Raising awareness

Peter “Spike” Chippalone, 49, of no fixed abode, feels aggrieved that he cannot claim the status of victim.

Peter "Spike" Chiappalone

Peter “Spike” Chiappalone

Spike assures The Sunday Age he has put his 22-year drug addiction behind him and is using knowledge gained from an arts degree and a community development diploma to champion the cause of the homeless. He says:

People that are gay, bisexual, greenies, bank users, public transport users – they all have their voice but there is nothing for the homeless.

Spike has a point but sadly it is inevitable that in dividing people into oppressors and victims, some unfortunates find themselves caught on the wrong side of a the ledger.

It suggests the Gillard Government’s Homelessness Bill 2013 missed the mark. The Bill, former homelessness and housing minister Mark Butler told us, was aimed “at increasing recognition and awareness of people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.”

Labor ran out of parliamentary time before it was able to pass the Bill, but presumably Spike feels as I do that:

If you’re looking for hand-wringing symbolism, a statement that says merely, “I feel your pain”, it is hard to beat the Homelessness Bill 2013. Indeed “law” may be putting it a little strongly, for this is an instrument with no legislative purpose, other than to proclaim that the government’s heart is in the right place.

Roger Scruton sees “an aggressive sentimentality” at work in the modern charade of victims and oppressors:

I call this sentimentality “totalitarian” since — like totalitarian government — it seeks out opposition and carefully extinguishes it, in all the places where opposition might form. Its goal is to “solve” our social problems, by imposing burdens on responsible citizens, and lifting burdens from the “victims,” who have a “right” to state support. The result is to replace old social problems, which might have been relieved by private charity, with the new and intransigent problems fostered by the state.

I’m not sure if Scruton’s words will be any comfort to Spike, but neither apparently was Kevin Rudd’s pledge in 2008 that Labor would half the number of homeless by 2020.

Last year a report by the federal Auditor-General found despite governments committing $1.1 billion since 2008 to tackling homelessness, the number of homeless people increased from almost 90,000 in 2006 to more than 105,000 people by 2011.

 

 

 

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113 Responses to Raising awareness

  1. Relevant to this issue is an extract from Today’s Catholic Leader -

    The article is called Putting People First: The call for an economy of social inclusion.

    In co-operation with all sectors of business, unions, and the community, government has a responsibility to ensure workers and their families are put first in the nation’s economic system. It should take the lead in:

    1. Creating jobs for vulnerable workers which are secure, adequately paid and relevant to the needs of business and local communities

    2. Supporting industrial and infrastructure development that increases opportunities for local employment

    3. Increasing investment in research and development and lifting national training standards

    4. Assisting employers by reducing on-costs – for example through wage subsidies or tax rebates on employment-related costs

    5. Agreeing on a way of measuring poverty and social exclusion and applying it when setting minimum wages and social security payments.

    We need a competitive and productive national economy. But we cannot leave it to the market alone. There is a responsibility on government to ensure all people can make their contribution to the productivity of our nation and reap the benefits of growth.

    It resonates with me, as I’ve always believed that after providing security, the first responsibility of any government is to create conditions so that everyone, irrespective of age, gender or disability, can find productive work.

    This has apparently gone out of fashion, and as the statistics in the article demonstrate, people on the margins are suffering, and that suffering is spreading.

    Bolding is mine.

    RTWT

  2. duncanm

    Like the servile Boko Harem hashtag, Gillards message is consistently social left: all about appearing to care, not do.

    Good on Spike for pulling himself out of addiction and getting motivated to act.

  3. duncanm

    Numbers, you forgot to bold this bit:

    relevant to the needs of business and local communities

    without that, its just self -perpetuating a welfare mentality.

  4. Baldrick

    Perhaps Spike could ask the Hungarian slags husband for some tips about the Homelessness Bill and where he might find accommodation.

  5. Notafan

    A local lefty told me in a chastising kind of way that one of our local ‘characters’ that I know lives in special accommodation around the corner is actually ‘homeless’.
    So I am not convinced about the numbers because I don’t know that ‘homeless’ is defined in a manner that one might expect.
    And while there are lots of genuine people for a certain number it is a lifestyle choice. I thought that private charity has always provided a lot of support for homeless people.

    One option for the homeless

  6. Sir Fred Lenin

    A large number of these homeless people have mental and addiction issues,years ago they would have been in institutions,sheltered fed , bathed and looked after and prevented from self harm.Enter the socialist feel gooders,close the institutions,sack the carers,and spout “their rights were being denied” ,throw them on to the streets where they are subjected to violence and opression,then of course spot platitudes about them,without mentioning who initially created the problems,socialism at work! All BS and NO responsibility

  7. JC

    I’m sorry, but I simply don’t care. I can understand a tiny minority getting caught out homeless, but that’s about it.

