From Hansard: Windfarms

Senator MADIGAN (Victoria) (23:20): I rise to speak tonight on the privilege of this parliament to operate without fear or favour. Members and senators have the right to undertake their duties freely to represent their constituents—it is the reason we are here. Any attempt to gag a senator or member of parliament, any attempt to exert influence by means of threat or intimidation is a breach of parliamentary privilege. This could incur the most serious penalties. Tonight I will speak of such an attempt by a high-profile Australian academic. This academic has a track record of making fun of people in regional and rural communities who are sick. He trades in scuttlebutt. He makes consistent attacks on anyone who makes a complaint against his network of corporate buddies. This academic has become the poster boy for an industry which has a reputation for dishonesty and for bullying.

I have a policy of playing the issue, not the man. Policies should always go before personalities. It is a personal credo, one I have practised all my life and specifically in my professional duties since my election in 2010. But since I have been investigating matters related to wind turbines for almost 10 years now I have recorded a consistent track record of vilification, denigration and attack by those on the other side of this debate. This is an industry that sucks hundreds of millions of dollars in subsidies from the public purse. This industrial power generation sector is an industry that masquerades under a false veneer of ‘saving the environment’.

The wind industry is about one thing in this country: it exists to make people rich at the expense of many rural and regional Australians, their lives and their communities. My investigation shows it does not decrease carbon dioxide, it does not reduce power costs, it does not improve the environment. And this academic in question stands shoulder to shoulder with the wind industry companies and their colourful—and I use that term deliberately—executives. He promotes their products. He attacks their critics. He attends their conferences. He rubs shoulders with their henchmen. He is, in the words of the former member for Hume, Alby Schultz—who was a great campaigner on this issue, I might add—devoid of any decency and courage.

But, first, some background. My party, the Democratic Labour Party, has a long tradition of standing up for principle in the face of enormous opposition. My party was born in conflict and forged in sacrifice. No other political party in Australia can boast that its parliamentary founders—51 in total, including 14 ministers and a state Premier—were prepared to sacrifice promising political careers to uphold the belief dedicated to freedom from undue and corrupt influence. The DLP was the first Australian political party to promote the vote for 18-year-olds. We were the first political party to call for equal pay for equal work and equity in education funding. We were the first political party to call for an end to the White Australia policy. And when our veterans returned from Vietnam, bloody but unbowed, DLP parliamentarians marched in their ranks while the rest of Australia turned their backs.

The DLP is a party of principle. We respect the dignity and the sanctity of life. From the womb to the grave, from the primary school to the factory floor, we see every life as unique and having intrinsic value. This is the cornerstone of the DLP; this is the foundation upon which I place every vote. That is why my attention has been turned to the wind industry for almost a decade now, even before my election to the Senate. I have seen firsthand the devastation it has caused communities. I have listened firsthand to the stories of wrecked families’ lives: family farms destroyed and small outback areas torn apart. I have seen the empty homes in Victoria at Waubra, Macarthur, Cape Bridgewater and Leonards Hill. I have listened to country people tell me stories of corporate bullying and deceit, and of corporate fraud in matters of compliance. I have repeatedly called for one thing on this issue: independent Australian research into the health problems that wind farms apparently cause. That is all—independent research. It is a question of justice. It is about getting to the bottom of this issue.

So when I spoke with Alan Jones onto 2GB on 27 March, I made one simple point. I told Mr Jones we need to be careful about people who profess to be experts in this area. For the benefit of the Senate I repeat what I said in that interview:

… when we talk about people, using the title, using a title, such as Professor, let us be clear crystal clear here Alan. Most people in the community assume that when you use the title Professor, that you are trained in the discipline of which you speak. And I ask people, look and check. What is the person making these proclamations about other people’s health? What is the discipline they are trained in of which they speak? Because most people in the public assume when you speak of an issue of health, that you are trained in the discipline of which you speak, and there are people making pronouncements and denigrating people who are not trained in human health.

I stand by this statement. It is fair and reasonable to encourage people to look behind the blatant campaigning done by people like Professor Chapman of the University of Sydney.

