Leonardo: stick to acting

I have a confession to make: I have enjoyed many of the movies in which Leonardo di Caprio has starred.

But when he goes off pouncing about at some sort of  international eco forum telling the enthralled audience that Australia is destroying the Great Barrier Reef and all developments must cease forthwith, my ardour for him as an actor comes off the boil.

Please, Leo, just stick to acting, and stop banging on about things about which you would not have the faintest clue.

Here is some objective information on the state of the GBR.

UNESCO’s World Heritage Committee (WHC) has delivered a vote of confidence in Australia’s ongoing management of the iconic Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Queensland Resources Council Chief Executive Michael Roche said all Australians would welcome the committee’s decision in Doha (Qatar) to reject activist calls to place the reef on the World Heritage ‘in-danger’ list.‘We are pleased the committee is as focused on the future management of the Great Barrier Reef as we are here,’ Mr Roche said.‘The decision is global acknowledgement that Australia is on track to deliver a long-term plan for conservation of the Great Barrier Reef’s outstanding universal value (OUV).‘The federal and state governments’ progress on improving the reef’s management and health is evident from the recently released Queensland Ports Strategy and Reef Water Quality Report Card.’Mr Roche said the report card confirmed science-based programs were improving reef water quality, which in turn, would play a role in reducing Crown-of-Thorn starfish outbreaks.Storm damage, starfish outbreaks and coral bleaching were identified by the Australian Institute of Marine Science in 2012 as the major threats to reef health.‘In relation to future port management, the Cumulative Impact Assessment prepared for the Abbot Point coal terminal expansion has created a new standard for informing government decision-makers.‘The cumulative approach to environmental impacts gave the federal government and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority the scientific confidence they needed to approve the project subject to 142 conditions.‘Maintaining the outstanding universal value of the Great Barrier Reef was the centrepiece of the assessment process, which has set a world class benchmark for marine precinct management.’Port-related activities along the 2,300 kilometre-long Great Barrier Reef occupy less than one percent of the coastline and the areas set aside for sediment relocation represent less than 0.02 percent of the world heritage property area.

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43 Responses to Leonardo: stick to acting

  1. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Would this be the Leonardo di Caprio who took a yacht about the size of your average battleship to the World Cup in Rio?

  2. Judith Sloan

    Yep, that would be the one.

  3. Gab

    But when he goes off pouncing about at some sort of international eco forum telling the enthralled audience that Australia is destroying the Great Barrier Reef and all developments must cease forthwith,

    Leo is a qualified climate scientist, doncha know?

    Quite frankly, I’m sick to death of celebrities telling us what they’ve been told to tell us. What business is it it of Leo Cappers? Someone who earns millions preening and pretending to be someone else does not an authority of climate science make.

  4. Robbo

    What is it about these actors wanting to sound off on every subject under the sun without having a clue about the subject? We have our local versions in the stunningly stupid Cate Blanchett and that dumb bum Russell Crowe at the forefront. These poor deluded individuals, who are paid massive amounts of money to pretend they are someone else, have extended their acting out of fantasies into their real lives. Sad individuals.

  5. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    celebrities telling us what they’ve been told to tell us

    Why does the name of a certain Irish rock star spring to mind?

  6. nerblnob

    I thought bleaching one’s coral starfish was quite the in-thing among celebs these days?

  7. David

    He should have fallen off the bow of that ship and saved us all from his silly prognostications.

    Another Carbon Kate.

  8. Docket62

    It was a delight to watch Julie bishop tear that smug arsehole Toddfuckingsampson a new one on the Project tonight. Made him look like the idiot he is… Worth a rewind to watch it again.

  9. Docket62

    He was banging on about the reef. Sorry.. Forgot to put that in!

  10. A Lurker

    He’s an actor – actors, to put it bluntly, like to play dress-up and let’s pretend. Every profession has a particular skillset – the actor’s skill is to remember their lines and to portray a character. Just because they are on the screen or stage doesn’t make them any more insightful, wise or clever than anyone else. It just makes them more visible; and given that so many of them are utter Socialist flakes and have serious personality disorders it amazes me that their opinions are given any weight or consideration at all.

