How the NRL clubs support charities and communities

Checking NRL websites turned up a remarkable range of good works that the clubs are doing, not only engaging the players, some are seriously involved in community development. My favourites are the Panthers Kokoda project and the Manly schools program.

What if the NRL has a stand at the Easter Show where all the clubs could have a display to showcase their community activities?

Penrith Panthers on the Prowl.

Manly Sea Eagles Community news, schools program, health and wellbeing, charity partners.

South Sydney Rabbitohs, South Sydney Cares programs.

Parramatta Eels community programs.

West Tigers Roar for a Cause, “We have staff based at Campbelltown whose primary focus is on development and educational programs in the South West corridor. Next door to the Campbelltown office is our community classroom called The Lair”.

Sydney Roosters community programs.

St George community support grants.

Cronulla Sharks community news.

Newcastle Knights programs.

Gold Coast Titans community news.

Melbourne Storm community news.

Brisbane Broncos community activities.

Canberra Raiders community news.

New Zealand Warriors, community activities.

North Queensland Cowboys schools and community programs.

Canterbury Leagues club grants scheme.

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20 Responses to How the NRL clubs support charities and communities

  1. Bruce of Newcastle

    Good stuff. If we didn’t have sport we’d be fighting and killing each other instead. The Romans should have invented rugby instead of gladiators, it would have improved their civilization immeasurably.

    BTW: an owner is wanted. With money. Please…?

  2. I’m a touch browned off with football clubs. I’ve experienced off-field player behaviour & morals up close.
    On top of that, one of those clubs listed above owes me rather a lot of money for player accommodation and meals, from several years ago, which they freely admit they owe, but refuse to pay. (Apparently Gods don’t have to pay or something).

  3. David

    G’day Steve,

    A “nice” letter from a solicitor often works well I have found.

    If that is not successful the newspapers and tv “current affairs” programmes are worthwhile.

    Nothing like a bit of public embarrassment/

  4. G’day David,
    Yer dead right. I’m hoping to avoid embarrassment/extra costs for them. A coded phrase that seems to go over their head alas, as I’m dealing with a dumb clerk (babe in the woods) who doesn’t understand the implications of not paying.
    Turns out the wallies didn’t read the invoices, about Nine (9) times in a row they paid the money to some other pub (would you believe) they’re taking the view that they should not have to pay “twice”.

    I’m prolly going to have to get nasty with them. The years are dragging by.

  5. iamok

    Bingo. It is all a load of marketing bullshit – and not very good at that. I was heavily involved ten years ago in this (AFL) space and at the end of the day they do not give a toss. It is a visage.

  6. Bingo. It is all a load of marketing bullshit – and not very good at that. I was heavily involved ten years ago in this (AFL) space and at the end of the day they do not give a toss. It is a visage.

    Indeed. In a particular year one of those clubs above had an income of circa $30 million, their “community good works” expenditure for that year was a hundred and fifty grand.
    It is unlikely the ratios have changed much in the intervening years.

  7. Nic

    The Bunnies do a lot with a aboriginal and remote communities via Souths Cares, which I think was the brainchild of Peter Holmes a Court

  8. His Omniscience

    So, having created turmoil in many individual’s lives, unravelled numerous families and shredded the community fabric through their cynical promotion of problem gambling, these clubs give a few sheckles back on some token community projects and that’s enough for Rafe to sing their praises.

  9. Brisbane Lad

    It’s easy to slag ‘em off for many of the negativities we hear through the media, or even experience ourselves at times, but the development of these programs over the last decade is to be applauded. Of course some clubs/players are more involved in it, but any effort to see them get their players off their arses in front of the latest gaming console, and engaging with community and the less fortunate, should be given the benefit of the doubt.

    As a Manly supporter, I have keenly followed their efforts ever since Michael Monaghan led the playing group, and subsequently the club, into such activities as generating funding for an $110,000 special needs bus for Arranounbai School. Much of it is unreported and I appreciate Rafe’s effort to highlight it to another audience.

  10. Baldrick

    Whilst it’s admirable for NRL clubs to be supporting community development initiatives, they’re not actually spending their own money:

    Only two clubs – the Brisbane Broncos and North Queensland Cowboys – can claim to be financially self-sufficient from footballing revenues – sponsorship, merchandise, gate receipts and the NRL grant. The other 14 clubs all require regular cash injections from between $1 million and $5 million from supporting leagues clubs or generous backers just to break even. This is not sustainable in the long run.

    Perhaps if clubs spent a few million less on buying players, they might actually be able to contribute their own money to community organisations. That would be something to cheer about.

  11. Realist

    What a load of bollocks! These are people who spend their adult lives pooing in hotel hallways, glassing their wives and taking kickbacks on the side. They are using fan money for token community programs to try and break those images in the public mind. You would never support the public service having their own community programs to cross promote themselves so why should we report these?

    PS they wouldn’t be drowning in debt if they could actually get more than 4000 people to a home game….

  12. Poor Old Rafe

    I started out expecting to find tokenism all the way, like once a year photo ops in a children’s cancer ward and a good deal of the activity is not surprisingly at that level but there are other programs like Panthers on the Prowl that have a lot more to offer and they should be considered as a benchmark that other clubs should aim to match.

  13. ….should be considered as a benchmark that other clubs should aim to match.

    Won’t be hard to match. Popping a gold coin in when the Salvos shake the tin on Friday nights would make most people proportionately more altruistic than most all of those clubs listed above.

  14. AP

    And so they should. They’ve nothing but time on their hands since they are all “professional” now.

  15. Poor Old Rafe

    At a time when we want to get people off dependency on the government, any avenue to develop civil society, social capital, private charities and community support is worth exploring and promoting if it has any potential.

    Social work is not the prima facie purpose of football clubs and of course some administrators and players are going to care less about it than others. The point is to use the current situation as a platform for better things in future.

  16. Rococo Liberal

    The NRL are also supporters of the Commando Welfare Trust

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jaVgyg_g1pY

  17. iamok

    And I have to say putting millions of govt funds into stadiums that generate income a dozen items a year seems to me to be fundamentally flawed, and indeed obscene. Vote buying maybe?

  18. Poor Old Rafe

    I have reservations about public spending on sport which is a separate matter from the social and community work of the clubs. On the topic of charities, beware of charities seeking government support, we have been warned by Gary Johns that the charity dollar is often used (abused) for political advocacy or simply wasted.

    I don’t know enough about the budget of football clubs to know how hard it is to divert funds from football to community development and in a way it is surprising that they do any of that kind of thing at all. In the days when they trained on meat pies and beer and half the players would have had a smoke at half time I don’t imagine that they did anything like that. Times have changed!

  19. crocodile

    I started out expecting to find tokenism all the way, like once a year photo ops in a children’s cancer ward and a good deal of the activity is not surprisingly at that level but there are other programs like Panthers on the Prowl that have a lot more to offer and they should be considered as a benchmark that other clubs should aim to match.

    Sorry, but I can only relate my own personal experience here. When my eldest son was a patient in Westmead Children’s cancer ward it was common enough to see quite a few players from the Parramatta NRL club visiting the kids. Signing autographs, talking, giveaways etc. One year the then captain, Nathan Cayless came dressed as Santa. Sometimes the charity work happens without fanfare so is unnoticed.

  20. Fibro

    Accept the notion Rafe but seriously, these clubs are like Qantas.

    Broken, irrelavant business model with continual HR issues (player behaviour) so they introduce a couple of warm and fuzzys to get a few back on side.

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