But it is the statement that has prompted him to threaten me, utilising a law firm that was instrumental in the set-up of Hepburn Wind. He has threatened to sue me for libel over this statement unless I pay him $40,000 plus costs. He has threatened to sue me for libel unless I organise an apology on the website of 2GB and an anti-wind farm website called Stop These Things. He has threatened me with contempt of parliament and a breach of parliamentary privilege if I raise these matters in the Senate. This reaction by Professor Chapman is something that my more experienced parliamentary colleagues have labelled a blatant try-on. It is another attempt by the wind industry to silence me, to scare me off and to intimidate me. It is a case of a Sydney university academic firing shots across the bow of the blacksmith from Ballarat. This is something he has done before now, tweeting about my position on this issue, always in the context of my background as a blacksmith—a background, I add, that I am enormously proud of. I remain one of the wind industry’s most stubborn and outspoken critics. I will not be silenced. I will not give up on the injustice inflicted on people who claim to be impacted by living near turbines. I will not stop. My comments to Alan Jones were a series of rhetorical statements or questions about the assumptions members of the public should be entitled to make when somebody professes to be qualified to speak about an issue of public health. In other words, I was asking people to check that so-called experts on this issue are relevantly trained and qualified. It is a reasonable request. Our media and the internet are crawling with self-appointed experts. Daily we operate in a cacophony of opinion presented as fact.

Professor Chapman has been an outspoken critic of those who have dared to question the wind farm orthodoxy. But is Professor Chapman a medical doctor? Is he legally entitled to examine and treat patients? Is he qualified in acoustics or any other aspect of audiology? Is he a sleep specialist? Does he hold any qualifications in bioacoustics or physiology or neuroscience? How many wind farm victims has he interviewed directly? How many wind farm impacted homes has he visited? Professor Chapman claims to receive no payment from the wind industry. How many wind industry conferences, seminars and events has he spoken at? How many wind industry events has he attended? Writing on the Crikey website in November 2011, Professor Chapman lamented how many conferences do not pay speaker’s fees, and, when one conference organiser refused to pay his hotel bill, he withdrew. This is the same Professor Chapman who was photographed at a campaign launch in Melbourne by the Danish wind turbine manufacturer Vestas. Did Vestas pay your hotel bill and other costs, Professor Chapman? These are reasonable questions—they put in context his actions.

I take this opportunity to draw the attention of the Senate to the discovery of a 2004 PowerPoint presentation by Vestas employee Erik Sloth to the former Australian Wind Energy Association, now the Clean Energy Council. This demonstrated Vestas knew a decade ago that safer buffers are required to protect neighbours from noise. Vestas knew their preconstruction noise models were not accurate. I draw the attention of the Senate to a quote from the presentation that Vestas knew then that ‘noise from wind turbines sometimes annoys people even if the noise is below noise limits.’ This is confirmation that the global wind industry have known for more than a decade that their turbines impact on nearby residents. How can Professor Chapman reconcile his ridicule of the reasons numerous people have been forced to abandon their homes with the knowledge that the company initiating this campaign he attended knew a decade ago there were problems?

As a public health academic, Professor Chapman displays a lack of compassion for people who claim to be suffering debilitating effects from pervasive wind turbine noise. Professor Chapman’s undergraduate qualifications were in sociology. His PhD looked into the relationship between cigarette smoke and advertising. I question his expertise, I question his qualifications and I question his unbridled motivation to promote and support the wind industry at the cost of people’s lives, homes and communities. I question Professor Chapman’s lack of interest in speaking with wind industry victims. Professor Chapman has a record of public denigration of victims. I refer to his tweet in February this year about ‘wind farm wing nuts’.

One of the important things about this fight that is going on across rural Australia is that it is country women who are in the front line. Farmers’ wives are running hard, fighting to save their families, fighting to save their homes, fighting to save their communities. It is often these women who suffer the most denigration. It is a roll call of honour—people like Mary Morris of South Australia; Dr Andja Mitric Andjic in Victoria; Sonya Trist, Joanne Kermond and Melissa Ware at Cape Bridgewater; Colleen Watt in New South Wales; and, of course, the extraordinary Sarah Laurie in South Australia.