    If the Left truly cared about poverty it would be concerning itself with absolute poverty not concocted relative poverty. In other words there are plenty of poor people to worry about around the world, such as in Mali and North Korea.

  8. James

    A large number of these homeless people have mental and addiction issues,years ago they would have been in institutions,sheltered fed , bathed and looked after and prevented from self harm.Enter the socialist feel gooders,close the institutions,sack the carers,and spout “their rights were being denied” ,throw them on to the streets where they are subjected to violence and opression,then of course spot platitudes about them,without mentioning who initially created the problems,socialism at work! All BS and NO responsibility

    Sir Fred Lenin on the money once again. You’re my favourite poster.

    Can you write a book or something?

  9. Enter the socialist feel gooders,close the institutions,sack the carers,and spout “their rights were being denied”

    Absolute bullshit.
    I lived through this era and worked with people with disabilities at the time.
    The market fundamentalists pushed this hard because -
    1. They could see a quid in it for privatization of these services.
    2. The economic rationalists in government at the time saw it as a way of saving money – they booted the inmates out, sold the real estate (usually picturesque and in great locations) and sacked the staff.
    Socialist do-gooders had stuff all to do with it. It there were any, they were at the coal face caring for these people, not in the meeting rooms making “rational ” decisions to shaft them.

  10. Shelley

    What Sir Fred Lenin said. Nailed it.

  11. A large number of these homeless people have mental and addiction issues,years ago they would have been in institutions,sheltered fed , bathed and looked after and prevented from self harm.

    It’s pretty clear you spent no time in any of these institutions when they were thick on the ground.
    I did, as part of my training.
    What I witnessed daily was disgraceful.
    Children with maggots in their ears because there were no fly screens, urine soaked bedclothes, insufficient staff to prevent people from harm – to identify a few issues from many.
    They were understaffed, what staff there were weren’t trained, inmates were drugged to the eyeballs, and most of the buildings were sub standard.
    The solution would have been to spend money on facilities, more staff, and tertiary qualified staff, but that would have been too expensive.
    It was cheaper to shut them down and sell off the assets.

  12. Tom

    People that are gay, bisexual, greenies, bank users, public transport users – they all have their voice but there is nothing for the homeless.

    Don’t they teach the left’s totem rankings in arts degrees, Spike? Muzzies trump gays who trump women who trump anyone who doesn’t have a loud whiney voice like the homeless. And the ‘rivoment trumps everything, except it’s not really the ‘viroment, because old white men and evil capitalism. But you asked for group rights to replace common law rights because fairness, didn’t you? Australian bureaucracy, the judiciary, academia, the media and most of our politics is now being run by the compassionate left so quit your whingeing. Because shut up.

  13. Numbers:

    ‘Find productive work’.

    But the Government enforced floor price is too high.

    The Government should just get the hell out of the way.

  14. Infidel Tiger

    What a surprise. Numbers has spent a good deal of time in institutions.

    If only they’d have him back.

  15. But the Government enforced floor price is too high.

    From the article above –

    Minimum wages are failing to keep pace with the Australian standard of living.

    Since the turn of the century, average weekly ordinary time earnings increased by 80 per cent, while the minimum increased by only 55 per cent.

    If the minimum wage had kept pace, it would be almost $100 more than the current $622.20.

  16. Dan

    Mali and

    Charity begins at home. Mali is a problem for the Malians and there is nothing we can do about it.

  17. Walter Plinge

    1. Creating jobs for vulnerable workers which are secure, adequately paid and relevant to the needs of business and local communities

    This bland, pointless boilerplate. The same pap the social service agencies have been churning out out for decades, decades of zero achievement.

    And therein lies the problem. One person’s adequate payment is another person’s excessive payment. Unless minimum wages are reduced or (preferably) abolished people such as Spike: minimally educated, no worthwhile skills and lacking a history of stable work will always be priced out of jobs. The pity is that Spike can doubtless do a job that is “relevant to the needs of business and local community” but not for $20+ an hour. He might be worth $12-$15 an hour until he gains experience and has a proven work ethic.

  18. Snoopy

    Children with maggots in their ears because there were no fly screens

    Really?

  19. alan Moran

    I actually took part in a television panel program on homelessness where Spike was the host. He was quite good. My co-panelists were the normal lefisits. Two matters learned by me were first that 70 per cent of the homeless were not suffering from psychiatric problems and secondly almost all wanted to lead a “normal” life as they defined it.

