The government wants to record your browser history

Be sure to watch the video clip at this SMH story.

Update: Now up on Youtube.

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88 Responses to The government wants to record your browser history

  1. Mike of Marion

    Brandis is an embarrassment – get him out of the AG portfolio – QUICK

  2. I have only one thing to say Offshore VPN/Proxy!

  3. C.L.

    “It’s not the contect of the letter, it’s the address on the envelope.”

    Oh, huzzah. Workshopped apologia of the year! Well done, Miss Credlin.

    Yes, Abbott really said that.

    It would be OK for the state to record the names and addresses of the people to whom you write letters. This is not merely similar to, but exactly the same, as policy in the Third Reich.

  4. C.L.

    “Well, I del muh muh muh thee …”

    - George Brandis, Attorney-General (from 1:24).

  5. Infidel Tiger

    Tonyabbbottisacompletecuntandunfittobepm.com.au figures prominently in mine.

  6. .

    This is why I am a financial member of the LDP and premium member of the IPA.

  7. incoherent rambler

    Are we free to speak of the Governments plans to monitor your internet usage?

    FMD

  8. Mayan

    I’ll be overseas at the next election, and every election after that, just as I’ve been overseas for past elections. I refuse to choose between cancer and leukaemia.

  9. Infidel Tiger

    Damn. Someone is trying to moderate me.

  10. C.L.

    “Well, I del muh muh muh thee …”

    Liberty quote.

  11. .

    Nick
    #1406853, posted on August 6, 2014 at 9:17 pm
    I have only one thing to say Offshore VPN/Proxy!

    Well. What costs are involved? How do we get meshweb or TOR browsers that aren’t stupidly slow?

  12. Mayan

    Anyone who cannot circumvent these measures is most likely too stupid to build a bomb or plan some other attrocity.

  13. JC

    Dot

    A friend of mine uses a proxy . That way he gets everything like wants like Netflix etc.

  14. Infidel Tiger

    In recent years, more Australian-born residents have been emigrating. This trend is likely to continue as a result of the increasing internationalisation of labour markets and global demand for skilled workers.

    …And Australia becoming a shit splattered toilet run by fascist wowsers.

  15. .

    First the ALP do Finklestein, now the Liberals do this.

    This is bizzare. The mainstream cherish free speech but their reps are taking it away from them.

    Sometimes the gratuitous plugs are grating, but I can say, please consider joining the IPA and LDP.

    Please follow Yobbo’s link or the link on my name as it comes up in the comments.

  16. squawkbox

    How do we get meshweb or TOR browsers that aren’t stupidly slow?

    Surely the NBN will have speeded up Tor by then? :-)

    More seriously, do Brandis and the mental deficients and control freaks in ASIO seriously think that the jihadi community aren’t aware of TOR, TAILS, VPNs etc?

  17. Infidel Tiger

    It’s funny, the Australian jihadis currently posting photos of their dead victims on Twitter and Facebook don’t seem too concerned about hiding their browser history.

  18. Gab

    It’s funny, the Australian jihadis currently posting photos of their dead victims on Twitter and Facebook don’t seem too concerned about hiding their browser history.

    Also, ASIO need only look at youtube if it wants to see who is a threat.

  19. goatjam

    I have only one thing to say Offshore VPN/Proxy!

    I got that in place when Capt Underpants was threatening my freedom. I still have it, but thats not really the point is it? I shouldn’t have to worry about such things when there is a fracking Liberal government in power!

    Screw those arseholes. Screw them all to hell.

  20. Chris

    Sadly VPNs don’t really protect you – rather than avoiding government surveillance you’re really just choosing which government gets to keep your metadata since so many of them are doing it. Perhaps there’s some country in the EU that might be ok for now, but regardless network performance is probably going to really suck.

    TOR is perhaps an option, though it’s possible so many of the external nodes are owned/monitored by the US intelligence agencies it won’t help either.

    Little chance that the ALP will oppose the changes either – when it comes to national security they’ll just follow the govt like they did in the Howard years. It’ll probably only be the Greens and the LDP opposing.

