Backing down on 18c: Looks like another broken promise

The rumours I’ve been hearing are true.

Attorney-General George Brandis is preparing to water down a controversial plan to scrap sections of the Racial Discrimination Act that restrict racist insults and hate speech, after an avalanche of submissions signalled concerns over the changes.

Last week a senior(ish) Liberal told me that backbench MPs in marginal seats had been getting a lot of adverse feedback on the plan to amend 18c and the government had to respond to that. Okay – yet the government has felt absolutely no urgency to respond to any of the negative feedback it has been getting on the PPL or on the proposed tax increases.

This entry was posted in Freedom of speech, Take Nanny down. Bookmark the permalink.

117 Responses to Backing down on 18c: Looks like another broken promise

  1. entropy

    What the bastard wanted all along. And still to this day people think the statement “people have a right to be bigots” was a mistake. The two faced prick knew exactly what he was saying and doing.

  2. RodClarke

    18c will stay because being a “victim” in this day and age is both easier and the culturally sanctioned way of dealing with your problems.
    The cultural zeitgeist is supportive of the politics of envy.
    The welfare state supports laziness and
    One side (or maybe both) want the populace in a state of learned helplessness.

    It’s simply so much easier to be a “victim” than accept full responsibility for your own life completely and totally.

  3. Token

    Word is that the Liberal Party had not prepared for this day and had limited ability to communicate with the newspapers targeted at the myriad of ethnic communities, especially those printed in languages other than English.

    The Labor Party is too professional to make such a stupid mistake and flooded the papers with an effective misinformation campaign. It was mostly uncontested, leaving the Liberals who represent marginals in a very difficult position.

    You would not believe the misrepresentations I’ve heard back via the Chinese community.

    Another case of the amatuers getting lost in a complicated logical argument fighting against a professional organisation with a simple emotive message built around lies.

  4. Rabz

    So, we punt one bunch of utterly absurd, staggeringly incompetent, destructive amateur hour fuckwits with the reverse Midas touch and then guess what happens?

    We end up saddled with another.

    FFS.

  5. KC

    Perhaps one reason for the backdown was the invisibility of those who support the repeal of 18C. The IPA ran a very high profile campaign when opposing Labor’s terrible amendments last year, and when they (appeared) to get the then Opposition to support the measures. There appeared to be no-one around to support repeal.
    The net result – a new law new full of new subjective terms; once the courts have got to interpreting them, the net result will be less freedom not more.
    On balance, another reason not to support them.

  6. Habib

    Negative feedback from Green voters. Hopefully this will be the end of the Liberal Party, like the ALP it’s well past its use-by date, a relic of the ’50s. The ALP is a relic of the ’30s. We could do worse than defund parties, and adopt a party-free system like the Swiss, with mandatory representation as a requirement of citizenship. Some may say we’d wind up with a parliament full of wastrels, knaves, theives, scoundrels, halfwits, lunatics, and time-servers. How would we notice the difference, and we’d save all that campaign dosh and revenue foregone for tax-exempt status.

  7. KC

    To be clear, ‘them’ is the Government; not the IPA

  8. jupes

    Attorney-General George Brandis is preparing to water down a controversial plan to scrap sections of the Racial Discrimination Act that restrict racist insults and hate speech, after an avalanche of submissions signalled concerns over the changes.

    Weak. As. Piss.

    Australia is in desperate need of a conservative political party.

  9. Token

    Hopefully this will be the end of the Liberal Party, like the ALP it’s well past its use-by date, a relic of the ’50s.

    The inability of the current party to address the dreadful populism of Clive Palmer and his band of drones is a clear indication of an institution that only survives due to years sunk into its infrastructure.

    That defection in SA after Slippes move should be shaking the organisation to the core, as we all now know the party representatives do not believe they have to serve the people who voted for them.

  10. Alfonso

    Got a flashback to Al Grassby, when ethnic immigrant mainchancers determined Australian govt policy, in this case determined Australian freedoms.

  11. Rabz

    The ALP is a relic of the ’30s

    I’m presuming you meant the 1830s.

  12. Craig Mc

    Perhaps one reason for the backdown was the invisibility of those who support the repeal of 18C.

    Bingo.

    I wrote to Brandis this morning about it. If every LNP voter did so, he’d change his tune very quickly.

    They all remember how Turnbull got dumped. Don’t whine here, get in their faces about it.

  13. jupes

    That defection in SA after Slippes move should be shaking the organisation to the core …

    Not really. The main difference between the parties is the level of competence. As we have seen from the Abbott government, the policies are much of a muchness.

    Changing allegiance shouldn’t surprise anyone. Slipper did it.

  14. Mayan

    One side (or maybe both) want the populace in a state of learned helplessness.

    This is what galls me about the calls for an increased rate and scope of the GST. The proponents say there will be compensation, which means more people receiving money from the government, thus widening and deepening the extent of dependency upon the government, and normalising the notion of government as provider.

  15. Token

    Changing allegiance shouldn’t surprise anyone. Slipper did it.

    I am contesting why people would leave the Labor-Lite party for an organisation that is actually interested in representing people who don’t buy the message of the hard-left (Jean Kitson just found herself violently thrown into this pile)…

    …I am talking about the effect of parliamentary members who betray their electorate so they can get a bigger pension pay out has on the people who spent years volunteering for the party.

