m sure TA can remember how he came to be leader of the opposition.
    A vast, spontaneous grass roots campaign that shook the Libs to their core.

    That was a long, long time ago, and Abbott was a very different man.

  81. tomix

    His confusion dates back at least to the campaign. He thought he should give the state apparatus a suppository when it needed an enema.

  82. MemoryVault

    I knew self-interest would be at his core, just wasn’t sure how

    Palmer doesn’t have self-interest “at his core”, it starts skin deep and goes all the way to the bone.

    One of the more obscure things buried in PUP policies is support for massive subsidies for a greatly expanded ethanol industry in QLD, based on subsidised sugar cane. Strange, given that even the greenfilth have gone mute on using productive farm land for growing fuel.

    Until you discover that Palmer has major investments in sugar cane farming . . .

  83. Dan

    Memoryvault you are absolutely right but there is no political will to do it and it won’t happen. That’s the precise problem.
    Whyisitso, there are plenty of countries with efficient governments and low tax rates. It wasn’t North Korea I was thinking of. What is the actual limit income tax will get to in this country? Potentially heading to 49.5%. Remember The UK was up to 93% for some income within my lifetime. That IS a form of totalitarianism. A government doesn’t need tanks in the street to be overwhelmingly pervasive and powerful.

  84. Rabz

    He thought he should give the state apparatus a suppository when it needed an enema.

    An enema of the state, eh?

  85. egg_

    At least, if the Chaser ‘Boys’ had a sketch of Staples ‘screwing the pooch’, it probably wouldn’t qualify as satire.

  86. MemoryVault

    An enema of the state, eh?

    Does that make him a male douchebag?

  87. MemoryVault

    it probably wouldn’t qualify as satire.

    More like Mission Impossible.

  88. tomix

    It’d hafta be a big dawg.

  89. Andrew

    Is it possible that Abbott666 knows that nothing will pass the Sen8 and is setting up the ALP? Float the idea of a wealth tax. The SLF says he will vote it down. Even grub Milne says they oppose it. Then he figures for the rest of his term every time they demand tax increases on the “rich” or accuse him of favouring them he pulls out the videos of them opposing envy taxes?

  90. handjive

    I made this comment at Tim Blair’s blog.

    Tony Abbott:

    “If you want to put a price on carbon why not just do it with a simple tax.
    Why not ask motorists to pay more?
    Why not ask electricity consumers to pay more?”

    * * *
    “As for any politicians who have ever believed in global warming, or supported the carbon tax, or a carbon-constrained economy, there is no hope for them.

    They are either too stupid or incompetent to be taken seriously.”
    . . .
    And so it came to pass …

  91. tomix

    Keep drinking the koolaid Andrew.

  92. stackja

    Ho-hum! More anti-TA. ALP is loving this I am sure.

  93. Senile Old Guy

    Okay, from Terry McCrann, via Bolt:

    The Coalition’s formal election policy document “Real Solutions” said: “We pledge to the families of Australia that we will never make your lives harder by imposing unnecessary new taxes.”

    Apart from that not insignificant qualifying word “unnecessary”, this is not a new tax, it’s an increase in the existing personal tax.

    Most of the attacks on the deficit levy/tax have pompously asserted that it’s a tax, not a levy. OK, it’s a tax; it’s an increase in an existing tax, and so does not contradict the policy commitment.

    Within this there was a subsidiary theme, the promise not to increase one tax to pay for a cut in another tax. That was a specific promise not to pull a thimble-and pea trick, self-evidently not relevant to a temporary revenue-raising — not revenue-shifting — tax increase.

    Too tricky by a long way.

  94. MemoryVault

    Ho-hum! More anti-TA. ALP is loving this I am sure.

    I prefer to think of it as constructive criticism.
    It has the potential to be far more productive than just being a member of the LNP Love-In Society.
    We’ve got Andrew Bolt for that.

  95. MemoryVault

    Too tricky by a long way.

    “It’s not a carbon tax, it’s a carbon price.”
    “It’s not a tax, it’s a levy.”

    Spot the difference?

  96. Infidel Tiger

    Not only is Abbott a foul liar, he is also history’s worst salesman.

    He couldn’t sell the benefits of a head job to a horny teenager.

  97. DrBeauGan

    I feel sorry for Peta Credlin. Having to run the country through two gormless dullards like Abbott and Hockey. It must be very wearing.

  98. Infidel Tiger

    I’m sure TA can remember how he came to be leader of the opposition.
    A vast, spontaneous grass roots campaign that shook the Libs to their core.

    That was a long, long time ago, and Abbott was a very different man.

    He wasn’t under the control of the succubus back then.

  99. cohenite

    He couldn’t sell the benefits of a head job to a horny teenager.

    Before or after?

  100. Helen

    This all started to go bad when Greg Hnt trottd out his Direct Action Pln, the green love was palpable, it seems the infection has spread far in the Governmnet since LNP, L and N ame to power.

    Mandarins influnce or ‘the soft argument of reasoned diplomacy?

    The filth are deeply entrenched in the adisory ranks, it seems the government has been ‘got’.

  101. Helen

    This all started to go bad when Greg Hnt trottd out his Direct Action Pln, the green love was palpable, it seems the infection has spread far in the Governmnet since LNP, L and N ame to power.

    Mandarins influnce or ‘the soft argument of reasoned diplomacy?

    The filth are deeply entrenched in the adisory ranks, it seems the government has been ‘got’.

  102. Aristogeiton

    It’s just possible that the Prime Minister knows more about politics than you clowns saying ‘this is then end of the man’. Just sayin’. You try selling cuts in government expenditure to an electorate that believes in magic puddings; that all we need to do is soak the ‘rich’ to balance the budget (you know: the only quintile that pays net tax).

    Doesn’t disappoint me any less though.

  103. cohenite

    Correct Helen; Abbott has been swamped by filth. I think he is a decent human being that only Robert McClelland from the filth side can claim to be.

  104. Aristogeiton

    cohenite
    #1290089, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:01 pm
    Correct Helen; Abbott has been swamped by filth. I think he is a decent human being that only Robert McClelland from the filth side can claim to be.

    Praise for McLelland? Perhaps you’re confused because Nicola Roxon was such a godawful Attorney-General.

  105. It’s just possible that the Prime Minister knows more about politics than you clowns saying ‘this is then end of the man’.

    No, we are right and he’s wrong.
    If he raises taxes he’s done. Plain and simple.

    You try selling cuts in government expenditure to an electorate that believes in magic puddings

    Interesting idea. Has anybody tried it?
    This fear of cutting programs is driven by superstitious thinking that cuts are always and everywhere the worst political option.