  21. Johno

    The Liberal Party should be charged with false advertising by caling itself liberal.

    This is a day of infamy. Duing 18C and now this.

    Why would you bother supporting them?

  22. Notafan

    I despise the breach of privacy. The timing also concerns me, is there a real threat they are aware of right now or is this a shoulda, coulda, woulda?

  23. Infidel Tiger

    Anyone still voting Liberal should hang themselves for treason.

  24. DrBeauGan

    I don’t really care if the government finds out I watch youtube clips of young ladies dancing around in their underwear. What does worry me is that Abbott, Brandis and ASIO should be so ignorant about the internet and so stupid as to suppose this is going to work. If our safety is in their hands, God help us all.

  25. H B Bear

    Brandis is seriously unimpressive. He’s not Robinson Crusoe there either.

  26. goatjam

    Sadly VPNs don’t really protect you – rather than avoiding government surveillance you’re really just choosing which government gets to keep your metadata

    While that is technically true it becomes an issue foe Junior J. Edgar Hoovers who are overseas because although they may have your metadata, they are unable to do much with it because they do not have jurisdiction in Australia and therefore have to jump through a lot of administrative hoops to use it. That’s not to say they couldn’t do that if they were determined to but without some reason to do it you will generally be off the radar to a degree.

    When your own government is doing it however, they can easily cross-link your shit to your tax records, drivers licence and banking records and do all sorts of sinister shit with it with barely any effort at all.

  27. MemoryVault

    I’ve written about this before, but it seems a reminder would be timely.

    The current grubbbermint is NOT trying to pass legislation to allow it to spy on your communications.
    Successive grubbermints have been doing that illegally since the latter days of the Fraser grubbermint.
    It is overseen by the CIA and is part of the UKUSA Pact, aka PRISM, aka Five Eyes, aka Echelon.
    Principal monitoring station here is the Deakin Defence Offices, Canberra.

    All the current grubbermint is trying to do is retrospectively make legal what they have been doing anyway for over thirty years, so they can start openly using the information against you.

    And some of you are naive enough to think this has anything to do with Muslims and terrorists.
    As Barnum once quipped, there’s one born every minute.

  28. Mayan

    The answer is clear: make many posts and have many conversations that will red flag the system, thus rendering it useless. If Mrs Maybury-Smythe of Waspville (aged 98) appears to be a terrorist, then the fals positives will drown the system.

    Seriously, the problem is due to a certain community. That community is enlarged through immigration. The obvious step is to be more fussy about immigration.

  29. Peace underlies order. Order underlies law. Law underlies freedom.

    We are moving back down that ladder. The worst thing about it is that it is probably necessary; what we are seeing here, and with 18C, and with OSB, and with the bikie laws in Qld are symptoms, not causes.

    Addressing the causes… that requires Fisk doctrine just to get started.

  30. nic

    Whew, its not as if we have offended Muslims are anything / sarc

  31. The obvious step is to be more fussy about immigration.

    The obvious thing is that we should have been more fussy about immigration since 1970.

  32. oldsalt

    MV this is how our FiveEyes partners in Canada do it link

  33. squawkbox

    I have just written a letter through gritted teeth to my (Labor) MP on this subject that wasn’t full of scatological abuse. I suggest any of you unfortunate enough to live in Labor areas do the same. The Liberals may have gone full fascist, but there’s some hope that the ALP will oppose it if only to embarrass the libs.

  34. Notafan

    I only watched a few minutes but the guy sounds vague and making stuff up, and very much doing the muslim as victims line. Why can’t he just leave?

    Linky to Badar’s asio talk

  35. oldsalt

    I doubt it Squawk. Unlike most here, I’m not against it. My complaint is relying on sigint is bound to fail. We admit this ourselves by proposing legislation to interrogate travellers.

    The proposed new legislation wouldn’t have prevented the Sari Club crime and won’t prevent a repeat. That needs better humint, not sigint. It needs more competent people and better quality Ministerial decision making. Putting all our eggs in the sigint basket will be an epic fail. But it’s the easy option and that’s why we’re doing it.