    Personally I reckon your average knockabout jackaroo would possess more common sense and have a better handle on real life and have more insightful views on the environment than any actor, let alone, anyone out of the plastic palaces of Hollywood.

  11. Marcurse

    By constantly dealing with the ‘suspension of disbelief’ so intimately, many in that industry inhale too many vapours.

    Main Entry: suspension of disbelief
    Part of Speech: phr
    Definition: a willingness to suspend one’s critical faculties and believe the unbelievable; sacrifice of realism and logic for the sake of enjoyment

  12. john of dandenong

    For 40 years ‘scientists’ had their nose in the public trough to ‘study’ the declining GBR and the terrible effects of the Crown of Thorns starfish. Pollies eventually got sick and tired of the bullshit submissions and cut grants. Bingo ‘climate change’ or whatever its name was those days appeared as a worthy submission for public money. No that’s drying up we are back to the GBR. Just how low will some stoop for money? If that actor is so worried about the future he should follow nuclear attack advice, i.e., face east, drop your pants, bend over and kiss your arse goodbye.

  13. Roger

    1st line: I think you mean “poncing”, Judith.

  14. I have a confession to make: I have enjoyed many of the movies in which Leonardo di Caprio has starred.

    I like many of his movies too.

  15. cynical1

    Can’t stand the tosser.

    He makes David Marr look tough…

  16. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Off the Titanic now and on to SS Global Warming, recently renovated as SS Climate Change.
    This one really needs to meet an iceberg. And take Leonardo with it this time.

  17. Baldrick

    Di Caprio is a twat. Do as I say, not as I do … typical leftist meme.

    nerblnob
    #1351860, posted on June 18, 2014 at 9:05 pm
    I thought bleaching one’s coral starfish was quite the in-thing among celebs these days?

    +1 LOL

  18. 1st line: I think you mean “poncing”, Judith.

    Judith needs an editor.
    I’ll do it for free.

  19. JohnA

    Gab #1351833, posted on June 18, 2014 at 8:47 pm

    Leo is a qualified climate scientist, doncha know?

    Quite frankly, I’m sick to death of celebrities telling us what they’ve been told to tell us.

    It’s not that they are celebs, it’s that they speak without backing up their statements with a grasp of the facts. Just like so many others around the world.

    From left field, for example, I have no objection to John Travolta talking about flying, and large aircraft. He is a Qantas Ambassador for marketing purposes.

    But he is also a qualified pilot on multi-engines, flies his own Boeing 707, and is respected around the aviation scene as a disciplined and highly capable left seat captain. He never plays the celebrity game in the air.

    He walks the talk. I notice that he never talks about climate change err variability etc.

  20. Bruce of Newcastle

    These people don’t seem to realise what damage they are doing to their Cause as they fly around in their personal jets and light their mansions up like Christmas trees.

    As Glen Reynolds of Instapundit says over and over:

    I’ll believe it’s a crisis when the people who tell me it’s a crisis start acting like it’s a crisis.

    Telling us to wear hairshirts and sit in the dark isn’t especially convincing when the guy saying this is partying in Rio with 21 mates on an Arab oil sheik’s megayacht.

  21. outsider

    They play to the claquers – the left having captured the arts long back. Eastwood has spoken about these idiots at some length. Witness Spiderman’s ASD boy’s antics in poker games, written up recently – leftism is a stated of arrested intellectual development, a circle of confusion from which many never escape.

    The average moviegoer is an 18-24 year old coke-guzzling, popcorn-gorging slob with electronica-induced ADHD, so those on both sides of the screen have much in common. Leo has grown up, however, and I like his movies these days. ‘The camera likes him’.

  22. cohenite

    I’ll do it for free.

    Will you numbers. Well, you get what you pay for.