  106. Aristogeiton

    Aussiepundit
    #1290092, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:06 pm
    It’s just possible that the Prime Minister knows more about politics than you clowns saying ‘this is then end of the man’.

    No, we are right and he’s wrong.
    If he raises taxes he’s done. Plain and simple.

    You try selling cuts in government expenditure to an electorate that believes in magic puddings

    Interesting idea. Has anybody tried it?
    This fear of cutting programs is driven by superstitious thinking that cuts are always and everywhere the worst political option.

    Don’t disagree with you. I don’t think this is the end of Tony Abbott, though.

  107. Aristogeiton

    You’re telling me that Labor come in from the wilderness on a low tax platform? Or on a moral platform around a ‘broken promise’? Seriously?

  108. Nanuestalker

    May I remind everyone of what we have always known on this site: the Liberal party is just Labor-lite.

  109. jumpnmcar

    Not only is Abbott a foul liar, he is also history’s worst salesman.

    Well, he hasn’t lied yet but we will see.
    Shit salesman he is.
    He could have at least named this shit idea a little more creatively.
    An acronym for the less politically aware like “Australian Labor Phuck-ups ” levy (ALP levy )
    Or ” Gain Realistic Economic Expenditure Normality ” tax ( GREEN fee )

    FFS even Swan sold a ” Fair Go Budget ” to millions of people and he’s retarded.

  110. You’re telling me that Labor come in from the wilderness on a low tax platform? Or on a moral platform around a ‘broken promise’? Seriously?

    oppositions don’t win elections, governments lose them, as the old political saw goes.
    What Labor does is secondary. I’m saying that the rapid change in sentiment to Gillard wasn’t magic. It wasn’t because of her hairstyle or the fact that she was a woman or any of that shit. It was because she promised not to introduce a new tax, got elected, and immediately introduced a new tax. That is the reason – the beginning and the end – of Gillard’s unpopularity.

    If Abbott does the same thing, the same thing will happen. Call it science, call it lessons of history, whatever you like. He’s not immune to the laws of politics.

  111. cohenite

    Aristogeiton; McClelland made the initiating speech about Gillard’s alleged shenanigans with the married man Wilson while she was then a senior, albeit naïve partner at S&G.

    Maybe I’m glossing typical filth payback but without McClelland putting his hand up the witness list against Gillard would have remained with the dross of Blewitt.

  112. whyisitso

    Australians as a whole are more likely to favour dependence on governments than those in the United States (although US citizens have changed significantly towards the left in their culture in the last 30 years). No purist libertarian/small government political party is electable here. If politicians lean towards that position and want to be elected, they have to be pragmatic. It’s very easy to overstep the mark, as John Howard did in his last term with Work Choices.

    The Labor Party was very purist in Menzies’ day, and so were out of office between 1949 to 1972. The ALP had a disastrous split in the mid-Fifties and nearly became extinct. If you want to move towards a more libertarian State you have to be very patient and practicable about it. It’s very easy to overstep the mark by taking too much notice of the ratbag element so prominent in this blog.

  113. Aristogeiton

    Nanuestalker
    #1290106, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:12 pm
    May I remind everyone of what we have always known on this site: the Liberal party is just Labor-lite.

    This is wrong. There are genuine ideological differences between Labor and Liberal members. To whit:

    “Let those that hold leadership positions in the movement embrace the principle that lies at its heart – that justice for all is more important that the power of the individual”
    (Anthony Albanese, 1 May 2014)

    The thing that never changes is the politics.

  114. Aristogeiton

    Aussiepundit
    #1290109, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:15 pm
    […]
    It was because she promised not to introduce a new tax, got elected, and immediately introduced a new tax. That is the reason – the beginning and the end – of Gillard’s unpopularity.

    I think you’ve missed a bunch of bungled policy and a marked deterioration of the country’s economic position. Opposition to the tax was for this reason, and because it was seen as a useless impost (since the putative revenue was returned to taxpayers, and it had no actual effect on emissions). I don’t think it is as simple as you make out.

    I am not defending this proposed tax hike, I should make clear.

  115. Aristogeiton

    cohenite
    #1290110, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:15 pm
    Aristogeiton; McClelland made the initiating speech about Gillard’s alleged shenanigans with the married man Wilson while she was then a senior, albeit naïve partner at S&G.

    Maybe I’m glossing typical filth payback but without McClelland putting his hand up the witness list against Gillard would have remained with the dross of Blewitt.

    Forgotten that. He was a shit Attorney-General, but he knew him some payback.

  116. This is wrong. There are genuine ideological differences between Labor and Liberal members. To whit:

    “Let those that hold leadership positions in the movement embrace the principle that lies at its heart – that justice for all is more important that the power of the individual”
    (Anthony Albanese, 1 May 2014)

    compare:

    “On the revenue side, we are going to have to have a new agenda in taxation. And the best way to lay out that agenda is to ensure that those that have a capacity to, pay their fair share.”
    – Joe Hockey, 2 May 2014

  117. Gab

    Claim:

    May I remind everyone of what we have always known on this site: the Liberal party is just Labor-lite.

    If I recall correctly, the Libs voted with Labor around 77% of the time when bills were being voted on in Parliament. Add to that all the Labor schemes adopted by Abbott (NBN, Gonski, PPL, NDIS etc) and it’s easy to see a pattern.

    Status: True.

  118. I think you’ve missed a bunch of bungled policy and a marked deterioration of the country’s economic position.

    Yeah, that’s what the wonks, the political class and pundits all explained it as being. Which is why nobody picked up on the depth of hatred out in punterland. On the economic stuff you can argue the toss between terms of trade, the GFC, the debt, the unemployment rate and so on.

    The science on this is simple. Look at the polls. She reneged on the carbon tax promise, and instantly lost about 5-6 percent of the vote, pretty much permanently. Labor’s fortunes fluctuated up and down, but bounced around that new base. Then she got rolled and despite Rudd’s erratic style the numbers floated back up.

    This is backed up by the qualitative research. She was seen as a liar. That was her biggest problem.

  119. MemoryVault

    I think you’ve missed a bunch of bungled policy and a marked deterioration of the country’s economic position.

    Yeah, that’s what the wonks, the political class and pundits all explained it as being.

    Spot on, Aussiepundit. I’m beginning to believe a lot of contributors here have never had a beer in a worker’s pub on a Friday night. Gillard was toxic from the moment she uttered the fateful line.

    About the only thing that had much of an impact on her “popularity” after that, was her misogyny speech, which also cost her a lot of support out here in the real world, regardless of what the political pundits reckoned at the time.

    I’m getting a little tired of people who seem to believe that three quarters of the electorate are brain dead. The truth is, Aussies have come to expect very little from their politicians. But what little they expect, they expect to be delivered.