  36. .

    oldsalt
    #1406997, posted on August 6, 2014 at 10:45 pm
    I doubt it Squawk. Unlike most here, I’m not against it

    They already have echelon and carnivore.

    Why give them such extra ordinary powers you think won’t do anything?

  37. squawkbox

    Oldsalt, that was one of the points I made in my letter to my MP. The other point was that the data retained by ISPs might well not be secure, and could be captured by any hacker/thief/blackmailer. And of course imagine an unfriendly journalist getting hold of the browsing history of an MP on the other side of the political fence….

  38. Infidel Tiger

    Screw letters. Let shoot a couple of them?

    If you’re in, email me.

  39. oldsalt

    Yes Dot, someone in FiveEyes is doing it anyway. And it will increase incrementally like it does with our FE partners. But we’re fighting against the cultural tide with this. This is the quick fix. We have a quick fix culture, and political culture. We do the easy stuff. The alternative is humint, more competent individuals and Ministers. The former requires languages, lifetime networks etc. The other two require more accountability for failure, or there’s little incentive to change practices. When the people responsible won’t even fess up to failure, what chance of correction? Nada.

  40. C.L.

    The worst thing about it is that it is probably necessary;

    Nonsense.

    It isn’t necessary at all.

  41. Rich

    Anyone still voting Liberal should hang themselves for treason.

    Agreed…but as Mayan pointed out – if you don’t pick cancer you get leukemia

    Whoever I vote for (LDP for example) my vote is sucked up and given to the 2 party preferred system – giving it to either Labor or Liberal, which is great for them, but robs me of any say when neither will back my position

    PR sucks though, and as politicians are largely pointless and don’t do the job they’re meant to do, I therefore now favour direct democracy – because as least if 10% want free speech we’ll know about it

  42. MemoryVault

    Whoever I vote for (LDP for example) my vote is sucked up and given to the 2 party preferred system – giving it to either Labor or Liberal, which is great for them, but robs me of any say when neither will back my position

    VOTE4THEMM

  43. oldsalt

    Yes good point squawk. most of the leaks are coming from sigint not humint. sigint isn’t secure. As commentators over at ASPI admit, cyber defence is weak and it’s only a matter of time before most systems are penetrated.

    We’re really just following the US. New legislation of this sort requires more bureaucracy to implement, more training in the US, more money. Lots of it. Of the $6oo mill being sought, that’s where most of it will go.

  44. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    My browser history? Mostly Catallaxy Files. There, saved them the trouble.

    Now I fully Expect the Spanish Inquisition.

  45. talleyrand

    If you suspect a person is engaged in terrorist activities , or planning to undertake them, how about you go to a court and ask for an interception warrant. You do not need to scoop up all of the data/metadata of all law abiding citizens to see who may be doing something fishy.

    Such NSA intercepts did not stop the bombings in Boston last year, even when the alleged terrorists were know to have such views by the authorities and had visited an alarm ringing hot spot such a Chechnya. Nor other cases which were repeatedly overlooked.
    Reliance of technology and not informed action has not had a good result to date. Too much data, makes it impossible to sift meaning from it.

    If you want to increase the odds of preventing an attack, how about analysis of recent street protests against Israel, or last years violence ridden protests for the Prophet. Or you could recruit agents in the local community who will direct you towards questionable motives of individuals.

    This human intelligence effort is all too much like hard work. No let us make everyone a possible suspect for anything, and let God sort them out afterwards.

    Don’t think future governments will find reasons to use this data to source extra taxation? How about criminal elements corrupting law enforcement to hack financial records, for blackmail, market manipulation. Cuz Bikie gangs and organised crime haven’t been found recently to be involved in border and customs areas ?
    How about governments or the HRC using this data to ban books, articles you find offensive. What , will not happen? But the courts and the HRC banned 2 columns of Andrew Bolts from being available on the basis of offense, and the cunt cowards of the LNP folded on such a law’s repeal.