One more example: Annie Gardner and her husband, Gus, have lived and worked happily and healthfully for 34 years on their farming property in south-west Victoria. This came to a sudden halt in October 2012 when the first 15 turbines of the Macarthur wind farm began operation. In a recent letter to the AMA Annie said she is now able to get only two or three hours sleep each night in her own home. She writes: ‘At the time of writing this letter, I am suffering terribly from the infrasound emitted by the 140 turbines located far too close to our property. I have a bad headache. I have very strong pains shooting up through the back of my neck and into my head. I have extremely sore and blocked ears and very painful pressure in my nose. I have pressure in my jaws and my teeth. My heart is pounding. I can feel the vibration going through my body through the chair like an electric charge. The infrasound in our bedroom was appalling. I could feel the vibration through the mattress and the pillow like an electric charge through my body. My head felt as if a brick was on it, and the pressure and pain in my nose was extreme.’

Annie Gardner would be what Professor Chapman would call a ‘wind farm wing nut’. Writing on a green movement website earlier this year, Professor Chapman said protesting against wind farms is a fringe activity as if to suggest that the hundreds of people who attended and spoke at anti-wind farm forums I have held across my home state of Victoria and interstate are simply collateral damage. I cannot live with such a utilitarian view. As I said, even putting aside the highly questionable environmental, social and economic benefits of wind farms, every life matters and every life is important. I have sat in people’s homes and kitchens. I know firsthand the suffering they experience from these industrial developments. Professor Chapman’s attempts to gag me are the same as his attempts to silence those who object to the great wind farm scam. It is part of a greater attempt to silence open and transparent debate on this issue. It does no service to academia or to science already under much attack. It does nothing to advance discussion or progress.

Surely the big businesses behind this attempt—the entities who are funding it, like Bleyer Lawyers, who have worked for Hepburn Wind—should remember cases such as McDonald’s and Gunns. For the environmental movement to attempt this shallow legal shooting of a mere messenger is poor judgement in my view. Bullies corporate or otherwise never get far. Surely it is apparent that companies that use the courts to silence opposition lose out in the court of public opinion. To borrow words from the great human rights campaigner Malcolm X:

I’m for truth, no matter who tells it. I’m for justice, no matter who it’s for or against.
If Professor Chapman proceeds with this action, I look forward to having him answer in court those questions I have raised here tonight—questions about his qualifications, his expertise and his links with the wind industry financial or otherwise. I look forward to his cross-examination under oath as equally as I look forward to mine. I say this: his action, if it proceeds, is doomed in a legal setting or elsewhere for one reason; it is not based on the truth.

Hansard June 17, 2014.

(HT: Velvet Glove, Iron Fist).

This entry was posted in Global warming and climate change policy, Hypocrisy of progressives, Take Nanny down. Bookmark the permalink.

76 Responses to From Hansard: Windfarms

  1. incoherent rambler

    The senator just made it to my top 3 senators to vote for in vic.

  2. Bruce of Newcastle

    Congratulations to John Madigan for telling the truth.

    Wind turbines are the most destructive, harmful and deceitful source of power invented by mankind. They produce carnage of birds, bats and other animals. They harm susceptible people. They lower house prices and pollute the visual landscape. They don’t save on CO2. Their manufacture, as I posted on the open thread, is accompanied by appalling pollution in China. Yet Greens like them.

    My message to them is this: get real. If you want an environmentally sustainable power generation technology, get one. Wind farms aren’t. The only thing they generate is bird carcases, huge electricity bills and vast unequallable hypocrisy.

  3. .

    Chapman is a bully. He deserves this bucket of shit to be poured all over him.

  4. Mk50 of Brisbane, Henchman to the VRWC

    Well said that man!

  5. nerblnob

    Well said, yet his main basis for opposing wind farms seems to be the noise and health claims.

    You could shut down almost any industry, including farming, on basis of claims like that.

  6. entropy

    Yeah, while it would suck if you were in range of the hints, the greater evil is the subsidy scam, extracting OPM from gullible politicians as a business model. That impacts on a lot more people and the nation as a whole.

  7. entropy

    Expect beaver along any moment now….