    I pointed out two things impeding this were the housing policies of governments which in rationing development land brought increased house prices and therfore rental cost that price many homeless out of their own place.

    Secondly Australia’s very high minimum wage prevents people who are marginal from getting a job and thereby acquiring work skills etc etc. Both of these arguements would be familiar to Cat readers but they were alien, indeed offensive to a fellow panelist, an RMIT professional academic in the homeless field. The industry’s solution is more government housing, more support and more counselling.

  20. tomix

    Definition of “homeless” according to the Gummint.
    Anyone who doesn’t have either 1.a lease; 2. a mortgage; or 3. deeds to the property.
    This covers people living in:
    Pubs
    Caravan Parks
    Private Hotels
    Flatettes
    Boarding Houses
    Then there are:
    People on benefits who opt to forgo Rent Assistance because it’s less than the cost of accommodation.
    Some Aborigines and others who prefer to sleep outdoors.

    Bums like Spike want to live in the CBD on Benefits.
    A better idea is that they move to country towns where accommodation is cheaper.

  21. Numbers:
    If the minimum wage had kept pace, it would be almost $100 more than the current $622.20.

    Yes, with proportionally more unemployed, priced out of a job.

    The solution is to subsidise low productivity workers not price them out of a job.

  22. Children with maggots in their ears because there were no fly screens

    Really?

    Yes – as recently as 1986, in an organisation originally established by parents of children with disabilities post polio. The institution no longer exists….

  23. Notafan

    I realise know I know more homeless people that I thought.

  24. The solution is to subsidise low productivity workers not price them out of a job.

    Which is point 4 in the extract above.

  25. jumpnmcar

    Children with maggots in their ears because there were no fly screens,

    And people actually converse with this fool.
    Amazing.

  26. Sir Fred Lenin

    Poor numbers,maggots in his ears? Did they penetrate to the brain? One wonders,suppose hes on a “benefit” like a lot of “vietnem vets” ,? Some of the ones I have met had problems,mostly caused by Alcohol ,this is a Vountary Affliction, whrpen they were in Vietnam their favourite saying was “more piss” , youngsters being Smartasses and now thw chooks are home to roost! Voluntory – Affliction!

  27. jumpnmcar

    The standard of living and homelessness in countries can be directly correlated with that countries debt levels.
    There may be 1 or 2 that are temporarily out of sinc but I can’t think of any.

  28. Bruce of Newcastle

    Victimology is a core tenet of the Church of Progressivism. We all must know what our Victim Value Index is. The higher the better, and most importantly, the more renumeration compensation you are due.

    When this is understood, it is easy to grasp why when RGR attempted to bring any legislation to reduce homelessness, control racism by S18c or support disabled, gay, transgender, unclassified sexuality people who want to marry each other, whales or other threatened species, that that legislation had exactly the opposite effect. Victimhood must be maximised!

  29. And people actually converse with this fool.
    Amazing.

    In places were flies are common, people with paraplegia can’t chase them away because they are unable to prevent eggs being deposited in the ear canal.
    This phenomenon is not uncommon in the third world.
    In 1980s Australia, it was a disgrace.
    If you can’t deal with the truth and the consequences of disregard of the marginalised, go disappear into you own little Glibertarian fantasy.
    And thank the Lord that you aren’t forced to depend on others for basic care.

  30. stackja

    We are assured the Richmond report solved all the problems.

  31. Poor numbers,maggots in his ears? Did they penetrate to the brain? One wonders,suppose hes (sic) on a “benefit” like a lot of “vietnem (sic) vets” ,? Some of the ones I have met had problems,mostly caused by Alcohol ,this is a Vountary (sic) Affliction, whrpen (sic) they were in Vietnam their favourite saying was “more piss” , youngsters being Smartasses and now thw (sic) chooks are home to roost! Voluntory (sic) – Affliction!

    FYI, I am in good health.
    I don’t have issues with alcohol, unless a glass of wine (usually a good Shiraz) with my evening meal is a problem.
    I am not (as you put it) on a benefit, although I am one of two in my old rifle section of ten not TPI.
    I qualify for a service pension, but my assets and income make me too wealthy to benefit.
    I still work for a living, and plan to do so until 70.

    BTW, avoid posting when drunk.
    Given what you wrote above, you must be….

  32. Notafan

    I thought the thread was about the homeless

  33. egg_

    All roads lead to ‘Nam?

