MemoryVault asks the question

From the threads, this comment deserves its own post.

Can one of you Liberal Luvvie apologists please explain to me how the current Liberal government is in any meaningful way materially different to or better than the previous Labor government?

Electorate lied to – check.
Election promises broken – check.
The ABC still totally out of control – check.
Increased government expenditure – check.
Increased personal and company taxes – check.
Businesses still drowning in red and green tape – check.
Household electricity and gas costs still skyrocketing – check.
Non-existent “global warming” policies still being supported – check.
Education and academia still firmly controlled by socialist ideologues – check.
Government pursuing multi-billion dollar pie-in-the-sky policies to buy votes – check.
Government pandering to every two-bit minority at the expense of their support base – check.

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140 Responses to MemoryVault asks the question

  1. Gertrude

    Yes.

    Memory Vault has a point.

    Several.

  2. ar

    They haven’t begun the refrain “presumption of innocence” just yet…

  3. Senile Old Guy

    MV, you omitted:

    Government doing bidding of ASIO and AFP to enable them to peruse everyone’s web browsing – check.
    Government so incompetent at implementing said policy that they cannot explain it (except by mumbling about envelopes) – check.

  4. stackja

    Can one of you Liberal Luvvie apologists please explain to me how the current Liberal government is in any meaningful way materially different to or better than the previous Labor government?

    ALP still can control the Senate. MSM still control the news cycle. Constant harping on the not as pure as expected by idealists as the present Government is represented, is not helping.

  5. Tel

    Government handing keys to the kingdom over to vested Copyright interests during secret talks (while regular citizens are not allowed to have secrets).

    I’d say the LNP are just a fraction more competant and haven’t blown the deficit out quite as badly. Also they don’t pander to the unions quite as much… under the ALP there would have been no investigation whatsoever, now you have some investigation.

  6. Tel

    And they have put a spanner in the people smuggling business, some credit is due for that.

  7. Fat Tony

    Well, I’d like to explain this by saying….Look! A Squirrel!!……(sounds of running feet into the distance)

  8. will

    I guess that leaves the sole material difference as border protection.

    Providing you don’t mind government by a bunch of corrupt union officials, and I assume most of Australia don’t care. Otherwise they would not have made the electoral choice in 2007 that they did. I remember at the time that the suggestion that most of the ALP shadow cabinet were ex Union officials was greeted as ‘sliming”.

  9. stackja

    Liberty Quotes
    Americans elected a black president. Twice. Labor can’t find a seat in federal parliament for a single indigenous Australian.
    — Niki Savva

    Well on 7 September 2013 Peris became Australia’s first indigenous woman elected to federal parliament. Well Senate anyway.

  10. Senile Old Guy

    stackja:

    Constant harping on the not as pure as expected by idealists as the present Government is represented, is not helping.

    Tel:

    I’d say the LNP are just a fraction more competent and haven’t blown the deficit out quite as badly.

    I’m not an idealist. I would be happy with competent and committed.

  11. Tel

    SOG: They are committed to the idea of looking after themselves in government, and competent at watching their backs.

  12. Dismissive

    Carbon Tax removed? – Yes

  13. Senile Old Guy

    SOG: They are committed to the idea of looking after themselves in government, and competent at watching their backs.

    Not exactly what I had in mind.

  14. Gertrude

    Delta

    The skip list makes for a lot of skipping sometimes, but it’s a good idea. Works for me, too.

  15. wreckage

    I’d say that the material difference is that each and every item is much, much less awful than it would have been with another term of ALP/Greens running the show.

    I’m not happy about the LNP being merely the lesser of two evils, but they are, in fact, the lesser of two evils.

  16. mmamster

    Electorate lied to – check.You are kidding aren’t you? Name one government who has not.
    Election promises broken – check.
    Ditto.
    The ABC still totally out of control – check.Didn’t its budget just get cut significantly? Aren’t they in the process of stacking the board?
    Increased government expenditure – check.
    Which Australian government has ever cut spending. It is a case of slowing the growth.
    Increased personal and company taxes – check. Yes agree on this.
    Businesses still drowning in red and green tape – check.
    They have significantly cut into both.
    Household electricity and gas costs still skyrocketing – check.Not because of this government’s policies. Carbon tax gone, RET going soon.
    Non-existent “global warming” policies still being supported – check.
    Like what? Theonly thing left is the direct action plan which has no chance of becoming law. The remaining stuff is left only because of the senate.
    Education and academia still firmly controlled by socialist ideologues – check.How do you suggest this is to change by government action. Do you propose intervening in university hiring policies to sack the staff you don’t approve of?
    Government pursuing multi-billion dollar pie-in-the-sky policies to buy votes – check.
    Such as? PPL is the only one I can think of.
    Government pandering to every two-bit minority at the expense of their support base – check.Another sook about 18C. There are no votes in 18C. What other minorities are being pandered to. The greens?

    Grow up. The enemy of good government is idealists like you seeking nirvana who cannot compromise. Stick to your whinging with Sinclair et al and we’ll have another ALP government in 2 years. I would be happy if this government achieved nothing more than preventing the ALP and greens from enacting more legislation or making any more spending decisions. So would any conservative.

  17. Ellen of Tasmania

    Can one of you Liberal Luvvie apologists please explain to me

    Really? We have some of those at the Cat? I thought this was the home of conservatives and libertarians.

  18. Senile Old Guy

    The ABC still totally out of control – check. Didn’t its budget just get cut significantly?

    Are you for real? The cuts to the ABC really were just flesh wounds. It still gets about $1 billion a year.

  19. Driftforge

    Electorate lied to – check.You are kidding aren’t you? Name one government who has not.
    Election promises broken – check.Ditto.
    The ABC still totally out of control – check.Didn’t its budget just get cut significantly? Aren’t they in the process of stacking the board? Blah blah blah….

    And… This is why conservatism is useless. No capacity to hold the line, no capacity to wind back the clock.

  20. stackja

    Liberty Quotes
    If a man is called a Chinaman, a member of the Labour Party will always be found ready to rise and protest against his employment. I have no sympathy with any such narrow-minded pettifogging views.
    — Donald Cameron, member for the Free Trade Party, March 22, 1904

    ALP never changes.

  21. mmamster

    And… This is why conservatism is useless. No capacity to hold the line, no capacity to wind back the clock.

    What was that bit about the carbon tax I missed it.

  22. chrisl

    Since when did a government have a blueprint for governing and then check them off one by one? Dare I say not since Gough Whitlam. It is more about how the various situations as they arise(such as the plane shot down over Ukraine) The rest is a bit of a sideshow

  23. Chan Sun Deep

    Yes, who would have thought it; we can now call this the Rudd-Gillard-Rudd-Abbott Government.

    Any chance the next Prime Minister can be any more disappointing? Any chance we can find a government that actually wants to govern, rather than be in power? Any chance? Any where? Any time soon? Thought not.

  24. Squirrel

    Yes, far from ideal, but as others have suggested, they’re still the least worst of the politically plausible options.