  8. .

    I don’t know farmers that cause their neighbours to be unable to sleep at night.

  9. Mater

    Ah, yes, Hepburn Wind…

  10. Gab

    I don’t know farmers that cause their neighbours to be unable to sleep at night.

    Well, that’s it then. Case closed.

  11. stackja

    Garry Weaven – Chair Appointed in 2003
    Garry is Chair of IFM Investors and of Pacific Hydro, a leading Australian renewable energy company with extensive operations in Australia and South America. He also chairs ‘The New Daily’, a free digital online news service. He is also a Director of Members Equity Bank and was a foundation Board member of Melbourne’s Docklands Authority as well as its successor, VicUrban. Garry’s involvement in superannuation and funds management follows a successful career in the Australian union movement, which culminated in him being elected Assistant Secretary of the ACTU in 1986. Garry played a seminal role in the development of the industry superannuation fund movement and in 1994 founded Industry Fund Services, the forerunner to a number of collectively owned financial service providers, including IFM Investors.
    Garry is a member of the Board Investments Committee, the Board Remuneration Committee and the IFMH Director Nominations Committee.

    The Yambuk wind farm is the first stage of Pacific Hydro’s four-stage Portland Wind Energy Project (PWEP) in southwest Victoria.

  12. James of the Glen

    Chapman must be subject to a very fine toothcomb run through all of his curious obsession with defending the indefensible. I’d suggest a judicial body.
    Listening to him leaves you wondering if he’s ever heard of the Scientific Method.

    In SA, he’s the go-to man for a particularly ‘interesting’ evening presenter on ABC Radio 891 who waxes lyrical about seeing wind farms (then drives on past to leave them well behind). No other parties are entertained.

    John Madigan has made an outstanding start by actually seeking out primary sources of information over several years. It would be difficult to find a harder working senator with a better grasp of the scientific and economic distortions on which these Renewable Energy Certificate farms (the electricity is almost incidental) are based.

  13. Leo G

    Well said, yet his main basis for opposing wind farms seems to be the noise and health claims.

    My impression was that he provided in-principle support to people who believed they have been harmed or disadvantaged by the wind farm industry, and was opposed to the industry’s threatening and marginalising behaviour.

  14. Mater

    Well said, yet his main basis for opposing wind farms seems to be the noise and health claims.

    You could shut down almost any industry, including farming, on basis of claims like that.

    I can understand the viewpoint but have a look at just one example.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbIe0iUtelQ

    Perhaps if industry or farming dumped crap like this on established families, they should be shut down (or not allowed to proceed).

  15. stackja

    Liberty Quotes
    No politician is any longer interested in the question whether a measure is fit to produce the ends aimed at. What alone counts for him is whether the majority of the voters favor or reject it.
    — Ludwig von Mises

    And voters can be swayed by ‘professors’. So pollies need ‘professors’. ‘Professors’ said AGW. And we got the Kev.

  16. Andrew

    You could shut down almost any industry, including farming, on basis of claims like that.

    And grubs like that TRY to shut down almost every other industry.

  17. Bruce of Newcastle

    And grubs like that TRY to shut down almost every other industry

    That was why I was so amused by the Aussie enviro activist arrested in Malaysia today for opposing a facility which makes stuff needed for wind turbines.

  18. Rabz

    I’ve commented before on this blog about Perfesser Crapman. I am skeptical of his credentials and loathe his modus operandi. He is an insufferably smug inner city wanker, who as a gerbil worming believer and high priest, feels he has carte blanche to attack the little people who refuse to bow down to their holier than thou betters and their religious symbols, such as eco-crucifixes. He is also given a frequent platform to spout his perceived wisdom via the ALPBC.

    As noted above, kudos to Madigan for tipping that sizable bucket on Perfesser Crapman. Long overdue and much deserved.

  19. Bozo

    I was involved in some litigation years ago where the professor prepared something like a 3 page report, accompanied by an 80 page CV.

  20. nerblnob

    And grubs like that TRY to shut down almost every other industry.

    That was kinda my point.

    I’m still a bit agnostic on the health issue, mainly because it reminds me of the “mobile phone mast scare” which still has a zombie existence in some places.