  16. Gab

    Perhaps one reason for the backdown was the invisibility of those who support the repeal of 18C.

    Rubbish. There were many submissions made to them by people who were in favour of the changes, people and groups who were in favour of repealing the section, as Brandis himself said in the Senate this year. Submissions were also received from “community leaders” against any such changes and asking for more restrictions to free speech. Brandis has gone with the latter.

    When it comes to doing the hard yards the Libs fold, quickly, forgetting their pre-election promises.

  17. Token

    I wrote to Brandis this morning about it. If every LNP voter did so, he’d change his tune very quickly.

    Have you met people like Teresa Gambaro, Craig Lundy or any number of Labor-Lites from Victoria?

    If you are not in their electorates your letters mean nothing to them. They only care about surviving past the next election.

    Brandis may care as he is a senator.

  18. Tom

    So the non-left vote fractures even wider as the government surrenders principle and further emboldens the Alinskyists, who now believe more than ever they can goad the Liars, Greenfilth and the Fat Bastard Party to block supply, bring on a constitutional crisis and tip out the Liberal Socialists by Christmas. Remember the month of quiet after the September election? Didn’t take long for the howler monkey choir to fill the media air with deafening screeching that will last until they succeed in wrecking the joint or the LNP grows a pair of balls. It’s easier for nervous backbenchers to defend a democratic principle than advertise the fact that they’ll cave in to the loudest pressure group. The LNP primary vote is in freefall.

  19. Robert Blair

    For me, 18c is a litmus test.

    If the Libs fail there, then best thing for the country is to get Labor back asap, and let them totally complete their wreckage.

    Remember, the LDP flourished in the last Labor government – in the next 0ne it will likely seize control of the Senate, and maybe even a lower house seat (Melbourne perhaps).

    LDP – the potential UKIP downunda…

  20. .

    People say sometimes the Cat is out of touch as we are political junkies, prosletysing libertarians rather than vote grabbing career pollies and we are well educated and work in finance, construction and law…BUT

    This is one issue where we are indeed a voice of the silent majority. The man on the street thinks he has a right to free speech, and s 18C of the RDA is a nonsense violation of his sacred rights his dad and pop spilled blood to preserve.

  21. Craig Mc

    Brandis is a senator. Tell him you’ll preference LDP at the next election (when he has to run again) if he folds, and he’ll get the message.

  22. MemoryVault

    Perhaps one reason for the backdown was the invisibility of those who support the repeal of 18C.

    So, we have reached the stage where the merit or otherwise of a piece of legislation is decided solely on the basis of the level of perceived support for it – like “climate science”.

    We’re f*cked.

  23. Habib

    Nor preference, primary. And I’ll put every other fringe ratbag ahead of the slapheaded sponge, excepting the ALP, socialists and greens.

  24. Gab

    So, we have reached the stage where the merit or otherwise of a piece of legislation is decided solely on the basis of the level of perceived support for it – like “climate science”.

    We’re f*cked.

    You don’t seriously expect the Libs stand on principle? Have a backbone? Keep their promises?
    Free speech is not sacred to them. Future votes trump all.

  25. C.L.

    Let’s simplify this to its essence:

    The Liberal Party backs jailing journalists who criticise the left.

    After a ‘trial’ conducted by a former member of the far-left faction of the ALP.

  26. incoherent rambler

    Another election commitment to be discarded. A lie.

    The difference with this government compared to Gillards is that the ministers share some of the lying load.

  27. MemoryVault

    You don’t seriously expect the Libs stand on principle? Have a backbone? Keep their promises?

    No Gab, sadly I don’t.
    That’s why we’re f*cked.

  28. Alfonso

    Yep, Brandis is Mordy’s bag boy.

  29. dianeh

    Dot, I agree. I have met very few people that agree with 18c, although they dont think about it so specifically. People hate the idea of being told what to say and what to think. And they resent govt or judicial interference in that regard. Although the left have tried to change it, we are still a country of individuals. We havent yet turned into the Borg.

  30. JMH

    Robert Blair
    #1322689, posted on May 28, 2014 at 9:01 am
    For me, 18c is a litmus test.

    Likewise. If they blow off 18c then they blow my vote. LDP it will be. My local member will be hearing from me.

  31. MemoryVault

    Lot of talk in the comments above about warning Lib members you won’t give them first preference.
    Pointless exercise.
    Ultimately, in over 90% of cases, your vote will flow to LIB or LAB via preferences.
    They know this.

    Instead, tell them you are going to vote informal in the HoR, and for a minor party in the Senate.
    At least that deprives the bastards of taxpayers’ funds for their next election.
    Money seems to be the only language these pricks understand.

  32. dianeh

    You don’t seriously expect the Libs stand on principle? Have a backbone? Keep their promises?

    Gab, being a long time LNP supporter, I did expect them to stand on principle and keep their promises. I expected them to protect our freedoms, our property rights, to reduce the size of govt, stop the boats and to foster an economy for growth. They have Liberal in their name after all.

    And they are failing miserably. I could not be more disappointed in them. I expect nothing but shit from Labor and they delivered beyond my wildest expectations. But I expected from my ‘guys’ that they were what it said on the wrapper.

    LNP – I will not be voting for you again. You are not the party I have supported over the years.

  33. H B Bear

    Is the Liberal Party going to show leadership or a vaguely ideological policy on anything?