    The magic pudding/entitlement culture is rampant and any parties which are too honest about the need for balanced and surplus budgets and constrained spending will struggle to win and hold majority support. The tax (other people), borrow and spend parties are now the natural parties of government, and the options for the centre-right are crash through or crash, or incrementalism (just like it was for Labor, a generation, or so, ago). The sobering statistics summarised here probably go quite some way to explaining the challenges now faced by any Australian politicians arguing for reduced handouts:

    http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4102.0main+features202014

  25. Joe

    You want to wind back the clock.
    Hit ‘em where it hurts. Revoke Copyright and Patent!
    Then just watch ‘em squeal!

  26. Eyrie

    MV, looks like a a fair few Liberal Luvvie apologists stuck their heads above the trench. Fire for effect.

  27. Baldrick

    Can one of you Liberal Luvvie apologists please explain to me how the current Liberal government is in any meaningful way materially different to or better than the previous Labor government?

    M.V. – the only point I can argue with your post is this:
    It is not a ‘Liberal’ government. It is a Labor-Lite government.

  28. johanna

    They just don’t seem to have any moral or ideological compass to guide them through the policy issues that arise on a daily basis.

    Bureaucrats and pressure groups all have agendas and regularly trot out their pet proposals, which generally involve reducing other people’s freedom or giving special privileges to selected groups. A good government will glance at these and immediately note that they don’t pass the sniff test. The Howard government had these instincts (with a very few exceptions over 10 years) and these junk policy proposals usually got swiftly binned.

    Hockey’s Budget is a classic example of their complete lack of political gumption. They managed to get just about everything wrong – no mean feat.

    Bob Hawke had more nous in his little toe than the entire current Cabinet.

  29. Yobbo

    Haven’t banned anything for no reason leading to permanent damage to an important export industry yet, so I guess that’s something.

  30. Chrisl

    Who is your role model for a government that didn’t break a promise. Anyone?

  31. Dismissive

    Bob Hawke had more nous in his little toe than the entire current Cabinet.

    He also had a senate who wanted the Liberal Party policies he was enacting. There is no doubt Hawke’s govt was a far better Liberal party govt than Fraser’s. Keating’s was a Labor party govt which is why it sucked so badly.

  32. Senile Old Guy

    Haven’t banned anything for no reason leading to permanent damage to an important export industry yet, so I guess that’s something.

    Really?

    Prime Minister Tony Abbott said in March the super trawler was banned from Australian waters with cross party support. “It was banned,” Mr Abbott said. “It will stay banned.”

    Remember that the super trawler was approved by fisheries and banned for purely political reasons.

  33. john constantine

    labor used 6 years to stack the public service even harder with social engineers.

    any public servant that makes it obvious that they are competently carrying out non-left works will be executed [career wise] in just two years time when the swampies roll back in.

    only 20 months left to patch gaping wounds–if the free speech 18c thing was to be done, and be a vote loser, then in 100 weeks shorten gets to stand up, follow his orders and put even harder ‘no offending, ever’ legislation through.

    100 weeks,and if any more votes go, then sarah hanson-young gets to rename the navy ‘demographic change boat taxis’, 100 weeks and all those that sat out detention get to sue the government, which will provide them with assistance to get the biggest pay-outs.

    100 weeks, and flannery gets to do a stalin style purge of all climate deniers that surfaced.

    compulsory veganism at schools to go with the common core of socialist values.

    the abc gets funded to crush all other media online.

    they are making lists right now, and when they get back in, this week will look like a prague spring just before the tanks roll in.

    Did you see shorten doing his recent public speech-reading from bits of paper supplied to his hand, you could see his eyes rolling before he read out the crap he had to say, but he did it. The vengeful masters of puppets will erect mounds of severed heads next time they get in,and australia will indeed be obama’d into fundemental change forever.

  34. Senile Old Guy

    Who is your role model for a government that didn’t break a promise. Anyone?

    It is the number of broken promises; it is that several were “core” promises (no new taxes, reduce the budget) that people voted for; it is the inept way in which Abbott, Hockey and Brandis have handled policy (the Brandis interview earlier this week was excruciatingly bad); it is the gutless way in which the LNP has surrendered to its critics; it is the pandering to people who will never vote LNP; and I could go on.

    I don’t really care that much about 18C but for Abbott to drop it like a hot potato to build bridges with the Muslim community on anti-terrorism? Hello? Knock, knock! Anyone home?

    Chris Kenny had a good column today about the twitterverse* and I suspect that Abbott and his advisers may be paying too much attention to it.

    * I do have a twitter account because local utilities post updates about power outages and that’s handy.

  35. Chan Sun Deep

    mmamster:

    And… This is why conservatism is useless. No capacity to hold the line, no capacity to wind back the clock.

    But these Liberals are not Conservatives and the Nationals have never been other than agrarian socialists.

    john constantine:

    I’d like to disagree with you. I mean I’d REALLY like to disagree with you. If would be so damn good if I could just disagree with you.

  36. Anne

    Government always feeds itself.

    It seems to be merely a figurehead for the massive leviathan that is the public service.

  37. old bloke

    The Abbott government has shown some steel, but it has been inconsistent. I congratulate the government for telling GMH, SPC & Qantas that there will be no more handouts, that’s a plus. The Royal Commission into the Trade Unions was sorely needed, we wouldn’t have seen that under a Labor government. Morrison’s “stop the boats” policy has been an outstanding success, and the removal of the Carbon Tax is another plus for the government.

    I am disappointed that 18c hasn’t been repealed (it should have been removed when Howard controlled both Houses), the ABC hasn’t been touched, and the immigration policy needs to be reviewed to ensure we select people more compatible to our secular state. These are my major complaints against this government.

    I voted for the Liberal Party in the last election. Going by their performance to date, even though I do have some concerns, I will vote for them again. They are, as others have pointed out, the lesser of two evils.

  38. Stephen Williams

    Tony Abbott = Ted Ballieu
    Next election? Look where Victoria is.

  39. Senile Old Guy

    Going by their performance to date, even though I do have some concerns, I will vote for them again. They are, as others have pointed out, the lesser of two evils.

    Old Guy, I understand what you are saying but I don’t want to be choosing between “the lesser of two evils”. What Abbott promised was not “the lesser of two evils”. Yes, he has a very hostile senate, with a lunatic holding the balance of power, but most of the problems with LNP policy begin with the LNP.

    So I will consider options when the next election rolls around.

  40. Armadillo

    Heh. Well said MV. I particularly like the way the post is set out visually. It looks like one half of a step pyramid. That’s the way you climb to the top – lie.

  41. Alfonso

    Team Taqiyya Tone only dares to do this stuff for the ABC / non assimilating immigrant demographic vote because he believes his base has nowhere else to go.

    Unless the Liberals get reeducated, nothing changes.
    LDP, FF or a drovers dog…..but if you keep letting the prefs flow to Tone NOTHING WILL EVER CHANGE IN LIBERAL LAND.