    Fuck off with your assumptions around need to know what and whom I talk to, or what I communicate, read , watch.
    I do nothing wrong, and will not have some idiot state operative say they need to know , and surely I have nothing to fear if I have nothing to hide. Governments that intrude themselves into my life at a micro level are indeed something to be feared.

  46. MemoryVault

    Now I fully Expect the Spanish Inquisition.

    Far worse, I’m afraid.
    You will be fully interrogated by a team of Keynsians hand-picked from amongst tenured Economics Professors from Australian universities, backed up by a squad of Journalism Academics, overseen by Professor lewandowski, who will write a paper on your ideation fixation, once you have confessed.

  47. Staphy

    This is one area where both major parties suck. They get some fuckwit power-tripping AFP/ASIO bureaucrat in their earhole and can’t help themselves.

    It’d be good to see Ludlum and Leyonhjelm team up on this, they should be of one mind on this issue if none other.

  48. squawkbox

    Yes, weird that only the extreme left (Greens) and the extreme right (LDP) have any respect for liberty

  49. struth

    Just straight out liars.
    Socialist scum.
    They shouldn’t be worried about my browser history.
    They should be just worried about history, and how it will be written about them.

  50. Baldrick

    Get yourself a VPN. There’s plenty around but the one I’ve used before and is good value is Astrill VPN.
    A yearly subscription is $70 which gives you access to 160 servers in 50 countries. No special hardware required, just download the software and then surf.
    Anyway, don’t take my word for it. You can try in for 7 days free.
    (… and no, I’m not getting paid to say this and I don’t have shares in the company. It’s just a community service announcement for Cats)

  51. MartinG

    Yobbo
    #1406877, posted on August 6, 2014 at 9:35 pm

    ldp.org.au

    Aren’t you supposed to be a lefty or am I mixing you up with someone else? Did you do the quiz?

  52. ASIO

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #1407067, posted on August 6, 2014 at 11:43 pm

    My browser history? Mostly Catallaxy Files. There, saved them the trouble.

    Now I fully Expect the Spanish Inquisition.

    We know all about your casseroles and you can’t fool us. Your developing them as Weapons of Mass Torture and experimenting on your own family. A fiendish plan but we’re on to you.

  53. MartinG

    squawkbox
    #1407085, posted on August 7, 2014 at 12:01 am

    Yes, weird that only the extreme left (Greens) and the extreme right (LDP) have any respect for liberty

    There many in the Liberal party but they are in the background. Let’s hope Abbotts polling goes so low they feel compelled to kick the lowlife scumbag out.

    Listen to this audio at the 35.49 mark. It’s not just the Cats who are pissed off.

    Classy Lady

  54. John Comnenus

    When it comes to meta data monitoring none of you know what you are talking about.

    The facts are that the data is not yours to start with, it’s owned by your telco or internet provider.

    Secondly it is not associated with a name. The meta data is tied to a handset or phone, but the owner is unknown. It is only after an investigation starts that they will Look At your digital behaviour.

    Finally how many agents do you think the government has. No government in the world is able to monitor this. It can only store and retrieve. Think about this – how many web pages do you visit per day? How many emails do you send per day? & how many phone calls do you make per day? Now multiply by let’s say 15 million Australians. Then multiply that by the meta data your collecting – outgoing number, incoming number, time, duration etc.

    You quickly realise that they are probably collecting a billion + points of meta data in Australia every day. It is too much. No one can monitor it. The telcos already collect and analyse it in aggregate to work out what it’s plans and offers to users should be.

  55. John Comnenus

    Oh and I forgot to add you will still need a court approval to read the email, listen to the phone or check the browsing history.

  56. lotocoti

    Welcome to StasiBrandisland.

  57. ΑSΙΟ

    My first post was censored this is an attempt to circumnavigate it, the reply will use the exact words I used in the original post.

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #1407067, posted on August 6, 2014 at 11:43 pm

    My browser history? Mostly Catallaxy Files. There, saved them the trouble.

    Now I fully Expect the Spanish Inquisition.

