Rafe’s Roundup Jan 15

You are not all Charlie.

A bit of realism on the cost of the NDIS

The NDIS 0.5 per cent Medicare surcharge is intended to fund the scheme and according to the feds this will raise $20.4bn between 2014 and 2019.

But even this considerable chunk of change will not be enough to fund people now covered by the scheme. The Commission of Audit estimated that, by 2019-20, 30 per cent of funding will have to come from new outlays by Canberra and the states.[v] According to assistant social services minister Mitch Fifield the federal government will have to kick in $9bn of new money per annum.

And this will definitely not be enough as the scheme’s coverage, or matching funding for other welfare groups, expands. Which will not take long. Already the aged care lobby is demanding more money, arguing that it is unjust that people who develop a disability after retirement age will not have access to the NDIS. As Judith Sloan points out:

Unless there are clear guidelines about entitlement to the NDIS that are firmly implemented, the danger is that more and more individuals with milder disabilities will secure coverage. In this way, the potency of the scheme to improve the lot of the severely disabled will be quickly undermined.

So the Crows want to caw for Scott Morrison in acknowledging that funding the NDIS is going to require cuts in other aspects of the welfare system.

But they can’t, because the minister’s tough talk is only baloney. “The system should be there for people who need it, particularly for the age pension, where people have paid taxes their whole lives, they have earned their retirement,” he said last month.

Books. 10 bookshops. Some 10 neglected classics. Ten nice sentences.

Botany. The disappearing poppies in Flanders fields.

Sport. Children playing sport for the benefit of over-motivated parents.

So goes the all too common narrative for American youth these days, an adult driven, hyper competitive race to the top in both academics and athletics that serves the needs of the adults, but rarely the kids. As movies such as “The Race to Nowhere” and recent articles such as this one from the Washington Post point out, while the race has a few winners, the course is littered with the scarred psyches of its participants. We have a generation of children that have been pushed to achieve parental dreams instead of their own, and prodded to do more, more, more and better, better, better. The pressure and anxiety is stealing one thing our kids will never get back; their childhood.

More of the same thing.

Last month, at a local coffee shop, I ran into a father I know from my daughter’s school. While we exchanged small talk, he mentioned that he’d hired a local Olympic-level soccer player to work with his daughter. She was now receiving one-on-one coaching, as well as extended training sessions. Under this tutelage, she’d learn how to eat right, compete at the highest level, and prepare for what would surely be a glorious athletic future.

Did I mention our daughters just turned 7?

Athletes struggling in college.

Around the town. The Australian Institute for Progress, (AIP) “because the future does not look after itself”. IPA HEY. The Sydney Institute. Australian Taxpayers Alliance, Quadrant on line, Mannkal Foundation, Centre for Independent Studies.

Recent Policy Monographs from the Centre for Independent Studies. The problem of kinship in Indigenous child protection. Checking the value of preventive health measures.

Don Aitkin. Jim Rose, feral and utopian!

Sites of interest. Richard Hammer, Free Nation Foundation. Aust NZ libertarian students. Powerline.

For nerds. Melvyn Bragg’s radio program. Stephen Hicks, always interesting for nerds. Econotalk. Misesian stocking-stuffers. Understanding Entropy – expecting the world to fall apart.

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20 Responses to Rafe’s Roundup Jan 15

  1. Gleambright

    One thing that particularly irks me is the concept that people who pay taxes are entitled to a retirement income stream, as explicitly stated above. It has been public knowledge that taxes go into general revenue, rather than a sinking fund, meaning that the pension doesn’t come from previous contributions but rather is a direct burden on present taxpayers. The principles of welfare descibed above hold as true as ever, ie when you give a handout, the number of hands to receive will grow, seemingly inexplicably.

  2. 3d1k

    These roundups are a favourite for me. The stuff I’d like to find if I had the nous. Cheers.

  3. john constantine

    The entire point of the ndis is to replace mining, agriculture and manufacturing with the brave new australian economy based on services. Wealth through welfare.

    tits mc shortfilth himself set the landmines, explosive growth in employment for swampies organising vast herds of votepeople, all funded by the best sort of free money : that being the money someone else has to pay back.

    The whole point of the ndis model is exponential growth of the swampfilth, feeding of debt and the disabled.

    Just like the rudds made hundreds of millions off government contracts handling the unemployed, the swamproyals will be jockeying and backstabbing to see whose family company gets the big ndis contracts.

    The disabled are the new windfarms,desalinisation plants and solar panels.

  4. 2dogs

    The system should be there for people who need it, particularly for the age pension, where people have paid taxes their whole lives, they have earned their retirement

    I think Morrison may be signalling that those who have “paid taxes their whole lives” may get a higher pension in future than those that haven’t.

  5. Blogstrop

    the danger is that more and more individuals with milder disabilities will secure coverage.

    As surely as night follows day.

  6. johno

    Unless there are clear guidelines about entitlement to the NDIS that are firmly implemented, the danger is that more and more individuals with milder disabilities will secure coverage. In this way, the potency of the scheme to improve the lot of the severely disabled will be quickly undermined.

    This is exactly what is going to happen.

