Was this in the news?

June 19 was the hundredth anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the event that started World War I.

The world has never been the same.

More astonishing than anything I can think of is the absence of news on this. But as I am on the road and in North America, maybe it’s everywhere but I just didn’t see.

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46 Responses to Was this in the news?

  1. Viva

    Well I was listening to the radio in the wee hours of the morning a couple of nights ago when I couldn’t sleep and I whizzed past a station where someone was talking about Franz Ferdinand – and kept going down the dial. So that must have been it.

  2. kae

    Steve
    I saw a tiny item on TV, a sound bite advertising news or something, saying that there are some who these days say that Gavrilo Princip (was that his name? Don’t know spelling…) was a hero.

  3. .

    Wasn’t he?

    What was so good about the Austrian Empire?

    Quite a lot.

    However, they were shameless, militarily aggressive imperialists who expanded on the basis of conquest.

    Someone like Franz Ferdinand would these days be regarded in the same way as Saddam Hussein or Putin.

    That Supreme Dickhead Charles Woolley actually got stuck into his family who considered him a hero.

  4. Bruce K

    Tim Butcher has a new book out in time for the centenary . ” The Trigger ” covers the assassination and the fate of Princip. I have not read it yet but it had a good review in Spectator. I recommended it to our local library and I will pick up my copy tomorrow.

  5. Bruce of Newcastle

    Tonight at 9:30 SBS has a dramatization called 37 Days – the time between the Archduke’s assassination and the start of the war between Serbia and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Which of course led to bigger things.

  6. jupes

    Read the article Steve. The Archduke was assisnated on 28 June 1914.

    You’ll probably read about it a lot more then.

  7. jupes

    assisnated

    Assassinated.

  8. Infidel Tiger

    60 Minutes are interviewing the shooters family this Sunday.

  9. 2dogs

    I think the problem here is we are unsure how to commemorate this centenary.

    Are we sorry for the archduke? Is it a celebration, since the assassins were on our side? A day to be mourned?

  10. Rabz

    Definitely a day to be mourned.

    The not so slow and extremely inevitable decline of the West can be traced to the commencement of this most singularly absurd and destructive conflict.

  11. Tel

    Must be close to the 100th anniversary of the lie about income tax being temporary and just because we have no choice and need to pay for the war. Does anyone have a more accurate reference?

  12. entropy

    Sounds like the manticore government with itstemporary progressive income tax to fund the war, which the progressives tried to keep /obscure sci fi reference

  13. kae

    There is a programme on SBSone right now called 37 days.

    The assassination was June 28, 1914.

  14. kae

    Er, oops.

    I feel like the white rabbit!

  15. Des Deskperson

    I recently re-read the Sarajevo chapters of Rebecca West’s ‘Grey Falcon Black Lamb’ – her travelogue-cum- history of the Balkans – where she has quite a bit to say about Franz Ferdinand. To précis her account in the shortest possible way: he was nasty, crazed, erratic and stupid.

  16. which demands did the Serbs refuse?
    1. Suppress all publications which “incite hatred and contempt of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy” and are “directed against its territorial integrity”.
    2. Dissolve the Serbian nationalist organisation “Narodna Odbrana” (“The People’s Defense”) and all other such societies in Serbia.
    3. Eliminate without delay from schoolbooks and public documents all “propaganda against Austria-Hungary”.
    4. Remove from the Serbian military and civil administration all officers and functionaries whose names the Austro-Hungarian Government will provide.
    5. Accept in Serbia “representatives of the Austro-Hungarian Government” for the “suppression of subversive movements”.
    6. Bring to trial all accessories to the Archduke’s assassination and allow “Austro-Hungarian delegates” (law enforcement officers) to take part in the investigations.
    7. Arrest Major Vojislav Tankosić and civil servant Milan Ciganović who were named as participants in the assassination plot.
    8. Cease the cooperation of the Serbian authorities in the “traffic in arms and explosives across the frontier”; dismiss and punish the officials of Šabac and Loznica frontier service, “guilty of having assisted the perpetrators of the Sarajevo crime”.
    9. Provide “explanations” to the Austro-Hungarian Government regarding “Serbian officials” who have expressed themselves in interviews “in terms of hostility to the Austro-Hungarian Government”.
    10. Notify the Austro-Hungarian Government “without delay” of the execution of the measures comprised in the ultimatum.

