Metadata explained

This helpful slide – posted to Facebook by our good friend Helen Dale – explains metadata.

Meta date

So much better that George Brandis’

mus, der, um, err, mum …

I suspect in Brandese that translates to “get with Team Australia or else”.

The government also needs to explain why they need our “metadata” and internet browsing histories when terrorists are announcing their crimes on Facebook, Twitter, and youtube?

Update: Apology to George Brandis – I may have misquoted him.

George Brandis: Well, I, my, my, the, what you’re viewing on the internet is not what we’re interested in —

This entry was posted in Politics, Take Nanny down, Tough on Crime, tough on criminals. Bookmark the permalink.

53 Responses to Metadata explained

  1. goatjam

    What a bunch of totalitarian

    Tony Abbotts

    the Liberal Party are.

    Election Now!

  2. Yon Toad

    The first dot point has a lot of the Libs ducking for cover!

  3. CameronH

    They want OUR meta data so that the far leftists who now run all of the bureacracies can try to stop us from protecting ourselves from both them and the radical jihardists who are now firmly planted on the top rung of their victim value index.

  4. A H

    When using ssl (https), the url will be encrypted. All they will know is the IP address and port. Unless they crack the encryption, which presumably they can.

    so are they saying ISPs must retain data for x years in case requested. Or that ISPs must give metadata direct to law enforcement?

  5. Encrypt your files and Email messages (PGP) or equivalent, Use SSL everywhere, and run it all through a VPN. That doesn’t guarantee privacy, nothing can. But you’re the hardest one on the list. And, human nature being what it is, will be the last to be survieled. Don’t forget, the bureaucrats are people as well. They make decisions on what is easiest way for them to get value out of their effort. Make it difficult! And you’ll see ‘em coming. BTW?…. They’re coming!

  6. goatjam

    “use a VPN people”

    Yes, but really, that’s not the point is it? The point is that the government is building up their fascist totalitarian state machinery under the pretense that it will make us “safe”.

    Safe from whom?

  7. P.S. Don’t use 3rd party tools, DropBox, SjyDrive, 3rd Party Web Mail etc and dump that proprietary system that wont let you look at what it’s doing behind the scenes! You have no idea how “Freeing” and empowering it is to independent and run your own systems!

    There is nothing mysterious or magical about any of this technology. Technology is the most egalitarian field on the planet. What ever anyone is running? you can as well! It’s all just Bits and Bytes It doesn’t care who assembled or installed it!

  8. .

    Adrian
    #1407283, posted on August 7, 2014 at 9:20 am
    use a VPN people

    Can’t we use a government that lets us stay free?

  9. goatjam, The system is protecting itself from the occupants. We’re occupying the system, and it wants it back.

  10. goatjam

    Encrypt your files

    That works until they pass a law such as they have in the UK where plod can demand the keys to any encrypted file and failure to provide the key (even if you lost it) is ipso-facto evidence of a crime and you are charged with whatever it is they have decided to suspect you of.

    But you’re the hardest one on the list.

    Which can be a red flag in itself. “Hmmm, Nick has a lot of encrypted stuff, must have something to hide! No smoke without fire after all”

  11. goatjam AAAhhh and when they force the entry of the passphrase. It’s rigged to zero out files! No problem, I’ll type it in, or hand it to you to type it in. BBBBZZzzzzz Scrubbed!

  12. Bear Necessities

    You have to monitor those Presbyterians.

  13. Bear Necessities

    Why ASIO/Fed Police can’t just monitor activities, persons of interest situated around certain “Religion of Peace” meeting places in Australia?

  14. goatjam

    “goatjam AAAhhh and when they force the entry of the passphrase. It’s rigged to zero out files! ”

    They might be idiots, but they are not that stupid. Self destructing files are on their radar, if you pull that one it is covered by the “refused to provide the (correct) key and its of to the clink for you.