    Get elected on a policy platform and do stuff. If you listen to the bleatings of the permanently professionally aggrieved, wog councils and the perpetually noisy interest groups you will do nothing. Then Labor returns and the whole process starts off – exactly where they left it.

    FMD. Brandis is turning out to be the great disappoint he always promised to be. And he isn’t Robinson Crusoe on that score.

  34. Infidel Tiger

    Haha!

    Anyone who votes Liberal after this is a self hating thicko.

  35. MemoryVault

    Anyone who votes Liberal after this is a self hating thicko.

    FTFY
    Nothing much has changed since Fraser got elected.

  36. Dr Faustus

    Not the biggest issue facing Australia, but a nice definition of this Government.

    The issue is blindingly simple: in a free society it cannot be an offense at law to give offense by expression of ideas – there can be no objective test to measure ‘offense’ by, the legal process is easily gamed, and the net effect is to give individuals the power to constrain free speech of others.

    Having now kicked the hornets’ nest, this Government’s response is also blindingly simple. It values its own electoral prospects above the values of the society that elected it. So, no big surprise there.

  37. Wozzup

    There is no doubt about it. The Left is winning the culture war. Although I loath their socialist agenda, they have demonstrated time and time again that they are capable of vastly better communication of their agenda, making the Liberals look inept and uncertain. Time and again Labor uses over the top scare tactics and the Liberals huff an puff then fold like a house of cards. Is there no one amongst the Liberals who has what it takes to prosecute a case and state an argument in a way that captures the imagination of the populace? Without this they will go on looking foolish and weak. And guess what. They will be. The case for removing 18C should be a walkover but instead Liberal yet again allow labor to have the ascendancy.

  38. gabrianga

    Perhaps Mr Brandis and the Coalition could consider levelling the playing field by removing the payment of mining and exploration “royalties” to one section of the Australian public?

    The receipt, distribution and use of these “royalty” payments discriminates against some Aborigines and all non-Aborigines and was of Socialist design introduced by Malcolm Fraser.

    Perhaps reducing the Land Council’s share of 40/50% of royalties might be a start?

    ps. Good to see the perennial Irish participation in Reconciliation Day

  39. Arnost

    Lot of talk in the comments above about warning Lib members you won’t give them first preference.
    Pointless exercise.
    Ultimately, in over 90% of cases, your vote will flow to LIB or LAB via preferences.
    They know this.

    Instead, tell them you are going to vote informal in the HoR, and for a minor party in the Senate.
    At least that deprives the bastards of taxpayers’ funds for their next election.
    Money seems to be the only language these pricks understand.

    This.

  40. Gab

    On Tuesday night, Opposition Leader Bill Shorten told an Australian Federation of Islamic Councils dinner that ”any move to weaken protections against hate speech is a seriously retrograde step”.

    Yes, thank you, Dolly. Brandis has received your message loud and clear and will obey.

  41. Beef

    Gab, we can’t have people denouncing cultural female genital mutilation, the calling for the beheading of all non believers and misogynistic attitudes towards women in general. Dolly is a fan. Brand-arse agrees.

  42. oldsalt

    The polls show a large majority want 18c to stay. The population’s changed since 1946, seems some Cats haven’t. Many in the ethnic communities will remember being bullied at school. Most people I know go to work each day with people from across the ethnic spectrum, often have to work with people they don’t have much in common with, and understand the potential problems in their workplace if just one bigoted dickhead says the wrong thing. So, quite sensibly, people want to keep what works. Bolt’s a conflict entrepreneur. Where’s the greater problem? With the propagandist or with those who are so receptive to the propagandist’s message?

  43. Max

    FTFY
    Nothing much has changed since Fraser got elected.

    Afterall Howard did nothing to repeal 18c

  44. Old School Conservative

    Baldrick, thanks for the links. Message sent.
    My disappointment with this crowd grows by the day.

  45. What really was the point in voting Libs?

    They may still be better than Labor, but it’s getting to the point where it’s worth some short term pain to force the Libs to reset… Of course, the idiots would learn the wrong lesson from being booted out, and conclude they need to be more like ALP. They really are that fucking dense.

  46. H B Bear

    Why do the fucking Liberals even bother forming government?

  47. egg_

    Why do the fucking Liberals even bother forming government?

    Their ‘core’ policy platform now resembles a colander?

  48. Habib

    Salty the statist, since when has it been possible, or advisable, to legislate manners? Who’s the arbiter, those who lack same? I was bullied at school, as WASPy a troop as you’d find, mostly by ethnic morons. What’s new? Does 18C cover being given the razz because you’re considerably more intelligent than the mouth-breathers around you, who’ve probably gone onto careers in politics and the trade union movement? A lot of people really need to grow up. Nanny may promise to wipe your bottom and scare away those nasty boys, but she’ll turn up late, with no nappies or mercurichrome.

  49. Habib

    But with lawyers……………..

  50. Beef

    Their ‘core’ policy platform now resembles a colander?

    Does this mean we should soon be getting some ‘leaks’?
    The whole party needs to be leaked on.

  51. jupes

    Next thing Brandis will appoint the current Australian of the Year as his advisor, if he hasn’t done so already.

  52. Andore Jr.

    I remember being bullied at school.

    The thought of government intervention never crossed my mind – ever.

  53. Token

    Many in the ethnic communities will remember being bullied at school.