  34. All roads lead to ‘Nam?

    Talk to Sir Fred Lenin.
    He introduced it into the discussion in an attempt to smear me – (#1300913, posted on May 11, 2014 at 1:08 pm).
    Happens all the time here.
    I’m simply defending myself (and other Vietnam Vets).
    You’re telling me I have no right to do that?

  35. Dave Wane

    I have the answer: To further compliment the wonderful range of anti-discrimination commissioners and various other commissioners we already have in every state, territory and federally, surely we should now have 8 brand new Homelessness Commissioners. And of course we will also need 8 Anti-Homelessness Commissioners as well.

    People like Spike will no doubt be warmly welcomed at their local Anti-Homelessness Commission office. Or if they happen to decide that they like their homeless lifestyle, they may wish to check out the Homelessness Commission Office – where I feel certain they will receive valuable tips from the many staff that will assist them with their life-choice.

    Both these new commissions will have a fully staffed legal section to offer guidance and specialist legal advice should a homeless person want to sue someone who may have “offended” them. Like for example, someone questioning whether or not they are 100% homeless – the “full-bottle” homeless, so to speak.

    I am sure Mark Butler and his fellow concerned Opposition members are already beavering away on this excellent proposal, or something similar – so it can be implemented as soon as they get back into government.

    So all Australia’s homeless can have plenty to look forward to when Australia next elects a Labor government.

  36. tomix

    To give you an idea. I live in a Flatette in inner city Brisbane. The flatette is self contained, but toilets and showers are shared with 3 others. Rent $160 p/w plus $20 per month power bill and free osp.

    I’m on easy street. A comparable flat with a lease in the area costs at least $350 p/w. plus 4 weeks bond that you’ll never get back.
    But according to the gummint and the do-gooders, I’m homeless.

  37. Notafan

    Thankyou Tomix as there I was thinking 110,000 people were sleeping in cardboard boxes under bridges.
    I know a guy who lives in a boarding house, he now has a good job in a call centre and it suits him to keep his accomodation costs low. Another has lived in a cabin in a caravan park for many years, could have moved into a flat but ditto.
    Do people who sell their house and buy those big motor homes also get counted as homeless?

  38. tomix

    I would say yes, Notafan, depending on whether or not the Federal Government has a record of their circumstances.

  39. tomix

    That should be “State Government.” The criteria for non- homeless is quite strict.

  40. Notafan

    I don’t think I’ll tell my friends they are homeless, they might be offended :) .

  41. Anne

    Numbers, you obviously feel passionately about this cause.

    Why don’t you take one man off the street, take him home, get him cleaned up, find out what his skills are or teach him some useful skills to help him get a job.

    You could report back here every week. Who knows some reader might give him a job.

    Lord knows there’s always yard work needs doing around here.

    At best you might get some notoriety and start a ‘pay it forward’ type movement.

  42. Bruce of Newcastle

    Serving in ‘Nam vastly increases your VVI, especially if you were conscripted. Ironically this is mainly because ‘Nam veterans were persecuted by the Left.

  43. find out what his skills are or teach him some useful skills to help him get a job.

    Been doing that since 1971….

  44. tomix

    There are no hopers in the area on DSP who sleep in empty houses and buildings, saving themselves $300+ per fortnight. In the welfare state, living outdoors is a lifestyle choice.

  45. tomix

    They are often surprised by the news, Notafan.

  46. Bruce of Newcastle

    I suspect also that some homeless people are intimidated by the bureaucracy of Centrelink. And woe if they get one full stop wrong on the forms, turn up late to an interview because of a broken down bus or do not apply for all the jobs they are supposed to apply for.

    I had a flatmate like that once, who got lost in a crevice of bureaucratic insanity. We supported him for months since he couldn’t get unemployment and was so depressed he’d sleep all day to avoid facing reality. Nanny state help can be bloody intimidating.

  47. Anne

    find out what his skills are or teach him some useful skills to help him get a job.

    Been doing that since 1971….

    I was thinking something more like how to operate a mower not postmodern, marxist, feminist, separatist tree hugging for beginners.

  48. jumpnmcar

    My Neighbour would be homeless except he’s in a housing commission home.
    His bad back prevents him from either mowing or working, yet he gets his tinny ( bigger and newer than mine ) on the water at least twice a week.
    He’s 10 years younger than I am.
    Maybe he should go into sales judging by the weed trade from his garage but that would affect his standard of living I guess.
    I’m so glad we have a safety net for the most vulnerable and needy.
    Yet we taxpayer could do more too.
    Please won’t you all have a heart and some compassion.

  49. I was thinking something more like how to operate a mower not postmodern, marxist, feminist, separatist tree hugging for beginners.