  120. stackja

    MemoryVault
    #1290129, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:47 pm
    But what little they expect, they expect to be delivered.

    So every time the memory of past ALP disasters lapses, what is delivered is a deficit.

  121. Token

    Don’t disagree with you. I don’t think this is the end of Tony Abbott, though.

    Abbott has shown he can change and learn from experience. Clear and consistent feedback does make a difference. Abbott is leader as he listened to the base about Turnbull & the ETS when much of the party chose to ignore the clear message…

    Piers Akerman really expressed it well yesterday:

    The mooted new tax is, at this point, Abbott’s baby, but there is no logical reason why it should make it into the Budget papers and plenty of reasons why it should be permitted to disappear between now and May 13.

    From the constant repetition of the “spreading the pain” mantra, it is clear that Abbott thinks (erroneously) that hitting up those Australians who already pay the overwhelming bulk of income tax will in some way make those who pay little or no income tax feel more kindly toward his government.

    That is the sort of soak-the-rich attitude that unthinking generations of Labor trade unionists and politicians used to kill industry and stifle growth.

    The Labor and Green voters, for whom this sort of pandering rhetoric is ambrosial, are never going to change their votes…

    … Abbott has already shown some flexibility with a backdown of sorts on his proposed Paid Parental Leave program, reducing the recommended payments to a maximum $50,000.

    What he should do is speak to some of the young mothers around the nation and he will find they are not as interested in his PPL as getting some action on childcare — that’s what they are most concerned about.

  122. Senile Old Guy

    I’m beginning to believe a lot of contributors here have never had a beer in a worker’s pub on a Friday night. Gillard was toxic from the moment she uttered the fateful line.

    I’m getting a little tired of people who seem to believe that three quarters of the electorate are brain dead. The truth is, Aussies have come to expect very little from their politicians. But what little they expect, they expect to be delivered.

    MV is right. Up thread I posted Terry McCrann’s sophisticated argument that Abbott is not breaking a promise. It’s BS. It is the same kind of ducking and weaving that Gillard tried to use.

  123. stackja

    So TA is the problem? The ALP is forgotten? Oh, dear. More ALP spin!

  124. MemoryVault

    What he should do is speak to some of the young mothers around the nation and he will find they are not as interested in his PPL as getting some action on childcare — that’s what they are most concerned about.

    This is typical of the utter crap, totally divorced from reality, referred to above by Aussiepundit, as coming from the wonks, the poltical class and the pundits.

    What the vast majority of those mothers really want is for the grubbermint to get its fist out of their husband’s wallets enough so that they don’t have to go out to work to help pay off the mortgage.

    To those mothers, childcare is not a “desirable”, it’s a necessary evil.

  125. The ALP is forgotten?

    This isn’t about the ALP.

  126. stackja

    Aussiepundit
    #1290150, posted on May 3, 2014 at 2:16 pm
    The ALP is forgotten?
    This isn’t about the ALP.

    It is ALP’s deficit! TA did not create it.

  127. candy

    She was seen as a liar. That was her biggest problem.

    Aussiepundit,
    I think there was a little more than that. She knifed Kevin Rudd, which put her offside with many people instantly. I seem to remember she said there was a regional solution in place for asylum seekers, when there wasn’t, and that the MRRT was excellent. She had been hedging about things all the time, in retrospect.

  128. MemoryVault

    So every time the memory of past ALP disasters lapses, what is delivered is a deficit.

    and

    So TA is the problem? The ALP is forgotten? Oh, dear. More ALP spin!

    and

    It is ALP’s deficit! TA did not create it.

    You know, Stackja, you’re getting a little bit tiresome.

    Unwavering support for TA to make exactly the same blunders as the ALP (NBN, NDIS, Gonski etc), plus some of his own (PPL, retiring age 70, no dole for young people), while at the same time telling the same lies as the ALP (“there will be no . . . . under my government), plus applying the same spin (“it’s not a . . ., it’s a . . . .”), is not going to accomplish anything.

    At the moment Abbott and the LNP are offering us a choice between Tweedledum and Tweedledee, and to the average punter there isn’t any difference.

  129. calli

    We need to change that cartoon over…it’s starting to mess with my mind.

    Curious that they had to caricature TA to make him look horrid…but if you scroll down, there’s the real deal.

  130. stackja

    MemoryVault
    #1290157, posted on May 3, 2014 at 2:28 pm

    I find this anti-TA tiresome. You are all helping the ALP cover up for the mess they created. If you want ALP so be it. Don’t complain like you did about RGR then. The next ALP PM you help get elected will destroy your livelihoods and shut down the Cat using some weird law.

  131. egg_

    You try selling cuts in government expenditure to an electorate that believes in magic puddings;

    Assumption.
    Just act and see the consequences if you have any ‘political courage’ at all.
    Or would you like it workshopped with focus groups for a year, diddums?

  132. Gab

    You are all helping the ALP cover up for the mess they created.

    That’s a tad hysterical. Maybe you can plain how any criticism of Abbott’s policies is helping the ALP?

  133. Infidel Tiger

    Don’t disagree with you. I don’t think this is the end of Tony Abbott, though.

    Of course it’s not the end of Abbott. He’ll leave office in by month or two on arms I’ve pension and benefits scheme only to resurface a short while later as the head of some far left grant seeking quango to continue bleeding us dry.

    Socialist scum are incorrigible.

  134. Infidel Tiger

    …in a month or two on a pension and benefits scheme we could only dream of…

  135. Infidel Tiger

    I find this anti-TA tiresome.

    That’s nice dear. Why don’t you sod off to some Liberal Party fanboi site.

  136. MemoryVault

    I find this anti-TA tiresome.

    It’s not anti-TA, it’s anti stupidity.

    You are all helping the ALP cover up for the mess they created.

    No, we’re trying to get the new government to realistically DO something about the mess the ALP created, instead of fiddling while Rome burns.

    If you want ALP so be it.

    At the moment, there doesn’t appear to be any difference.

    The next ALP PM you help get elected will destroy your livelihoods

    They couldn’t do a more thorough job on me than the last LNP PM did with Workchoices.

  137. stackja

    Gab
    #1290170, posted on May 3, 2014 at 2:47 pm
    You are all helping the ALP cover up for the mess they created.
    That’s a tad hysterical. Maybe you can plain how any criticism of Abbott’s policies is helping the ALP?

    Any criticism of Abbott’s policies creates the impression that even supposed non-ALP want to keep the present mess that ALP created. During the last election campaign Samuel J’s criticism of TA was being quoted on the radio. Do not give the ALP any help. The MSM are bad enough. MSM will always create a crisis about the non-ALP but then cover up any ALP. I do not hear much about RGR on MSM only criticism of TA for trying to repair the damage the ALP created.

