John Faulkner will be checking his privilege

Senator Faulkner said: “(It is) a serious breach that a senator in this parliament is being spied on in that way as they go about the proper conduct of their duties.

“This is the most serious breach. I’m sure every senator around this table understands what has just been said.”

Senator Faulkner said he “will be taking this matter forward as a matter of privilege immediately”.

That’s a politician complaining about CCTV cameras and invasion of privacy. The rest of us, apparently, can just suck eggs.

In the meantime the ABC reports that only those with something to hide have anything to fear from the spread of CCTV cameras.

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34 Responses to John Faulkner will be checking his privilege

  1. stackja

    He has privilege. Others do not.

  2. Bruce of Newcastle

    Given the way technology and government is going in the world, if you don’t want to be watched by CCTV cameras I suggest you avail yourself of something fatal.

    We are going to have to get used to it.

  3. JC

    Oh yea right. But where was Faulkner when his own political party in cahoots with the Greenslime tried to muzzle their political opponents in the media.

  4. incoherent rambler

    CCTV cameras in Q&A programming meetings and ABC board meetings

  5. Tel

    CCTV cameras in Q&A programming meetings and ABC board meetings

    Compulsory reality TV, fills up that other digital channel no one knows what to do with, and if you complain you must have something to hide so we sack you. Saves money too, what not to like?

  6. egg_

    That’s a politician complaining about CCTV cameras and invasion of privacy. The rest of us, apparently, can just suck eggs.

    Yeah like awaiting the FBI to release the Pentagon servo 911 cruise missile footage… crickets.

  7. candy

    Oh, I don’t know. He is in a very high level job. Is there not some privacy accorded to that?

    Would we be okay with CCTV in for example Cabinet and PM meetings / security council meetings. just asking.

  8. Anthony

    Maybe Faulkner should take this up with SBY and his missus.

  9. Econocrat

    Maybe a job for the Human Rights Commission?

  10. rickw

    Mr Faulkner, you know that Big Brother will never hurt you!

  11. The ABC turned off the cameras on Q&A while they turfed out the demonstrators the other night. VERY SUSPICIOUS, I call it.

  12. Disillusioned

    Is the senator trying to hide his coaching of a potential witness in order to embarrass the govt? Just out of curiosity do those cameras record voice as well? If not what is he hiding?

  13. Disillusioned

    Just promise that they won’t put cameras in the Greens change rooms.

  14. Perfidious Albino

    There’s an interesting doco out about the use of CCTV and facial recognition software in the aftermath of the Boston bombing. NYC has apparently taken the London CCTV network as the international benchmark and made their version ‘live’ with sophisticated software and a manned controlled room, such that it can be used real time to spot or prevent crime, rather than just reviewed retrospectively to identify and track suspects after the event. Pretty impressive technology, if all a bit too ‘skynet’ for mine…

  15. Aristogeiton

    egg_
    #1320441, posted on May 26, 2014 at 7:56 pm
    That’s a politician complaining about CCTV cameras and invasion of privacy. The rest of us, apparently, can just suck eggs.

    Yeah like awaiting the FBI to release the Pentagon servo 911 cruise missile footage… crickets.

    Are you a “truther” egg?

  16. Chris M

    PA:

    ….to identify and track suspects after the event. Pretty impressive technology

    What an absolute pathetic joke all this government surveillance is. The US government spies on all it’s citizens day and night yet cannot spot a single crazy? Even after their nose is rubbed in it? Recall that the Russians warned about the Boston bomber jihadis. Parents and friends warned police about the crazy mass-murdering Rodger kid.

    One can only conclude the govt surveillance is not intended to catch dangerous or crazy people. So probably Faulkner is fine.

  17. Bertie_Wooster

    Douchey leftoid a couple of years older than you puts his salary up for another career path you might have taken.

    Earns nearly 40k less than you do.

    Feels good man.

  18. Bertie_Wooster

    >being spied on in that way as they go about the proper conduct of their duties.

    >as they go about the proper conduct of their duties.

    >proper conduct of their duties

    nuff said.

  19. Baldrick

    Seriously, what does Faulkner expect … that politics doesn’t involve spying? Get a grip man.

  20. Blogstrop

    So, after being at the forefront of the anti-coalition whingers, egg is now also a truther?
    Tell us it aint so, egg.

  21. gabrianga

    Why didn’t the ghoul just piss off to “Aussie’s” for a coffee like everyone else?

  22. Andrew

    LOL public service “whistleblower.” If they were blowing any whistles against the wrong side, we know how that turned out for Orkopolous and HSU whistleblowers. Which suggests it’s another Gloria.

  23. Des Deskperson

    ‘public service “whistleblower.” ‘

    I’m sure there are genuine ones, but all the people I’ve ever met who claimed to be whistle blowers were actually crazed grievance-mongers.