    I’ve taught Skills for Living, which can include independence skills – cooking, washing clothes, using public transport, being safe on the street – situational awareness, safe shopping (“safe” in the sense of avoiding being being ripped off by getting change from a $50 note as if $5 was tendered – not uncommon for people with intellectual impairments), filling out forms, using the phone (mobile and public), etc. etc – it keeps changing as the world changes.

    I don’t recall teaching “postmodern, marxist, feminist, separatist tree hugging for beginners”.
    I’m talking about the real world – not a Glibertarian fantasy.

  50. James B

    Housing is unaffordable because of “urban containment” and “smart growth” policies.

    Set development free on greenfield areas and see housing prices plunge.

  51. Anne

    It’s obviously not enough Robert. If people are still on the street, you need to do more.

    What would you do about Jump’s neighbour?

    I’d call the police.

  52. tomix

    Centerlink became user friendly tears ago. A person can register over the phone. DSP is given to people whose sole disability is that they’re pissheads.
    The whole issue is a beat up using emotional arguments.

    Why should anyone be forced to subsidise Spike and his mates because they want to live in Carlton but can only afford the rent on a pub room in Rockhampton.

  53. Notafan

    I wouldn’t mind living in Carlton.

  54. tomix

    Not a good idea, Anne. Neighbour and the police likely get on quite well.

  55. braddles

    I did read once that, in Melbourne at least, there are more beds available (and unused) in homeless shelters than there are people sleeping rough. Is this true, and if not, what are the numbers?

    I suspect that there are significant numbers of homeless people who, for whatever reason (mental illness etc) choose to live on the streets.

  56. people who, for whatever reason (mental illness etc) choose to live on the streets.

    Care to rephrase that?
    “Reason”, “mental illness” and “choose” don’t sit well in the same sentence.

  57. Anne

    Tomix. Next step, Royal Commission.

    Numbers. Typical. When offered a reasonable hands on suggestion to help a fellow human being, he exits, stage left. In true Marxist spirit, it’s the revolution that’s important not the end result.

  58. tomix

    Bloke who lives part of the time in Vietnam told me this:

    “If someone in the Army has a drink or drug problem, they dig a hole about 8 metres deep and drop them in it.Throw a bit of rice and some watewr down occasionally, and pull them out after a month or so. Voila, they’re cured”
    Our first Vietnamese P.M. can’t come soon enough.

  59. tomix

    “Reason”, “mental illness” and “choose” don’t sit well in the same sentence.

    Is it Dr. 1735099 M.D. now?

  60. Notafan

    I have friend is an ex alcoholic, he used to be homeless homeless -sleeping rough, now he is just ‘homeless’ as a government statistic in a neat as a pin cabin in a caravan park. Great worker but he has what I call a variant of Oppositional defiant disorder .

  61. jumpnmcar

    And Ive got plenty more.
    I bloke I worked with as getting a carers allowance for grossly overweight wife.
    She was getting one too cause he claimed he couldn’t read.
    His mum worked at centre-link and knew all the tricks.
    I let the lazy shit go due to ” lack of work ” before he could fake a compo injury.

  62. Bern1

    Another day another thread.Yet again we learn that numbers numbnuts went to SVN.So did a lot of us ,however it wasn’t the defining point of ours lives and sole topic of conversation. Give it a rest.

  63. Another day another thread.Yet again we learn that numbers numbnuts went to SVN.So did a lot of us ,however it wasn’t the defining point of ours lives and sole topic of conversation. Give it a rest.

    Read back through the thread.
    The reference to Vietnam was introduced by Sir Fed Lenin (#1300913, posted on May 11, 2014 at 1:08 pm).

    Better tell him to give it a rest.

  64. manalive

    Its goal is to “solve” our social problems, by imposing burdens on responsible citizens, and lifting burdens from the “victims,” who have a “right” to state support …

    That seems to be the point Mill was making here:
    “It seems to me that this feature in the case- a right in some person, correlative to the moral obligation- constitutes the specific difference between justice, and generosity or beneficence. Justice implies something which it is not only right to do, and wrong not to do, but which some individual person can claim from us as his moral right. No one has a moral right to our generosity or beneficence, because we are not morally bound to practise those virtues towards any given individual …” Utilitarianism.