  42. rebel with cause

    I don’t really care that much about 18C but for Abbott to drop it like a hot potato to build bridges with the Muslim community on anti-terrorism? Hello? Knock, knock! Anyone home?

    I too found this ‘compromise’ utterly bizarre. Did anyone from the Muslim community actually say they would be prepared to support more ASIO spying on young Muslims in exchange for keeping 18C? I find that very hard to believe.

  43. Tel

    I voted for the Liberal Party in the last election. Going by their performance to date, even though I do have some concerns, I will vote for them again. They are, as others have pointed out, the lesser of two evils.

    No major party is ever going at the top of my list of preferences. However, when you get down the list a bit you eventually have to decide between the majors and at the moment I still think the Abbott / Credlin party is the best of a bad lot. The deeper problem is that most Australians enjoy socialism… there I said it. While this situation remains, the results will be pretty much what you see here.

  44. rebel with cause

    Mark Steyn said the other day that America has a two party system with one party committed to making the country worse, and the other committed to not making it any better. That could equally apply to Australia.

  45. Tel

    Did anyone from the Muslim community actually say they would be prepared to support more ASIO spying on young Muslims in exchange for keeping 18C?

    I can assure you that Australian Muslims are well aware that nothing they say nor do will discourage government from spying on them.

  46. Raider580

    From free speech to approved speech. Higher taxes. Tony`s speeches don`t match his actions.

  47. Tel

    It seems to be merely a figurehead for the massive leviathan that is the public service.

    As I mentioned elsewhere, the third house of Parliament… the place where legislation is both drafted and implemented.

  48. Senile Old Guy

    I too found this ‘compromise’ utterly bizarre. Did anyone from the Muslim community actually say they would be prepared to support more ASIO spying on young Muslims in exchange for keeping 18C? I find that very hard to believe.

    Rebel, it is utterly stupid. It is like the Jewish* lobby arguing to retain 18C. The recent outrage on the bus reveals just how much 18C helps Jews: i.e. not at all.

    * I have Jewish “connections”; and that is as much as I will say.

  49. Baldrick

    As Infidel Tiger said the other day … after 6 years of Labor, we all knew one day they would go, and there was still hope, but what we’ve ended up with is such a disappointment.

  50. Nope – i got nothing.

    Leave this country people, it’s fucked.

  51. Infidel Tiger

    Hockey is the problem.

    He is a lazy shit who sings a different tune for every different audience and then cries when it doesn’t hit number 1.

  52. egg_

    A. Credlin’s “The Boss”.
    Whaddaya expect?

  53. Infidel Tiger

    We should make every maiden speech delivered by a politician a binding contract.

    I’ve never heard a bad maiden speech from an LNP pollie. They fill you with hope and then spend the next 3 years removing your bowel with a rusty spoon.

    The cancer started when having an ideology and principles became viewed as being obstinate, a “reactionary”, an extremist, and so forth. If you are a Liberal MP and don’t believe in free markets and individual responsibility,what the hell are you doing?

    If you are on the “right” and don’t think Hayek, Popper, Friedman, Say, Burke, Oakeshott, Smith and co. are the business, or even worse, have never heard of them, what the hell?

    Canberra is full of chancers, spivs and frauds, aided and abetted by a media class who far from speaking truth to the power, cream their dungarees about embiggening and protecting it.

  54. mmamster

    Electorate lied to – check.You are kidding aren’t you? Name one government who has not.

    Lying destroys political credibility. How, for example, can you make promises at the next election if nobody believes you?
    As for the old excuse that “they all do it,” you could equally ask, has there ever been a government free of corruption. It’s exactly the same: although commonplace it is political poison.

    The flippant attitude of Coalition insiders such as yourself to lying to the public is disheartening and sickening.

  55. stackja

    Baldrick
    #1410164, posted on August 9, 2014 at 8:09 pm
    As Infidel Tiger said the other day … after 6 years of Labor, we all knew one day they would go, and there was still hope, but what we’ve ended up with is such a disappointment.

    Too many unrealistic expectations. In the real world of today we do not get all we want.

  56. Tom

    I’ve never heard a bad maiden speech from an LNP pollie. They fill you with hope and then spend the next 3 years removing your bowel with a rusty spoon.

    That’s a fair dinkum liberty quote, Your Royal Snicness.

  57. In the real world of today we do not get all we want.

    We wanted a conservative government.
    We wanted a government that would reduce spending, and not raise taxes.
    We wanted a leader who wouldn’t look right down the barrel of the TV camera and tell a series of bald faced lies, just to win power.

  58. MemoryVault

    Before I address individual criticisms, following are two follow-up posts on the original thread. Togther they address many of the issues raised here.

    You want the ALP back in power?

    Why not?
    Stackja, the political parties no longer even aspire to actually running the country, the bureaucrats and academics do that. Australian politics is now nothing more than a spectator sport where the masses get to root for two teams competing over who gets to sit on the Treasury benches in Parliament, and enjoy the perks that go with the job.

    Labor are quite happy with the current arrangement, and the Liberals have clearly indicated they don’t have the gonads to do anything about it, assuming they even want to.

    So again I ask, what difference does it make?
    ————————————————

    Some insecurity will hopefully make our pollies more responsive to the majority of voters. If politicians twig that the electorate don’t like being lied to, then that is a good thing.

    Hammer. Nail. Head, Rambler.

    Unfortunately the only thing that makes Australian politicians feel insecure is the prospect of losing their seat at the trough in Parliament, such is the level of hubris on both sides. This will be the saving grace for Australia, though regrettably, not until we have been through a decade or more of pain.

    Apart from the rusted-on faithful at both ends of the spectrum, it is patently obvious that the majority of Australians have had a gutful of their politicians and the current party-orientated political system. Voting patterns for the senate in the last federal election clearly demonstrate this.

    It is easy to predict what is coming. Ten years or more of minority, one-term governments that rarely even get to survive their three years. Federal elections every other year, as the Australian electorate hires, and then fires politicians who lie and refuse to actually represent them.

    Eventually we will end with much the same two teams, one representing the concepts of “social justice”, (left), and one representing more conservative values (right). However, the difference will be that the people on those two teams will actually believe in what they say they represent – they will aspire to principles, not pragmatism – and voters, regardless of who they vote for, will do so in the reasonable expectation that they are going to get what they voted for.

  59. Baldrick

    stackja
    #1410196, posted on August 9, 2014 at 8:35 pm
    Too many unrealistic expectations. In the real world of today we do not get all we want.

    Too many unrealistic expectations promises. In the real world of today we do not get all we want should expect politicians to delivery what they promise.

  60. wreckage

    Here’s the problem. The last ALP gov’t rammed its agenda through like and out of control freight train…. but Abbott can’t, because in the Senate, that government is still in power.