    The video linked by Mater is disturbing, showing that setback distances aren’t sufficient. I lived near an experimental wind turbine in Scotland in the late 70s, but it was up on a hill and I guess the sun was never that bright.

    But there’s no doubt the media give the wind industry a free ride on the sorts of allegations they’d normally be going all Erin Brockovich (the movie) over.

  21. stackja

    Mater
    #1357333, posted on June 23, 2014 at 8:39 pm
    I give up!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbIe0iUtelQ

    Good link! Thank you.

  22. Some_History

    Ah. Good old Simon Crapman. Disagree with Crapman and the wafer-thin veneer of quasi-civility quickly gives way to reveal the natural vile streak in the man. He is abrasive and obnoxious. He has the social graces of an oaf…… no…. a drunk oaf.

    Crapman, together with his buddy Mike Daube, has been with the antismoking crusade from the very early days. Crapman has worked for the WHO (in an antismoking capacity), he’s been editor of the antismoking rag “Tobacco Control”, he’s suggested the eradication of menthol, he’s suggested smoker licensing, he was instrumental in having “fire safe” cigarettes made mandatory in Australia. Problem. These cigarettes increase the chemical load and were never health tested. Here’s Crapman getting congratulations and praise from former NSW Premier Bobby Carrtoon for Crapman’s “denormalizing of smoking” efforts:
    http://www.usyd.edu.au/news/84.html?newscategoryid=1&newsstoryid=1910

    It has to be remembered that this moron of Public Health has been honoured by the State. The professional liar….. propagandist for Tobacco Control, Simple Simon Crapman, the snot-nosed antismoker who’s helped society regress over a hundred years to a destructive fanaticism, has been… err… recognized for his “services”. Some of the description is quite hilarious – “distinguished service to medical research” [AHHHHHH HAAA]….. “world-leading academic, researcher, writer, commentator and public health policy advocate” [HEE HEEEEE]. The problem is, it ain’t a joke! It gives a clear indication of the pitiful state of academia, Public Health, and the government health bureaucracy….. and not just in Australia.

    Professor Simon Chapman: Officer of the Order of Australia (AO)
    Professor Simon Chapman has been awarded an Officer of the Order of Australia for distinguished service to medical research in the area of public health policy.
    Professor Chapman is a world-leading academic, researcher, writer, commentator and public health policy advocate, particularly in the field of tobacco control.
    He has played a major role in reducing the smoking rate in Australia from 45 per cent on men and 30 per cent of women in 1978 to 15 per cent in all adults today.
    Professor Chapman has published over 18 books and major reports as well as over 400 articles in peer-reviewed journals.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-06-10/prominent-australians-recognised-with-queens-birthday-honours/4739608
    http://sydney.edu.au/news/84.html?newsstoryid=11737

    “Awards” are a mainstay of the Tobacco Control racket: They keep the massive egos well massaged. It’s an opportunity to sip on a Chardonnay, delicately bite into some hors d’oeuvres, and admire your fellow fraudsters. There must be quite a number of awards nights each year. If you have no talent, ooze mediocrity, and deceptiveness is second-nature, come to TC. We have an award(s) for you.

    Now, I don’t mind awarding an award as much as the next guy. The problem here is award category: They’ve got the category all wrong. I wouldn’t mind…. in fact, I’d enthusiastically applaud….. if Simple Simon was given the Crap Merchant of the Last 30 Years or the Prolific Crapper in Public Health award. There, that’s better.

  23. Mater

    The video linked by Mater is disturbing

    Not sure which one more so, the one to Little Britain or the one showing the environmental placebos

  24. Docket62

    I think if those things were erected on land near me, they would forever be ‘broken’ ….. And often. Always handy to sight in a three – 0

  25. Boambee John

    Don’t hold back, Some_History, tell us what you really think!

  26. gabrianga

    Put Hewson high up on the Chapman Supporters Club
    with his attempt and self interest to attract funding for “non carbon producing industries”.

    To think these sleaze bags receive, or have had, taxpayers money to assist bringing down the coal industry
    is a national disgrace and an insult to generations of Aussie coal miners.