    Yes, there has been a lot of stoking of that emotion.

  54. Aristogeiton

    oldsalt
    #1322788, posted on May 28, 2014 at 10:27 am
    The polls show a large majority want 18c to stay. The population’s changed since 1946, seems some Cats haven’t. Many in the ethnic communities will remember being bullied at school. Most people I know go to work each day with people from across the ethnic spectrum, often have to work with people they don’t have much in common with, and understand the potential problems in their workplace if just one bigoted dickhead says the wrong thing. So, quite sensibly, people want to keep what works. Bolt’s a conflict entrepreneur. Where’s the greater problem? With the propagandist or with those who are so receptive to the propagandist’s message?

    Yes, and s. 18C is the method by which the problem of “one bigoted dickhead [saying] the wrong thing” is ameliorated; it’s off to court to get an injunction or an apology – that’ll help (see RDA s. 26). No help are the various anti-discrimination instruments of the states, nor the industrial relations laws of the Commonwealth and States, nor the workplace policies made as a result, nor the state laws criminalising racial vilification.

    I leave aside the subjective nature of what constitutes the “wrong thing”, and any philosophical or consequentialist discussion thereof, because I fear your leftie head might explode.

  55. jupes

    So, quite sensibly, people want to keep what works.

    Except that it doesn’t.

    We now live in a land where pointing out the colour of people’s skin is an offence. What “works” about that?

  56. Old School Conservative

    It gets worse.
    “Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane called for transparency from the government through the public release of the submissions on the proposed changes. ”It would be a good thing for the public debate for us to know what people have been saying in their submissions,” he said.”
    Tim is either a hypocrite – he wants some opinions publicly available but not the speech he doesn’t like – or he wants payback on those who oppose his point of view.

  57. Beef

    My kids love me so much that they bought me tickets to the Gold Coast-Swans AFL game. Just so I can boo my head off every time Adam Goodes gets near the ball. I also want to see what all the fuss about a guy named Ablett. Would he have been a good AOTY. BTW I don’t follow AFL.

    I expect I will either be thrown out of the ground for expressing my distain or meet some wonderful people with similar feelings. Should be interesting.

  58. Token

    …often have to work with people they don’t have much in common with, and understand the potential problems in their workplace if just one bigoted dickhead says the wrong thing…

    pre-Fair Work IR system the person would be warned & sacked once the bigotry was exposed. This was very effective in the 90s in stopping morons.

    Under Fair Work the old unionist racket of protecting the bigots was extended to all workplaces, so now people look to devices like 18C for protection.

  59. Toiling Mass

    I swear the Libs don’t understand that their dropping polls is not the result of not attracting enough Labor voters, but pissing of Liberal ones.

    Is there anything they aren’t happy to drop in the ‘too-hard’ basket?

  60. MemoryVault

    Is there anything they aren’t happy to drop in the ‘too-hard’ basket?

    Of course.
    NBN, NDIS, Gonski, PPL . . .

  61. Token

    Don’t forget IR reform (including the myriad of rules created by Shorten to push people in the contracting industry to unions)

  62. Rabz

    The polls show a large majority want 18c to stay.

    I’d argue that if the electorate were presented with the reality of 18c and its ridiculous consequences, they would feel differently.

    The state has no business whatsoever policing “the causing of offence”, much less the sanctioning of people deemed to have done so.

    The entire concept is not only utterly fucking absurd, it is completely intolerable and leads directly to unacceptable abuses of state power.

    People do not have a human right to live their lives free of ‘offence’.

    There are a lot of people both within this country and outside of it that I consider extremely fucking offensive. There are a lot of absurd value systems, preposterous beliefs and totalitarian political views that I also consider extremely fucking offensive.

    I debate these deadshits and their beliefs on their merits in a contest of ideas and if I end up causing others offence, invariably for the ‘crime’ of pointing out the bleeding obvious, stiff fucking shit.

    Get over yourselves and get the fuck out of my life, you ridiculous, pretentious totalitarian wankers.

    Rant off/

  63. Gab

    I swear the Libs don’t understand that their dropping polls is not the result of not attracting enough Labor voters, but pissing of Liberal ones.

    Two days ago the mussies in Lakemba took to the streets and demonstrated against changes to the RDA. The Left have been in an uproar over Brandis’ (alleged) changes to the Act. GetUp has been running a campaign to stop changes to the ACT. These are the groups Brandis and Abbott are listening to on this matter. Principle of free speech doesn’t even register with the Libs. Pissing off people who voted the Libs in doesn’t even factor in their little lefty bubble.

  64. Baldrick

    I swear the Libs don’t understand that their dropping polls is not the result of not attracting enough Labor voters, but pissing of Liberal ones.

    Very true and if they keep attacking their voter base all it will do will be to see the rise of hung parliaments, with the balance of power given to lunatic fringe independents, or lunatic defected Coalition members. If they want to stay in government they’ve got to stop all this hand-wringing, bed-wetting, cry-baby b.s. and start to govern like they promised.

  65. Rob

    Forget the broken promises, the reality is that Australia is becoming ungovernable.

  66. Joe Goodacre

    It would be disappointing if Tim Wilson resigned.

    Talk about chucking a nana because he didn’t get his way!