  7. Tel

    We have a generation of children that have been pushed to achieve parental dreams instead of their own, and prodded to do more, more, more and better, better, better.

    Nothing new about that; consider the sad life story of Michael Jackson, pushed by his parents from a very young age, he had plenty of talent and made millions but just never found peace to enjoy what he earned.

  8. Tel

    The entire point of the ndis is to replace mining, agriculture and manufacturing with the brave new australian economy based on services. Wealth through welfare.

    There was a comment from yesterday about perpetual motion, I’m too lazy to give proper attribution.

    Once the self-sustaining reaction kicks in, the whole of Canberra will start to rotate, slowly at first but then gradually accelerating. The city will levitate, like a flying saucer, humming above a cloud of iridescent social energy. Ordinary everyday people will become “empowered” with huge muscles, pulsing veins, and spooky psychic empathy ability.

    Hmmm, this coffee must be a bit stronger than usual 🙂

  9. lotocoti

    Peter Matthiessen does some nice sentence work in The Tree Where Man Was Born.

  10. Andrew

    Why are we going ahead with the NDIS anyway? It is clearly a dud on a cost basis considering a fully operational NDIS will cost $22billion per annum and will serve approx. 460,000 people. If you do the math, that is close $50,000 per person per year, not including the DSP and other benefits. Has anyone thought this through?

  11. MAGB

    The States’ experience with workers compensation tells us that these people better put some hard-headed professional managers into the NDIS or it will be another financial debacle. Especially with regard to mental health. And they’ll need lots of independent expert medical specialists to make the decisions, just as they’ve found out with the disability pension system. If left to the treating GPs, it’ll be a free-for-all.

  12. Aussiepundit

    I can understand Bolt’s bitterness about the Charlie thing, given the lack of support that he got from the Australian media and the journalistic community.

    But the right should be wary of reflexive cynicism; the Charlie shootings really has awakened support for free speech. Take wins where you get them. Give credit where it’s due.

    The cover of the first issue of the Charlie Hebdo magazine since the attacks in Paris has been revealed, and the majority of the Australian media has chosen to publish it.

    That’s significant.
    This is far better than when the Danish cartoon controversy happened and the media did not publish the cartoons.

    The ground has shifted.

  13. vlad

    we can’t afford the NDIS, let alone the money pit it will turn into.

    we’re in a financial hole. We need to stop digging.

  14. felicity

    Vlad we cant afford not to have an NDIS what you suggest we do with all of the severely disabled people who have aging parents, when those parents die, euthanase them? Ever since they closed all of the institutions and sent those people home to their families we have had a ticking bomb just waiting for those families to die or their remaining siblings to relinquish them to the care of the govt. What we need is some one in this govt to counteract the lies that the previous govt told everyone ‘yes you will be covered by the NDIS, yes you can have what you want” Rafe quoted 420,000 there are millions of people with a disability with disabilities ranging from a severe intellectual disability to dyslexia, but only those with a severe to profound disability will be covered in the highest level. Vlad for someone with a severe disability 50,000 doesn’t come close to the cost of care, more like 150,000

  15. Nelson Kidd-Players

    And only one week to wait for the return of Nancy.

  16. Tintarella di Luna

    Thank you felicity

    We can afford an NDIS. Instead of the dog’s breakfast that is the NDIS today, designed of course by Labor and its bureaucrats the Scheme should have targeted the people with the most severe and profound disabilities at first instance. Instead we have launch sites with only about 2.1% getting services in the first 18 months and supposedly 460,000 are going to be in the scheme in the next four years. Good luck.

    It will be the most severely disabled people without any capacity to put their case who will be done like a dinner.

  17. Tintarella di Luna

    The States’ experience with workers compensation tells us that these people better put some hard-headed professional managers into the NDIS or it will be another financial debacle. Especially with regard to mental health. And they’ll need lots of independent expert medical specialists to make the decisions, just as they’ve found out with the disability pension system. If left to the treating GPs, it’ll be a free-for-all.

    It will not be GPs who will be listened to – because when it comes to severe disabilities which affect the capacity of an individual to care for themselves, make decisions for themselves or ever be able to articulate their needs, GPs bless their little cotton socks, are totally clueless. I’ve trained my GP and his staff and he is now an excellent GP who understands severe and profound disability is not dyslexia.

  18. Tintarella di Luna

    Once the self-sustaining reaction kicks in, the whole of Canberra will start to rotate, slowly at first but then gradually accelerating. The city will levitate, like a flying saucer, humming above a cloud of iridescent social energy. Ordinary everyday people will become “empowered” with huge muscles, pulsing veins, and spooky psychic empathy ability.

    Tel it sounds suspiciously like the quizzical oozle bird at work, the creature which flies in ever diminishing concentric circles (Canberra is already mapped out accordingly) to finally disappear up its own fundament. Amen to that I say, the sooner the better and with the greatest flourish possible.

  19. custard

    Nelson Kidd-Players
    #1572068, posted on January 16, 2015 at 1:53 pm
    And only one week to wait for the return of Nancy.

    It’s been so long. Can you pick the deliberate mistake on his last blog from 28/11?

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