    The second part of the problem is that it seems conservative parties just WON’T meet like for like. That makes them weak, and they will lose. If you’re in the PS and you cross Labor, you lose your job. If you cross the LNP, nothing bad happens. It runs this way at every level. The left are on fire with their own righteousness and do not give a shit about anything but promoting their tribe and punishing the other. Conservatives still believe in balanced government.

  61. whyisitso

    Grow up. The enemy of good government is idealists like you seeking nirvana who cannot compromise. Stick to your whinging with Sinclair et al and we’ll have another ALP government in 2 years. I would be happy if this government achieved nothing more than preventing the ALP and greens from enacting more legislation or making any more spending decisions. So would any conservative.

    Totally agree. Davidson and the majority of commenters on this blog are behaving just like my grandkids did before they reached pre-school. Tanty everytime they didn’t get their own way. The green/left filth were able to control the Senate for the entire seven years that they all but destroyed this country. Davidson et al just them back to finish the job (and the will if given half a chance).

  62. Clam Chowdah

    Well on 7 September 2013 Peris became Australia’s first indigenous woman elected to federal parliament. Well Senate anyway.

    What was Neville Bonner, a unicorn?

  63. What was Neville Bonner, a unicorn?

    Not an indigenous woman, I believe, but a man.

  64. oldsalt

    SoG, I also went for the ‘lesser of two evils’ approach – minus malum.

    The ALP was doing so much damage, the opposition was very unimpressive, I and a good many colleagues, all non partisan, had hoped that the opposition would do less damage while we waited for a younger more impressive generation to come through. On the whole, I think this lot have done less damage. For the future, Nikolic as PM and Hunt as Foreign Minister.

  65. Also, Clam Chowdah, Nikki Savva (rather irrelevantly) claimed that Labor couldn’t find a seat for an indigenous person. Neville Bonner was Liberal.

  66. Totally agree. Davidson and the majority of commenters on this blog are behaving just like my grandkids did before they reached pre-school. Tanty everytime they didn’t get their own way.

    We just want the government we thought we were voting for.

  67. oldsalt

    You want the ALP back in power?

    MV. Imagine for a moment this is a one term Gov. The ALP returns, 10 000 plus people remain in the pipeline in Indonesia and in detention here. The ALP caves, does what Howard did and give them visas or ensures they get them to NZ, to solve the ‘Legacy issues.’ They do this without first having resolved the broader issues at Lombok Treaty level.

    In which case, we’re back to square one on the snakes and ladders board, with potential i.i knowing they just have to tough it out to get in eventually. I don’t think this will be a one term Gov.

  68. You want the ALP back in power?

    Why does it always come back to this? No criticism of the government will be brooked from the non-left, or people just jack up and say, “you want the ALP back in power?”
    It’s almost a sort of electoral blackmail.
    “suck it up or the other guys will get back in.”
    Yes, they were worse in many respects. That’s no excuse for tossing your integrity out the window.

  69. MemoryVault

    …. but Abbott can’t, because in the Senate, that government is still in power.

    I must have missed something. All this blame for the current state of affairs on the new senate.
    Can one of you Liberal Luvvies please explain to me how the new senate thwarted Abbott’s promise to reduce government expenditure, or reduce personal or company income taxes, or prevented electricity and gas prices from going down as promised, or prevented the removal of red and green tape from business, to quote just a few examples of broken promises?

  70. MemoryVault

    MV. Imagine for a moment this is a one term Gov. The ALP returns, 10 000 plus people remain in the pipeline in Indonesia and in detention here. The ALP caves, . . . .

    There will be no return to KRudd’s “open borders” policy, regardless of who is in power.
    What is happening in the ME now, complete with photos posted on Facebook by the perpetrators themselves, has people so shit-scared that a return to mass, unchecked Muslim immigration (boat people), would lead to open violence on the streets. The politicians know this.

  71. Joe

    It takes an act of parliament to change an act of parliament.
    You know, that tedious business of voting changes in the HOUSE and the SENATE!
    QED

  72. whyisitso

    It takes an act of parliament to change an act of parliament.
    You know, that tedious business of voting changes in the HOUSE and the SENATE!
    QED

    Oh gosh, you mean legislation has to pass BOTH house – who would have believed it? Quick, someone tell Davidson and his minions!

  73. MemoryVault

    It takes an act of parliament to change an act of parliament.

    and

    Oh gosh, you mean legislation has to pass BOTH house – who would have believed it? Quick, someone tell Davidson and his minions!

    I can only repeat my earlier polite request:

    Can one of you Liberal Luvvies please explain to me how the new senate thwarted Abbott’s promise to reduce government expenditure, or reduce personal or company income taxes, or prevented electricity and gas prices from going down as promised, or prevented the removal of red and green tape from business, to quote just a few examples of broken promises?

  74. custard

    They scrapped the $11m a day stupid carbon tax, they stopped the boats, passed legislation to scrap the MRRT.

    MRRT blocked in the senate, most savings items blocked in the senate…..those who ignore the senate are just a part of the false narrative.

    Anyone who would rather the other mob in government well good luck I say. The ABC control the (false) narrative not the government.

    Perhaps the greatest challenge of this government is to find a way to cut the head off the ABC.

  75. incoherent rambler

    …they will aspire to principles…

    Nailed it, MV.

    Principles are sadly missing from our parliament.
    The only principle for the LNP is to check what the polls say.
    A principle base (e.g. free speech) would enable any LNP to eloquently put the case (with historical examples) of why it is so important. But no, MPs need to consult their daily briefing sheets.

  76. custard

    Perhaps those who are so pissed off will explain to the rest of us how the government should get all of its agenda passed thru the senate and thus make it law and not an aspiration.

    Good luck with that.

  77. Perhaps the greatest challenge of this government is to find a way to cut the head off the ABC.

    The way to decapitate the ABC permanently is easy to find—the example of Herakles v. the Lernean Hydra comes immediately to mind—but, first, this government must want to end the ABC’s control of the narrative, and that won’t happen whilst the member for Wentworth (no Iolaus, and certainly no Herakles), is Minister of Communications.

  78. And Another Thing

    Don’t forget that the left has turned the Government’ s agenda into an obstacle course. Look at what has been achieved. There has been no option but to put other legislation on the back burner.
    Abbott will get my vote again. He still runs the best outfit available.

  79. custard

    @ deadman,

    I don’t know how any government of any persuasion can kill off the ABC. But it must be done. And anyone who thinks it’s just a matter of saying so is seriously deluded. I wish I had a cunning plan.

  80. I don’t know how any government of any persuasion can kill off the ABC.

    Easy: sack Mark Scott, appoint instead someone* who will swiftly terminate all unnecessary operations and, furthermore, sack all members of staff who fail to comply strictly and fully with the Charter.

    * I’m available.

  81. Clam Chowdah

    Not an indigenous woman, I believe, but a man.

    Ah, right you are. My only excuse is I am in bed with flu.

  82. Token

    What was Neville Bonner, a unicorn?

    Not an indigenous woman, I believe, but a man.

    As is Ken Wyatt. If they a sitting indigenous woman the claim is that she is not gay.