    Mind you Hewson might just do himself in again but let’s not just wait and see.

  27. .

    he was instrumental in having “fire safe” cigarettes made mandatory in Australia.

    He’s a complete and utter dickhead. He made cigarettes less safe then declares them not safe for consumption?

    PS – ciggies can still start fires. What a knuckle dragging buffoon.

  28. johanna

    There is a great video which was posted on Bishop Hill a couple of years ago (I’m looking for it) about a hippie household who were just fine about a bunch of windmills being placed next to their chooks & veges & incense riddled country cottage. What a splendid thing for The Environment, they thought!

    When the things went up, alas, the Age of Aquarius was over. For a start, there was intermittent, low frequency noise. It wasn’t very loud, but it was there. Anyone who has experienced doof-doof noise while trying to sleep will grasp the point.

    But, the most startling bit – and I will try to find the video, but believe me, it’s true – is that their living areas were turned into a disco during certain parts of the day because of the flicker effect of the nearby turbines. The video shows that if you were epileptic, you would have a fit. Apparently they were meant to just keep their curtains and blinds closed to “address” this “issue.”

  29. cohenite

    Another academic up to his ears in the various scams which have proliferated like syphilis under the all purpose virus of AGW.

  30. Some_History

    “Don’t hold back, Some_History, tell us what you really think!”

    I’m just getting warmed up….. you know … clearing the throat. La La LAAA.

    :)

  31. AP

    They are bloody dangerous things. Check out this one virtually explode:

    http://youtu.be/-YJuFvjtM0s

  32. Leo G

    I’m still a bit agnostic on the health issue, mainly because it reminds me of the “mobile phone mast scare” which still has a zombie existence in some places.

    There is a well established scientific basis for concerns about human exposure to microwave emissions. The physical processes of absorption by human tissues are understood and the behavioural effects are well documented. But the concerns were always for exposures at intensities associated with handsets, not towers. The “scare” on the other hand was about a hypothesised exceedingly small cancer risk, blown out of proportion by alarmists. The “zombie existence” is likely the residual concern about the physiological processes causing the more definite behavioural effects.

  33. sabrina

    If you criticise professor Chapman for speaking outside his core expertise, others may criticise you for speaking on a range of matters outside your core expertise. What training have you got in coal and minerals?

  34. mareeS

    “If you criticise professor Chapman for speaking outside his core expertise, others may criticise you for speaking on a range of matters outside your core expertise” sayeth Sabrina the Dalek, who presumably also has training in coal and minerals.

  35. johanna

    sabrina

    You misunderstand our criticism of Chapman.

    He has made a taxpayer funded career out of telling other people how they should live, why whatever they are doing is wrong, raising panics, and explaining (at length, and in detail) why much more public money should be allocated to people like him, in perpetuity.

    Apart from that, he’s a great bloke. I’d love to have a few beers with him, except that it would constitute dangerous levels of drinking in his world. Conviviality is his mortal enemy.

  36. sabrina

    mareeS – I have training in and long involvement with coal and minerals industry in multiple countries.

  37. nerblnob

    We had a bloke threw a fit on a chopper once, due to the strobing of the light on his window from the rotor blades as it was a sunny day. He’d managed to conceal his epilepsy up until then, poor fellow.

    So I can certainly see how the wind turbine blades would create these effects. I’ve yet to be convinced about the ultrasound effect on health.

    The media could certainly do with looking into these claims soberly without either senstionalising or setting out to debunk them as enemies of progress.

    However, there might be mitigating actions that could be taken. Not so with the cost/benefit equation on the energy supply side and the environmental effect, which is a disaster and needs to be exposed.

  38. MT Isa Miner

    johanna

    #1357997, posted on June 24, 2014 at 4:26 am

    sabrina

    You misunderstand our criticism of Chapman.

    He has made a taxpayer funded career out of telling other people how they should live, why whatever they are doing is wrong, raising panics, and explaining (at length, and in detail) why much more public money should be allocated to people like him, in perpetuity.

    Apart from that, he’s a great bloke. I’d love to have a few beers with him, except that it would constitute dangerous levels of drinking in his world. Conviviality is his mortal enemy.