    We know all about your casserole experiments and you needn’t think we are not on to you. Your developing a weapon of Mass Mastication and fiendishly using your family for your evil experiments.

  58. outsider

    John, you know every data custodian and analyst with big data experience absolutely dreams of data linkage, all of it requires the mother lode of central foundation data on which to build; but so much more insidiously, the energy, will and clarity of knowledge to do so. As for volume being an impediment, I only wish I could agree – search algorithms are becoming incredibly sophisticated for exactly this reason. And no one will ever know what security is put in place – read the papers. And finally – it is government! Look at the atrocities of the past hundred years. There is a reason people want to see what is released after 30 years. Many humans are naturally secretive, and curious.

    It’s already there in many government initiatives. Once discovered, data wants to be free, it is candy to a child’s eye. And all politicians and managers accept the status quo upon their arrival as fully acceptable, then start on plans to build it faster, further, better. The critical point of course is dreaming up uses for it all. Brandis nee Conroy already has that covered, the actual ID tag of the polly matters not at all. Just the beginning.

  59. Luke

    “For investigating crime”. Which 1 month later will be amended included to include potential copyright breaches (using taxpayer funding to enforce copyright), and in the same month will come the first of the court precedents that the family court have access to this data as well.

    6 to 12 months later, after a precedent setting court loss, an amendment will be made to deem the account owner liable for anything done/viewed via their account. Because an I.P. address is not a person.

    This will effectively end free wi fi in parks, shops and public transport for fear of liability. And let’s not forget all those older members of the public being pursued for what their teenage neighbours accessed via their poorly secured wi-fi.

    Let the IP trolling and account hacking bonanza begin!

  60. EB

    I shouldn’t have to worry about such things when there is a fracking Liberal government in power!

    I pity anyone who actually swallowed this.

    It’s government. Get that through your thick head.

    The front man you vote in is irrelevant.

  61. .

    MartinG
    #1407164, posted on August 7, 2014 at 5:54 am
    Yobbo
    #1406877, posted on August 6, 2014 at 9:35 pm

    ldp.org.au

    Aren’t you supposed to be a lefty or am I mixing you up with someone else? Did you do the quiz?

    You’ve been fooled. Some rabid idiot troll declared Yobbo is a lefty.

    He and John Humphreys and another IT mate of Yobbo’s wrote the LDP quiz.

  62. .

    oldsalt
    #1407028, posted on August 6, 2014 at 11:06 pm
    Yes Dot, someone in FiveEyes is doing it anyway.

    So charge them for their criminal behaviour.

  63. .

    outsider
    #1407189, posted on August 7, 2014 at 7:35 am
    John, you know every data custodian and analyst with big data experience absolutely dreams of data linkage

    So we should abort our My.Gov accounts once our tax refund is paid out?

  64. .

    Where is rock ribbed, holier than the LDP, uber libertarian “Mattthew” in all of this?

    Or does he only turn up to troll the LDP?

  65. Ant

    I’d lean more towards outsider’s argument than John Comnenus’.

    Ultimately, we can have all the checks and balances we like.

    At the end of the day some bureaucracy is going to run it, and that bureaucracy or maybe more will have access to this information.

    Bureaucracies are run by people and they’re setup and staffed by politicians. Or at least the important bits are.

    I look at what was once the world’s greatest republic, the USA. It has “public accountability” rules and regulations coming out of its ass.

    Yet check out what is probably its most powerful and intrusive bureaucracy, the IRS, has been up to with private and personal data on the Obama administration’s ideological opponents.

    More critically, check what it did to cover it up its behaviour the instant the scandal became public.

    I’d have to say that you would be stark raving mad if you think any government can be trusted with any access to what sort of stuff you’ve been looking at on your computer at home.

    Sure, they’ll tell you that they’ve put this and that in place just to make sure little old you has their privacy locked up and protected.

    We all know how much they care. Right?

    Right?

  66. Yon Toad

    It’s a good thing Ol Jellyback George was sitting down; he has no principles to stand on.