    The fact is it took until the Coalition and Democrats had elected people to both houses for the white men and white women of the Liars Party to find one aboriginal they could find a spot for.

  83. Rich

    They’re a disappointment, yes (largely due to a crazy obese man running the senate) but the obvious distinction is border control – Labor only adopted tough sounding policies with a looming election and never actually believed in them

    Likewise, self-serving as the Libs may be, they aren’t criminally negligent and wouldn’t create things like the NBN, for example, nor would they increase the ABC, even if they can’t destroy it

    Basically, I view them as a net zero – their main positive is they aren’t Labor, and they block a bunch of fascists getting their hands on the till

    oh, and they aren’t an international embarrassment

  84. Token

    It takes an act of parliament to change an act of parliament.
    You know, that tedious business of voting changes in the HOUSE and the SENATE!
    QED

    Oh gosh, you mean legislation has to pass BOTH house – who would have believed it? Quick, someone tell Davidson and his minions!

    Put your pom poms down guys. The government chose to break key promises fundamental to the ideological identity of their party. They are courting their enemies at the cost of their supporters.

    This should be highlighted and the anger deserves to be heard.

  85. Andrew

    Electorate lied to – check.
    Election promises broken – check.
    The ABC still totally out of control – check.
    Increased government expenditure – certainly better quality. Building freeways and airports rather than school halls and gifts to corrupt unions
    Increased personal and company taxes – company taxes have fallen, PPL will not occur and companies won’t bear mining and carbon tax burdens
    Businesses still drowning in red and green tape – some green tape improvement, more to come
    Household electricity and gas costs still skyrocketing – slowing
    Non-existent “global warming” policies still being supported – cut 90% and Sen8 will block rest
    Education and academia still firmly controlled by socialist ideologues – what, they’re meant to fire the lot on taking office, with a Sen8 minority?
    Government pursuing multi-billion dollar pie-in-the-sky policies to buy votes – will be blocked
    Government pandering to every two-bit minority at the expense of their support base – pandering in the sense of not repealing. I’ve noticed there’s 100 a day less minorities being imported for pandering.

    Dramatic improvements in every area highlighted. Then there’s the benefit of NOT bringing in a new catastrophic major policy a year. Ok, some of this is not by merit but because the Sen8 is blocking stuff. So? If one of the benefits of not having a Green-left govt is a functioning Sen8 review function, so be it. What was the last Gillard idiocy improved by Sen8 scrutiny? Back then, they were dragging further to the ecoloon far left.

  86. Marion of the Glades

    mmamster sweetie and ors:

    The reason this chap has a point is related to your expectations. Both are unrealistic and IMO puerile.
    Our experience of life has been enhanced by two decades (20 years) of low inflation, cheap debt and the importation of other people’s labour productivity (that is: low incomes).
    Pollies do not like to tell people tough stuff. The tough stuff is that our kids will have trouble with careers and we will have trouble getting them to pay our health costs.
    If we can’t maintain employment we will likely have quite significant social trouble and much less acceptance of basic principles.
    Government has been largely irrelevant in Australia for 40 years, aside from the opportunities for Keating and others to do nice things for certain people (compulsory super, mr kelty, what a great idea! And for you Rupert?)
    It gets tougb from here Cats. We live in a world where the market actually has some effect.

  87. MemoryVault

    custard
    #1410314, posted on August 9, 2014 at 10:14 pm
    They scrapped the $11m a day stupid carbon tax,

    To what end? Most Australians couldn’t give a stuff about the carbon tax. The promise made was that the carbon tax would be scrapped, and as a result, power bills would go down. The tax got scrapped, and electricity bills went up.

    This is because the real elephant in the room re electricity prices is the RET, and the subsequent taxpayer support and subsidies for solar and wind. The Fiberals continue to support the RET and the subsequent taxpayer support and subsidies, so electricity prices will continue to go up.

    The ABC control the (false) narrative not the government. Perhaps the greatest challenge of this government is to find a way to cut the head off the ABC.

    The current Fiberal government had ample opportunity to bring the ABC to heel with the misreporting of the Chris Turney Antarctica Ship of Fools saga. They remained silent. They had a similar opportunity with the “burned hands” scandal when the ABC attempted to defame Australian Navy personnel. They remained silent for over two weeks, and then said and did nothing of consequence anyway.

    They had the opportunity to close the ABC down completely over their breach of S79 of the Crimes Act, in relation to their publication of top secret reports of Australian monitoring of Indonesian politicians. They did nothing.

    The Abbott government can cut off funding to the ABC tomorrow, without taking it to Parliament. But our PM is on record as saying he is happy with the ABC, “just the way it is”.

    —————————–

    Now how about you Liberal Luvvie apologists stop blaming everybody except the tooth fairy for the current government’s shortcomings, and answer the original question: just how is the current LNP government so different from the previous Labor government?

  88. Andrew

    Missed the first 3. First 2 are generic – I think they’re trying harder compared to their predecessors given the disaster they inherited. Contrast to R-G-R: “I rule out carbon tax, we’ll tow back boats and run a surplus.”
    ABC: the anti-Australia Network closed, luvvies retrenched. At least their treason is only domestic now. And there’s been some attempt to shame them – eg Burnung Boatees lie.

  89. Marion of the Glades

    Oh yes. Deadman:

    When I had a drink with Senator Bonner in his electorate, during his term, he could not enter the Mt Isa pub. Not that we wanted to enter. It was not a lovely hotel.

  90. Andrew

    There will be no return to KRudd’s “open borders” policy, regardless of who is in power.

    MV, crack cocaine is not a vitamin pill.

    They have opposed every act by Sir Scott in this parliament, already gone to the caucus with a proposal to abolish everything in Rudd’s policy because the was ONE death in a riot. The SLF cannot maintain discipline, even now. We will have years of footage of genuine atrocities in Iraq for example. Can anyone imagine the Progressives (sic) will be able to resist the green siren songs yet again?

  91. custard

    MV and deadman

    Good luck retaining government with the plans you outlined. You’d be thrown out on your arse.

    Come back with a plan that has a chance of standing up and you might be taken seriously.

    It just is not as simple as you make out. Sorry not convinced one bit!

  92. custard, a trimmed, Charter-compliant ABC would be a force for good: it would accurately analyse the country’s problems and fairly report the Government’s successes and failures (and the Opposition’s), and it would be cost-effective; any Government thrown out on its arse after transforming the ABC into what it should have been all along would deserve that fate.

  93. Aristogeiton

    Any question which begins with a composite insult is probably not worth answering, but I’ll give it a go.

    Some of the previous government’s greatest hits are the largest increase in Government expenditure since Whitlam while pissing away a substantial surplus on nothing in particular, some investment-retarding taxes which either collected no money or were churned back, attempts to regulate the press, attempts to regulate all aspects of public life to end ‘discrimination’, an attempt to bring in the very same metadata laws the Government are proposing, multiple attempts to filter the Internet, an electorally-popular government telecommunications monopoly which was never going to be completed, banning an export industry and pissing off a near neighbor, retrospective changes to tax laws as affected large M&A transactions, regulatory barriers to ensure trade union control of childcare and shipping sectors, worst IR laws since Hawke, and pushing the then Opposition to adopt populist policies they knew they could never afford.