    See.Sabrina. Look for the manual to see how the world works.

    No, no beer for him. He deserves nothing but a pink slip from every government fund he has sucked off in the past and will try for in the future.

  39. Bribiejohn

    These “professors” produce more wind than any windfarm could possibly need! Hip pocket loyalties have been the moving force behind a large part of what is happening in the name of environment. The word “environment” brings dreams of wealth untold to so many drips under hip-pocket pressure (ex-spurts) these days.

  40. Tapdog

    “…Bullies corporate or otherwise never get far…”

    Really?

  41. gabrianga

    I know many who have GOT training in and long involvement with coal and minerals industry in multiple countries.

    Members of FOE,ACF,WWF,Green Peas etc amongst the “many”

  42. Elwood

    A very reliable little birdy tells me that Pacific Hydro is about to take at least a $200m valuation write down, mainly on their Australian Windfarms.

    One to watch I’d suggest.

  43. Robbo

    I’m a Liberal voter but Madigan has just earned both my respect and my vote. Wind turbines are nothing more than a gigantic con job. They are expensive and do not produce anywhere near enough power to justify their existence. Add to that the visual pollution and the attendant health problems and you have to ask yourself why on earth are our governments in this country persisting with these things?

  44. .

    sabrina
    #1357988, posted on June 24, 2014 at 4:00 am
    If you criticise professor Chapman for speaking outside his core expertise, others may criticise you for speaking on a range of matters outside your core expertise. What training have you got in coal and minerals?

    I don’t make statements about metallurgy or biology for example.

    I know enough about statistics to know that he is a huckster.

    If I find evidence that he denies, I post a link to it (e.g, health benefits of smoking).

  45. .

    Fact is, wind and solar lower your electricity prices and consumers are better off with a RET

    You fucking lying shitbag.

  46. Aristogeiton

    evcricket
    #1358292, posted on June 24, 2014 at 1:32 pm

    Dude. Duuuuuude. You’re going to run out of Doritos, man. Time for a mission brah. Bowl for the road?

  47. JC

    Fact is, wind and solar lower your electricity prices and consumers are better off with a RET

    You fucking lying shitbag.

    Incredible. He deserves to be thrown in shark infested waters and left there.

  48. Leo G

    How many Australian Solar Council shills out of a job by January?

  49. john constantine

    so when the managers of the union super funds used workers superannuation money to support a political position [wind machines], went overweight on the wind machine business–were they acting in the best interests of the superannuation contributors?.

    have any of the directors that signed off on the overweight allocation to wind machines suffered any personal setback? or is compromising the retirements of the workers an acceptable cost of supporting the right political position.

    wind machines run on subsidies. we all know it.

  50. evcricket

    So not one of you can read. Not surprising.
    The modelling company chosen by the Abbott government, ACIL Tasman, found that the RET lowers prices.

    But yeah, just call me names when something inconvenient comes up. Great debating guys and girls, good truth to power

  51. Aristogeiton

    evcricket
    #1358354, posted on June 24, 2014 at 3:01 pm
    So not one of you can read. Not surprising.
    The modelling company chosen by the Abbott government, ACIL Tasman, found that the RET lowers prices.

    But yeah, just call me names when something inconvenient comes up. Great debating guys and girls, good truth to power

    How does it achieve this magic? It forces expenditure by generators on more expensive sources of electricity. But to, it’s a fucking magic pudding. You fucking tax eating prick.

  52. Aristogeiton

    s/but to/but no/

  53. incoherent rambler

    Fact is, wind and solar lower your electricity prices and consumers are better off with a RET

    Enrolment in an “Arithmetic for dummies course” is recommended. For slow learners there is a 6 year course available.

  54. Leo G

    The modelling company chosen by the Abbott government, ACIL Tasman, found that the RET lowers prices.

    No it did not.
    Its starting point was the status quo, with the RET in place.
    As usual your reasoning is as fallacious as your conclusion above that no one commenting on this thread but yourself can read.
    As to speaking truth to power, how brave of anonymous you. The truth that makes men free is one thing, the men that are free with the truth are something else.