    This was rolled out by a bunch of muppets – we have a right to be a bigot. What an absurd message to take to the electorate. Of course the easy response to that was ‘no we don’t', ‘you’re a bigot for thinking so’ or ‘you’re a white male so of course you don’t understand what we’re talking about’.

    The changes proposed were always contentious, poorly timed and a low priority. Since they were poorly executed they inevitably failed and political capital was wasted in the process. Who knows what effect the proposed changes had the WA senate re-election (perhaps we’d have one less Greens senator if this hornets nest hadn’t been touched).

    The government has started well on boats, has lost it’s message regarding the budget and has propped up pet projects of Abbott and Brandis that were politically risky with little payoff (knights and dames and s 18C). No doubt they’re way better than Labor, but come on, they’re shooting themselves in the foot here!

  67. It’s getting close to time for the IPA to declare war on the current government.

  68. Most people I know go to work each day with people from across the ethnic spectrum, often have to work with people they don’t have much in common with, and understand the potential problems in their workplace if just one bigoted dickhead says the wrong thing.

    Then why can’t most people you know OPEN THEIR MOUTHS and tell the bigoted dickhead that what s/he is saying is unacceptable, and to lay off?

    You don’t need a special law to make this possible; you and your mates – this vast horde of ‘most people you know’ out there – can just do something about it yourselves. And it doesn’t involve anyone getting beaten up; you just tell them, and make it clear that this kind of talk is not acceptable.

  69. Infidel Tiger

    It’s getting close to time for the IPA to declare war on the current government.

    If the IPA allows any Liberal MPs to speak at its events who don’t expressly declare their opposition to Sect 18c, the Wealth Tax and Fuel Tax, I will cancel my IPA membership and send them a pipe bomb.

  70. Gab

    Good luck trying to find the trasncript of Abbott’s speech to the IPA August 2012. When you go to the Lib site all you’ll find is the title but the transcript of Abbott’s speech is blank, which is telling.

    However it is here on video. Abbott’s lies begin at the 7 minute mark.

    Abbott used the IPA.

  71. Shelley

    Thankfully there isn’t a crime against thought (yet)…give it a few years and they will invent a way to make sure it is…’I don’t like the way he looked at me’.

  72. john malpas

    The ‘hate crime laws’ made possible the Tony Blair Cultural revolution. You can’t reject government action if you get arrested for saying the ‘wrong’ thing.
    So now the cities of England have fewer and fewer whites. And multiculturism grows.
    And the EU grows.

  73. Shelley

    You don’t need a special law to make this possible; you and your mates – this vast horde of ‘most people you know’ out there – can just do something about it yourselves. And it doesn’t involve anyone getting beaten up; you just tell them, and make it clear that this kind of talk is not acceptable.

    +1

    People have become wimps and fold at the first sign of anything that they should otherwise challenge.

  74. I am the Walrus, Koo Koo K'Choo

    Bloody hell, people. Are you surprised?

    You’re in the Abbott Socialist Republic.

    Credlin, her Prime Ministerial handpuppet, Brandis etc are absolutely determined to recreate the glory and triumph of the Fraser years. As far as they are concerned, apart from Scott Morrison’s successes, everything is on track.

    How long till we can clone Scott Morrison 150 times?

  75. Infidel Tiger

    Has there been a worse government?

    Gillard and Rudd were atrocious, but they stuck to their leftist agenda, so we can’t be surprised at that.

    This government has kept the Gillard/Rudd agenda and added a Wealth Tax and Fuel Tax, plus broken all its other promises. It’s surreal.

  76. Infidel Tiger

    How long till we can clone Scott Morrison 150 times?

    Morrison fully supports the tax lies. He is scum too.

  77. Dr.Sir Fred Lenin

    Well the National Green Laboral Party has done it again,crawling to the Scum of Aystralia,its the old “trust me Im a lawtradesperson” syndrome,what is it about socialists,greens,criminals ,and lawtradespeople and LYING ? Do they teach it in some hidden collage ? Are politicians always the Dux of class like giLIARd was? She was an accomplished liar,but only marginally ahead of the other pollies.

  78. harrys on the boat

    Gillard before politics was a union lawyer, a crook, a liar, a fabian socialist and was prominent in the socialist alliance. And at the first opportunity she jumped in bed with her brethren the communist greenfilth.

    So all of the socialist filth she infected us with wasn’t a surprise, it was actually expected. A despicable slapper she maybe, but we saw it coming a mile off.

    What do the Liberals actually stand for FFS? Brandis and Abbott couldn’t have more vehemently stated before the election state that 18c was gone. Primarily because of their “liberal” principles.

    I’m over these socialist pricks, and I feel disgusted that I put Liberal 1 above the line on the senate re-run here in WA.

  79. Aristogeiton

    Gab
    #1322895, posted on May 28, 2014 at 11:35 am
    [...]
    Abbott used the IPA.

    Bingo. Some of the more perceptive on here warned of this very thing. Fool me once…

  80. stackja

    More unrealistic expectations.

  81. Fisky

    The government’s done and their authority is shot. Abbott gave himself an almighty uppercut and is lying motionless on the canvass

  82. Habib

    What’s unrealistic about expecting someone supposedly honourable to keep their word? Why are politicians exempt from the standards of decent society, business, the military and even the sodding public service? Are they really that reprehensible, vile, duplicitous, venal and morally bankrupt*?

