The webs they weave

The AFR are now looking at the linkages between the Greens, the Australia Institute, CAER and the ANU.

Green Web

That graphic is missing a feedback loop – John Hewson holds a Honorary Professorial Fellowship at the ANU and is himself an activist in this policy space. This from a recent press release:

AODP Chair Dr John Hewson, himself a Preofessor (sic) at ANU said “This is the tip of the iceberg regarding institutional resistance to the transparency that would prove that these Universities and other institutions are taking some huge gambles on a nice gentle transition to the low carbon economy -and they have no Plan B if they are wrong.” Earlier this week, it was revealed that Australia’s 8 premier universities had apparently colluded in a botched attempt to avoid scrutiny over their long term investment strategies that would include a plan for dealing with the financial risks of climate change.

This information was inadvertently supplied by Monash University just hours after a request by AODP for such disclosure from 300 Universities around the world. It has since emerged that Oxford and Cambridge Universities have also refused to disclose.

“These Vice Chancellors and their investment officers are trusted with this money that doesn’t belong to them – they have a duty to avert the risks to that money posed by climate change,“ Dr Hewson said.

In the meantime the greenies are trying to shift the debate:

THE decision by the Australian National University to sell its shares in the oil and gas miner Santos last week is another body blow to the company’s trouble plagued Narrabri coal-seam gas project in northwestern NSW.

The Narrabri project continues to attract all the wrong sorts of headlines despite the best efforts of Santos chief executive David Knox to put a positive spin on disaster after disaster (The Australian, October 13).

The decision by the ANU will not be the last as shareholders and investors, big and small, recognise that the Santos decision to invest heavily in the controversial unconventional gas industry is exposing the company to unprecedented financial and org­anisational risk.

Now had the ANU initially argued that they had concerns about the long-term prospects of the stock, or that it was, in their opinion over-valued, or something similar, they would have gotten away with it. But they didn’t.

ANU said on Friday it would sell its holdings in Iluka Resources, Independence Group, Newcrest Mining, Sandfire Resources, Oil Search, Santos and Sirius – amounting to about 1 per cent of its $1.1 billion portfolio.

ANU vice chancellor Ian Young said the university’s policy was “in simple terms, we should not invest in companies that cause social harm”.

The university relied on research group CAER – which provides advice on the environmental, social and governance performance of public companies – to decide which stocks it would divest. CAER ranked the companies in the ANU portfolio in five groups from most responsible to least and ANU decided to sell the ones on the lowest level.

We’re in for some back-flipping, I think. Their apparent sophistication but shallow understanding of portfolio theory is going to be sorely tested.

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53 Responses to The webs they weave

  1. Giffy

    “… should not invest in companies that cause social harm …..”
    Also, should not invest in companies if Hewson is anywhere near …
    Spit on the ground at the mention

  2. entropy

    The Santos Curtis island LNG plant is now coming on line, fed by a massive Qld CSG pipeline.
    Narrabri is a pimple on its operations. That it is still an issue at all is because of the fecklessness of the NSW liberals and its wet government.

  3. Token

    Thank you to the AFR for following Deep Throat’s advice from All the President’s Men by following the money.

    This case has as rancid a stink as the stories surrounding the wind farm contracts.

  4. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Could some kind soul please direct Liberal politicians to some home truths about climate ‘science’?
    And tell them to get off their backsides and do something about the scam when it becomes expressed concerning government money?

  5. john constantine

    crony socialism forms a daisy chain.

  6. blogstrop

    the Santos decision to invest heavily in the controversial unconventional gas industry is exposing the company to unprecedented financial and org­anisational risk.

    That would be the controversial unconventional perfectly ordinary gas extraction industry that’s saving America’s bacon, and should be doing the same here.

  7. Michael Evans

    So the ANU, for largely political reasons, invests only in politically correct companies,, however they might identify them and thereby derives less from its investment and endowment pool than it might otherwise receive. To cover its costs of salaries, buildings etc it then goes cap in hand to the Federal Government for additional funding that will come from, at least in part, the petrol excise, tobacco excises and the pockets of taxpayers, including tax paying companies like Santos, BHP and so forth. Oh to be so pure and chaste! Let him who is without sin cast the first stone. As for “home truths” about “climate change” that Liberal politicians should grasp how about: 1. There has been no measurable global warming for over 17 years, a fact which even the IPCC accepts; 2. According to NASA there has been no warming of the deep oceans since 2005; and, 3. Plants have been consuming large quantities of CO2 and are thriving.