  17. stackja

    To paraphrase/misquote:
    The Black Hand wrote once having writ moves on.

  18. stackja

    Five of the 10:
    World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1

    Sir Max Hastings – military historian
    Germany
    No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most.

    Sir Richard J Evans – Regius professor of history, University of Cambridge
    Serbia

    Dr Heather Jones – associate professor in international history, LSE
    Austria-Hungary, Germany and Russia

    John Rohl – emeritus professor of history, University of Sussex
    Austria-Hungary and Germany

    Gerhard Hirschfeld – professor of modern and contemporary history, University of Stuttgart
    Austria-Hungary, Germany, Russia, France, Britain and Serbia

  19. Grigory M

    Steve – you are extremely optimistic if, on the road in North America, you expect to hear anything about the assassination of ArchDuke Ferdinand. America was very late to enter WWI – dropping The Bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki has much more relevance.

  20. Splatacrobat

    World War One: 10 interpretations of who started WW1
    Sir Max Hastings – military historian
    Germany
    No one nation deserves all responsibility for the outbreak of war, but Germany seems to me to deserve most.

    Sir Richard J Evans – Regius professor of history, University of Cambridge
    Serbia

    Dr Heather Jones – associate professor in international history, LSE
    Austria-Hungary, Germany and Russia

    John Rohl – emeritus professor of history, University of Sussex
    Austria-Hungary and Germany

    Gerhard Hirschfeld – professor of modern and contemporary history, University of Stuttgart
    Austria-Hungary, Germany, Russia, France, Britain and Serbia

    David Marr – Noted scholar of political student activism , Forensic researcher of hole punched plasterboard at Sydney University.

    Tony Abbott

  21. Ubique

    I did read somewhere recently about Princep, poor darling, being left to rot (literally) in jail. It seems to me he got off lightly.

  22. Bruce K

    Princip died of TB in prison in 1918. He was too young to be executed apparently.

  23. Empire

    David Marr – Noted scholar of political student activism , Forensic researcher of hole punched plasterboard at Sydney University.

    Tony Abbott

    You wins the webs today Splat.

  24. Baldrick

    Gavrilo Princip was one of six assassins (five Serbs and one Bosnian Muslim), who were in Sarajevo to attempt an assassination on the Archduke. These assassins were supported by the Serbian military, who armed and trained them.
    The first two assassins failed to act when the motorcade passed, but the third assassin, armed only with a bomb, threw it at the Archdukes vehicle, but the bomb bounced and being timed, did not detonate immediately and exploded under the following car, injuring several occupants and bystanders. The motorcade passed the other three assassins at speed, enroute to the Town Hall.
    After the Town Hall meeting, the itinerary was changed so as the Archduke and Duchess could visit the wounded from the vehicle caught in the explosion. The route was subsequently changed but the drivers were not advised.
    Princip was placed along the original route, not knowing the route had been changed. As the motorcade proceeded down the original route, it stopped near where Princip was standing and was reversing to take the altered route, when Princip stepped forward and fired two shots. The first struck the Archduke in the jugular and the second hit the Duchess in the abdomen. Both injuries were fatal.
    The rest is history.

  25. J

    Surely far less significant than 15 March 44 BC?

  26. Splatacrobat

    Surely far less significant than 15 March 44 BC?

    Ann Summers wedding anniversary?

  27. Cold-Hands

    Ann Summers wedding anniversary?

    That was the most unkindest cut of all… ;)

  28. johanna

    One of my favourite spoof headlines – I think it was an O Week Honi Soit in the 1960s:

    Archduke Ferdinand Found Alive.

    World War One for Nothing.

  29. 2dogs

    Must be close to the 100th anniversary of the lie about income tax being temporary and just because we have no choice and need to pay for the war. Does anyone have a more accurate reference?