  55. .

    evcricket
    #1358354, posted on June 24, 2014 at 3:01 pm
    So not one of you can read. Not surprising.
    The modelling company chosen by the Abbott government, ACIL Tasman, found that the RET lowers prices.

    But yeah, just call me names when something inconvenient comes up. Great debating guys and girls, good truth to power

    You lying fucking shithead. Enjoy being unemployed when this racket is gutted.

  56. Rabz

    As to speaking truth to power, how brave of anonymous you.

    The Beaver’s identity is no secret, so he certainly can’t be accused of covering his identity. Having said that, I am in no way advocating he be harassed.

    His adherence to green idiotology and tendency to blindly defend it here is its own reward.

  57. Aristogeiton

    Rabz
    #1358400, posted on June 24, 2014 at 3:42 pm
    As to speaking truth to power, how brave of anonymous you.

    The Beaver’s identity is no secret, so he certainly can’t be accused of covering his identity. Having said that, I am in no way advocating he be harassed.

    His adherence to green idiotology and tendency to blindly defend it here is its own reward.

    He’s got skin in the game. Who could blame him? It is in the nature of man to mind his own interests. The bigger question is, should we allow crony capitalism in the first place? The answer is… yes… government knows best ;)

  58. evcricket

    Leo are you going to demand that the incredibly threatening “.” reveal his identity?

  59. evcricket

    Sorry or her, there is every chance that “.” is a woman. I apologise.

  60. JC

    Rabz

    Okay, so people know his identity. I don’t as I don’t really care who he is. Cricket is a dishonest sack of shit. That’s all. He’s got the hide to come here and assert propellers on sticks and plastic panels with magnifying Lense will not only produce cheaper energy, but enough to satisfy demand for industrial civilisation.

    As I said, he ought to be dumped in shark infested water and left there.

  61. .

    Ev

    I don’t care who you are. I don’t threaten anyone. You are a grub who makes a living off subsidies. It will end soon.

    The figures you quote are utter bullshit.

  62. incoherent rambler

    Windfarms raise the spectre of eco-terrorism.

    People nuking wind towers (not turbine, it implies they do something).

  63. Andrew

    People nuking wind towers

    Nah, they’re more valuable as a source of scrap copper. What a great idea, putting tons of copper in remote locations in poor countries. Nothing could possibly go wrong there, surely?

  64. Evcricket

    Still not a single relevant fact from any of you

  65. Aristogeiton

    Evcricket
    #1358548, posted on June 24, 2014 at 5:27 pm
    Still not a single relevant fact from any of you

    The relevant fact are:

    1) you’re on the take; and
    2) you lie to keep eating our taxes.

    Now fuck off.

  66. Evcricket

    Funny how Abbott hand picked the consultant’s and still didn’t get the result he wanted. So incompetent that he can’t even fix a report.

  67. Aristogeiton

    Evcricket
    #1358589, posted on June 24, 2014 at 5:54 pm
    Funny how Abbott hand picked the consultant’s and still didn’t get the result he wanted. So incompetent that he can’t even fix a report.

    Learn to use the apostrophe. And while you’re at it, learn how to earn a living without having hard-working people pay your way. You bloody leech.

  68. Leo G

    “So incompetent that he can’t even fix a report.”

    I suspect that if ever you were pressured to fix a report, you’d promptly soil yourself.

  69. James B

    Fantastic.

    What we need to do is start tearing down wind farms. State governments need to use the left’s tactics against them. Firstly, ban all new wind farm construction, or tie it up in so many bullshit laws and regulations that it’s impossible to get any development to proceed (sort of like the greenies have done for mining).

    Secondly, we need to actually start literally ripping wind turbines down, with NO compensation to their owners.

  70. Evcricket – Shouldn’t you be off crying to ben cubby on twitter about how mean those nasty Catallaxy people are.

  71. .

    Evcricket
    #1358589, posted on June 24, 2014 at 5:54 pm
    Funny how Abbott hand picked the consultant’s and still didn’t get the result he wanted. So incompetent that he can’t even fix a report.

    Jesus. You just can’t stop lying, can you?

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