The unusual suspects

It is the end of days – liberal minded people – not to mention actual Liberal voters – having to rely on the ALP and Greens to ensure that Tony Abbott doesn’t break an election promise.

This morning Terry McCrann continues his valiant defence of Tony Abbott.

THE congregation of the church of the Big Lie over Tony Abbott’s mythical tax promise is certainly a very broad one.

Apart from the usual suspects — the Greens and Labor, which have grown a total institutional inability to tell the truth; and the Canberra Press Gallery, which has long revealed an inability to actually analyse anything — it’s managed to also scoop up a wide range of what might be termed unusual suspects.

They include my colleague, Andrew Bolt, who surprisingly for a self-identified atheist, even occasional sceptic, seems to have drunk this church’s Kool-aid altar wine; and some on the libertarian right, like Fairfax’s Paul Sheehan and the Catallaxy blog’s Sinclair Davidson, who have revealed an inner loonism every bit the equal of the loony left.

The broad church

He is doing a fine job defending Abbott, but I just don’t believe him. I suspect many Liberal voters don’t believe him either. Terry has identified an unusual coalition of suspects who are arguing that Abbott is breaking a promise. Here at the Cat we’ve run a 15 day series of posts showing the evidence of the promise over the four years Abbott has been leader. Abbott has been remarkably consistent on the point of taxation.

The problem Terry faces and, more importantly, the government faces was set out in the Financial Review this morning (emphasis added):

But some Coalition MPs returning to Canberra on Monday following a six-week parliamentary recess said they and their constituents were perplexed and angry at the tax decisions.

One said voters were far less tolerant today towards governments that broke promises.

“Six years ago we would have got away with this,’’ he said.

Another said others were questioning Mr Abbott’s comprehension of what voters would and would not accept.

He said the anger intensified when the government tried to contend the changes were neither tax increases nor broken promises.

Trying to argue no broken promise is bad strategy. Better to take the electorate into your confidence and treat them like adults – say something like “Yes we’ve had to break a promise for these [insert list] reasons.” Politicians who have been able to do that have gotten away with their broken commitments, those who can’t haven’t.

The other problem Terry faces is in the list of his unusual suspects. When you have people like Andrew Bolt, Paul Sheehan, Peter van Onselen, and my good self – individuals from across the entire spectrum of the broad church that is liberal thought – all saying the same thing, that Abbott is going to break a promise, then maybe a promise in being broken. I’m happy to believe that any one of us can make a mistake, but all four of us making the same mistake at the same time?

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79 Responses to The unusual suspects

  1. Milton Von Smith

    Is it just me or does that graphic in the Coorey article you have linked to make absolutely no sense?

  2. MickfromVic

    The other problem Terry faces is in the list of his unusual suspects. When you have people like Andrew Bolt, Paul Sheehan, Peter van Onselen, and my good self – individuals from across the entire spectrum of the broad church that is liberal thought – all saying the same thing, that Abbott is going to break a promise, then maybe a promise in being broken. I’m happy to believe that any one of us can make a mistake, but all four of us making the same mistake at the same time?

    Exactly right, Sinc. But really, I don’t care about broken promises – I care about outcomes. I also care about not having anyone in the major parties that values private enterprise, wants to reduce government overreach (and the taxes used to prop that up) and basically gets off my lawn.

    I would have been quite happy if the promise he had broken was not privatising the ABC – why does every broken promise lean left and let the luvvies off the hook?

  3. tgs

    Terry McCrann is a hack. He is still trying to run the argument that Abbott didn’t actually promise not to increase taxes when this is demonstrably false:

    David Koch: Okay, so how do you get the budget back into surplus without putting up taxes?
    Mr Abbott: By sensible expenditure restraint.

    August 5, 2013

    The only party which is going to increase taxes after the election is the Labor Party.