  8. Mr Rusty

    If CAER and AI were ‘da evil private corporations’ can you imagine the consequences and the uproar?

  9. Norma

    Impressive article by Callick in today’s Oz on Oil Search
    After singing the praise of the company, he asks the question:
    “Can any business, can any individual, live up to the ANU’s or CAER’s lofty aims?”

  10. Fred Lenin.

    Just think how lucky Australia could have been,we could have had Hewson as PM, then Latham,we could have had Kevvie for another term ,or Jooliar,still we have’ not missed all the luck,we have the Laboral one term Tony,to be followed by Shifty Shortass! The luck keeps raining down on us ,don’t it ?

  11. Louis Hissink

    Glib is the word to describe those intellectual dwarves.

  12. .

    Can’t wait for the triple bottom line accounting for all of those cadmium users and producers of China, namely solar panel producers and salespeoples…

  13. Token

    Could some kind soul please direct Liberal politicians to some home truths about climate ‘science’?

    You realise that the careerists in the Labor-Lite party have as bleak employment prospects as those in the Labor party.

    They are not likely to close down these options to make a swag of money post politics. The other option is to actually find a way to develop skills where they can be productive to the economy, something the Frasers and Hewsons of this world have proven is not an option.

  14. Token

    Can’t wait for the triple bottom line accounting for all of those cadmium users and producers of China, namely solar panel producers and salespeoples…

    LOL, triple bottom line accounting is so 2006 as it has been discredited as effectively as the Glow-ball Warming nonsense.

  15. alan moran

    John Hewson is clearly an ethical investor and adviser. His views on green energy rorts would be totally unconnected to “Dr Hewson who has spent his time since politics in a string of sustainable policy and business ventures said Australia needed an emissions trading scheme”.

  16. Kingsley

    “We should not invest in companies that cause social harm”

    This morning I went for a very nice swim in the ILUKA Olympic pool at the Bunbury/South west sports centre. My shoulder was a bit sore but enjoyed it nonetheless.

  17. Myrddin Seren

    Could some kind soul please direct Liberal politicians to some home truths about climate ‘science’?

    Lizzie

    I could direct you to MPs like Dr Dennis Jensen and Sen Cory Bernardi. Who get ‘it’. And are virtually marginalised within the Party Room.

    Whereas your average Coalition MP is going to branch meetings, school fetes and what-not, where they are buttoned-holed by earnest, socially conservative people who loudly proclaim their intellectual superiority by declaring that they only ever watch the ABC and read the SMH and, given the balanced coverage the subject receives in those forums ( max sarc ) are extremely worried about ‘Da Glimate Change’ and demand the government “do something about it !”

    Maybe an Ebola pandemic will refocus priorities – but frankly I await the usual suspects trotting out computer models which conclusively prove the spread of Ebola is due to ‘Da Glimate Change’ and we need Climate Justice Now !

  18. Judith Sloan

    Young should be sacked for accusing these companies of doing social harm. These are legitimate companies that comply with the law. Some might say the ANU does social harm.

    Sinc. We should get up a petition to make sure Young resigns.

  19. Judith, I would like some of these companies to grow a pair and sue the ANU for damages to their business reputation.

  20. Econocrat

    Sinc. We should get up a petition to make sure Young resigns.

    Judith, Sinc, I’ll sign that!

    As a current student at ANU, I feel Young’s actions make the university an intellectually intimidating environment for anyone who is not a socialist. His position is untenable.

  21. Judith Sloan

    Pretty sure companies can’t sue for defamation.

  22. Econocrat

    Injurious Falsehood

    Where business is excluded from bringing a claim for defamation under the Uniform Defamation Legislation, then the defamed business may be able take action for injurious falsehood, also called malicious falsehood or trade libel.

    A business will be successful in bringing a claim of injurious falsehood if it can be established that a malicious and false publication has injured its business or goods and has caused it to suffer financial loss. Whether the malicious and false statements disparage the business’s reputation is not critical to the success of the claim, the main issue is whether a financial loss can be established which was caused by the publication of the malicious and false statements.4 Unlike defamation, damages for a claim in injurious falsehood are not capped and court proceedings must be commenced within six (6) years of the publication of the defamatory material.