    So the Libs have a way to go to top that.

  94. Aristogeiton

    Oh, how could I forget. Dismantling a successful regime for dealing with IMAs and losing control of our borders.

  95. incoherent rambler

    Now how about you Liberal Luvvie apologists stop blaming everybody except the tooth fairy for the current government’s shortcomings …

    The first problem with this government (and the previous one had the same problem).
    I dun nuffin’ wrong, it’s fault of someone else.

  96. MemoryVault

    custard
    #1410372, posted on August 9, 2014 at 10:58 pm

    I note neither you, nor any of the other Liberal Luvvies, have actually answered my question.
    Nonetheless, I will answer yours.

    Good luck retaining government with the plans you outlined. You’d be thrown out on your arse.

    To date, I haven’t outlined any plans – at least not in this thread. But I will.
    You think this current government ISN’T going to get thrown out on its arse next election?

    Come back with a plan that has a chance of standing up and you might be taken seriously.

    1) – Define what “welfare” actually is. Centrelink currently administers some 150 different payments and variations of payments. Each of these has its own little ivory tower of public servants. Reduce it to two – income replacement (pensions), and income support (dole etc), and eliminate about 148 public servant fiefdoms.

    2) – Calculate all welfare payments as a realistic percentage of the Minimum Wage (which means a raise for most people), but eliminate all ancillary benefits – eg – rent assistance, extra benefit for each new child, etc. When was the last time employers gave a pay rise to a minimum wage employee, just because his wife had a baby?

    3) – Using the same Minimum Wage criteria, end Supporting Parent’s Benefits as a lifestyle choice.

    4) – Accept that 80% of unemployed people are genuinely looking for work, and scrap the entire “Employment Service Provider” industry.

    5) – Transfer all the drug addicts and “depressed” people (about two thirds of DSP recipients) off the Disability Support Pension (income replacement) and put them back on income support payments (currently the dole) with the proviso that they seek help and attend relevant therapy.

    6) – Apply the same principles to other areas, like Medicare and the PBS. You want something to ease the pain of your arthritis? The most commonly prescribed drug with the best reported success rate is available, subsidised on PBS. You want the latest and greatest you read about on the internet at $3,000.00 a month, you pay for it yourself.

    You’re a naive young girl who really believed that guy loved you, and now you’re pregnant? Okay, Medicare will pay for your abortion. You’re too lazy to take a government-subsidised contraceptive pill once a day, and now you’re pregnant for the fifth time and want your fifth taxpayer-subsidised abortion? Stiff. Pay for your own abortion.

    You see, Custard. Not so difficult. About $30 billion in savings there. Note it didn’t involve increasing taxes, raising the retiring age, chucking young unemployed people in the gutter, or throwing genuine cripples under a bus. And nothing that wouldn’t make it passed the current senate, if presented honestly and properly.

    I’ve stuck to my own area of expertise – welfare. I’m sure there are people out there who could offer similar input in other areas.

  97. Yohan

    The real problem is spending on middle class welfare, which in total is higher than pensions, dole and DSP combined.

    The liberals should go to DD with a radical plan to have a flat 10% income tax rate, while removing all deductions and other family welfare. They could get over the line by a simplistic advertising campaign to appeal to the wallet, e.g 33% vs 10%, 39% vs 10%, to drown out all the hysteria it would cause. Australian’s would vote for this chance of hope.

    My friend met John Howard in 1982 when he was treasurer under Fraser. In private, he said this was his exact ideal, 10% flat tax, but even he as treasurer could never do it. He had the senate in 2005 and look how complacent the LNP became.

  98. Matthew

    MemoryVault, I have come to favor welfare for everyone, from billionaire to pauper. Everyone should get an unconditional payment. It is the only way to eliminate the welfare trap.

    The cost of this will be so high that there will be little left for the government besides national defense, law and order and other basic government functions. No more money for entrenched interests that are paid by the government to lobby against the interests of the Australian people.

  99. Gab

    MV, they stopped the boats and didn’t come up with an NBN elephant. But that’s all I can think of.

  100. MartinG

    Infidel Tiger
    #1410170, posted on August 9, 2014 at 8:13 pm

    Hockey is the problem.

    I don’t often disagree with you, but you’ve made a bad call. The buck stops with the leader of the party, the Prime Minister.

    He has failed in nearly every respect.

  101. MartinG

    Gab
    #1410518, posted on August 10, 2014 at 2:17 am

    We can relax now Gab, morning shift doesn’t start for three hours. Michael McLaren is still live on 2GB, always good listing. He’s on until 6.00 am this morning. If I heard right he’s on tomorrow as well.

    I was going to listen to Kathleen Battle & Wynton Marsalis, “Eternal Source Of Light” but it’s bit too classy for me.

    Here a little something to lighten things up a bit although it might not come up ‘cos I may have exceeded my link quota.

    Sara Bareilles – Brave

  102. Makka

    jc,
    ” The vengeful masters of puppets will erect mounds of severed heads next time they get in,and australia will indeed be obama’d into fundemental change forever.”

    I would argue we are changed forever now. IMO, Abbott’s LNP Govt was our last real hope of turning back the Leftscum tide infecting our PS and institutions. But they won’t. Abbott will not take on the Left where it matters- the Bureaucracy. The best they will do is a siege which will be swamped with the next Labor Govt. Of this I am utterly certain. And this is because the LNP has no stomach for a fight over the most important issue at hand : values. In fact I get the impression that Conservatism, at least as I know it, is somewhat of an embarrassing issue for them and best kept behind the curtain in most instances.

  103. Blogstrop

    Senate still ensures balance of power given to minor ratbags, assisted by Labor’s recalcitrance – check!

  104. Norma

    Let’s go comrade Cats.
    Roll out the red carpet, escort the boats in again.
    Restore the carbon tax. We need even higher energy prices if we are to save the planet.
    And fix the MRRT so it raises real money, until it sends the miners broke, or overseas.
    Oh, and get rid of the Senate, just in case it gets in the way of this nation improving stuff. Can’t have that swill getting in the way of what a Government wants to do, can we.

  105. Pete D

    ALP had six years. Pose the same question with the same check list in 5 years time. However, too much “Mr Nice Guy” about this govt. Time to get a little mongrel about them. They/he went or soggy/limp when faced with the 18c legislation.

  106. custard

    MV

    I appreciate your plan and accept your area of expertise is welfare.

    My own area of interest is GST and it’s distribution being from WA. My plan would involve GST being levied on everything with state stamp duties and payroll being abolished along with personal tax cuts. I’m unable to opine as to what the rates of income tax would be other than less than they are now, and have a pretty firm belief that the GST should not rise simply broaden.