    The real smart kids have two layers of encryption. Put in one password and it unlocks a bunch of innocent, “nothing to see here” stuff but the other password unlocks a different set of files that you may not want plod to see.

    Then they are forced to do file size analysis to try and determine whether the set of innocent files that you unlocked constitutes the entirety of the encrypted file. That can be more difficult for them to do, especially if the bulk of the data is innocent and there is only a small amount of incriminating stuff.

  15. This is the tipping point of “Tyranny of the Majority” There’s no turning back from here. It’s all down hill till rock bottom. At which point it’s total destruction or a realisation and come back. Either way, rock bottom has to be attained first.

    Circle the wagons and try to ride it out if your not a warrior in the battle.

    The system is protecting itself. And too many have an interest in the system being sustained. Now, we know it’s not sustainable, which means it will stop. But the frogs in the water don’t know the flame is lit.

  16. .

    Nick

    Should I use gmail?

    What about Kaspersky?

    CC Cleaner?

    How do I run a could like Sky Drive or Drop Box without using something proprietary?

  17. .

    That works until they pass a law such as they have in the UK where plod can demand the keys to any encrypted file and failure to provide the key (even if you lost it) is ipso-facto evidence of a crime and you are charged with whatever it is they have decided to suspect you of.

    THIS IS SUCH A CROCK OF SHIT!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9S2f76Kjx0c

    I call them principles…

    An appropriate video. The government is being paternalistic to boot. The Commonwealth is adrift from the principles it was founded on.

    “I’d take a flamethrower to this place…”

    Well. He must have been a domestic terrorist.

  18. goatjam

    “Should I use gmail?”

    If you are concerned about privacy, no. But if the government has its way it wont matter what email server you use, they will know who you are emailing unless both the sender and the recipient control their own mail server.

    I have a (dormant) mail server situated outside of The Peoples Democratic Republic Of Australiastan so any emails I send via that server would be off the radar until, and this is the important part, it arrives (or passes through) a public/ISP email server that is part of the governments data grab. As soon as my email passes through any monitored mail server the game is up, so to speak.

    How do I run a could like Sky Drive or Drop Box without using something proprietary?/blockquote>

    This is possible but unfortunately you need some sysadmin skills. You can lease an offshore VPS such as a Linode but unless you have the skills to admin a Linux server (from the command line) then you will get nowhere fast.

    It’s a worrying situation to be sure. I have the skills to get around most of the stuff these people want to do but that’s not the point. Just having the totalitarian machinery in place at all is a danger to everyone, including people like me that are capable of side stepping it should we feel so inclined.

  19. goatjam

    Oops, I mucked up the blockquotes in that. Mad skills indeed.

  20. Infidel Tiger

    Those of us planning to kill as many politicians as we can, switched to pencil and paper years ago.

  21. thefrollickingmole

    What we are seeing here is the end game for the internet.

    Governments of all persuasions HATE it, its not secure, people can gather and express opinions without monitoring, and governments held up for ridicule.
    It used to be possible to control the “memory” of information through publication, 5-10 years after an event and it required a trip to the library and a search to find a sanitised version of what you remembered.
    Now people can search near instantly, see witness reports etc and are able to inform themselves better.

    But no disregard all that and homogenie and control the information again because .1% of the population get their jollies on watching perversion (which they will do anyway) and another .1% are fanatical asswipes of some description who might be violent (also illegal).

    Nevr underestimate the amount of turd the government can stick in this particular turd sandwich if the bread is labelled “think of the chiiiildren and terrorism”

    Oh and on a side note Obama is trying a run around that whole pesky free speech/internet thing by “gifting” its ownership/control to that bastion of free speech the UN.

    How has the Internet worked so well—and stayed as free as it is—for so long? One big reason is U.S. oversight, and the Obama administration has now said it’s giving that up.