  24. Dr.Sir Fred Lenin

    As a long serving member of the criminal alp,comrade F has every reason to fear surveillance,people might find out what the comrades are really up to.reminds them of the old glorious soviet union,another union with honesty issues.

  25. cuckoo

    So Winston Faulkner does not love his telescreen? It’s only for the proles, is it? Long time since I read 1984, but isn’t there a suggestion somewhere that the inner party members were actually able to turn off their telescreens? Winston Faulkner longs for those good old days.

  26. Des Deskperson

    But wait on, doesn’t Faulkner have a point? He’s not talking about CCTV surveillance of streets or perimeters, he’s talking about surveillance of people going about their business in the workplace.

    If this is a common workplace practice outside Parliament House, then I’m not aware of it. I don’t, for example, know of any public sector agency that undertakes this form of surveillance, and I would be disturbed if it did. It means, for example, that staff would be reluctant to report harassment or bullying because the contact officers’ workplace is covered by CCTV.

    Is this sort of stuff already happening in workplaces, and if so, where? And why shouldn’t Faulkner fight it?

  27. johanna

    I agree, Des. In this case it is a direct threat to democracy. What Faulkner is complaining about is the surveillance of elected representatives by faceless bureaucrats. It means that if someone wants to report dodgy dealings to their MP, or an MP meets with other MPs to discuss something, it is potentially subject to surveillance. And that is undoubtedly contempt of Parliament.

    On reading the transcript of Faulkner’s exchanges with officers of the Department of Parliamentary Services, to say that the bureaucrats were evasive and disingenuous it putting it mildly. They were obviously caught out doing the wrong thing, and even worse, tried to cover it up.

    I don’t care about the political stripe of the pollies being surveilled, or the reasons for it. It is utterly wrong in principle, and potentially very dangerous in practice. It puts these bureaucrats in a position of power over elected MPs, whether because they have evidence of someone bonking someone else, or a potential leadership challenge, or a potential defection to another party – you get the idea.

  28. Dr.Sir Fred Lenin

    I am totally in favour of professional politicians being watched 24/7,might get a bit of “honesty” in politics,tape all conversations and phone calls too,like you would with other criminals.that Would keep the bastards honest!

  29. Des Deskperson

    Spot on, Johanna.

    I myself have had a little bit to do with Faulkner over the years – mainly in the area of public sector ethics and governance – and I’m convinced that, whatever his other ideological faults, he has a genuine commitment to enhancing public integrity.

    And the transcript!! Wow, wrong and stupid!! Of course for years, Parliament House was run like a small separate municipality, with the worth ethic and standards of integrity that one would expect from a small municipality. Mills was supposed to clean all that up. The Sisterhod love her.

  30. Des Deskperson

    err, ‘work ethic’

  31. Steve D

    What, would Sir Humphery possibly be behind something like this?

  32. johanna

    Des, watching Faulkner and Robert Ray tag-teaming in Estimates was an esoteric delight. As a public servant for part of that time, I know that the prospect of appearing before that duo caused many a sleepless night. And it was not about cheap “gotcha” moments. It was about meticulous, well-researched questions. Either of them could have been a top QC.

    I agree that Faulkner seems to have hung on to his ideals, heaven knows how, and has a distinguished record of exposing chicanery, except in his own Party.

    Oh, well. You can’t have everything. Nobody’s perfect.

  33. Denise

    Johanna,

    Thank you for your insights into the public service, most useful.

    This is where I have the problem with politics on both sides :’Faulkner…has a distinguished record of exposing chicanery, except in his own Party’.

    So he has failed his duty of care to the Australian people whose interests he pledged to serve.

    What Luther said about Christians applies equally to all politicians

    “If I profess with the loudest voice and clearest exposition every portion of the Truth of God except precisely that little point which the world and the Devil are at the moment attacking, I am not confessing Christ, however boldly I may be professing Christ. Where the battle rages, there the loyalty of the soldier is proved, and to be steady on all the battlefield besides is merely flight and disgrace if he flinches at that point.” ~ ~MARTIN LUTHER

  34. Des Deskperson

    ‘So he has failed his duty of care to the Australian people whose interests he pledged to serve’

    Some of the key improvements in standards of executive governance implemented in the early days of the Labor Government – the Code of Conduct for Lobbyist, the Standards of Ministerial ethics, the codes of behaviour for Ministerial staffers – were largely the work of Faulkner. While I don’t know how these have worked out in practice – and there are issues about how enforceable the code for staffers might actually be – they were a genuine and I believe politically impartial attempt to enhance integrity. Whatever Faulkner’s other faults, these efforts need to be acknowledged.

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