  138. stackja

    Now the Greens are getting a free run over TA not going to Indo.
    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/labor-greens-demand-to-know-why-abbott-postponed-bali-trip/story-e6frg6n6-1226904120236
    The Greens want this deficit mess to get worse.

  139. stackja

    MemoryVault
    #1290178, posted on May 3, 2014 at 2:55 pm Workchoices.

    Workchoices replaced by FWA. This helped?

  140. Token

    Up thread I posted Terry McCrann’s sophisticated argument that Abbott is not breaking a promise. It’s BS. It is the same kind of ducking and weaving that Gillard tried to use.

    To this day the Liars Party and its clients in the media make fun of Howard about his “core” and “non-core” statement.

    Abbott will be permanently tarred by similar bit of trickery in a way that the Liars Party never has been, and never will be.

  141. Gab

    Any criticism of Abbott’s policies

    Oh dear. So we are not to criticise Abbott’s policies becuase that makes Labor look good?

    Do not give the ALP any help

    Yeah, too late, Abbott’s already doing that himself by following the Labor playbook.

    Thanks for your thoughts on the matter.

  142. MemoryVault

    Do not give the ALP any help.

    You miss the point, Stackja.
    It’s not US helping the ALP, it’s TA himself.
    We’re only pointing it out, in the hope that he will stop it.

    only criticism of TA for trying to repair the damage the ALP created.

    Aside from stopping the boats (which was Morrison) name me one thing that Abbott has announced which will reaistically address the long term problems this country faces, whether created by the ALP or not.

  143. Senile Old Guy

    Any criticism of Abbott’s policies creates the impression that even supposed non-ALP want to keep the present mess that ALP created.

    Stop telling us what we can and cannot say.

    And I am not ALP or LNP or any other damn thing. I vote for the policies, not the party. And Abbott, like Rudd, and then Gillard, broke promises (Abbott has not done so yet but is heading in that direction).

    So if your main argument is “don’t bag my team”, then bad luck.

  144. MemoryVault

    Workchoices replaced by FWA. This helped?

    Now you’re beginning to debate like a climate change acolyte, Stackja.
    Just keep moving the goalposts.

    Whether Workchoices was better than, worse than, or equal to, FWA is beside the point.
    I was responding to your claim that the next ALP PM would destroy my livelihood, and I replied by pointing out that the last LNP PM had done precisely that.

  145. stackja

    MemoryVault
    #1290205, posted on May 3, 2014 at 3:19 pm
    last LNP PM had done precisely that.

    You lost your job?

  146. MemoryVault

    You lost your job?

    And $164,000.00 in accrued benefits.

    There was nothing wrong with Workchoices per se, it was just implemented without any checks and balances to prevent some employers abusing some of the provisions.

    I wasn’t alone, which is why it ultimately caused Howard so much grief in 2007, and remained as an albatross around Abbott’s neck in 2010, and was still a millstone last election.

    Precisely the kind of stuff-up I’m trying to prevent happening again.
    Without much luck, so it seems.

  147. Eddystone

    stackja, please can you try to understand, we are not trying to get the ALP back in, nor have we forgotten who got us into this mess in the first place.

    Sure, criticising Abbott may give comfort to the ALP fans, but it is tribalism to blindly support a party regardless of what they do.

    Most of us just want to see good policy. This deficit levy doesn’t seem to fit the bill.

    If TA enacts good policy, I will applaud him.

  148. jumpnmcar

    And $164,000.00 in accrued benefits.

    Sucked in by union bullshit it seems.

  149. Infidel Tiger

    Work Choices was one of the most poorly sold and worded pieces of legislation in history.

    Rather than making things simple, it was harder to understand than the instruction manual for a woman written in Polish. And who did they use to sell it? Kevin Andrews? You wouldn’t buy a cold beer from him on a hot day.

    The Libs got what they deserved. Nice try, epic fail.

  150. whyisitso

    The Libs got what they deserved. Nice try, epic fail.

    It wasn’t so much the Libs who lost. Australia lost.

  151. struth

    If you hate socialist policy and you vote for the opposite, you are allowed to be scathing in your attack of the traitor who says one thing and then does the socialist opposite when elected. We vote for policy not party. The party with the best policies should always be your choice. In our system if our politicians lie to us our whole system fails. This is socialist big government policy being adopted be this government after they said they would not do it………be very vocal. However I do know what lying filth the msm are and hope to god that theiberal party get a big enough scare to come to it’s se nses. Write to your member. If Tony is as piss weak in as I think he could be I think he needs to know he can’t have a quiet life with the left at our expence. There will be consequences.

  152. MemoryVault

    Sucked in by union bullshit it seems.

    No unions involved.
    I was an independent consultant sub-contracting through a firm of consultants to the mining industry. Eight of us worked for five years to build the firm.
    We worked for a pittance on payday, on the basis of a share of the business down the track.
    It was FIFO work – 12 hour days, 14 days on, 7 off.
    I had just secured a new, $2.5 million contract at the site I was on.

    I should have been celebrating. Instead, I had to be escorted offsite by security like a thief or a drunk, because my instant dismissal – relayed to the mine manager, but not me – meant I was no longer covered by the firm’s liability and indemnity insurance.

    It is a commonly-held fallacy that Worchoices only affected feather-bedded trade unionists.

  153. Fisky

    It is a commonly-held fallacy that Worchoices only affected feather-bedded trade unionists.

    Sorry to hear about that MV. Workchoices was a terrible piece of legislation for which Howard had no mandate.

  154. struth

    When you think about it work choices has affected everyone terribly. It got libs booted out and it’s been hell ever since.

  155. Tel

    We worked for a pittance on payday, on the basis of a share of the business down the track.

    Always a dangerous thing to do under any regime. Difficult to find people you can work with and also trust.

  156. Tel

    Workchoices was a terrible piece of legislation for which Howard had no mandate.

    For many years Howard had the gift of a hostile senate to protect him from himself. Let’s hope Abbott gets the same gift.

  157. Perpetual Motion

    Stackja
    At this stage, Abbott is threatening my finances more than RGR ever did. But apart from that he is:
    1. Setting a “soak-the-rich-precedent” that the ALP will take advantage of for decades
    2. Causing real economic damage by reducing disposable incomes of everyone marginally over average earnings.
    3. Will probably see an income tax shortfall next year, because everyone who can, will re-arrange their affairs to avoid the levy.

    He is going to cripple the prospects of every future potential LNP government in your lifetime. Even if you are just an LNP fanboy, this should be causing you more than a little worry.

  158. MemoryVault

    And who did they use to sell it? Kevin Andrews?

    IT, Sinc, can anybody tell me how this guy keeps ending up in positions of influence?
    After the Haneef affair, I thought he’d be lucky get re-selected, let alone re-elected.