    August 9, 2013

    Question: Mr Abbott, Julie Bishop said on TV that… you would have to do both raising taxes and cutting spending to bring the budget back to black. What taxes do you propose to raise?
    Mr Abbott: The only party that will raise taxes after the election is the Labor Party.

    August 11, 2013

    I am determined not to increase the overall tax burden. I am absolutely determined not to increase the overall tax burden on anyone.

    August 15, 2013

    Now I say the tax burden isn’t going to increase. Well, we are going to abolish the carbon tax, abolish the mining tax, we will reduce the company tax – of course the overall tax burden is going to go down.

    August 17, 2013

  4. I think Terry is confusing honour with loyalty. Real friends will tell you when you’re wrong, and not be afraid to do so.

  5. I would have been quite happy if the promise he had broken was not privatising the ABC – why does every broken promise lean left and let the luvvies off the hook?

    And to what end? On rare occasions I read the Silly comments for a laugh for a minute or two before it gets too tedious, and the standard lefty response to the wealth tax is that Abbott is robbing the poor to give to rich. WTF?

    Tony, there is no reward to be had. Take it all away. Make their hatred worth it, you dumbarse.

  6. Vicki

    I won’t lose any sleep over having a different opinion to Terry McCrann.

    I heard him speak a while back on the causes of the GFC and found him curiously obscure in his analysis. It surprised me.

    On the issue of the Deficit Tax, he just misses the point. That point is TRUST. A government that breaches the bond of trust of this dimension is a government that has the mark of TEMPORARY on it.

    It’s a long way back from that position.

  7. viva

    Better to take the electorate into your confidence and treat them like adults

    Good idea – if only they would start acting like adults. Parents all over the world sometimes have to explain to their kids that sometimes promises made in good faith have to be broken. You would expect that adults wouldn’t need to have this basic idea explained to them yet again.

  8. .

    Good idea – if only they would start acting like adults.

    No. This is as screwed up as nudge theory – a 25 year old APS knows better than everyone else?

    Go jump.

  9. .

    Furthermore, Viva.

    The government are not our Mum & Dad.

    We are the master. They are our servants.

    Your analogy about this is so screwed up it needs to be abandoned.

  10. .

    They include my colleague, Andrew Bolt, who surprisingly for a self-identified atheist, even occasional sceptic, seems to have drunk this church’s Kool-aid altar wine; and some on the libertarian right, like Fairfax’s Paul Sheehan and the Catallaxy blog’s Sinclair Davidson, who have revealed an inner loonism every bit the equal of the loony left.

    Mc Crann is wrong and won’t listen to cooler heads. He is destroying his credibility defending tax increases to pay for old ALP-Green promises no one believed would be funded.

  11. Aussiepundit

    Here at the Cat we’ve run a 15 day series of posts showing the evidence of the promise over the four years Abbott has been leader. Abbott has been remarkably consistent on the point of taxation.

    He has been so consistent, in fact, that even this 15 day series has not comprehensively canvassed all the material. Being against tax hikes and new taxes was a signature position for him.

  12. Aussiepundit

    Parents all over the world sometimes have to explain to their kids that sometimes promises made in good faith have to be broken.

    But these promises weren’t made in good faith and they aren’t being broken in good faith.

    They are being broken – by the government’s own admission – in order to engage in political spin. The debt tax is about being seen to punish the rich, which is not a substantial reason.

  13. Infidel Tiger

    Good idea – if only they would start acting like adults. Parents all over the world sometimes have to explain to their kids that sometimes promises made in good faith have to be broken. You would expect that adults wouldn’t need to have this basic idea explained to them yet again.

    What sort of parent punishes their children for being hard working and successful?

    Shitty parents. That’s who.

  14. Aussiepundit

    Also, please don’t compare the relationship between politicians and the public as akin to parents and children. We had enough of that under left wing rule. I thought we got rid of that attitude when we voted them out.

  15. wreckage

    Parents all over the world sometimes have to explain to their kids that sometimes promises made in good faith have to be broken.