  65. Tintarella di Luna

    A large number of these homeless people have mental and addiction issues,years ago they would have been in institutions,sheltered fed , bathed and looked after and prevented from self harm.Enter the socialist feel gooders,close the institutions,sack the carers,and spout “their rights were being denied” ,throw them on to the streets where they are subjected to violence and opression,then of course spot platitudes about them,without mentioning who initially created the problems,socialism at work! All BS and NO responsibility

    Quite Sir Fred

    So now people with severe and persistent mental illness have the human right to sleep under a bridge or be at risk of being beaten to death when sleeping on a park bench just live everyone else. What a victory for the human rights advocates.

  66. Roger

    Second last para second line, “half” should be “halve”.
    One is a noun, the other a verb. Even journalists should know the difference.
    This piece is a bit half baked, too. Correlation does not necessarily equate to causation:
    the rise in public money being thrown at homelessness may or may not explain the growth in intractable homelessness, as Scruton implies. What you need is some hard data to prove the case.

  67. Notafan
    Definition of “homeless” according to the Gummint.
    Anyone who doesn’t have either 1.a lease; 2. a mortgage; or 3. deeds to the property.
    This covers people living in:
    Pubs
    Caravan Parks
    Private Hotels
    Flatettes
    Boarding Houses
    Then there are:
    People on benefits who opt to forgo Rent Assistance because it’s less than the cost of accommodation.
    Some Aborigines and others who prefer to sleep outdoors

    Or maybe the numbers of homeless homeless are about the same but others are being redefined as homeless.

  68. tomix

    There was a homeless bloke who sold the Big Issue for years from the steps of the cathedral in Elizabeth St. Brisbane. Used to get dropped off and picked up in a Daimler.

  69. tomix

    No This has been the definition for as long as it has been an issue. The numbers who sleep out in parks through necessity would be vanishingly small. 98% of those the government classes as homeless wouldn’t be aware of their new status.

  70. As a Catholic, I find Today’s Catholic Leader indicative snippet quoted by 1735 (Thank you 1735. I hope I may use a familiarity) offensive. Far too much emphasis is put on ‘Zozchial Jusitz’ of this ridiculous sort than on caring for the souls of people, homeless or not. The ‘leader’ should be leading us toward intellectual and spiritual honesty rather than lefty policies.

  71. Bern1

    Doesn’t matter who starts it numby-poos,it always ends up there.Getting tiresome.

  72. Numbers:

    4. Assisting employers by reducing on-costs – for example through wage subsidies or tax rebates on employment-related costs

    Excellent idea! But it doesn’t mention dropping the floor price?…

  73. Anne

    Our first Vietnamese P.M. can’t come soon enough.

    Yes Tomix! …or anyone with a living memory of Communism.

    ManAlive, AKA – Comforting the Afflicted and Afflicting the Comfortable.

  74. lem

    Whoops! Just came back from another happy Mother”s Day lunch and what do I find? Numbers, complaining about :

    Children with maggots in their ears because there were no fly screens

    Well, sir, I will have you know this is all the rage:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maggot_therapy

    Oh, and although I didn’t fight in the Vietnam war, teach people basic survival skills (I quote):

    I’ve taught Skills for Living, which can include independence skills – cooking, washing clothes, using public transport, being safe on the street – situational awareness, safe shopping (“safe” in the sense of avoiding being being ripped off by getting change from a $50 note as if $5 was tendered – not uncommon for people with intellectual impairments), filling out forms, using the phone (mobile and public), etc. etc – it keeps changing as the world changes

    I have, practiced medicine for 28 years, 22 as a surgeon. And I have first hand seen the remarkable and beneficial effect of maggots on wounds.

  75. I have, practiced medicine for 28 years, 22 as a surgeon. And I have first hand seen the remarkable and beneficial effect of maggots on wounds.

    I remember an interesting debate with one of your discipline in 1986.
    He was on the board of the society that was caring for these children.
    He was scoffing at the idea that they should be sent to a school at that time under construction which I was to open in 1987.
    He described these kids (mostly indigenous – all with severe and multiple impairments) as “unreceptive to education”.
    Your profession has always had a problem with disability.
    You can’t cure it – so you have no idea how to deal with it.
    Perhaps you are the exception.
    Against his preference, the school opened.
    It is still operating.

  76. Doesn’t matter who starts it numby-poos,it always ends up there.Getting tiresome.

    Not my problem.

  77. Anne

    Why do you come here Numbers?

  78. To educate, entertain, and inform.

  79. Bern1

    That really is the question Anne.
    I have never seen Numby win an argument.He is always treated with contempt and derision.He tells little stories where he is the victor against the evil forces of the lumpen.No one has ever seen this on this blog.Must be a parallel universe.
    Such Herculean efforts,building special schools for disadvantaged Indigenous(naturally) children,engaging in bitingly incisive repartee with evil Doctors of Medicine.That was only today. Educate,as if, fool.