    But here he is, not only on the committee to tell LIB pollies who they can, and can’t employ, but he’s also the Minister of what is currently perhaps the most crucial department of all, with regards to welfare reform and the NDIS.

  159. Tel

    Why don’t you sod off to some Liberal Party fanboi site.

    Are there any?

  160. Infidel Tiger

    When you think about it work choices has affected everyone terribly. It got libs booted out and it’s been hell ever since.

    Will be dejavu with the debt levy.

    Libs will booted, Shorten will enact a wealth tax, death duties and Droit du seigneur.

    C’mon Tony. Come to your senses. Stick a stake through the succubus.

  161. MemoryVault

    When you think about it work choices has affected everyone terribly. It got libs booted out and it’s been hell ever since.

    And Stackja wonders why we are fighting tooth and bloody nail to prevent it happening again.

  162. jumpnmcar

    I had just secured a new, $2.5 million contract at the site I was on.

    Now I’m intrigued.
    You signed a contract ?

  163. Infidel Tiger

    IT, Sinc, can anybody tell me how this guy keeps ending up in positions of influence?
    After the Haneef affair, I thought he’d be lucky get re-selected, let alone re-elected.

    It’s the Liberal Party. He’s a real go getter compared to most of them.

  164. MemoryVault

    and Droit du seigneur

    And these equal-gender, cross-gender, trans-gender days, that could get complicated.

  165. Andrew

    She was seen as a liar. That was her biggest problem.

    Aussiepundit,
    I think there was a little more than that. She knifed Kevin Rudd, which put her offside with many people instantly.

    That makes as much sense as saying it was Miss Ogyny that did her in. Her polls soared on the announcement, and that meant the people were happy with her gender and her deRuddification. Then a week after the election she fell to ~8% approval after announcing the WBCT. Having got an election tying swing in place of a wipeout a week earlier, it can only be that.

  166. MemoryVault

    Now I’m intrigued.
    You signed a contract ?

    No. I didn’t sign it, I just secured it.
    They loved my work, chose to to extend our services into other areas, and the Principal flew over and did all the contract negotiating and signing. I am very good at what I do, but my limited abilities don’t extend to negotiating contracts and all – in fact I’m hopeless at that sort of stuff.

    Which is why I was working in the arrangement I was in.

  167. JC

    The intention of Workchoices was admirable IT.

    Sure the wording could have been better and the Government should have spent a decade selling it through their proxies but the intention was based to good principles.

  168. MemoryVault

    The intention of Workchoices was admirable IT.

    I’m pretty sure that every politician from Moses on down would argue that their intentions were admirable. Maybe one day in the dim, dark, distant future we might end with some politicians whose intentions are workable, and free of all the “unintended consequences” that always seem to be par for the course.

  169. whyisitso

    You arsehole Catallaxians will deserve all you bloody well get when the REAL unionist totalitarians take over again after the supply double dissolution early next year that you’re all barracking for. You’ve all asked for it, and I’ll be cheering bloody-mindedly even though I will be one of losers too. I can always go on the pension, although I’ll probably be forced to join a union to get it. I won’t be able to rely on my retirement self-managed funds because they will be evaporated by runaway inflation. It’ll be so bad that Rudd-Gillard will seem benign. Serves you all bloody-well right.

    I can envisage you all screaming impotently on this blog next year, until you get that 1 a.m. knock on the door to whisk you away to the Gulag.

  170. stackja

    Infidel Tiger
    #1290177, posted on May 3, 2014 at 2:55 pm
    I find this anti-TA tiresome.
    That’s nice dear. Why don’t you sod off to some Liberal Party fanboi site.

    Dear, IT? Why?

  171. stackja

    whyisitso
    #1290265, posted on May 3, 2014 at 4:55 pm

    Careful. You might get told off by usual suspects.

  172. Infidel Tiger

    You arsehole Catallaxians will deserve all you bloody well get when the REAL unionist totalitarians take over again after the supply double dissolution early next year that you’re all barracking for. You’ve all asked for it, and I’ll be cheering bloody-mindedly even though I will be one of losers too.

    Ooga booga!

    How will we tell the difference?

  173. MemoryVault

    I won’t be able to rely on my retirement self-managed funds because they will be evaporated by runaway inflation.

    No, you won’t be able to rely on those funds because Hockey and Cormann are working right now on ways to relieve you of them.

  174. Token

    Careful. You might get told off by usual suspects.

    Yes, the people who are telling us to shut up are muttering about having arguments posed to their demands of silence and absolute obedience.

  175. whyisitso

    Has the Quiggin blog been closed down? I haven’t bothered looking, but it seems the commenters have all migrated to here.

  176. stackja

    Infidel Tiger
    #1290275, posted on May 3, 2014 at 5:12 pm

    One of the usual suspects.

  177. H B Bear

    And who did they use to sell it? Kevin Andrews?

    Kevin Andrews, Peter Dutton, Greg Hunt and Andrew Robb are some of the deadest of Howard era, big conservative government wood floating around.

    Hopefully Abbott won’t lose the next election and will get out of the way for some economic dries such as Cormann, Frydenberg, O’Dwyer and others who might actually start rolling back the size of government. It looks a long way away after the week just gone.

  178. Perpetual Motion

    How will we tell the difference?

    Labor will use a lubricant.

    Abbott and Hockey will lure you to a secluded spot with sweet-talk, and then give it to you good and hard.

  179. will

    You arsehole Catallaxians will deserve all you bloody well get when the REAL unionist totalitarians take over again after the supply double dissolution early next year that you’re all barracking for. You’ve all asked for it, and I’ll be cheering bloody-mindedly even though I will be one of losers too. I can always go on the pension, although I’ll probably be forced to join a union to get it. I won’t be able to rely on my retirement self-managed funds because they will be evaporated by runaway inflation. It’ll be so bad that Rudd-Gillard will seem benign. Serves you all bloody-well right.

    I can envisage you all screaming impotently on this blog next year, until you get that 1 a.m. knock on the door to whisk you away to the Gulag.

    I suggest that you stay away from the mushrooms

  180. Hendrix

    God stackja you’re sounding pathetic. “Ooh don’t be mean to nice mr rabbit” he spent three years telling anyone who would listen that Gillard broke a promise and introduced a great big new tax, and he doesn’t even last twelve months and breaks a promise and introduces a great big new tax. How fucking stupid do you have to be?