    (Link: http://www.stephens.com.au/StephensLawyersConsultants2196/Page/29236/Maintaining+a+strong+reputation.aspx)

  23. Roger

    Pretty sure companies can’t sue for defamation.

    Only small companies can – usually defined as less than 10 employees.

  24. grumpy

    I hope the “Students for a fossil free ANU” do all of their lectures outdoors writing with sap on discarded pieces of bark, otherwise they are just massive hypocrites.

  25. Talleyrand

    Well John Hewson was a director of Larus, an oil and gas explorer in PNG and the Gippsland basin

    Of course he can’t be accused of hypocracy.

  26. michaelfstanley

    EHRMAGERD that graphic blew my mind.

    Environmental activists with links to the Greens!!!!!!!!

    You might be shocked to hear that Labor have links to Unions, and that Liberal party have links to the IPA and the business lobby.

  27. Ros

    “Fossil Free ANU is a working group of the ANU Environment Collective. ” Anybody know who are the players and movers, other than the spokesperson Tom Swann. I note that they are a “collective” so no need to have elections for office bearers etc, unless Uni is handing over money.

    My view, Young has to resign. He has allowed his university to captured by a small very radical group of students who have no interest in the welfare of the students the staff, the university, or despite their claims, the Australian people. The university is just a tool to further their ideological ambitions.
    A reminder of Young’ s history, and the collective. Probably all in the AFR, but I am too lousy to buy.

    Ian Young,

    He was Executive Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences at the University of Adelaide from 1999 to 2003…..He is an Honorary Fellow of the Institution of Engineers, Australia and a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering.  While he was executive Dean, in Aug 1999

    “One of Australia’s biggest petroleum exploration and production companies, Santos Ltd, is providing a $25 million sponsorship to the University of Adelaide to establish a world-class School of Petroleum Engineering.
    To be known as the Santos School of Petroleum Engineering,”

    They must love him now. Wouldn’t take annual leave in Adelaide if I was him.

    Then came, 2012

    “ANU’s vice-chancellor Professor Ian Young announced the sell-off of about $1million worth of Metgasco shares in a statement to the ANU Students Association this week. But he’s played down the role of student protests in forcing the move….”a pragmatic decision” based on the worth of the shares.”

    How the collective saw it feb 2013

    “A GROUP of students was claiming victory on Tuesday after the Australian National University confirmed it had offloaded its remaining shares in gas mining company Metgasco.
    Vice-Chancellor Ian Young informed ANU Environment Collective spokesman Tom Swann of the sale via email on Tuesday morning.
    “I am informed by the ANU Investment Office that the university has now divested itself of all shares in Metgasco,”

    Some student can demand actions of him and require him to advise he has done so?

    Feb 2014, Lithicon sale, how the two unis saw it,
    NSW, “This is an outstanding example of co-operation between two of Australia’s leading research universities moving great research into use in our society and enabling new industries to evolve.” and “The Lithicon story is one of taking world-class research from two of Australia’s best universities and turning it into a growing business,…..In the process we have created a whole new industry segment based on high-value, intensive, knowledge-based services……….It’s exactly the sort of thing we should be doing in Australia and we need more of it.”
    Cooperating with, and still working with, the consortium, The Digicore Consortium; Saudi Aramco, ExxonMobil, Shell, Chevron, BP, Total, Schlumberger, Baker Hughes, Abu Dhabi Onshore, Maersk, Petronas, PetroBras, JOGMEC, ONGC, BHP, BG, Conoco Philips, FEI, OMV, EOG, Whiting.

    And Young, tweet feb 2014.

    Outstanding commercialization success for ANU with the sale of Lithicon for A$76 million. bit.ly/1aLEfMK”

    Then Young in July 2014
    “Mr Young said with no change to government research funding levels on the horizon, the only option universities had was to make harder decisions about where to spend money and what to spend it on. “We have to invest in excellence, wherever we find excellence,” he said. “We need to make clever choices to invest where we are brilliant, where the money will pay off in the future, where other countries are not as good as us”

    And now,
    Lateline

    IAN YOUNG, VICE CHANCELLOR, AUST. NATIONAL UNIVERSITY: For a university like ours, which is, for instance, a major researcher in environment and alternative energy, we need to be able to put our hand on our heart when we talk to our students and to our alumni and to our researchers and be able to say that we’re confident that the sort of companies that we’re investing in are consistent with the broad themes that drive this university.

