Turnbull: man of vision or sound administrator?

There was a telling moment in the Monday night press conference when newly minted Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull was asked about his approach to climate change.  Quick as a flash Liberal Deputy Leader, Julie Bishop, prompted him to say that Australia already has an excellent policy.

Bishop would have known that Malcolm could not be trusted on this issue.  He originally lost the leadership to Tony Abbott because of his attachment to a carbon tax.  He has since backed the Abbott policy though perhaps more fully articulating the feature which is a targeted cut in emissions by 26-28 per cent by 2030.  Abbott was, by contrast, just setting such a target as a holding operation whereby he would not be giving offence to the US President and would quietly drop it over the next few years.

In fact, per unit of GDP, Australian greenhouse emissions have declined considerably.  They remain similar to their 1990 levels at around 550 million tonnes a year, while global emissions have increased by 40 per cent.  But this is not as a result of impositions through taxes, subsidies and regulations over energy.  It is due to regulations over land use which have resulted in emissions from farming being forcibly reduced by 100 million tonnes.

Such punitive attacks on farming (which took place under the Howard and Rudd-Gillard governments) have not been accompanied by any compensation for the land which was “sterilized” and one estimate is that the cost in lost value might have been $200 billion.  Lost agricultural productivity is the outcome.

The greenhouse issue represents a fault line among politicians.  If carbon dioxide is leading to planetary warming it represents an externality tailor-made for those who would prefer to intervene in economic directions.  Of course, as even the IPCC has acknowledged, the cost, if it is taking place, is only one year’s worth of global GDP over the course of a century.  This, and the fact that the supposed warming is not actually taking place, is glossed over by those with a preference for directing economies.

Turnbull in his interviews since Monday’s win emphasised the opportunities that Australia has in the ever changing world of technology and market firmament.  His guidance is a Schumpeterian howling gales of creative destruction.  Schumpeter thought these totally dwarfed the incremental gains made by competitive firms within existing technologies.  Yet it is those incremental gains – carving pennies out of transporting minerals and agricultural products, better grading of them to increase value to buyers and so on, that have been massively important to the Australian success story.  And it is those sorts of entrepreneurial gains that might be stifled by government, especially one that is less than vigilant over union powers to suppress change and seeks to find new ways of extracting taxes rather than pruning spending.

Economies are cursed by men of vision imposing their own preference.  In modern times such preferences have been focussed on rebalancing the gains from production by forcing a greater emphasis on environmental measures and risk reduction.  In this respect, one satisfactory outcome of the change of leadership is the Nats wrestling away of the Murray Darling policy from the Environment Department which has overseen a transfer of some 20 per cent of the rivers’ water from irrigation to meet phantom environmental goals.

The test is whether Turnbull can simply carve back spending and regulatory controls or whether he pursues ‘big picture’ positive opportunities that governments always fail to deliver and cripple economies in the attempt to do so.

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91 Responses to Turnbull: man of vision or sound administrator?

  1. Alex Davidson

    I think of him every time I need to replace a light bulb. They are not happy thoughts.

  2. Ant

    I suspect Mal is more inclined to take advice on the “Coming Climate Catastrophe” from the Dance Noir tossers than some old cocky out in the bush.

    My prediction is that this little coup is going to turn out on the ugly side.

    Hope I’m wrong.

  3. Tintarella di Luna

    My prediction is that this little coup is going to turn out on the ugly side.

    Hope I’m wrong.

    I think you can hope but reality bites – Turnbull is a snake

  4. Ant

    Indeed, Tinta. I’ve already put my local member on notice – in anticipation.

  5. Tel

    (A) man of vision
    (B) sound administrator

    I choose (C ) None of the above.

    In fact, per unit of GDP, Australian greenhouse emissions have declined considerably. They remain similar to their 1990 levels at around 550 million tonnes a year, while global emissions have increased by 40 per cent. But this is not as a result of impositions through taxes, subsidies and regulations over energy. It is due to regulations over land use which have resulted in emissions from farming being forcibly reduced by 100 million tonnes.

    Ahhh, accounting magic… Turnbull will come in handy after all.

    I’ve always thought that allowing scrub to grow over hither to productive farms would be the absence of farming. Anyway, next bushfire will turn all that fuel back into CO2 and the accountants will politely look the other way. It’s BS.

  6. banz

    From Bolta;

    AUSTRALIA’S newest Liberal [sic] Prime Minister was ­responsible for a series of hefty donations to the ALP totalling at least $25,000 about 15 years ago…

    Malcolm Turnbull … ploughed the cash into ALP coffers through his company Wilcrow Pty Ltd.

    Australian Electoral Commission records show that in the financial year 1998-99, Wilcrow gave $15,000 to the ALP and a further $10,000 in the year 1999-00.

    The latter donation went to the Victorian branch of the federal Labor Party, the faction from which Turnbull’s current political adversary Bill Shorten hailed.

    oh yes, MT is a man for all seasons.