  181. stackja

    Liberty Quotes
    There is no such thing as “a right to a job”—there is only the right of free trade, that is: a man’s right to take a job if another man chooses to hire him. There is no “right to a home,” only the right of free trade: the right to build a home or to buy it. There are no “rights to a ‘fair’ wage or a ‘fair’ price” if no one chooses to pay it, to hire a man or to buy his product.
    — Ayn Rand

  182. egg_

    We need to change that cartoon over…

    Dunno, Toni Gillabbott is kind of fetching, in her own way…

  183. stackja

    Liberty Quotes
    If a man is called a Chinaman, a member of the Labour Party will always be found ready to rise and protest against his employment. I have no sympathy with any such narrow-minded pettifogging views.
    — Donald Cameron, member for the Free Trade Party, March 22, 1904

  184. Dan

    I can always go on the pension, although I’ll probably be forced to join a union to get it.

    That doesn’t even make any sense.

    You are literally cheering one side because they are called “Liberal” and booing the other because they are called “Labor”. If they swapped their names around you wouldn’t be able to tell which was which.

  185. Rabz

    You arsehole Catallaxians will deserve all you bloody well get when the REAL unionist totalitarians take over again after blah, blah, blah …

    FFS, will you give it a rest??

    I’ve been reliably informed that there are Liberal Party Spacechook sites – perhaps you and Stacks should both toddle off to those and have a good ol’ whinge about those horrid meanies over at Catallaxy.

    FFS. 😡

  186. Senile Old Guy

    We need to change that cartoon over…

    Dunno, Toni Gillabbott is kind of fetching, in her own way…

    Please, I’m going to have nightmares as it is…

  187. viva

    Day 5 of a broken promise? This is beginning to sound like a giant dummy spit. Not everything Abbott does is going to please posters here – I almost blew a gasket over the dames and sirs – but hells bells cut the guy some slack! He has to operate within political constraints in terms of everyone wearing some pain – you can’t run the country and remain ideologically pure – only the Greens believe that sort of thing.

  188. stackja

    viva
    #1290310, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:01 pm

    Agree!

  189. Senile Old Guy

    If they swapped their names around you wouldn’t be able to tell which was which.

    And, since Labor has taken to using blue on its placards, and dropping the logo, you need a players list to tell who is on which side. And there’s Turnbull, who is more left wing than some Labor MPs…

  190. Perpetual Motion

    No. All he had to do was not lie.

  191. Anne

    Vault, Kevin Andrews is my local member. He’s utterly uninspiring but Menzies is a blue ribbon seat. What can we do if the guy is given unlimited tenure? Vote labor???

    I can tell you, next election, I’ll be agitating and educating my fellows to vote LDP.

  192. Dan

    Any moron could have constructed a setup whereby rather than increasing the top tax brackets, the lower two were reduced by some small amount for show (funded by cuts to some of the countless expensive agencies that people haven’t even heard of). There doesnt need to be ‘pain’ for anyone. Miracle recoveries from 25 years of welfare dependancy on the DSP are not pain, and work rather than welfare is not pain. This is pain that is purely destructive and which will harm, not help, the economy. We Lib voters understand that even if the MPs don’t.

  193. egg_

    viva
    #1290310, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:01 pm

    Was that a paid political announcement?

  194. stackja

    egg_
    #1290323, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:08 pm
    viva
    #1290310, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:01 pm
    Was that a paid political announcement?

    ALP will love you.

  195. Dan

    In addition, viva There is a growing realisation that apart from people-smuggling, the Libs have not made any headway on any useful subject.

    And frankly as far as I am concerned asylum seekers are really not my family’s major challenge.

  196. Anne

    I can tell you, next election, I’ll be agitating and educating my fellows to vote LDP.

    This is a paid political announcement.

  197. egg_

    ALP will love you.

    Not as much as they now love Abbott?

  198. stackja

    egg_
    #1290331, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:12 pm
    ALP will love you.
    Not as much as they now love Abbott?

    So the Senate will pass all the welfare cuts likely to be proposed?

  199. Token

    He’s utterly uninspiring but Menzies is a blue ribbon seat.

    Great place, you are lucky to live there.

  200. Aristogeiton

    MemoryVault
    #1290129, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:47 pm
    I think you’ve missed a bunch of bungled policy and a marked deterioration of the country’s economic position.

    Yeah, that’s what the wonks, the political class and pundits all explained it as being.

    Spot on, Aussiepundit. I’m beginning to believe a lot of contributors here have never had a beer in a worker’s pub on a Friday night.
    […]
    I’m getting a little tired of people who seem to believe that three quarters of the electorate are brain dead.

    That’s for the wonks, right? Because folks at the pub are too braindead to understand?

  201. Aristogeiton

    egg_
    #1290166, posted on May 3, 2014 at 2:41 pm
    You try selling cuts in government expenditure to an electorate that believes in magic puddings;

    Assumption.
    Just act and see the consequences if you have any ‘political courage’ at all.
    Or would you like it workshopped with focus groups for a year, diddums?

    Big man’s a big political mover. That’s why he’s posting his rants on a blog.

  202. egg_

    So the Senate will pass all the welfare cuts likely to be proposed?

    Who knows what Krazy Clive will do?
    It’s the lower house that Abbott faces losing, based on the 2PP – game over.

  203. Senile Old Guy

    Has anyone quoted Chris Kenny?

    So no matter the political arguments about sharing the pain, no matter the arguments about temporary revenue filling the coffers while the reforms cut in – no matter the excuses – if Abbott goes ahead with tax increases, he will have undermined a central pledge and broken faith with the electorate. And all for a minor fiscal benefit. He promised too much, quarantined too many areas from budget cuts. And yes, Labor is hypocritical having broken its promise not to introduce a carbon tax and then broken its promise to “terminate” it. Think about it, Labor is now opposing a tax on those it likes to describe as the rich – end of days. But Abbott needs to stay above that level, not descend into weasel words about a tax increase being different to a new tax, or a levy being different because its temporary or whatever else the spin doctors recommend.

  204. viva

    No. All he had to do was not lie.

    Now why don’t you stamp your foot.

  205. egg_

    That’s why he’s posting his rants on a blog.

    You’d best read back over your group insults re other bloggers?

  206. Perpetual Motion

    No. All he had to do was not lie.

    Now why don’t you stamp your foot.

    Because that wouldn’t do any good. Instead I’ve sent a couple of emails to my local member explaining exactly why I won’t be voting for her again at the next election.

  207. Aristogeiton

    egg_
    #1290355, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:28 pm
    That’s why he’s posting his rants on a blog.

    You’d best read back over your group insults re other bloggers?

    Diddums.

  208. stackja

    egg_
    #1290350, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:25 pm
    So the Senate will pass all the welfare cuts likely to be proposed?
    Who knows what Krazy Clive will do?
    It’s the lower house that Abbott faces losing, based on the 2PP – game over.