  67. MartinG

    Dot

    You’ve been fooled. Some rabid idiot troll declared Yobbo is a lefty.

    He and John Humphreys and another IT mate of Yobbo’s wrote the LDP quiz.

    Thanks for that, I did the quiz and came very slightly centrist Libertarian.

  68. jupes

    Good grief talk about an over reaction from you lot. Metadata has been collected for years. Read John Comnenus’ post above at 6:55 am.

    ASIO have done a very good job so far protecting us from Islamic terrorism so I am happy to accept that this legislation is in the national interest.

    My problem with it is that it is just chipping away at the edges of the problem. Far better to attack the problem from the source. Most important is to stop Islamic immigration. The equation is simple: The more Muslims the more terrorists.

    Secondly they need to increase the MINIMUM penalties for terrorist offences. The fact that a convicted terrorist can only serve three years is a blight on the laws and judiciary.

    Thirdly they need to target these fuckers at all levels – airports, internet, mosques, prayer rooms – the lot.

  69. .

    ASIO have done a very good job so far protecting us from Islamic terrorism so I am happy to accept that this legislation is in the national interest.

    You don’t belong here.

  70. Uh oh

    Can’t wait ’til Wikileaks or a rogue CIA analyst get access to all this info.

  71. Senile Old Guy

    …so I am happy to accept that this legislation is in the national interest.

    Good for you BUT I am not happy with it. In the UK, legislation enabling spying on people to counter the threat of terrorism quickly turned to councils spying on whether people were recycling “correctly”.

    If a power exists, it will be abused. The only question is when and by whom.

  72. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Now I fully Expect the Spanish Inquisition.

    Far worse, I’m afraid.
    You will be fully interrogated by a team of Keynsians hand-picked from amongst tenured Economics Professors from Australian universities, backed up by a squad of Journalism Academics, overseen by Professor lewandowski, who will write a paper on your ideation fixation, once you have confessed.

    Aha. I will lead them astray with my general ignorance. Part of my cunning plan for world domination. Along with my secret weapon – the Molotov casserole.

  73. .

    Good for you BUT I am not happy with it. In the UK, legislation enabling spying on people to counter the threat of terrorism quickly turned to councils spying on whether people were recycling “correctly”.

    Jesus christ. The greens and enviroistas already have too much power.

  74. Yon Toad

    Record this:
    In light of Prime Minister Weasels proven ability as a bare-faced liar, is it reasonable to ask if THAT punch really did occur?

  75. Yon Toad

    PM Weasel is obviously a firm believer in consensus:
    “To me, consensus seems to be the process of abandoning all beliefs, principles, values and policies. So it is something in which no one believes and to which no one objects.”
    — Margaret Thatcher

  76. goatjam

    “Get yourself a VPN. There’s plenty around but the one I’ve used before and is good value is Astrill VPN.
    A yearly subscription is $70 which gives you access to 160 servers in 50 countries. No special hardware required, just download the software and then surf.”

    This is false security and beside the point. The point is the creeping Orwellian state and just because there are aways around it now it doesn’t mean we should be less vigilant in the face of attempts to move closer towards a fascist totalitarian state.

    Also, even if you come to say, Catallaxy via VPN, if Catallaxy is hosted on an Australian ISP then they will still know that Baldrick visited Catallaxy from somewhere. Obviously this is less concerning and overseas sites are not affected but as I said this is not the point

    Also, making website hosting in Australia a logistical, economical and privacy nightmare may in fact force the entire Australian hosting industry offshore which would be an unintended consequence of Laborite proportions.

    Nice going Libtards.

  77. rickw

    “Get yourself a VPN. There’s plenty around but the one I’ve used before and is good value is Astrill VPN. A yearly subscription is $70 which gives you access to 160 servers in 50 countries. No special hardware required, just download the software and then surf.”

    TOR

  78. rickw

    ASIO have done a very good job so far protecting us from Islamic terrorism so I am happy to accept that this legislation is in the national interest.

    The scum in Canberra intentionally left the front door wide open in the middle of the night.