    Then Abbott should fucking well DO THAT and stop this suicidal bullshit about it “not really being a tax, so sort of, kind of, if you tilt your head like THIS, it wasn’t ever a promise anyway!”

    He is handing government back to the ALP and a the same time establishing a Greens cartel on protest votes in the Senate.

  16. rebel with cause

    I’m glad there are still parts of Australia where this class warfare schtick doesn’t fly. Keep giving them hell Sinclair.

  17. Aussiepundit

    I’m glad there are still parts of Australia where this class warfare schtick doesn’t fly.

    Unfortunately the Libs have decided that, you know, they kinda like the whole class warfare thing and want to give it a go. After all it worked out so well for Swanny…

    But they’re not going to rant and rave against rich miners. No, they’re going to give nice, friendly patronising lectures to the “well off” about how everyone should be pulling their weight.

  18. Parents all over the world sometimes have to explain to their kids that sometimes promises made in good faith have to be broken…

    but, for the most part, you should never make a promise you cannot keep.

  19. brc

    McCann has lost all credibility with his boot polishing. Bolt has been inconsistent. Costello was the best read on the whole darn thing.

    I’m prepared to give them credit if this turns out well – they abolish the temp levy next budget but cut harder again then. But the politics and economics of it are wrong, wrong, wrong. Especially when NDIS, PPL and Direct Action are still I their full strength. It sends all the wrong signals for all the wrong reasons.

    The fact is, when the next election comes, the most important thing will be if people feel secure in their jobs and optimistic about the future. If that happens they will scrape through with a mild swing against, and Bill Shortens run at the top job will have been all for nought.

  20. Aussiepundit

    but, for the most part, you should never make a promise you cannot keep.

    This is exactly it. Despite the public’s outrage at the behavior of the Gillard government, the political class assumed that Gillard knew what she was doing and this was acceptable political strategy. The political norms got reset in Canberra across the board. They tell themselves that “politicians break promises all the time,” ignoring the fact that it usually means the end of a political career.

    So they waltzed into the 2013 election – an election which they were almost guaranteed of winning – and went about making numerous promises which they didn’t have to make, and which they knew full well they couldn’t keep. It was both cynical and naive at the same time.

    Cynical, because they thought that politicking trumps principle. Naive, because they thought they could get away with it. (they won’t).

  21. Tom

    From the Phabulous Phil AFR link:

    The budget papers will say that “despite the reintroduction of indexation on fuel excise and the temporary budget repair levy’’ the government would have still reduced the overall tax burden in 2014-15 by $5.7 billion.

    The government will argue that in contrast, Labor during its six years in government hit families and businesses with an extra $107.3 billion in taxes.

    In other words, the Abbott Labor government is going to hang onto 98.5% of the previous Liars-Greenfilth spending orgy and will deliver Australia’s first $400 billion+ budget — a 70% nominal increase on the last $235 billion Costello pork barrelling pre-election spendathon.

    And the Filth and Krazy Klive will knock back most of it, so we’ll finish up with a drunken long lunch bill that would make Shane Wand blush.

    Six hours to go until the betrayal and the splintering of the right goes ballistic. Leyonhjelm for PM! Bring it on!

  22. stackja

    Sinc hair-splitting again.

  23. MickfromVic

    Good point, Beer Whisperer. I don’t understand liberals cuddling up to these statist scumbags.

    Doesn’t the LNP know there’s a war on?

  24. TerjeP

    Mean while senators elect David Leyonhjelm (LDP) and Bob Day (Family First) were on Lateline last night furiously agreeing on the need for a reduction in tax rates. Check out the video below if you missed it.

    http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/content/2014/s4003142.htm

  25. DrBeauGan

    MickfromVic, All politicians are statist scumbags. It’s the whole point of the job. I feel sorry for those who now put their faith in Morro. We’re getting steadily closer to the time when we have to hang the buggers from lamp-posts to show them who is in charge. They just don’t get it.