    Closer to the 200th anniversary. It was paying for the war against Napoleon.

  30. lotocoti

    I’m nearly at the end of Catastrophe: Europe Goes to War 1914 by Max Hastings but it appears the Arch-Duke, despite being widely disliked and unmourned, was probably the only member of the European elite who could’ve prevented an Austro-Serbian war from spreading.

  31. jock

    SBS ran a semi documentary series called “37 Days”. It relates to the 37 days from the Archdukes death to the start of the war. Interesting and I thought a bit bland . However at least SBS made the effort. Howver I nearly missed it as “37 Days” the title, doesn’t give much away.

  32. H B Bear

    I liked his album. I didn’t think it was this old though.

  33. johno

    Surely far less significant than 15 March 44 BC?

    Or November 22, 1963 when another leader was assassinated in an open motor vehicle.

    Whatever happened to that presidential limo? At Steve’s link, the Arch Duke’s car is in some museum. Is Kennedy’s car in the Kennedy Presidential museum?

  34. Roger

    The route was subsequently changed but the drivers were not advised.
    One is tempted to think there was a traitor within the Archduke’s ranks, but then, as Napoleon sagely observed, “do not attribute to malice what can be explained by incompetence.”

  35. Roger

    Is Kennedy’s car in the Kennedy Presidential museum?
    Apparently it’s in the Henry Ford Museum in Dearbon, Michigan.

  36. Infidel Tiger

    That’s quite amazing. They used Kennedy’s limo for another 13 years!

  37. Roger

    They used Kennedy’s limo for another 13 years!
    You know how hard it is to get out of these vehicle leasing contracts, IT? :0)

    The only reason I can think of is that governments were rather more frugal with tax payers’ dollars in those days – the original modifications were quite expensive – and clearly not sentimental.

  38. Baldrick

    Roger
    #1354748, posted on June 21, 2014 at 10:36 am
    One is tempted to think there was a traitor within the Archduke’s ranks, but then, as Napoleon sagely observed, “do not attribute to malice what can be explained by incompetence.”

    It was decided that the motorcade should avoid the city centre, following the bombing and travel straight to the Sarajevo Hospital, to visit those wounded in the earlier bomb attack. However, one of those wounded was the aide who was responsible for telling the drivers of the motorcade that the route had been changed.

  39. Roger

    Thanks Baldrick – you are a wealth of information on this. Once again we learn how history turns on such banal facts!

    one of those wounded was the aide who was responsible for telling the drivers of the motorcade that the route had been changed.

    And his superior didn’t think to replace the broken link in the chain. As Dr Peter observed, in hierarchies employees tend to rise to their level of incompetence. That was a lesson the old regimes were about to learn as WWI unfolded!

  40. Des Deskperson

    ‘one of those wounded was the aide who was responsible for telling the drivers of the motorcade that the route had been changed. ‘

    But according to West, the decision to change the route was only made after, and in response to, the original bombing in which the aide was wounded, so if anyone was entrusted to inform the drivers of the change, it couldn’t have been that aide. Wests suggests that such an obvious and gaping breach of security, particularly after the first attempted bombing, seems unlikely to have occurred by accident.

  41. Baldrick

    Wests suggests that such an obvious and gaping breach of security, particularly after the first attempted bombing, seems unlikely to have occurred by accident.

    True, particularly when the Sarajevo Chief of Police, when asked why he had not informed the drivers of the new route, said that in the ‘confusion and tensions’ he forgot.
    Big mistake!

  42. ChrisPer

    My wife and I toured the castle Konopiste in Czech Republic last year, which was Franz Ferdinand’s private home. He can’t have been much involved in Government of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, because he lived at Konopiste (excluded from the court because he married the daughter of a mere Count) and hunted almost full-time – he had around 300,000 documented and mounted animals/ birds shot in his career.

    Great as hunting is, its an amazing thing to have a quarter of Europe pretty much your personal hunting preserve. (And by todays standards, what an ARSEHOLE.)

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