    *Rhetorical question. In this case, everything they say before an election should be regarded as a bare-faced lie, and the whole charade run as a chook wheel. Couldn’t get a worse end result.

  83. Gab

    More unrealistic expectations.

    True. It was unrealistic of me to believe the Libs would keep their word and would uphold free speech.

  84. I am the Walrus, Koo Koo K'Choo

    This government has kept the Gillard/Rudd agenda and added a Wealth Tax and Fuel Tax, plus broken all its other promises. It’s surreal.

    +99 – I’m taking ’1′ off because they kept their promise on stopping the boats.

    How disheartening.

  85. will

    My kids love me so much that they bought me tickets to the Gold Coast-Swans AFL game. Just so I can boo my head off every time Adam Goodes gets near the ball. I also want to see what all the fuss about a guy named Ablett. Would he have been a good AOTY. BTW I don’t follow AFL.

    I expect I will either be thrown out of the ground for expressing my distain or meet some wonderful people with similar feelings. Should be interesting.

    Tell us how you go.

  86. Lem

    Letter sent to Brandis, for the good it will do.

    I am voting LDP, George.

  87. Beef

    Tell us how you go.

    No worrys will, will do. Game is at 3:20pm Sunday the 8th. Report to be that Sunday night or following Monday morning. It was birthday gift, my kids know me so well and are coming with me for all the spleen venting. I’m going to watch the next few Swans games on TV for reference, I have heard I will not be a lone voice.

  88. Yon Toad

    I also sent a letter to Brandis. Dunno why…optimism I guess. I really don’t expect anything but poli-speak back despite the fact that I asked for an unequivocal answer. Until Brandis steps up or Sinclair names his senior(ish) Liberal (kite flyer), I choose to remain optimistic. BUT, if the LNP shows itself to be a weak kneed nancy-boy collective we are indeed not just f@cked but rather, well and truly weasel-f@cked!

  89. Gab

    I also sent a letter to Brandis.

    Me too, for any good it will do.

  90. Baldrick

    I also sent a letter to Brandis.

    Me too, for any good it will do.

    When Cats go rogue …

  91. Gab

    Recent reports indicating that the Abbott government is about to back down on the proposed repeal of section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act are deeply concerning,” said Simon Breheny, Director of the Legal Rights Project at free market think tank the Institute of Public Affairs.

    Fairfax newspapers today report that the government is considering backing down over its proposed amendments to section 18C.

    On 25 March 2014, the Abbott government released exposure draft legislation which sought to repeal section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act. Section 18C currently makes it unlawful to “offend, insult, humiliate or intimidate” a person on the grounds of race, colour or national or ethnic origin. Section 18C was used against News Corp Australia journalist Andrew Bolt in 2011.

    The IPA has long argued that section 18C is a restriction on freedom of speech and should be repealed – most recently in a submission to the Attorney-General’s Department.

    “The Abbott government was elected after promising to repeal section 18C. If changes are made to the exposure draft the Abbott government risks breaking its election commitment on free speech,” said Mr Breheny.

    “The Abbott government must proceed with the exposure draft in its current form. Weakening the exemption provision, expanding the definition provisions or making any other changes which broaden the scope of the exposure draft would be a disaster for free speech,” said Mr Breheny.

    http://freedomwatch.ipa.org.au/abbott-government-must-proceed-to-restore-free-speech/

  92. daggers

    I also sent a letter to Brandis.

    Me too

  93. Vicki

    Is it any wonder there is so much bitter comment on this blog about this government’s direction?

    It was always known that the ethnic lobby would put up an almighty opposition to the repeal of 18C. That was a given. Abbott & Co knew it – or should have known it.

    But the Draft proposition only toyed with 18C in any case. My God! If they don’t even have the guts to go ahead with THAT small token gesture, what hope have we that we can reclaim freedom of speech in this country??

    Incidentally, I hope that everyone who supports the repeal of 18C on this blog has written a submission to that effect. I know plenty of people who “talk the talk”, but didn’t bother to even scribble a few lines as a submission.

    There is one thing about the Left, and the ethnic lobby as well – they are LOUD. The success of the angry Right in the EU elections should remind people that nothing changes without commitment and effort.

  94. Old School Conservative

    Fairfax newspapers today report that the government is considering backing down over its proposed amendments to section 18C.
    I smell a rat. If the Government is kite flying, why would they leak to the cheerleaders of the Opposition? Could Fairfax just be up to more mischief?

  95. johanna

    As I have said before, the government’s media management is apparently courtesy of the Teletubbies.

    Of course there was going to be a huge pushback – entirely predictable.

    So, who was out there explaining to ordinary punters in the pubs and clubs that the repeal was all about people speaking frankly among themselves not breaking the law. Who was out there saying that the pushback was the PC brigade rampant. Who was out there defending the “larrikin” social tradition, the right to crack a politically incorrect joke, the clear distinction between what people say and what they do?

    Crickets.

    Imagine what a Paul Hogan-like figure could have done with this?

    To describe them as amateurs is insulting to the many gifted amateurs out there.

  96. DrBeauGan

    Stack, there’s a pattern here. From appointing a loony lefty as ambassador for women to imposing a wealth levy. I do not owe loyalty to scum who betray me to appease the left. My loyalty is to the traditions of the anglosphere which made us the dominant force on the planet and overwhelmingly a force for good. I shall never vote for scum who are trying to deceive us about being liberals and who are nothing of that kind.