  26. harrys on the boat

    Closer? We’re there already DrBeauGan.

  27. MickfromVic

    DrBeauGan #1303739, I get what you’re saying there, but I am not yet that pessimistic.

    There are some good ones in the LNP – and there are a lot of good ones in the LDP. Bob Day is also good value.

  28. Rabz

    We’re getting steadily closer to the time when we have to hang the buggers from lamp-posts to show them who is in charge. They just don’t get it.

    Ideally, I’d be able to disagree with the first sentence above, but I simply cannot*.

    *NaDT.

  29. Combine_Dave

    Sinc hair-splitting again.

    Stackja, are there any policies the Libs could adopt that you wouldn’t support?

  30. Infidel Tiger

    Stackja, are there any policies the Libs could adopt that you wouldn’t support?

    He’s not comfortable with free markets. Luckily or are they.

  31. Combine_Dave

    IT,

    Good theory.

  32. MemoryVault

    Stackja, are there any policies the Libs could adopt that you wouldn’t support?

    Land rights for gay whales, maybe?

  33. rickw

    Who would have thought that a constituency which voted out a Government of Liars and Fools would be intolerant of a Government of Liars and Fools?

    It would seem that Australians not only voted for a change of Government, but for a change in Government itself, and so far the Liberals are completely failing to deliver on that second point.

  34. MemoryVault

    Much of this largely concocted “debate” revolves around the entirely inappropriate use of the word “promise”. Promises are things young lovers make to each other. They are carved in stone. Politicians, on the other hand, make “commitments” to the electorate in return for votes.

    Commitments, unlike promises, can and must be able to be modified as changing circumstances require. In order for a commitment to be modified, all the politicians really have to do is offer a plausible explanation as to why. Most people are not totally stupid.

    While it can be argued (and it has) whether or not Abbott first made, and then broke a “promise”, there can be absolutely no doubt that he made a commitment to the Australian electorate to reduce spending and bring the deficit under control without increasing taxes or introducing any new ones. That was the commitment made in return for our votes.

    Abbott and the LNP have now reneged on that commitment without offering the electorate any plausible reason as to why. They made commitments to groups within the electorate (pensioners etc) and they have reneged on those commitments as well, without any reasonable explanation.

    In fact, the only commitments they gave that they haven’t reneged on, are those they made to the very people who didn’t vote for them anyway (NBN, NDIS, Gonski etc). Then, to add absolute injury to utter insult, they have spent the last two weeks running around claiming they never actually made any of those commitments in the first place.

    And McCrann and others – including the local Liberal Admiration Society – wonder why some of us a tad upset.

  35. wreckage

    If they decide to implement the CoA reccos than ALL IS FORGIVEN.

  36. Senile Old Guy

    In fact, the only commitments they gave that they haven’t reneged on, are those they made to the very people who didn’t vote for them anyway (NBN, NDIS, Gonski etc). Then, to add absolute injury to utter insult, they have spent the last two weeks running around claiming they never actually made any of those commitments in the first place.

    Thank you MV for a succinct summary. McCrann is simply playing games with the wording of the commitment and the use of the word “promise” in various statements. Some Liberal supporters may accept the arguments and excuses but…this will buy no favour with Green and ALP voters.

    The Greens have already had another win, just as they did with Gillard, they have increased taxes on fossil fuel. That’s a nice own goal.

  37. Michel Lasouris

    ” heard him speak a while back on the causes of the GFC and found him curiously obscure in his analysis. It surprised me.”
    Vicki, it was probably a bit beyond you?

  38. Michel Lasouris

    Sinc, Please…please.. give it a rest. If by tonight, I’m wrong, well….I’m just wrong. However ,if you are wrong it’ll be a total embarrassment for you, and I really don’t want to see that.
    Mind you, being you, you’ll probably give it some spin, just like any closet socialist would do.