    IAN YOUNG: A company like Santos, for instance, is essentially an oil and gas producer, and so, it may in fact be a very responsible company in terms of a whole range of things that it does, and I’m sure it is. But because it is primarily an oil and gas-producing company, then it will perform poorly on the environmental criteria because it’s a major source of Co2 emissions, which, as we all know, has a significant impact on climate.

    What FEI (buyer of Lithicon, currently expanding offices Canberra, looking forward to further successful collaboration!) is saying to the ANU at the moment I would love to know. And all of its other collaborators. How Young thinks it makes sense to shaft Australian industry is beyond comprehension, like with the art nazis, all will look askance at ANU now. Tomorrow they too could be guilty of some kind of moral failing which will need to be shouted to the world.

    He has been done over, and then rolled over without a whimper, the only honest thing he can do is resign.

  28. .

    michaelfstanley
    #1478835, posted on October 16, 2014 at 12:30 pm

    EHRMAGERD that graphic blew my mind.

    Environmental activists with links to the Greens!!!!!!!!

    You might be shocked to hear that Labor have links to Unions, and that Liberal party have links to the IPA and the business lobby.

    You idiot. They’re on the take and it is a scam.

  29. Quite aside from anything else..

    “This is the tip of the iceberg regarding institutional resistance to the transparency that would prove that these Universities and other institutions are taking some huge gambles on a nice gentle transition to the low carbon economy -and they have no Plan B if they are wrong.”

    That is one of the worst sentences I’ve ever read! Are they letting Uni students write press releases now?!

  30. Roger

    I hope the “Students for a fossil free ANU” do all of their lectures outdoors writing with sap on discarded pieces of bark, otherwise they are just massive hypocrites.

    Yes, and does ANU have a building program?

    Will their next building be a hand-made, wood framed, natural fibre tent… a giant tee pee, perhaps?

    Or will it be steel, concrete and glass, all of which use fossil fuels in their production processes and significantly impact the environment?

    What a bunch of self-righteous, “look-at-me-I’m-so-good” hypocrites!

  31. PeterF

    Why are all the 50 people who signed this letter referred to as being “eminent “. Especially Fraser,who lost all his money in Lloyds of London,and Hewson,who seems to make a career of failed investment vehicles?

  32. nerblnob

    Environmental activists with links to the Greens!!!!!!!!

    And playing with public money derived from resources taxes. I don’t think you quite get it.

  33. jupes

    Just think how lucky Australia could have been,we could have had Hewson as PM, then Latham,we could have had Kevvie for another term ,or Jooliar,still we have’ not missed all the luck,we have the Laboral one term Tony,to be followed by Shifty Shortass! The luck keeps raining down on us ,don’t it ?

    Gold Sir Fred.

    We certainly dodged a bullet when Keating defeated the dickhead.

  34. DavidH

    I wouldn’t trust share investment advice from an organisation called CAER, whose name in Spanish means “to fall”.

  35. Bruce of Newcastle

    Environmental activists with links to the Greens!!!!!!!!

    University linked to the Greens you mean. And supposedly Australia’s premier university (giggle).

    What do you think would be the response if a University was found with links to Buddhists? Some humour and bad jokes, at least. What about if a University was found with links to Hillsong? Outrage. There would be opeds in the SMH and the Drum for weeks from all the usual suspects.

    What if you found a university with links to the green religion? Crickets. Except here at the Cat.

    Meanwhile they are pissing millions in endowments up against the wall in the form of green tithes.

  36. Ros

    Caer has got its claws into Sydney University School of Business as well. They have a Washington exchange program, Students can do,

    Food Advocacy and Policy-Making in the Nation’s Capital,
    This seminar examines the relationship between social movements and policy responses in current controversies over the U.S. food system. We will begin with a bit of theory, sampling the literature on social movement “success.” How can we evaluate success? If success includes government concessions to social movement demands, what features of social movements make success more likely — ample resources? effective framing? innovative tactics? the ability to exploit favorable political opportunities? H

    or

    The CIA…. Students will learn how to do research on the Agency and pierce the veil of secrecy around its operations.

    or

    Energy: Powering the Economy in Era of Climate Change and Political Instability…..
    This course, taught by The Washington Post’s energy correspondent, will look at the supply and demand balance for oil; how U.S. transportation policy has fed the U.S. “addiction” to oil;

    Food I now gather, is another big issue for ethically excited marxists; supply chains, carbon, too fat, carbon, not equally shared, profiteering global companies etc.