  97. Malefactor

    Don’t any to these people understand the human dynamics that come with the state suppression of the sometimes idiotic statements made by people in a free and open discussion? People don’t have a right to be bigots as much as they have a fundamental responsibility to offer their views and air their beliefs should they feel the need to do so.
    By advocating a state-funded legal system that searches out and then disciplining those who run a particular line it seems the school-teacher, ABC, HR types – who apparently think they own Australians – believe they can keep a nice, tidy quadrangle for nice, tidy ideas. This is bonkers.
    It bottles up the often misplaced rage of those who feel that they have been excluded, and in fact protects some of the most abhorrent people from being exposed for who they really are. Let ideas be free, let them be offensive and let them reflect the truth about those who offer them. And then, let the rest of us judge those characters based on their publicly expressed views. It’s either that, or a prepare for a generation of snivelling little aggrieved jerks running their conspiracy theories, and making all sorts of secret plans from their little hidey-holes.

  98. Andrew

    Western Sydney marginal seat holders have had electoral offices vandalised and their offices flooded with calls. It had to be watered down because of the political capital that would be used for what is a rarely used law. I’d prefer it to be abolished, but one has to pick their political battles.

  99. Aristogeiton

    Andrew
    #1323190, posted on May 28, 2014 at 3:02 pm
    Western Sydney marginal seat holders have had electoral offices vandalised and their offices flooded with calls. It had to be watered down because of the political capital that would be used for what is a rarely used law. I’d prefer it to be abolished, but one has to pick their political battles.

    Nice principles.

  100. Sinclair Davidson

    I’d prefer it to be abolished, but one has to pick their political battles.

    Slave.

  101. greid

    Breheny’s a good bloke but he couldn’t even destroy Commisar Triggs in the Sky News debate over 18C. He needs his debating skills to be sharpened.

  102. Aristogeiton

    Sinclair Davidson
    #1323204, posted on May 28, 2014 at 3:11 pm
    I’d prefer it to be abolished, but one has to pick their political battles.

    Slave.

    See here’s the thing: the left will fight (and win) ideological wars over the most dissolute and meaningless issues. Take a principled stand for liberty and instantly the pragmatists are telling you not to be blinkered by ideology and to pick your battles. How did we get here in the first place? Because the left already picked and won the battles, and conservatives and liberals alike just stood there watching them ransack our civilization largely unopposed.

  103. MT Isa Miner

    Andrew

    #1323190, posted on May 28, 2014 at 3:02 pm

    Western Sydney marginal seat holders have had electoral offices vandalised and their offices flooded with calls. It had to be watered down because of the political capital that would be used for what is a rarely used law. I’d prefer it to be abolished, but one has to pick their political battles.

    Andrew, none of us here are stupid. The Liberals retards couldn’t sell water in the fucking desert. It is their own fault that me and several others here are slipping the pin- manage the politics for fucks sake or get out.

    Aristogeiton

    #1323219, posted on May 28, 2014 at 3:25 pm

    See here’s the thing: the left will fight (and win) ideological wars over the most dissolute and meaningless issues. Take a principled stand for liberty and instantly the pragmatists are telling you not to be blinkered by ideology and to pick your battles. How did we get here in the first place? Because the left already picked and won the battles, and conservatives and liberals alike just stood there watching them ransack our civilization largely unopposed.

    And what Aristo said.

  104. Vicki

    It has been reported today ( http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-28/keysar-trad-wants-to-run-for-federal-parliament/5483302 ) that Keysar Trad has turned to the Liberal Party in his ambition to run as an MP!

    The mind runs riot over this one and its timing!

    Does he think this will cause them to back down on 18C? Does it indicate their total contempt for the Liberals? Is he quite mad?

    Or all of the above?

  105. Vicki

    The link seems to be broken, so here is the story:

    Sydney Muslim community leader Keysar Trad sounds out Labor, Liberals for federal seat
    By political reporter Latika Bourke

    Mr Trad says he’s interested in seeking preselection for the Liberal Party to run in the Senate.

    Sydney Muslim community leader Keysar Trad says he has spoken with both Labor and the Liberals about running for Federal Parliament, but neither has given him the nod.

    Mr Trad has told the ABC he was in eight months of negotiations with the Labor Party before the last federal election, but they went nowhere.

    But a senior Labor source says the talks were aimed at discouraging him at running as an independent in the Lower House seat of Blaxland, which is held by Labor’s Jason Clare.

    Mr Trad was invited to join Labor and continue making a contribution from within the party.

    But Mr Trad did not take up the invitation, and says he is now interested in seeking preselection from the Liberal Party to run in the Senate.

    “I haven’t joined any political party, however I would not discount the possibility of one day joining a party,” Mr Trad told the ABC.

    “I’ve raised the issue with improving the community’s representations with both parties, but they’ve made no promises.

    “I’ve had a couple of casual discussions with Liberal figures but there are no promises of anything.”

    He said a Muslim friend active in the Queensland Liberal National Party had talked to him about filling a Senate vacancy in Queensland but “nothing eventuated”.

    “I’m interested in giving more representation for my community, for me my preference is federal, my preference is an Upper House seat,” he said.

    Mr Trad said he supported socially progressive policies as well as traditional values.

    He said his priority was human rights and he would be at home in either party if they allowed him to continue being outspoken on the issue.