  39. Aussiepundit

    they are so convinced that the NDIS and Gonski are overwhelmingly popular. Two policies that nobody understands.

  40. tgs

    Mind you, being you, you’ll probably give it some spin, just like any closet socialist would do.

    You’re an idiot.

  41. Infidel Tiger

    Sinc, Please…please.. give it a rest. If by tonight, I’m wrong, well….I’m just wrong. However ,if you are wrong it’ll be a total embarrassment for you, and I really don’t want to see that.
    Mind you, being you, you’ll probably give it some spin, just like any closet socialist would do.

    I don’t want to use any bad language as I know you have soft, cloth like ears, but please understand this – you are a silly person.

    Tonight an Australian first will be revealed: A Wealth Tax. Something so fundamentally evil, not even Labor would dare do it. You can bet your bottom they will in the future.

  42. At least now we know stackja’s real name is Terry McCrann.

  43. Aussiepundit

    a wealth tax. France, here we come.

  44. MiltonG

    When you have people like … Peter van Onselen … individuals from across the entire spectrum of the broad church that is liberal thought

    van Onsolen? That’s quite a spectrum of thought if it runs to gamma rays and lead underwear.

  45. sabrina

    Terry M, Gerard Henderson and to a lesser extent Alan Jones talk at the same wavelength about Abbott’s tax promise.

  46. Just curious… how would Cats support a debt levy in principle as a deterrent to going into deficit.

    Eg, If Hockey were to introduce a 2% debt levy, but then issue a 2% cut in the rates for the same bracket… this would effectively be a delayed tax cut rather than a tax increase. Would such a move be a positive, in that it creates a real political cost in running a deficit, or would it be just another wealth tax?

    Not saying this will happen – I don’t think Hockey is clever enough to even consider it – just curious from a philosophical perspective whether Cats would support something like this under those circumstances…

  47. philip j. fry

    I just dislike handing the rabid left a free kick, even if they are wrong

    It wasn’t an election promise of the “There will be no XXXX XXX under a government I lead” type of thing?

  48. It wasn’t an election promise of the “There will be no XXXX XXX under a government I lead” type of thing?

    Yes, it was.

  49. It wasn’t an election promise of the “There will be no XXXX XXX under a government I lead” type of thing?

    Yes, it was.

    Otherwise we are back in ‘core promise and non-core promise’ territory.

  50. Senile Old Guy

    If Hockey were to introduce a 2% debt levy, but then issue a 2% cut in the rates for the same bracket… this would effectively be a delayed tax cut rather than a tax increase. Would such a move be a positive, in that it creates a real political cost in running a deficit, or would it be just another wealth tax?

    How would that deter the Government, especially a Green/Left one. The ones paying would again be the wealthy. I think that would deter them for all of 5 seconds.

    Green/Left politician 1: Of course, you realise that, if we do this, the deficit tax on the wealthy kicks in?

    Green/Left politician 2: So you’re saying it’s a “win/win situation”. Great! Let’s do it.

  51. Catallaxy blog’s Sinclair Davidson, who have revealed an inner loonism every bit the equal of the loony left.

    Sounds just like stackja to me.

    He must be really cranky still from having the dust of the flagpole ground into powder and sprinkled upon the water for his drinking thereof. And lo! stackja reached for his tablet and wrote upon them the words: ‘I Will Be Avenged’.

  52. McCrann turns out to be a Liberal party version of Gittins. It’s quite sad, really.

  53. How would that deter the Government, especially a Green/Left one. The ones paying would again be the wealthy. I think that would deter them for all of 5 seconds.

    Hmmm, yes… and in truth, to the extent it does deter, it may only do so during surplus. If the defcit is already there, then they may have an incentive not to run a surplus – kind of like local councils not getting road funding if they don’t spend all they got this year.

    Still, if there is a surplus in place, it would have to count for something politically? Though I guess it could simply allow them to shift the blame for the increase…

    Oh well, just a thought bubble.