    “A week is a long time in politics” attributed to Wilson
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Wilson

  209. egg_

    Aristogeiton
    #1290086, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:00 pm

    It’s just possible that the Prime Minister knows more about politics than you clowns saying ‘this is then end of the man’.

    Noted for future reference, Einstein.

  210. It’s just possible that the Prime Minister knows more about politics than you clowns saying ‘this is then end of the man’.

    If he knows anything about politics the debt levy, and any other tax increase they are planning, will never see the light of day.
    We’ll see. I’m still hopeful.

  211. Aristogeiton

    egg_
    #1290363, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:33 pm
    Aristogeiton
    #1290086, posted on May 3, 2014 at 1:00 pm
    It’s just possible that the Prime Minister knows more about politics than you clowns saying ‘this is then end of the man’.

    Noted for future reference, Einstein.

    You can join the pantheon of Catallaxians who have made unwise prognostications:

    http://catallaxyfiles.com/2013/07/19/time-to-bring-back-malcolm-turnbull/

  212. egg_

    Aristogeiton
    #1290368, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:36 pm

    My record’s 100%.
    Wanna bet over Abbott’s future?

  213. Aristogeiton

    egg_
    #1290376, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:42 pm
    Aristogeiton
    #1290368, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:36 pm

    My record’s 100%.
    Wanna bet over Abbott’s future?

    Didn’t we do just that? Or do you want odds? How about a pissing contest to put this to bed? I’ll meet you behind the bikesheds.

  214. egg_

    From your link:

    egg_
    #931992, posted on July 20, 2013 at 6:53 pm
    Abbott just needs to keep doing exactly what he has been doing.

    Yup, the only thing that’s changed is that KRudd’s had a poll bounce, as expected… and he is also expected to slide… (by most pundits, presumably).”

    Wanna bet?

  215. egg_

    I’ll meet you behind the bikesheds.

    Gloves off, pug?

  216. Aristogeiton

    egg_
    #1290385, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:47 pm
    From your link:

    egg_
    #931992, posted on July 20, 2013 at 6:53 pm
    “Abbott just needs to keep doing exactly what he has been doing.

    Yup, the only thing that’s changed is that KRudd’s had a poll bounce, as expected… and he is also expected to slide… (by most pundits, presumably).”

    Wanna bet?

    I have 100/1 odds on egg being an inveterate gambler.

  217. Didn’t we do just that? Or do you want odds?

    if Abbott scraps all intentions of raising taxes – of any kind – then he’ll scrape through this and all will be forgotten (in the fullness of time). But if he does that then it means he agrees with us.

  218. figuratively of course… I’m not suggesting he reads here.

  219. cohenite

    Poor old Tone, cleaning up after the delinquents; fucked if he does and fucked even harder if he doesn’t.

  220. mareeS

    The westerly wind has sent the spouse hyper, and our cats, and all the other Cats, judging from preceding comments. I can wear a bit of extra tax for the sake of the budget if it means the bludgers get less for sitting on their arses.

  221. egg_

    I have 100/1 odds on egg being an inveterate gambler.

    1st loss. 😉

    Next one?

  222. Aristogeiton

    egg_
    #1290388, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:48 pm
    I’ll meet you behind the bikesheds.

    Gloves off, pug?

    Keyboard warrior, huh?

  223. Perpetual Motion

    Abbott’s future is one of pain and endless ridicule from Shorten and Labor. He won’t unseat RGR as the worst prime ministers we’ve ever had, but he’ll be a good chance for the dumbest, for doing a “Gillard” not 12 months after he successfully had her crucified for the same crime.

  224. egg_

    Keyboard warrior, huh?

    Nah, I’ve actually met folk here – you?

  225. MemoryVault

    you can’t run the country and remain ideologically pure

    No. And you can’t do it by continually rearranging the deck-chairs on the Titanic either.

    The answer to the Age Pension conundrum is not to simply increase the retirement age to 70, which is only going to aggravate both the youth unemployment and the DSP problems down the track. A good start would be to scrap the 15% tax so people’s contributions accumulated faster.

    The answer to the DSP problem is to stop blaming the recipients, and accept that two-thirds of them have alcohol, drug and/or depression problems and need help, should never have been put on a pension in the first place, and were only dumped onto DSP by ALL successive grubbermints since Fraser, as a way of artificially reducing unemployment numbers.

    The answer to youth unemployment is not to simply make them wait an extra six months for the dole, thereby guaranteeing a rise in street crime and domestic violence. How about doing something about an education system now so broken it has kids for twelve full years, and still dumps them onto the streets illiterate and with zero numeracy skills. Educate them properly, let them leave school at 16 if they want, and rebuild our once-excellent apprenticeship system so they can learn something useful, like a trade.

    The answer to profligate grubbermint overspending is not yet another new tax to give them even more money to waste. I’ve already outlined how scrapping the “Employment Provider Services” industry can be done overnight, and save + $3 billion a year.

    Simply returning Centrelink to the way it operated six years ago does away with the “need” for over 3,000 middle-level public servants. Scrapping the position of Job Capacity Assessor and returning the DSP assessment function to Commonwealth Medical Officers gets rid of another 500 + “make work” public service jobs and will halve the number of SSAT and AAT appeals overnight.

    Limiting PBS to the supply of the most widely-used, cost-effective drugs, instead of every boutique “cure” that hits the market, would save untold billions.

    None of this is rocket science, very little of it requires major legislative changes, and using natural attrition in the APS, involves very little pain for most people.

    Instead, what do we get? Increase taxes, and slash benefits.
    How original.

  226. Aristogeiton

    egg_
    #1290405, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:54 pm
    Keyboard warrior, huh?

    Nah, I’ve actually met folk here – you?

    More pissing contest? I’m sure you’re a big deal: now put that thing away.

  227. DtjW

    Brilliantly disguised caricature by John Tiedemann. The outward bent of the thumbs symbolise a person of generosity, honesty and openness. The open palms symbolise nothing to hide. The tortured look upwards symbolises his anguish. Damned sight better than the 14 seconds of the 2 instrumental clowns and destructors of recent times.

  228. #1290406, posted on May 3, 2014 at 6:55 pm

    That’s terrific stuf MemoryVault.
    Truths that are obvious but unfortunately require a bit of courage and some rolled-up sleeves.

  229. egg_

    Abbott’s future is one of pain and endless ridicule from Shorten and Labor.

    +1

    He and Hockey have screwed the pooch, and are presumably fools for listening to Credlin – from the ‘bunker style’ of their initial Government.
    This is more of the same – running a white flag up the pole from the bunker.

  230. Perpetual Motion

    I like the way you think MemoryVault. It sounds like you have a bit of inside knowledge of the way our taxes get wasted.

  231. Guest post for MemoryVault requested.

  232. egg_

    Nah, I’ve actually met folk here – you?

