Going home and coming home

Wednesday was the first time in which a genuine competition between a Canadian and an Australian had ever come up in a game where either might have won and both started from an equal footing. So the question had always been in my mind which way would I go. And even though I am in Toronto where I will be till Monday, when they went out on the court I was going for the Australian and was disappointed that he had lost although happy that a Canadian had won.

Forty years though I may have been in Australia, no one ever says to me when I’m in Canada, as they do to others I know, what an Aussie accent you have. I fit into this very different Toronto from the one I left but it has been a very nostalgic and enjoyable time, specially being summer as it is. And there are friends and family to see and places to re-visit. For Toronto, no tourist map is needed.

Nationality is a funny thing. I have a value system that is built out of the Judeo-Christian ethic that has travelled through a British historical and political tradition, a tradition found both here in the Dominion and also in Australia. And these I truly value and so am home in each and care about their survival.

Nevertheless, when I left Melbourne I was going home, but when I return, I will be coming home. It’s a small difference but it is a real one.

This entry was posted in Cultural Issues. Bookmark the permalink.

17 Responses to Going home and coming home

  1. Free Advice

    Only Canadians use the term “Dominions” to destcrobe the colonies.
    Aussies stopped using the word in the 1920s!

  2. Rafe

    Steve, you can’t really come home to Melbourne in any significant sense until you barrack for a VFL team:)

  3. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    I feel exactly the same way, Steve. Born in a Glasgow slum, came to Australia aged four with a Scots accent but one English and one Welsh parent, lived a most happy two years in England as an eleven year old with my Welsh nana, returned to a fracturing home in Australia when she died, married a sixth generation Aussie in my early twenties, married an English-educated Irishman some years later, travelled extensively with both husbands (sequentially, of course :) ), always felt very English because of my schooling there (Australian schooling and I did not much meet), have four children, two of them feeling quite Irish, and as of yesterday it feels a little strange still to be ‘home’. Maybe home is where the Cat is. Catallaxy is always there. And I am going to get me a little Russian Blue. I have mourned my little Burmese pointy-ears for long enough now.

    By the way, where did Thursday go to? There is a hole over the International Dateline that just swoops up days, or hands them out, willy-nilly it seems to those like me not paying proper attention.

  4. Grigory M

    By the way, where did Thursday go to? There is a hole over the International Dateline that just swoops up days, or hands them out, willy-nilly it seems to those like me not paying proper attention.

    Interesting flight path there, Lizzie – home from Heathrow via Dubai to Sydney – with somehow an east-west transit of the Pacific to lose a day traversing the International Date Line. Were you perchance flying Malaysia Airlines?

  5. Chris M

    Well Melbourne isn’t really part of Australia, more Canadia-ish so one can understand the confusion. :)

  6. Grigory M

    Curiouser and curiouser, Chris M – as Lizzie now lives in Sydney. But that would not preclude the airline diverting first to Mexico City Melbourne before finally arriving at Kingsford Smith Airport.

  7. Dr.Sir Fred Lenin

    Dont knock Melbourne,where do you think Burke and Wills started the expedition that discoverd all you other people? Swanston street! Where did Matthew Flinders start his voyage to discover a large part of Australia? From outside St .Pauls Cathedral! So there!

  8. Farmer Gez

    Just finished reading the battle of Amiens in WWI and note the Anzac and Canadians divisions smashed through the German lines fighting side by side, which signalled the end of the German war effort. Tremendous respect for each other as soldiers. It was nice to see the D Day commemorations give some due recognition to the massive contribution of Canadian forces. I was in Canada some years ago speaking at a conference and our Canadian hosts could not have been kinder and “got” our sense of humour, unlike their Southern neighbours.

  9. Grigory M

    Just joking – all good with Melbourne – been there a few times and liked it – sun was shining all but once, too. I’m more concerned about Lizzie’s loss of a day coming home from London via Dubai and the International Date Line. Maybe Langoliers were involved – or Roswell – and, after being kidnapped by aliens, she’s been re-programmed to remember nothing about last Thursday. ;)

  10. old bloke

    Where did Matthew Flinders start his voyage to discover a large part of Australia? From outside St .Pauls Cathedral! So there!

    I’m not sure if you are right there Comrade Commissar. I understand that Matthew Flinders started his mapping expedition from Augusta in Western Australia, where the Blackwood river flows into two oceans.

  11. old bloke

    I have a value system that is built out of the Judeo-Christian ethic that has travelled through a British historical and political tradition

    Australia, Canada, New Zealand & south-west England (Angle-land) are predominately Ephramite nations, Angle (Aegel in Hebrew) means bull-calf, a symbol of Joseph’s son Ephraim. Ephraim was promised a “company of nations” in the blessings he received from his grandfather Jacob (Israel). Ephraim was obliged to bring “a light unto the gentiles” which England did, for better or worse, with its colonial nation building policies.

  12. wreckage

    are predominately Ephramite nations

    No.

    But on the OP; very poetic, Kates. Well written.

  13. mareeS

    Flinders began his anti-clockwise circumnavigation of the Australian coastline at Cape Leeuwin, where his ship, the HMS Investigator, arrived on 6 December, 1801 after its outward voyage from England. Hope this helps.

  14. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Da Hairy Ape now tells me we didn’t cross the Dateline, which now I think about it is somewhere beyond New Zealand, so that reason is out. We left on early on Thursday morning and twelve hours later arrived in Sydney early Friday morning; so Thursday did exist, just got condensed. I also seem to attract children, not just my own, when on planes. I give glove puppet shows over the top of seats. Time flies under conditions of such excitement, so perhaps that explains it too.

  15. vlad

    Melbourne isn’t part of Australia, Melbourne IS Australia.

  16. Tintarella di Luna

    Nationality is a funny thing. I have a value system that is built out of the Judeo-Christian ethic that has travelled through a British historical and political tradition, a tradition found both here in the Dominion and also in Australia. And these I truly value and so am home in each and care about their survival.

    Steve – a very sweet vignette, nostalgic but not in a sickly way. This is basically what Daniel Hannan said in his talk in Sydney a few months ago – that our common law connections make us brothers and sisters in a family of common law nations.

  17. Helen

    It is not just countries, Steve, but country also.

    When I left my life long home, a base to where my heart and mind flew in moments of reflection or for grounding no matter where I was physically in the world to live in another place in the same state, I too did the going home thing.

    It took quite a few years before my heart said,’ I am home’ as I drove up the drive of my new home.

    I will always love my old home, for it is the birthplace of my childhood and young adult memories and I would feel at home there, amongst those memories but here is where my heart is now.

    Welcome home.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>