  54. Mique

    The whole “broken promise” thing is simply boring. Every person old enough to have experienced more than one or two election campaigns understands, or ought to, that the making and breaking of political promises is the very definition of politics wherever it is practised. To expect otherwise is to fail to learn from experience, and to harp on it for weeks rather than mere minutes is a sure sign that people don’t have a life. Please give it a rest.

  55. Gab

    let’s see … gillard broke her promise after the 2010 election about the carbon tax. Okay, let me defend her:

    The whole “broken promise” thing is simply boring. Every person old enough to have experienced more than one or two election campaigns understands, or ought to, that the making and breaking of political promises is the very definition of politics wherever it is practised. To expect otherwise is to fail to learn from experience, and to harp on it for weeks rather than mere minutes is a sure sign that people don’t have a life.

  56. Mique, Abbott spent 3 years attacking Gillard for her “No carbon tax” comment – and rightly so. This isn’t “merely” a broken promise by Abbott – it is an abandonment of his fundamental principles. It is also both extremely bad economics and extremely stupid politics.

  57. Exactly, Gab… people like Mique and McCrann are just flag-wavers for their chosen party. It’s quite sad, really.

  58. Ant

    Agreed. He should just fess up and tell it like it is.

    He could say something like “Look, while it might be splitting hairs trying to argue whether or not it’s a tax, I’m not bullshitting you around and I’m calling it a tax hike. We are the party of low taxation, however, after 6 years of catastrophically irresponsible government management under Rudd and Gillard, the situation is serious and it calls for serious measures to be taken by serious people or we will all be in the shit…”

    Stop pissfarting around, Tony.

  59. Robbo

    Sinc you are snitchy at McCrann because he called you hysterical a week or so ago. Everything you have been banging on about since about the federal budget and Abbott make his comment seem pretty realistic.

  60. Infidel Tiger

    Budget 2014: Federal Government to reveal deficit of $60 billion over four years

    What a joke.

  61. Gab

    Trying to argue no broken promise is bad strategy. Better to take the electorate into your confidence and treat them like adults – say something like “Yes we’ve had to break a promise for these [insert list] reasons.” Politicians who have been able to do that have gotten away with their broken commitments, those who can’t haven’t.

    Exactly. I find it bizarre that Abbott has not learned from Labor that to cover up a lie with another lie is political poison. I thought Abbott smarter than that.

  62. Gab

    Budget 2014: Federal Government to reveal deficit of $60 billion over four years

    Compare that to the LDP’s budget where

    Compared with the 2013 Mid-Year Economic and Financial Outlook estimates for the 2014-15 budget, the LDP proposed budget provides a modest drop in tax revenue along with nearly $40 billion in spending cuts, so that the 2014-15 budget moves from a $33.9 billion deficit to a predicted $3.1 billion surplus. It can be done, and it should be done.

  63. Welp, apparently they aren’t even going to be balancing the budget

    In fairness, I actually expected them to take a few years – since I’m sure the revised deficit for the current FY will be more than $40b… Partly because ALP sucked and spending is spiralling out of control, and partly because – like any new CEO – the Libs will be cramming as many losses into current period so that they can be seen to be making an amazing turnaround.

    “$60b over 4 years” doesn’t really tell us when they’re planning a surplus… you would think that, given their broken promises on tax increases, they’d be trying to get a surplus in before the next election to justify them, but that would still require them achieving it in their second full fiscal year (since they are yet to begin their first).

    Of course, I’m sure they’ll announce a future budget surplus tonight – Swannie did that all the time – but I think to justify their “urgent action” with the broader electorate, they have to actually deliver one before the next election.

  64. MemoryVault

    Tonight an Australian first will be revealed: A Wealth Tax. Something so fundamentally evil, not even Labor would dare do it. You can bet your bottom they will in the future.