    Absent oversight of the Department of Commerce, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) will likely face greater pressure from those who wish to censor, restrict, tax or otherwise pursue measures to undermine a free and open Web. As Heritage experts explain:

    ICANN is a U.S. nonprofit corporation established in 1998 to manage the Internet’s domain name system (DNS). The DNS is what allows users of the Internet, for example, to type “Heritage.org” and reach the correct website.

    “Although the U.S. regulatory hand was light, its role was seen as a vital bulwark to preserve the independence of ICANN and ensure that American priorities for a free and open Internet were defended,” Heritage experts say in a new paper.

    They warn that this transition to more global governance of the Internet opens the door for China, Iran, Russia, and others that favor censorship and obstruction.

    “Other nations do not share America’s perspective and have sought repeatedly to work through U.N. organizations such as the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) to constrain and censor the Internet,” they say. “Absent direct U.S. support, ICANN must answer to 193 nations, many of which want to control and obstruct a free and open Internet.”

    Will the Internet become the domain of foreign governments or the United Nations? That remains up to Congress.

  22. C.L.

    Mass (Muslim) killers already know to go old school – like Pauly in Goodfellas.

    Word of mouth. No phones and no laptops.

    This proposal is TOTAL BULLSHIT.

    Abbott and his colleagues are a disgrace.

    Somebody said it so well here the other day. They have betrayed the Diggers.

    Stabbed them in the back, taken a dump on the War Memorial.

  23. C.L.

    Just to repeat what Abbott argued yesterday:

    “It’s like reading the address on the envelope, not the contents of the letter.”

    In some towns in Texas, snooping around a man’s mail box checking addresses will get you shot.

    Justifiably so.

  24. Viva

    Your privacy is already lost with the Internet twist and turn as you might. The solution? Go offline. This means going offline from the 21st century. Cut up your credit cards and bank cards and throw away your mobile phone. Technology was always going to lead to a surveillance society. Those of us with paranoid tendencies or high privacy needs will suffer more than others psychologically – probably that means us baby boomers. Perhaps these characteristics will evolve out of the human species – already Gen X etc have no concept of privacy.

  25. .

    Currency Lad has improved his libertarian credentials over the past few years.

    I say he is above reproach now.

    This proposal is TOTAL BULLSHIT.

    Give that man pre-selection!

  26. .

    Viva

    Gen Y are worse.

    I don’t have facebook. It is abused more than this website. Apart from promotion, it has no commercial value. No one seriously runs a business or even a club on that. What it does can be replicated with an app or twitter.

    I have gmail but I’m not worried, despite the risk. I am going to end my my.gov account right now and only get another one for the next tax return.

  27. Mick Gold Coast QLD

    You all sound like Gene Hackman (who has made a fortune getting about the joint appearing awfully like me – I was mistaken for him in Hong Kong back in about 1990) as Harry Caul in “The Conversation” and later as Brill in “Enemy of the State”.

    Whilst HP PCs then laptops have been a constant business partner since about 1982, I don’t understand your dialect all that well. I was taken, however, with the circumstances detailed in those films and don’t much like strangers, who have no business knowing my business, knowing my business.

    Back when Labor floated the Australia Card I didn’t much care. I do now because I do not trust any of the bastards to do what they say, or to not do things and conceal them from me.

    The discussion here demonstrates that for every clever kiddy designing these secure systems for a caring gummint there are half a dozen clever kiddies just as able, and committed, to breaching them. Commercial monsters, with mega money to spend getting it right, regularly suffer a meltdown – banks and Ebay, US Defence, NASA, Microsoft and Goggleyes – they are all hopelessly vulnerable to modern day Masters of Deception.

    In business one encounters the odd misfit who is obsessed with gathering information for no good or profitable purpose. They spend so much energy amassing it they never get around to analysing and using it. Gummints would be full of these dopes.

    The Russian mafia and the goat botherers in their barren caves are that far ahead of ‘em, “like Pauly in Goodfellas”, it’s not funny. They don’t tell us that though.