    But my point is (and I went to bed after my last post) was that making steps in the discourse is bloody hard when the fucked out ABC control the (false) narrative. It means everything a polie says is subject to a gotcha moment and left wing soft cocks getting more say on virtually any subject.

    There is much more to add but I feel that any steps a government can make at the moment are made in knowledge that seemingly to make a radical change is too hard because there is too much risk of being howled down. It could be that stopping the boats and getting rid of the carbon tax are all that’s achievable this term, which is welcome, but if this is all a government can achieve in one term it just show’s how fucked the discourse is.

  107. outsider

    Whatever their intentions before gaining office, they have shown tremendous cowardice in caving to any interest group raising a voice against them, as if their election platform counted for nothing in the face of populist responses post-poll.

    When you do this you, legitimise the existing arrangement, policies and directions. People notice.

    Other point is that in a few weeks they have had a full year, and may not get much more, in an uncertain future. Say what you will about Whitlam, but he got a lot done for his side in a short period, he used to tick off ‘wins’ in cabinet I believe. Keating recounted a line – you might think (upon taking office) you have all the time in the world, but the truth is you don’t have a second to waste. Unless you are the present day ditherers of the wishy-washy LNP, of course.

  108. custard

    @outsiders

    True. But given that Abbott made so many promises he didn’t need to make in the final weeks of the election, did the LNP still believe they would lose? I didnt but worried all the same.

  109. candy

    It’s just extraordinary that MV does not know legislation has to get through both houses, and we know from their direct statements GreenLabor/Pup are set to block it all to enforce a DD.

  110. Candy, a DD was winnable by the Libs initially. It is now not a given, due to TA et al failing to stand up to the Left. A failure of nerve and moral cowardice that is going to come back and bite Australia on the arse.

  111. MemoryVault

    It’s just extraordinary that MV does not know legislation has to get through both houses

    It’s just extraordinary that Candy feels qualified to make sweeping, unfounded statements about a person on a thread where she obviously hasn’t even read the other comments.

    It’s even more extraordinary that Candy knows precisely how the unaligned senators will vote on issues currently under consideration, when those senators don’t appear to have decided themselves, yet, how they will vote.

    And it’s most extraordinary that Candy knows precisely how the unaligned senators will vote on issues that are not even currently under discussion within the political sphere.

    Ladies and gentlemen, I give you Candy.
    Australia’s next Laurie Oakes of political prediction.

  112. twostix

    The Carbon Tax, the boats and the budget were the issues at the last election.

    You can’t really say there is no difference when on the biggest issues of the moment they’re more or less opposed.

    I mean we could make up a similarily arbitrary list of ways that the LDP is exactly the same as the Greens or how PUP is identical to the Liberals.

    To add to the list of ways theyre different Christopher Pyne is attempting to introduce a more free market competition into higher education and fix the national curriculum.

    RC into union corruption?

    Noted above was they abandonment of Holden which was no small thing for the electorate to swallow.

    Most of their term so far had been spent under a wilfully and maliciously obstructive Labor Senate. So it’s not really completely fair to blame them for not being able to do anything so far.

    Sure there are lots of softcocks in the Liberals but i’m afraid to say that’s how Australia likes it.

    The capitulation on S18c was pathetic but I will wait to see how they go under the new senate before damning them as being as the same as Labor (have people really forgotten how dreadful the Gillard years were ?).

  113. incoherent rambler

    have people really forgotten how dreadful the Gillard years were ?

    Yes.

    Abbott reminded the electorate of how dreadful when he rolled over on 18C. Some political sins are so heinous that whatever else you do, it don’t matter. Gillard’s problem, FLC’s problem.

  114. handjive

    Love ya work, memory vault.

  115. candy

    Don’t be so cross, MV. You made a huge amount of sweeping points up there. On the other hand, I do admire the way you set it out with smallest line to longest line – nice symmetry.

  116. MemoryVault

    The Carbon Tax, the boats and the budget were the issues at the last election.

    To the electorate the issue of the Carbon Tax was NOT simply the removal of the tax, but the promised reduction in power bills and other costs that were supposed to result from it. Well, the tax got repealed, electricity prices went up, not down, and all we have heard ever since is why other costs are unlikely to go down. Rightly or wrongly, the electorate feels cheated.

    In the last election every man and his dog, with the exception of the Greens, ran on a ticket of turning back the boats, by “taking the sugar off the table”. If KRudd and Labor had won the election and NOT done something similar to what has transpired, they would be in exactly the same position Abbott now finds himself in – on the nose with the electorate.

    Yes, the budget was a big issue, and the majority of Australians indicated with their vote for LNP that they realised something had to be done. What they were offered, and voted for, was a reduction in government expenditure, and a cut in income taxes. What they got was an increase in both, which can’t be blamed on the senate, either the old one, or the new one. Rightly or wrongly, the electorate feels cheated.

    have people really forgotten how dreadful the Gillard years were ?

    No, they haven’t forgotten, and therein lies the heart of the issue. To the average Joe Blow who voted LNP, what he is seeing now is simply a continuation of the same crap. You cite a perfect example in your own comment. Christopher Pyne has just spent a year reviewing the God-awful, socialist-inspired, innumeracy and illiteracy promoting “National Curriculum”, and given it his “tick of approval”, to use his own words.

    What’s the message in that for those of us who voted LNP specifically because we were concerned about the state of education in Australia today?

  117. MemoryVault

    I do admire the way you set it out with smallest line to longest line – nice symmetry.

    Cut and paste is a wonderful tool, Candy. Just type the issues, then cut and paste them to achieve the desired result. The “check” at the end of each sentence are graph data points tracing Abbott’s popularity on an imaginary chart.

  118. Tel

    You’re a naive young girl who really believed that guy loved you, and now you’re pregnant? Okay, Medicare will pay for your abortion. You’re too lazy to take a government-subsidised contraceptive pill once a day, and now you’re pregnant for the fifth time and want your fifth taxpayer-subsidised abortion? Stiff. Pay for your own abortion.

    Sounds like you will need some public servants to manage those rules of yours.

    Linking everything to the minimum wage is a bad idea, because it then creates political pressure to keep raising the minimum wage, which is already keeping people out of work.

  119. Tel

    MemoryVault, I have come to favor welfare for everyone, from billionaire to pauper. Everyone should get an unconditional payment. It is the only way to eliminate the welfare trap.

    It certainly would be easier to administer, but you miss the obvious. Government wants to control people’s lives, which means if your payment is uncontitional they can’t bribe you into having a baby, or pay you extra to decide to build your first house rather than buying second hand. They will never give up the power.

    The other problem is that out of millions of people, a certain number will end up as failures, and they will be obvious, and in the public eye. Whether they spend their allowance on gambling, drugs, or whatever doesn’t matter, all that matters is, “Why can’t you help these poor people?” Next you have a political movement on your hands and more public servants eager to take power over someone else (for their own good of course). Back to where we started.