    Trouble is, Tiger, they won’t have to “do it” in the future.
    It has now already been done for them.
    All that’s left is for the grubbermint of the day to up the rate to achieve whatever revenue grab they need. Just like that other “temporary levy”, personal income tax.

  65. MemoryVault

    He could say something like “Look, while it might be splitting hairs trying to argue whether or not it’s a tax, I’m not bullshitting you around and I’m calling it a tax hike. We are the party of low taxation, however, after 6 years of catastrophically irresponsible government management under Rudd and Gillard, the situation is serious and it calls for serious measures to be taken by serious people or we will all be in the shit…”

    Sorry Ant, but that kite ain’t gonna fly.

    Abbott and the LNP were telling us the economy was going to hell in a handbasket well over a year before they took over. The intention to institute a Commission of Audit was announced months before the last election, specifically based on their claims of how bad the economy was.

    EVERY commitment given to the Australian public prior to the last election, was given in the full knowledge of just how bad things were. To try and change the narrative now is simply to go on trying to treat us like total braindead fuckwits.

  66. egg_

    Of course, I’m sure they’ll announce a future budget surplus tonight – Swannie did that all the time – but I think to justify their “urgent action” with the broader electorate, they have to actually deliver one before the next election.

    So, Smokenomics is Swanomics-lite?

  67. Swanomics doesn’t sound right… Swannienomics?

  68. egg_

    indexation on fuel excise and the temporary budget repair levy

    Sounds like the analogy of Labor’s “broken down old car”, with just a lick of new paint.

  69. MemoryVault

    An hour to go. Are we going have an open forum on it, Sinc?
    Perhaps Carpe could run a “kick in the face” lotto in place of interruptions?

  70. .

    AH
    #1303978, posted on May 13, 2014 at 5:44 pm
    Welp, apparently they aren’t even going to be balancing the budget

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-13/federal-government-to-reveal-deficit-of-60-billion-over-4-years/5450498

    Fail.

    Every smart arsed, condescending, pig headed and downright stupid conservative defending Abbott and Hockey with bizzare, zealous knee padding ought to prostrate themselves to libertarians NOW if they have any honour or dignity left.

    Fuck me.

    They’re going to raise taxes and STILL not balance the budget?!

    CUT SPENDING, NUMBNUTS.

  71. Gab

    CUT SPENDING, NUMBNUTS.

    Oh no can’t do that it might upset the lefties. Okay, they’ll do a gesture trim but that’s it.

  72. Senile Old Guy

    Oh no can’t do that it might upset the lefties. Okay, they’ll do a gesture trim but that’s it.

    I am prepared to eat humble pie, if they do something meaningful but I don’t expect to.

    I’ve heard about all the agencies that are going to be cut or merged but the saving was just a few hundred million. And the rumbles about the size of the deficit are not encouraging.

  73. Empire Strikes Out

    WTF – I’m away for a few days and on return, The Cat has been infested with soft cock totalitarian conservatives smearing libertarians as socialists. Lazarus and stackhat, you ought to be ashamed of yourselves.

    The Abbott regime has demonstrated they proudly represent the political class in favour of prosperity. They profit, we pay.

    Maynard would be pleased. Imaginary public goods sleep easy tonight.

  74. coz

    It’s all about Sinclair Davidson, doncha see folks, everything is always about him. He never misses an opportunity to mention his mentions in the malestream media, as though he’s miffed, but we all know he’s delighted. Watch his academic standing wither while his meeja (it’s all about mee) profile expands.

  75. MemoryVault

    It’s all about Sinclair Davidson, doncha see folks, everything is always about him.

    Gotta problem with that Coz – go start your own blog.
    Then it can be all about you.

  76. coz

    You just agreed with me?

  77. WTF – I’m away for a few days and on return, The Cat has been infested with soft cock totalitarian conservatives smearing libertarians as socialists.

    That trend’s been going for longer than a few days.

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