    Will Sydney be the next to shaft its sponsors and contributors, and so of course students and tax payers

  37. Snoopy

    and Hewson,who seems to make a career of failed investment vehicles?

    And marriages.

  38. Grey ghost who walks

    These Vice Chancellors and their investment officers are trusted with this money that doesn’t belong to them – they have a duty to avert the risks to that money posed by climate change,“ Dr Hewson said.

    Nice one Dr Hewson. Do you mean the sky might fall in?
    The one good thing that Keating did, was to beat that Hewson bloke!
    What a dunce; and he keeps popping up all around the place with some new sinecure.

  39. struth

    Hold all taxpayer funding until we are sure all taxpayers are only from approved companies of the left.

  40. Tim Neilson

    Ros
    #1478879, posted on October 16, 2014 at 1:15 pm
    “The CIA…. Students will learn how to do research on the Agency and pierce the veil of secrecy around its operations.”
    Well, I suppose someone’s got to teach it now that the KGB has been shut down.

  41. Lysander

    Sinclair – as an academic myself I am sure these universities have vested a good deal of time and money into their Professors of Ethics making sure that this does still stack up and is ethical.

    Think of the likes of the ‘highly ethical’ Peter Singer.

  42. Andrew

    This morning I went for a very nice swim in the ILUKA Olympic pool at the Bunbury/South west sports centre. My shoulder was a bit sore but enjoyed it nonetheless.

    “Evil corporation Iluka risks our kids lives by exposing them to dehydrogen monoxide”

  43. AP

    Follow the money. This link suggests:

    A) there are close ties between Hewson and the greens; and
    B) Hewson basically admits he is a rent seeking scum bag.

  44. Marion of the Glades

    I really am surprised. Judith Sloan, of all people, wanting to bully Young into quitting over this.
    All of you need to have a good lie down. For starters, there is a reason the Gladstone LNG plant are strugling. The reason is the gas is not flowing. A very large part of that is technical problems with production. In other words, the promoters (Santos et al) have cocked up.
    Sure there are environmental intrusions, but anyone who is familiar with the actual production plans can tell you that this is mostly due to bad planning and poor technical approaches from day one. It is simply stupid to be assuming you can experiment with aquifers in the Northern Tablelands of NSW, for example.
    I think Santos is a dud stock. And that it’s LNG project will kill the company.
    Do the sums, kids.

  45. Fred Lenin.

    Does this Hewson clown get paid for spouting this crap? If so where does the money come from? I wouldn’t employ him to clean the toilets ,like a lot of these so called “interlekchools”.

  46. nerblnob

    I think Santos is a dud stock. And that it’s LNG project will kill the company.
    Do the sums, kids.

    I thought the kids were selling (“divesting”) Santos shares because they judged them unethical.
    Now it’s because they’re duds?
    Is that meant to be a self-fulfilling prediction/fantasy?

  47. Econocrat

    Received today from the ANU:

    From: [email protected] on behalf of Student List Coordinator
    Sent: Thursday, 16 October 2014 2:51 PM
    To: ‘[email protected]
    Subject: [Students.all] Employment opportunities on campus for ANU students

    Dear Student

    The ANU’s Student Experience and Career Development team is actively working to increase employment opportunities on campus for ANU students.

    Working on campus in casual and part-time jobs whilst studying offers many great benefits including – convenience, great pay, contributing to the university community, and the opportunity to build valuable skills and experience in a professional employment environment.

    JOBS ON CAMPUS – FEATURE JOB
    Currently the ANU is looking to recruit up to 50 students for its 2014 Telephone Appeal for the ANU Fund. The opportunities are open to all ANU students. Details of the Telephone Program Caller roles are below, as well as on the ANU CareerHub jobs noticeboard http://careerhub.anu.edu.au

    Telephone Program Caller Roles

    Do you want to connect with alumni? Want to improve your communication skills? Enjoy talking with people? Want to be part of an unique opportunity at ANU?