  80. JC

    Dan
    #1300883, posted on May 11, 2014 at 12:48 pm

    Mali and

    Charity begins at home. Mali is a problem for the Malians and there is nothing we can do about it.

    That may be so, Dan, but that really isn’t the point.

    The point is that you’re really concerned with da inequality your real concerns ought to be with absolute poverty around the world, not the bullshit relative crap the left drones on about.

    Frankly, I don’t see skinny poor Australians. I see lot’s of fat ones.

  81. jumpnmcar

    Frankly, I don’t see skinny poor Australians. I see lot’s of fat ones.

    The Swollen Generation.

  82. calli

    Frankly, I don’t see skinny poor Australians. I see lot’s of fat ones.

    The Swollen Generation.

    Jump! :D

  83. jumpnmcar

    I must ask my Dad what it was like when everyone had maggots in their ears, you know, before fly screens were invented.

  84. Rabz

    Another thread entirely ruined by that obnoxious, braindamaged, syphilis addled ol’ knobgobbler.

    Fucking unreadable.

    This has to stop.

    :x

  85. Rabz

    Spike assures The Sunday Age he has put his 22-year drug addiction behind him

    Of course, because only the fucking sunday aged would be stupid enough to believe him.

    FFS.

  86. David

    To educate, entertain, and inform

    Well at least the second one is right. I am sincerely impressed with your life experience numbers. You’ve been there, done that, got the T shirt and there can’t be much left you have yet to experience. :-) Can’t understand why you were not an important “gummint” advisor to the last lot of wankers or a published author of a top selling treatise on where we have all gone wrong.

    However I will give you top marks for persistence. No matter what you post and get plastered for you keep coming back for more.

    Having said that, and before you get too chirpy, I disagree with most of what you post but refrain from the invective you get hit with.

  87. David

    Another thread entirely ruined by that obnoxious, braindamaged, syphilis addled ol’ knobgobbler

    Rabz you are only feeding numbers masochistic nature by speaking to him like that – no matter how true it may be.

    And why the new avatar?

  88. Tel

    I don’t recall teaching “postmodern, marxist, feminist, separatist tree hugging for beginners”.

    Good little phrase that, “I don’t recall”, I’m sure we will be hearing a bit more of that in the near future.

  89. Rabz

    And why the new avatar?

    Time for a change and I loved Leak’s incidental rendering of Brandis – for at least two very good reasons.

    Kol tov

  90. CatAttack

    I think you will find the numbers may have increased partially because they changed the counting rules. But I am happy to be corrected.

  91. Rabz

    I think you will find the numbers may have increased partially because they changed the counting rules. But I am happy to be corrected.

    I seem to remember a change in the counting rules during Rudd’s Prime Ministership that resulted in the the numbers halving, FFS.

    This was quickly ‘rectified’ to beyond the original figures.

  92. Bruce of Newcastle

    Homeless:
    2006 = 90,000
    2011 = 105,000

    Oz population:
    2006 = 20.7 mil
    20011 = 22.32 mil

    Which means homeless has gone up 16.7% vs population up by 7.8%.

    If you assume some miscounting as discussed above that means not much increase, but certainly no decrease despite 6 years of enlightened government by Fabians.

    Socialism makes people poor, it doesn’t raise them out of poverty.

  93. frederic

    The point is that you’re really concerned with da inequality your real concerns ought to be with absolute poverty around the world, not the bullshit relative crap the left drones on about.

    Well yes, but on the one hand I can and do financially support projects offering various activities keeping disadvantaged kids off the streets in the Nth fringes of Melbourne, and this has concrete results I have seen with my own eyes…
    …when whatever we do in Mali is a waste of time unless Malian society changes and that’s beyond our control.

  94. Rabz

    I can and do financially support projects offering various activities keeping disadvantaged kids off the streets in the Nth fringes of Melbourne, and this has concrete results I have seen with my own eyes

    Excellent – keep it up and ensure the kiddies learn how to read write and count, FFS – and make sure they’re taught some history.

    Oh – and lots of sport – to both keep them fit and tire them out.

  95. tomix

    •Primary homelessness is experienced by people without conventional accommodation (e.g. sleeping rough or in improvised dwellings);

    This figure would be tiny. Here is the ABS definition of “homelessness”:
    http://www.homelessnessaustralia.org.au/index.php/about-homelessness/what-is-
    homelessness
    Shorter definition: If a person thinks they deserve to live in a penthouse at the Hilton, but they’re not, they’re homeless.

    It’s a scam.