  28. Shauno

    There is an easy fix for this terrorism threat. Stop bringing them into to the country. How hard is that?

  29. alexis

    Google “AOL search query release”
    So called metadata – google search queries which were anonymised contained enough information to identify various individuals and reconstruct everything about their lives.

  30. Alfonso

    Matey in the middle east uses a German VPN and one time pads for sensitive stuff in cahoots with the few email destinations involved , tests it regularly with deliberately obscene remarks about Mo.
    Knows the CID will deport him if sprung, prefers that to not knowing his surveillance status.
    One time pad is uncrackable, its disadvantage is your recipient has to have them, hand delivered is best.

  31. Splatacrobat

    So if there was a cabinet meeting held via video link teleconference could we get access to their conversations?

  32. Luke

    @splatacrobat

    You’ll find that there will be an exemption put in for politicians (home and work accounts) and public servants (work accounts).

  33. .

    Shauno
    #1407550, posted on August 7, 2014 at 12:36 pm
    There is an easy fix for this terrorism threat. Stop bringing them into to the country. How hard is that?

    If you are referring to Muslims, there are hundreds of thousands of Muslims here already, many of them are citizens.

  34. Gab

    If you are referring to Muslims, there are hundreds of thousands of Muslims here already, many of them are citizens.

    Yes and many lived here for decades without a whiff of trouble so I wonder why the latest batch of arrivals in say the last ten years, are intent on bringing their war here and have no allegiance to their adopted country? And why are we seeing a growing home-grown terrorist and hate Australia campaign emanating from Australian-born youths of Middle Eastern and African background?

  35. .

    Gab

    We should do background checks and arrest and try those citizens and immigrants who have fought with foreign terrorists.

    I don’t know why this is complicated.

  36. Luke

    I find it really odd that they already know who our radical potential home terrorists are, they have done nothing to them, but yet somehow they tell us if they have EVERYBODY’s internet and phones records for the last two years they’ll be able to make us safe.

    All this information will ever be used for will be family court matters, defamation and 18c proceedings, copyright and patent enforcement. Not 1 terrorist action will be stopped by it.

    Those who are genuine about intelligence know that excessive data is just as useless as no data in the real world. O sure with hindsight you can connect the dots once you know your target and what they did, but you can do that now with a warrant as well.

    Who the 9/11 terrorists were and what they were up to while in America was all information already collected by different US law enforcement agencies before 2001. The fact that they chose to do what they did, when they did it, and the location targets were nothing more than a number of possibilities before sept 9.

  37. Clam Chowdah

    Is this data passed to the government whenever they ask or does an agency need to seek a warrant to access it? Does anyone know?

  38. oldsalt

    Gab this is why Keating brought in mandatory detention – for background checks. When the number of boats and their passengers got too much, Rudd and Gillard simply let them into the community without asio checks. If, God forbid, one of these people perpetrates a dreadful crime sometime in the future, the blame should devolve on those who shirked their task on watch.

    In the mid 90s the security services never really regarded boats as a threat and resented being tasked with it. They reasoned that as we were aware of the entries and conducted background checks it was all good, the threat lay with those who arrived by air and overstayed. It’s one of the reasons Gov did nothing while the tempo of illegal maritime entries built up during the 90s.

    Now that unauthorised boat arrivals are once more not being released into the community without checks, the traditional concern with air arrivals had reasserted itself. The security services always thought and still do that boats was a job for the plods, not for them.

    Emerging threats usually come from left field, not from where we expect them to come. We always fight the last war. So it will prove with ISIS. When a threat goes mainstream and gets funding thrown at it, it’s like the grasshopper effect, everyone piles on the ruck and those tasked with identifying emerging threats are stuck on a desk in the corner with no money.

    Emerging threats will come from people who have a reason to hate us, people who bear a grudge, people whom we have harmed.