    Second evasion.
    My synopsis in your link was correct – you were incorrect in your surmising of me.
    Strike three.

  233. calli

    Youse boys fighting behind the bike sheds?

    Call me when it’s over and I’ll bring the Elastoplast and mercurochrome. And the skip for the debris.

  234. blogstrop

    OK, looks like we’re all committed to an untried but plausible sounding LDP guy. Good luck with that long road.

  235. stackja

    blogstrop
    #1290417, posted on May 3, 2014 at 7:04 pm
    OK, looks like we’re all committed to an untried but plausible sounding LDP guy. Good luck with that long road.

    I am sceptical of LDP.

  236. Grigory M

    I am sceptical of LDP.

    I am Spartacus, of Thrace.

  237. Perpetual Motion

    OK, looks like we’re all committed to an untried but plausible sounding LDP guy. Good luck with that long road.

    Not necessarily. An informal vote perhaps. If we end up with another Labor disaster it may be the final encouragement needed for the LNP to rid the party of liars, crooks, and closet socialists. Maybe we’ll get a proper liberal/conservative government in time for the Roaring 20’s.

    I had high hopes for Abbott, and still do, but I’m being sorely tested. And I’m old enough to know that it doesn’t actually make much difference whether there’s a Labor govt or a “wet” Liberal govt in power. At least Labor transmit their stupid policies in advance.

  238. cohenite

    Aristogeiton is a real brawler; like his namesake; watch out for his vicious Latin.

  239. stackja

    Grigory M
    #1290422, posted on May 3, 2014 at 7:13 pm
    I am sceptical of LDP.
    I am Spartacus, of Thrace.

    Crassus crucified 6,000 of Spartacus’s followers on the road between Rome and Capua.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spartacus#Objectives

  240. Grigory M

    Crassus crucified 6,000 of Spartacus’s followers on the road between Rome and Capua.

    And?

  241. lem

    Abbott is a goner. Any political capital he had (remember he always had sub 50% satisfaction ratings, unlike Rudd) will be completely squandered now. He is totally fucking up. It is possible he could spin his way out of the deficit tax if he renounced it, but the punters will be jittery with him. He always looked a bit too zealous for many.

    He is a gift for the “unelectable” Shorten. We are in bottom of the barrel territory with our politicians.

  242. MemoryVault

    We are in bottom of the barrel territory with our politicians.

    Great!
    When do we get to open a new barrel?

  243. lem

    Spear one whenever you like dude, I’m willing to taste.
    Trouble is, I’m not expecting a better flavour.

  244. He is a gift for the “unelectable” Shorten. We are in bottom of the barrel territory with our politicians.

    Abbott was widely believed to be unelectable.

  245. Splatacrobat

    Abbott would do better to just say
    “No I haven’t lied, I have changed my mind on increasing taxes. Sorry. I came to this conclusion after realising the gravity of the financial hole the previous government has left you.

    By you I do really mean you the taxpayer. My government is working on a range of measures to reign in expenditure which for the most part will affect others. By others I mean non taxpaying moochers.
    My government will leave no stone unturned in cutting waste and duplication, however if it becomes necessary to raise taxes to make up any shortfall we will equally share the burden across all tax thresholds including $0- $20,000 pa. I believe it is not fair that those that benefited least from the reckless waste should carry a heavier burden than those who benefited most and contributed the least.

    Any new tax measures introduced to pay off debt from this day forward will be called a LDRM: Labor Debt Reduction Measure. Please be under no illusion the pain we are about to suffer is a direct result of six years of profligate spending by the previous Labor/Green government.

    To help remind you of this fact we will be legislating a requirement that all payslips issued to tax payers have the following information printed:

    Wayne Swan, May 2010:

    We now expect a surplus in three years, three years ahead of schedule.

    Julia Gillard, August 2010:

    The Budget will be back in surplus in 2013 if I’m re-elected.

    Wayne Swan, August 2010 :

    Well, we’re getting back into surplus in three years. Come hell or high water.

    Julia Gillard, August 2010:

    The Budget is coming back to surplus, no ifs no buts it will happen.

    Julia Gillard, November 2010:

    The budget will be back in the black, back in surplus in 2012-13 … as promised.

    Wayne Swan, April 2011 :

    We see the surplus in 12-13 as being absolutely fundamental.

    Julia Gillard, April 2011:

    My commitment to a surplus in 2012-13 was a promise made and it will be honoured.

    Wayne Swan, May 2011:

    We’ll be back in the black by 2012/13, as promised.

    Julia Gillard, May 2011:

    We’ll bring the budget to surplus in 2012-13, exactly as promised.

    Wayne Swan, August 2011:

    I believe we will attain those forecasts, coming back to surplus in 2012/13.

    Wayne Swan, August 2011:

    The government remains absolutely committed to delivering our return to surplus as we planned.

    Wayne Swan, February 2012:

    I am determined to produce a surplus in 2012-2013. We have got our colours nailed to the mast.

    Wayne Swan, March 2012:

    Despite the tough global conditions, we remain determined to return the budget to surplus in 2012/13, and we will get there.

    Julia Gillard, November 2012:

    We stand by the predictions, the entries in the Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook. We stand by the figures and we’re on track to deliver a budget surplus.

    Wayne Swan, December 2012:

    It’s appropriate that we return to surplus.

    Wayne Swan, December 2012:

    It’s unlikely that there will be a surplus in 2012/13.

    Once again I’m very sorry and hope you understand”

  246. lem

    Aussiepundit, exactement.

    Abbott got elected because the previous government were so bad, anything alternative would do. The proverbial drover’s dog. Abbott was the ugly sister at the beauty contest who won because the other candidates couldn’t make it. So Abbott, and more importantly his younger colleagues, need to understand that even the grubby, fiddling Shorten could take them out. People are that dumb.

    But I am thinking that Abbott maybe thinks that, having won, he has some sort of Bruce Willis charisma, and can get away with shite. Which worries me. He definitely cannot fly a helicopter, dodge run away trains, and save the world. Shit, he can hardly string two words together without going the aaahh..he is no beauty queen.

  247. “No I haven’t lied, I have changed my mind on increasing taxes. Sorry. I came to this conclusion after realising the gravity of the financial hole the previous government has left you.

    They knew it was a mess. Everybody knew the budget was a mess. They said so repeatedly before they were elected.
    Wayne Swan’s obfuscation fooled nobody and can be no defense for Abbott.

  248. sdfc

    Abbott would do better to just say
    “No I haven’t lied, I have changed my mind on increasing taxes. Sorry. I came to this conclusion after realising the gravity of the financial hole the previous government has left you.

    A temporary tax won’t do anything to fix the budget long term.

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