  120. candy

    The “check” at the end of each sentence are graph data points tracing Abbott’s popularity on an imaginary chart.

    So, it’s mathematical as well as artistic then, MV? Never mind, he’s 10/10 for me. I can’t help it if most other people are wrong, can I.
    :)

  121. MemoryVault

    Sounds like you will need some public servants to manage those rules of yours.

    Well, dismantling the Centrelink/Human Services Ivory Towers will free up about 20,000, and scrapping the Employment Service Provider industry will make another 30,000 redundant, so there will be plenty of spares to take up any slack. Besides, all that information is already recorded on the Medicare Permanent Remembery, so checking if someone has had a procedure previously should be no problem.

    Linking everything to the minimum wage is a bad idea

    Too true, Tel. For the record, I in no way support the concept of a Minimum Wage. However, since we have it, and since, unlike other indicators (wages growth index, cost of living index etc) it is battled out in a court rather than subjected to whims of bureaucrats, it is the most reliable figure available.

  122. jupes

    Can one of you Liberal Luvvie apologists please explain to me how the current Liberal government is in any meaningful way materially different to or better than the previous Labor government?

    I’ll have a crack.

    Sir Scott stopped the boats. Labor didn’t. If they had been in power every one of the boats sent back or the boatloads sent back in the orange life boats would have made it to Australia.

    They got rid of the ‘carbon’ tax and Tim Flannery. Sure, it is more a symbolic event than a practical measure to decrease electricity prices but it is a moving in the right direction. Labor was moving in the other direction.

    They approved Abbot Point for coal export. Labor didn’t.

    Abbott and Bishop have handled foreign affairs well. They have had to deal with the Labor legacy on Indonesia and didn’t kowtow to them over the spying allegation. They have also provided genuine global leadership particarly on the MH 17 disaster, as opposed to the embarrassing preening exhibited by Kruddentrop when he was embarrassing us on the global stage.

    The union RC. Sure, it’s only the first step to reigning in these corrupt organisations and the reaction to its findings will be the true test, however this first step would never have occured under Labor.

    They appointed Tim Wilson to the HRC. Granted, they should have abolished it, however Labor would never appoint a libertarian or conservative to the HRC.

  123. jupes

    Oh and Abbott reinstituted knighthoods. He then screwed with lefties heads by appointing a leftie as the first recipient.

    Comedy gold.

  124. Tel

    No, they haven’t forgotten, and therein lies the heart of the issue. To the average Joe Blow who voted LNP, what he is seeing now is simply a continuation of the same crap. You cite a perfect example in your own comment. Christopher Pyne has just spent a year reviewing the God-awful, socialist-inspired, innumeracy and illiteracy promoting “National Curriculum”, and given it his “tick of approval”, to use his own words.

    Yeah, agree with you on that one. More diversity in education is what would benefit both Australia and the individuals. Besides that, the Federal Government has no business getting involved in education at all… doing so is blatantly illegal.

  125. Andrew

    Sack entire depts that duplicate State functions while adding nothing.

  126. egg_

    Some of the previous government’s greatest hits are the largest increase in Government expenditure since Whitlam while pissing away a substantial surplus on nothing in particular, some investment-retarding taxes which either collected no money or were churned back, attempts to regulate the press, attempts to regulate all aspects of public life to end ‘discrimination’, an attempt to bring in the very same metadata laws the Government are proposing, multiple attempts to filter the Internet, an electorally-popular government telecommunications monopoly which was never going to be completed, banning an export industry and pissing off a near neighbor, retrospective changes to tax laws as affected large M&A transactions, regulatory barriers to ensure trade union control of childcare and shipping sectors, worst IR laws since Hawke, and pushing the then Opposition to adopt populist policies they knew they could never afford.

    Good summary; however, the bulk of the damage done under Gillard?

  127. egg_

    Sack entire depts that duplicate State functions while adding nothing.

    Centralising HR functions could cut the APS c. 30%?

  128. Billy the Kidder

    Whereas I can admit to a degree of disappointment, you can’t fix everything at once.
    The ABC however should be ranked #1 to be whacked.

    I am considering whether to keep my Liberal membership, they are certainly the best of two choices and on the surface the Libs have most things right… just too many “people pleasers” and Lefties for my liking.

    Will wait until renewal next year. Not altogether happy.

  129. 'S

    It’s gonna sound flippant but I would put myself in the lesser of two evils camp. The 18c capitulation is a real disappointment.

    However a term of Labour will see 18c used with relish by Labor appointed judges, unions given more power over super funds, more debt, more wasteful spending on renewables, pointless grants,and open borders back on.

    The only real substantial difference is that the LNP will do less damage over the time frame they are in power.

  130. Marion of the Glades

    When Bishop takes the top job, which is now certain, we can expect some serious change and a lot less fuss. Just take a glance at the flattening of the bureaucracy in AusAID and AusTrade, implementation of a much more business-friendly DFAT and a series of internal changes that have gone without a whimper. Add on the performance over MH17 and her steadying presence generally.
    Now compare the budget management a la Abbott+Hockey, various foot in mouth episodes by the A-G and others and the yet to be awful PPL. Not to mention lying on policy, backtracking on policy and general chaos etc. (Dare I mention the “metadata” concept?)
    Out with the Abbott-Hockey leadership, in with Bishop. ASAP.

  131. wes george

    As someone who has smacked down Memoryvault in the past because I saw in him the same kind of irrational anger we all see in the extreme Left, I have to apologise to him, and unconditionally admit that he was right long ago when he pre-emptively label Tony and the Lib team a bunch of cheese eating surrender monkeys who would not stand up and speak the truth about the climate change boondoggle or protect our individual liberties or even meekly entreat the ABC to pretend to abide by their legal charter… I admit that I was wrong on all these counts and hope that Memoryvault gets this message.

  132. MemoryVault

    Hi Wes,

    Don’t sweat it. In a way you are right, I’m an angry, irrational old man.
    But not “left” or “right”. I hate them all with an equal vengeance.
    When I see what this country could be, but isn’t, my heart weeps blood.
    All for the lack of a bit of political leadership.

    But enough of the grumbles.
    The important question now is, what the hell do we do about it?

  133. MemoryVault

    Doomlord or mods

    Is it just my imagination or did we lose about four hours of comments on this thread?

  134. MsDolittle

    MV I think I’m going mad.

  135. MemoryVault

    MV I think I’m going mad.

    Is it something I said?
    If so, I apologise profusely.

  136. candy

    The important question now is, what the hell do we do about it?

    What you do is respect and believe in someone and stop with the grumbling and look for the best.

  137. Sinclair Davidson

    No idea – will consult Jacques.

  138. MemoryVault

    What you do is respect and believe in someone and stop with the grumbling and look for the best.

    Thanks for that Candy. As soon as somebody comes along that I can respect and believe in, I’ll stop grumbling and look for the best.

    So tell me. How do we get Scott Adams or Bess Price into federal parliament?

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