    AQ are still a greater threat than ISIS. The latter wants a State, the former wants to weaken the US and its allies. All sorts of loony extreme left, right and separatist groups in Europe could work with AQ for mutual benefit to conduct proxy attacks for eachother.

    ISIS, funding ,Grasshopper Effect. Yawn.

  39. Splatacrobat

    You’ll find that there will be an exemption put in for politicians (home and work accounts) and public servants (work accounts).

    Yes. Just like they wanted to legislate drug and alcohol testing in workplaces everywhere except the parliamentary dining rooms and bar.

    All citizens are equal, but some citizens are more equal than others.

  40. Cold-Hands

    Yes and many lived here for decades without a whiff of trouble

    Islam as an ideology is transnational, with the adherents’ first allegiance to Allah above all else. Islamic terrorism is not a new problem in Australia.

  41. Gab

    It’s not a new problem but it certainly is gathering more steam, more rabid and more vocal. I also don’t recall so may protests in the past as we are seeing recently with calls to behead the infidels,or rabid anti-Australian imams openly preaching hate and violence, like these.

    Something has changed, whether it’s the antisemitism of the media or our glorification of being politically correct to the detriment of our traditional freedoms, I just don’t know.

  42. Cold-Hands

    What has changed is that the Islamic population has increased dramatically and have congregated in enclaves where they no longer have to interact regularly with wider Australia. The social pressure to conform to Australian norms is diluted or becomes non-existent. The views that are repellent to other Australians self-reinforce and become widespread in Islamic communities. They are aired at protests and by spokesmen and the politically-correct emasculated society doesn’t have the means to shout them down.

  43. Chris M

    I wonder why the latest batch of arrivals in say the last ten years, are intent on bringing their war here and have no allegiance to their adopted country?

    There is an Islamic reformation underway. Moslems worldwide are returning to the Koran and seeking to follow what it teaches…. which is jihad, terrorism and the subjugation of all non-Moslems.

  44. Cold-Hands

    It’s not really a “Reformation”, more of a return to hardline salafist fundamentalism.

  45. oldsalt

    G.hoppers swarm up on a target, when they’ve feasted they move to another. When an emerging threat becomes a mainstream preoccupation, all those who failed to predict the trend jump on the funding bandwagon and make a project out of it. Until they move on to the next one.

  46. oldsalt

    Surveillance tech company that sells malware to Governments hacked, source code of Gov malware published. link

  47. Badjack

    How many Libertarians use Facebook and/or Google? If you think it is wrong to collect MetaData then you better get off Facebook and Google

  48. Senile Old Guy

    How many Libertarians use Facebook and/or Google? If you think it is wrong to collect MetaData then you better get off Facebook and Google

    Stupid argument. Something done with my consent is entirely different to something done without my consent. Something done, in fact, contrary to my my wishes.

  49. Aristogeiton

    Badjack
    #1408389, posted on August 8, 2014 at 8:29 am

    How many Libertarians use Facebook and/or Google? If you think it is wrong to collect MetaData then you better get off Facebook and Google

    Slave.

  50. Alfonso

    Profile the baddies….the easiest of tasks…. target them and leave me alone.

    Or is that not the mission statement, is there something else you aren’t mentioning, George ?

  51. Demosthenes

    CC Cleaner?

    You should be using that as a matter of course, part of normal maintenance. It won’t protect your privacy in any meaningful manner, though. Very little can. Australia is fully integrated into the US-led surveillance system, a beast now out of control thanks to Moore’s Law and the funds available in a post-9/11 world. Attempting to evade Big Brother, say by downloading Tor, flags you for particular attention – only the guilty have something to hide, right?

    The game is collect everything, analyse later. Lie about what is being collected, then retroactively justify it when discovered, with no consequences, ably assisted by the secret court that is the supposed watchdog. Congress has finally realised they’ve lost hold of the leash, with the CIA perjuring themselves to senate committees and congressmen being wiretapped. They’ll have a hard time getting the intelligence-bureaucracy complex to heel.

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