    “My ideology is to serve humanity, I’m sort of the harmony between the two [parties],” he said.

    But he said if he joined the Liberal Party, his first “stumbling block” would be over the issue of free access to Medicare and the Coalition’s proposed fee for GP visits.

    “I would be fighting within the party and sending a strong message that Medicare should always be accessible to everybody,” he said.

    Cory Bernardi not convinced Liberals need a ‘party shopper’

    But Liberal Senator Cory Bernardi has cast doubt on whether Mr Trad would be welcome in the party, because of his views on issues involving Islam.

    “I’m not convinced the Liberal Party needs a ‘party shopper’ in search of a political career – particularly one whose agenda includes the acceptance of sharia law in Australia and advocacy for polygamous marriage,” Senator Bernardi told the ABC.

    “Of course that’s ultimately a matter for the respective party organisation.”

    Mr Trad has previously advocated for some aspects of sharia law but has said that he does not advocate its penal code.

    Today he said some Coalition figures had made “very Islam-phobic statements” and said they needed to “interact more with Muslims”.

    He said Government whip Phillip Ruddock and NSW Senator Concetta Fierravanti-Wells attended a multicultural event he held at Parliament House on Tuesday night, while Attorney-General George Brandis had planned to attend.

    Mr Trad said that was evidence many in the Liberal Party would welcome increased input from the Muslim community.

    But he condemned New South Wales Senator Bill Heffernan’s fake pipe bomb stunt, claiming it was directed at him and his event.

    “I am very concerned that Bill Heffernan pulled his security stunt the night before our function,” he said.

    “Obviously that sends the wrong message to my community.

    “The only way to address that cynicism is to educate them. This makes it crucial that the Liberal Party needs many more Muslims working with it to help them see that Muslims are part and parcel of Australian society.

    “We are here and part of Australian society; there is nowhere else for us to go.

    “This is one of the reasons why we need to be in there. There are clearly people in the party who don’t have correct information about Islam,” he said.

  106. Gab

    No doubt the Libs will welcome Trad with open arms.

  107. egg_

    Despite their PC front, the Left regard Waleed Aly as a stereotypically misogynistic Muslim and Right wing sympathiser, so of course they view him as ‘Rightwing’.

  108. Alfonso

    Senator Trad’s associates re his ASIO file might be a worry.
    Still, guilty Tone would be up for a national Catsmeat Day in tugging deference to the Trad’s cultural sensibilities…..in an attempt to get those young women to cover up, like in a properly run society.

  109. David

    Seems the community spokesperson Trad has been plagiarising Golda Meir with his “there is nowhere else for us to go.

    We Jews have a secret weapon in our struggle with the Arabs; we have no place to go. Golda Meir.

    Naughty Muzzie. Are he and his fifteen “wives” still on social services?

    Oh and plus one for the letter to Brandis.

  110. I predict that the only cases that will be tried and found guilty under this law will be cases that the law was never intended for.
    The hateful bogan leaning out of a v8 Holden shouting obscenities at someone on the street; that’s never going to be a typical prosecution under this law.

  111. daggers

    LOL. Keysar Trad in Parliament. It’s a multi culti dream come true. Then when he starts demanding women cover up and restricting education to boys or merging Al Jazeera with the ABC and clamping down on gay marriage we’ll all wonder how it came to this. FMD. Poor fella my country.

  112. None

    Trad won’t clamp down on gay marriage daggers. Once you have gay marriage you can’t stop polygamy and he’s been hankering for a harem for quite some time now. That’s what you have to remember any time any Muslim of any persuasion tells you they ‘support’ gay marriage: My Shari’Amour.

  113. Talleyrand

    Well which of Trad’s several allegedly common law wives will he take to the swearing in ceremony?

    You know the ones allegedly claiming the dole and government benefits, thus permitting their alleged husband to keep the Qur’an abd Sharia law’s requirement on having multiple wives only if one can support them.

    With any luck Trad will get a gig in Labor, and be promoted to sit on the Office of National Assessments.

  114. Baldrick

    And the response from TA:

    Dear Mr. ‘Baldrick’
    Thank you for your correspondence dated 28 May 2014 to the Prime Minister. The Prime Minister has asked me to thank you for your correspondence.
    Your views are noted and they are important. A strong democracy and a responsive government always require constant feedback from its people about the issues that concern them.
    The matters raised in your correspondence relate to the portfolio responsibilities of the Attorney-General. As such, the Prime Minister has referred your correspondence for a response.
    Further details about contacting the Minister and department can be found at http://www.gold.gov.au.
    Thank you again for writing to the Prime Minister.
    Yours sincerely
    Ministerial and Parliamentary Support Branch
    28 May 2014

    Sigh!!

  115. Yon Toad

    Re Baldrick’s response from TA: That’s polispeak for “Tell your story walkin.”.

  116. Justin

    Most Australians have never heard of 18C and hence couldn’t care one iota

    An avalanche of orchestrated lefties with pro forma responses sounds to me.

    That the government would cower to this is pathetic.

    But the real problem is this is a government that has time and time again destroyed its political capital on minor issues and that includes a budget that was not really a budget instead of getting on with the main job.

    If they focussed on the big ticket items and quietly brought in, incrementally, other reforms they would have more success. These guys seem divorced of any political nous and strategic common sense.

Comments are closed.