  23. cohenite

    Hollywood has always been pro-AGW; even before the misanthropic concept was invented.

    I love the movies, such a great invention; but actors are whores and wankers.

  24. Rabz

    I have enjoyed many of the movies in which Leonardo di Caprio has starred.

    I can’t remember a movie I’ve seen that the coke addled moron was even in, apart from “the Departed”, which I actually enjoyed – and made even more unlikely by the presence of this equally drug addled imbecile.

  25. Toiling Mass

    You have to wonder if any of them really believe in AGW. It seems more like a way of keeping themselves on people’s minds until their next movie comes out.

    Left wing fans approve of these inane platitudes because every moment of their lives they are judging people because they need to separate out ‘good’ from ‘evil’ – the categories underwhich they classify themselves and others.

    Others are more likely to indulge loudmouths, accepting that they can be wrong or ignorant of facts – no need to punish.

    I liked Di Caprio in Catch Me If You Can, and in Inception. Entertaining enough movies. Hated Titanic though.

    Don’t think I have ever enjoyed a George Clooney movie.

  26. cohenite

    Clooney was good in Out of Sight based on the novel by the great Elmore Leonard. It’s pretty hard to make a bad movie based on Elmore; even Bronson made a good movie based on one of Elmore’s novels, Mr Majestic.

    But Clooney is Hollywood royalty which means he’s more inbred than the rest of the fuckwits.

  27. Toiling Mass

    Thanks, cohenite.

    I’ll give George one more chance.

    And I know what you mean by Hollywood royalty. He is also in the Diplomatic Corps – he is Obamas man in Hollywood. Certainly the senior. Full Ambassador I would say.

  28. brc

    The thing is – this BS spouted on a regular basis does real damage to the Australian tourist industry.

    While in the US recently I spoke about the GBR to a table full of people. One of them said ‘isn’t it all dead already’. Not specifically climate change – that level of detail hadn’t sunk in, but just general ‘OMG reef dying, bad people’ – that was the only part of the message that was left over.

    I explained that it was longer than California and a zillion years old, and quite capable of looking after itself, and still very much worth a visit.

    If the useless people in the Aust tourism board or whoever they are found something useful to do, it could be marketing the fact that the reef is very much alive and kicking. A great campaign would be a bunch of bored-looking hair-shirt wearers sitting around a candle in a cold climate, going on about how even the GBR is dead.

    Then cut to some beautiful young people enjoying themselves immensely on a sailing boat, snorkelling, splashing, visiting remote beaches.

    Message : Shh, don’t tell anyone, but we’re still enjoying fun in the sun..
    or : If only they knew how good it really is

    Or something along those lines.

    I wonder how the people of NY would feel if Australian actors and celebrities went around saying New York is overrun with terrorists. To me it’s the same thing – spreading lies which do actually harm.

  29. Cynic

    I welcome the comments of Mr Roche from the Queensland Resources Council that sanity has effectively prevailed at the UNESCO meeting. It is premature to list the GBR as “in danger” until we see if Governments, businesses and the community follow through with the existing suite of commitments.

    After all, it would be economically inefficient if developments were allowed to continue without addressing external impacts wouldn’t it?

    I would also welcome from Mr Roche some genuine and transparent information on what the mining and energy sector in the GBR catchments are actually spending to address water quality, particularly as a proportion of their lifecycle cost base. 1-3% of costs at the most would be my guess??? Correct me if I’m wrong. And the expenditure above meeting minimum regulatory requirements?? Hang on, I’ll see how much loose change I have in my pocket…….

  30. Leonardo di Caprio is one of the better actors about right now.

  31. Bruce of Newcastle

    While in the US recently I spoke about the GBR to a table full of people

    Poll question on ABC Newsradio webpage this morning:

    Do you believe the Great Barrier Reef should be listed as ‘in danger’?

    Currently 70% yes : 30% no

  32. brc

    Yikes – even Australians believe the reef is in danger.

    It makes you think of a bunch of people arguing whether the world is flat when they can just go out and check with their own eyes.