    The University is looking for current students to be part of an exciting new program – 2014 Telephone Appeal for The ANU Fund. You will receive great pay, full training, get great experience for your CV, and connect with students just like you.

    To apply, go to the ANU CareerHub http://careerhub.anu.edu.au and look for the Telephone Program Caller job ad or search with the keyword ‘ANU’. A full position description and application process are listed.

    Paul Preston
    Manager, Student Experience and Career Development

    CRICOS Provider #00120C

    Just make sure no one who does not believe in climate change donates!?!

  48. entropy

    14 October 2014
    First gas into Santos GLNG pipeline

    14 Oct 2014

    Santos GLNG has fed natural gas into its 420-kilometre gas transmission pipeline for the first time via its primary compressor station in the Fairview field in south-west Queensland.

    Santos Vice President Downstream GLNG Rod Duke said he was pleased to take another important step towards Santos GLNG’s first shipment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from Gladstone Harbour next year.

    “Commissioning of our pipeline is an important milestone, not only for our business, but the Queensland LNG industry as a whole,” Mr Duke said.

    Once fully commissioned and in operation, the pipeline will transport up to 40 million cubic metres of natural gas each day from Santos GLNG’s gas fields to its gas liquefaction plant on Curtis Island, off Gladstone, where it will be cooled to minus 161 degrees Celsius and shipped to customers as LNG.

    “Building such a big pipeline is no easy task. Construction began in 2012, and since then we’ve worked more than six million hours on this part of our project,” Mr Duke said.

    “We’ve welded more than 36,000 segments of 1.05-metre diameter pipe, weighing in excess of 250,000 tonnes in total.

    “We’ve also individually negotiated land access agreements with more than 120 landholders, and we’re proud of the strong relationships we’ve built with property owners and local communities over this time.

    “I’d like to thank everyone involved in the pipeline project for safely reaching this milestone, as well as the communities along the pipeline route for their patience and support over the past two-and-a-half years.”

    Mr Duke said work in Santos GLNG’s gas fields across the Bowen and Surat Basins and construction of the LNG plant at Curtis Island were also progressing strongly towards first LNG in 2015.

    “We’re leading the way in building a new and exciting industry for Queensland, which is already delivering and will continue to deliver significant economic benefits for our state for many years to come.”

    The pipeline will now be progressively filled with gas, section by section, with first gas into the Santos GLNG plant scheduled for later this year.

    Saipem Australia constructed the pipeline for Santos GLNG.

    Santos GLNG is a pioneering joint venture between Santos, PETRONAS, Total and KOGAS to supply liquefied natural gas to global markets.

    Marion is right. They’re buggered.

  49. entropy

    oh, and Santos shares are up today.

  50. .

    Marion of the Glades
    #1479132, posted on October 16, 2014 at 5:20 pm

    I really am surprised. Judith Sloan, of all people, wanting to bully Young into quitting over this.
    All of you need to have a good lie down. For starters, there is a reason the Gladstone LNG plant are strugling. The reason is the gas is not flowing. A very large part of that is technical problems with production. In other words, the promoters (Santos et al) have cocked up.
    Sure there are environmental intrusions, but anyone who is familiar with the actual production plans can tell you that this is mostly due to bad planning and poor technical approaches from day one. It is simply stupid to be assuming you can experiment with aquifers in the Northern Tablelands of NSW, for example.
    I think Santos is a dud stock. And that it’s LNG project will kill the company.
    Do the sums, kids.

    You’re a fucking idiot.

  51. nerblnob

    So anyway, after selling their Santos et al shares, what did they put the money into then?

  52. johanna

    Why, nerblob, companies that do not rely on fossil fuels!

    Err …

  53. Marion of the Glades

    @entropy: I think you will find that the gas in the pipeline is conventional gas and not CSG. In fact you may be excited to know that the diversion of conventional gas to fill the CSG shortfall is precisely why your gas bill is going to rise by threefold or so. We missed out on two new Incitec Pivot plants that should be in Australia because of this mismanagament and no doubt others are in the same boat. The extent of this cockup is slowing dawning on a few people.
    BTW: I am not debating the merits or otherwise of ANU’s decision. I am simply saying that they are entitled to it. And that it is childish to be calling for Young’s head.

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