  96. Tintarella di Luna

    Frankly, I don’t see skinny poor Australians. I see lot’s of fat ones.

    The Swollen Generation.

    So glad I popped by to for this little charmer – lucky I wasn’t drinking coffee – Jump that is a keeper -

  97. Big Jim

    “A large number of these homeless people have mental and addiction issues,years ago they would have been in institutions,sheltered fed , bathed and looked after and prevented from self harm.Enter the socialist feel gooders,close the institutions,sack the carers,and spout “their rights were being denied” ,throw them on to the streets where they are subjected to violence and opression,then of course spot platitudes about them,without mentioning who initially created the problems,socialism at work! All BS and NO responsibility”

    I see what you are trying to say, but there are two problems:
    The first relates to Alan Moran’s comment too. Mental illness? The medicalisation of what was once considered a mordant perspective on the human condition practically ensures that there will never exist such a thing as a common or garden ‘bum’ ever again. Worse, down-on their-luckers with the pride NOT to play the Medical Health card will be truly at the bottom of the pile. (People naturally look after their own, but these are the really difficult bastards – experienced social workers, cops, etc would know the type.)

    Second. Any illusion you have that we are ‘better’ at dealing with indigence, is simply due to the lucky country phenomenon: What might be called the blessing of distance (and certain now thoroughly abhorrent immigration policies.)
    It’s the numbers, stupid.

  98. Tintarella di Luna

    The medicalisation of what was once considered a mordant perspective on the human condition practically ensures that there will never exist such a thing as a common or garden ‘bum’ ever again.

    And n-one is allowed to be sad — every body happy? you bet your life we are? or else every bastard is asking you RUOK? You are no longer allowed to be melancholy – which I often am — I thought I was depressed but realised that a tablet doesn’t change the circumstances so I have to deal with things as they are the best I can. I’m lousy it at but thank God for tomorrow.

  99. Pedro the Ignorant

    The Swollen Generation

    Jump (6.07 pm) wins the Internet for today, possibly for several days if no one can top that gem.

    *salutes* Well done, Sir.

  100. Rabz

    The Swollen Generation

    This will remain very difficult to top.

  101. David

    Time for a change

    G’day Rabz,

    I can drink to that.

    Kol tuv L’hitraot

  102. Notafan

    Tinta, I console myself with that too from time to time, it’s not depression if you have a reason to be sad.
    I remember a colleague years ago when I was very young, most eccentric behaviours but he did his simple repetitive job and no one tried to fix him or get rid of him. I found out he had suffered a number of tragedies in a short succession. We just respected his privacy. These days I’m not sure anyone would employ him.
    And as you say we always have hope.

  103. Crossie

    The industry’s solution is more government housing, more support and more counselling.

    I assume the industry in question is the welfare industry who are interested in enlarging their own empire just like every other business.

  104. I’m lousy it at but thank God for tomorrow.

    If you are caring for someone, that isn’t lousy – that’s magnificent.

  105. boy on a bike

    FFS – read the original report, people!

    3.34 The ABS has noted that most of the increase in homelessness between 
    2006 and 2011  can be attributed to the number of people living in  severely 
    overcrowded dwellings, as shown in Table 3.2. The data also show that there 
    were  significant  increases  in  the  number  of  people  living  in  supported 
    accommodation and in the number of people having temporary lodgings.

    The actual number of rough sleepers declined by 6% to 6813, which is a great result.

  106. Demosthenes

    The actual number of rough sleepers

    It’s been interesting reading this thread. It appears it’s the old relative poverty versus absolute poverty, just in a different form. I’m fairly sure ‘homeless’ meant ‘roofless’ or ‘shelterless’ back in the day, but no longer. The definition of ‘home’ has changed as Australia gets richer, so now “temporary lodgings” doesn’t meet the grade?

  107. Bill Shut

    Spike, did you suffer from drug addiction or did you just love the drugs?

  108. Notafan

    It’s also about people making rational choices about how they allocate their money; if person a wants to only spend$150 a week on accommodation so he has more money for the things he values why shouldn’t he?
    He doesn’t consider himself homeless or in need of government intervention.

  109. Rococo Liberal

    I think the phenomenon that everybody is trying to define is called “folk marxism”

    http://www.ideasinactiontv.com/tcs_daily/2006/01/folk-beliefs-have-consequences.html

  110. Rococo Liberal

    James at the Best of the Web Today page at the Wall Street Journal, once showed how every time a Republican president ws elected, there would suddenly be stories in the lefty press about the growth of homelessness.

  111. Notafan

    Thankyou for the article Rococo

Comments are closed.