    Take a flight over the reef people. It looks in rude health to me. I’ve seen dead reefs – usually in poor countries with no rubbish/fishing/pollution control. The GBR looks nothing like any of those.

    The biggest problem on the reef right now is overcharging by reef operators. We really need an Uber-like reef visiting service where anyone with a seaworthy boat can organzie and take passengers out for a day.

  33. Will you numbers. Well, you get what you pay for.

    It’s charity.
    I feel sorry for her.

  34. .

    Numbers you think the VC executing peasants is Ronald Reagan’s fault.

    Save that pity for yourself, champion.

  35. cohenite

    Hey numbers, why don’t you get a job with Leo. He could use someone like you.

  36. The reef is not in danger.

    Environmentalists have been loudly worrying about the reef dying for at least forty years due to a range of threats.

    The reef is a headline catcher for green activists, to try to get people’s attention. The side effect of using the reef as shock tactics for environmental messaging is that, over time, the value of the reef is being degraded, and it’s fame is being degraded.

    They’re literally spending the reputation of the barrier reef on environmental campaigning.

  37. Remember the crown of thorns starfish? When I was in primary school, a long time ago, a man came to the school and told us that the crown of thorns starfish was destroying the reef. None of this is new.

  38. Cynic

    “Aussiepundit
    #1352752, posted on June 19, 2014 at 5:20 pm
    Remember the crown of thorns starfish? When I was in primary school, a long time ago, a man came to the school and told us that the crown of thorns starfish was destroying the reef. None of this is new.”

    Correct. The scientific literature demonstrates that crown of thorns starfish are not a new problem at all. They have always been a bit of a cyclical event. The risks that crown of thorns are to the reef is just greater nowadays because the higher levels of nutrient runoff is like fertility drugs to their spawning process. Hence, breakouts will be much more intensive and widespread than when you were at primary school. And we still don’t know a cost effective way of killing them off or controlling the population.

  39. nerblnob

    OMG reef dying, bad people

    BBC Radio 2 just now played di Caprio’s speech as if it was an authoritative news report and, like, hey thanks Leonard for putting it out there!

    So there you go. Australia is a dark benighted country and would keep all The Destruction of The Reef under wraps were it not for brave American film actors bringing truth and light.

    FFS.

  40. nerblnob

    I would also welcome from Mr Roche some genuine and transparent information on what the mining and energy sector in the GBR catchments are actually spending to address water quality, particularly as a proportion of their lifecycle cost base. 1-3% of costs at the most would be my guess??? Correct me if I’m wrong. And the expenditure above meeting minimum regulatory requirements??

    If they meet regulatory requirements, what’s the problem?

    Are you saying the regulatory requirements are too low (that would be a first for Australia!), or that mining and energy companies should just pay more, because… well, it’s their money but we’d like some more of it.

  41. nerblnob

    It’s pretty hard to make a bad movie based on Elmore

    Felix Gray did try …

  42. Cynic

    nerblnob
    #1353452, posted on June 20, 2014 at 1:34 am

    “Are you saying the regulatory requirements are too low (that would be a first for Australia!), or that mining and energy companies should just pay more, because… well, it’s their money but we’d like some more of it.”

    In virtually all cases, developments (mines, urban, industrial, farm intensification) result in increases in loads, even after meeting regulatory requirements. I think the problem is that we just don’t have very smart regulation. It rarely incentivises reducing loads. Rather it just creates administrative red tape and does little to address the actual problem.

    What I do object to is the unsubstantiated claims by the mining/energy industry that “green tape” is killing their industry. I have never seen any actual consolidated data from the industry that backs up the claim, particularly anything that puts the cost of meeting environmental obligations into perspective. Unfortunately the available ABS data is pretty old, but it does indicate that “water management” (which includes managing discharges) was only about 2% of production costs.

    And there is nothing right about mines making higher profits via lower environmental outcomes, if it just means the rest of us wear the cost from the environmental damage.

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