    It’s not in the national interest and it comes on the heels of Canberra having acted against the national interest for decades.

  79. cynical1

    If you are wired up to explode, I’m pretty sure you don’t give a rats about your browser history.

    Specially since it’s on a $30 use once and bin android hacked Chinese tablet.

  80. johanna

    Talleyrand said:

    Such NSA intercepts did not stop the bombings in Boston last year, even when the alleged terrorists were know to have such views by the authorities and had visited an alarm ringing hot spot such a Chechnya. Nor other cases which were repeatedly overlooked.
    Reliance of technology and not informed action has not had a good result to date. Too much data, makes it impossible to sift meaning from it.

    If you want to increase the odds of preventing an attack, how about analysis of recent street protests against Israel, or last years violence ridden protests for the Prophet. Or you could recruit agents in the local community who will direct you towards questionable motives of individuals.

    Agree. Of course police and intelligence agencies are constantly lobbying for more intrusive powers to make their jobs easier. It’s much less bother than actually working smarter and harder.

    There is ample evidence in the public domain (for heaven’s sake, it’s all over You Tube) about fanatics and potential terrorists. Judges are not going to refuse wiretaps and whatever else under existing legislation on these people. And this kind of surveillance will lead to their contacts, who can also be followed up.

    As is so often the case, instead of doing their jobs properly in the first place, police and spies seek to detract from their failures by claiming that they need more power. The Boston marathon case is a classic example; the Fort Hood nutcase is another. There was no shortage of red flags, just unwillingness or incapacity to deal with it.

  81. Aristogeiton

    Your economic freedom index is 10, and your social freedom index is 9.

    Some of these questions are a bit misleading. For example, I support free immigration if there is no welfare, but it’s not clear what I’m answering here.

    Not sure where I stand on euthanasia; if people want to procure the drug for themselves, then that’s fine. When another administers the drug, then you have all kinds of potential problems. I don’t like the Government or the medical profession being involved. Abortion I tolerate up until the fetus is medically viable, and no further than that.

  82. Tel

    Well. What costs are involved? How do we get meshweb or TOR browsers that aren’t stupidly slow?

    Basically you have to rent a large number of virtual machines from a large number of *different* suppliers and massively add capacity to the TOR network. If you run exit nodes, quite a lot of those suppliers will throw you off their network without a refund. If you run non-exit nodes you are reasonably safe, but in Australia bandwidth costs are still going to sting you a bit.

    Note that by doing this you would greatly increase the speed for everyone on the TOR network, at your personal expense, they might feel like helping you in return, but since they don’t know who you are (by design) all they can do is contribute their own resources to the general good of all other TOR users. At least some of the people contributing resources are actually spying on you by the way, and you don’t know who they are either. At least some of the people using the TOR network are deliberately just wasting resources to slow it down for everyone else, and you don’t know who they are either.

    Intentionally, TOR takes the worst route possible, so the resources required to make the speed reasonable are an order of magnitude higher than normal routing.

    If anyone wants to do an economic analysis I’m interested.

    Sadly VPNs don’t really protect you – rather than avoiding government surveillance you’re really just choosing which government gets to keep your metadata

    The whole idea of the TOR network is that the metadata is spread widely and in many hands, at least some of those throw it away. We don’t know exactly how many are throwing it away. If there was one global government it would be useless, but while there remains balance of power there’s a hope of the individual taking advantage of mutual distrust (Putin is unlikely to share metadata with Obama for example).

  83. Tel

    Not sure where I stand on euthanasia; if people want to procure the drug for themselves, then that’s fine. When another administers the drug, then you have all kinds of potential problems.

    Agreed on that, there are many non-linear problems in the world. I support the principle of euthanasia, but by gum there are some tricky corner cases, and you want safeguards you can 100% trust. Given that we can’t trust our government regulators to do simple stuff like accept a letter from a lawyer in support of the opening of a dodgy bank account AND NOT LOSE THAT FREAKING LETTER, I’m reluctant to trust them with anything difficult.

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