  7. Sparkx

    “Turnbull is a snake” and any other nasty slithering creature youcould imagine. http://stopturnbull.com

  8. James in Melbourne

    “Turnbull is a snake” and any other nasty slithering creature youcould imagine. http://stopturnbull.com

    Where is the stopshorten.com website, Sparkx?

    That is all that matters.

  9. Botswana O'Hooligan

    Mr Turnbull was a merchant banker and of course is now an accomplished assassin as well. Both occupations are basically interchangeable when one comes to think of them for on the one hand, one exploits (robs) every crack in the economy and anything else that generates money, and the other assassinates for money or some end purpose usually associated with money. Next time I haul a politician around I am going to ask him/her/them, to spell integrity and explain what it means. Most probably the Labor ones can’t spell the word, and the others can probably spell it but can’t explain what it means.

  10. As I have suggested elsewhere it it impossible to be an awarmist and a fiscal conservative at the same time. To believe in the pseudo-scientific conjecture of AGW a person has to reject logic and science in favour of immoderate irrationality; to support the supposed solutions to the non-existent problem of global warming—which involve massive spending, increased taxes and illiberal statist controls—believers perforce deny personal liberty and freedoms in general; such a person cannot reasonably be expected to consider other issues logically, scientifically or prudently.
    The egomaniacal, amoral and seemingly psychopathic Turnbull is evidently more dangerous than Rudd and Gillard combined.

  11. The difference between the psychological profile of a merchant banker like turnbull and the psych profile of an armed bank robber is that the armed bank robber is prepared to use physical violence.

    Other than that both are extremely anti-social, sociopathic, narcissistic and simplistic in their beliefs.

  12. Combine Dave

    Where is the stopshorten.com website, Sparkx?

    If Shorten continues his shift rightward there’ll be no need for such a site.

  13. Senile Old Guy

    (A) man of vision
    (B) sound administrator

    I choose (C ) None of the above.

    And:

    The egomaniacal, amoral and seemingly psychopathic Turnbull is evidently more dangerous than Rudd and Gillard combined.

    With all three, it is all about them.

  14. gabrianga

    AUSTRALIA’S newest Liberal [sic] Prime Minister was ­responsible for a series of hefty donations to the ALP totalling at least $25,000 about 15 years ago…

    But they still wouldn’t accept his Membership application ?

  15. rickw

    In fact, per unit of GDP, Australian greenhouse emissions have declined considerably. They remain similar to their 1990 levels at around 550 million tonnes a year, while global emissions have increased by 40 per cent. But this is not as a result of impositions through taxes, subsidies and regulations over energy. It is due to regulations over land use which have resulted in emissions from farming being forcibly reduced by 100 million tonnes.

    As ever, “emission” decline equates to reduced productivity. 50 fewer cattle being run on my parents farm due to crown lease lock out (after 80 years). What a bunch of mongrels run this country.

  16. Roger

    The test is whether Turnbull can simply carve back spending and regulatory controls or whether he pursues ‘big picture’ positive opportunities that governments always fail to deliver and cripple economies in the attempt to do so

    Insightful analysis, Alan.

    The question goes directly to Turnbull’s personality and the role of hubris in determining which course he will pursue. For the sake of the nation, we must hope he receives strong advice urging restraint and incremental reform.

  17. PeterF

    Let’s not forget he is also very quick with a writ.Not someone to trifle with if he doesn’t like what you say.

  18. Jeremy Steyer

    Wonder if reality is starting to sink in for The Lord Wenworth cheer squad here on the cat?

  19. old bloke

    Such punitive attacks on farming (which took place under the Howard and Rudd-Gillard governments) have not been accompanied by any compensation for the land which was “sterilized” and one estimate is that the cost in lost value might have been $200 billion. Lost agricultural productivity is the outcome.

    We really need an agrarian led revolt in Australia to restore traditional Conservative values. What the heck are the Nats doing by supporting the Liberal greenies when they can see it is hurting the rural communities for absolutely no net benefit. Atmospheric carbon dioxide has absolutely no impact on global climate, as the past 20 years has clearly demonstrated, so why are the Nats allowing this falsehood to continue?

  20. Gab

    The test is whether Turnbull can simply carve back spending

    He certainly failed on that score Day One. How many billions did he sign away to appease the Nats yesterday? Was it $4 or $6 billion?

  21. Dr Faustus

    The test is whether Turnbull can simply carve back spending and regulatory controls or whether he pursues ‘big picture’ positive opportunities that governments always fail to deliver and cripple economies in the attempt to do so.

    Indeed.

    Apart from his skills as The Great Communicator, Turnbull is also apparently strong on economics. Well, he clearly has an impressive track record in investment banking, however we are taking him on trust as an economic manager in government – because he has no track record at all.

    I’m looking for a clear statement of the economic problems/challenges/issues facing Australia – full range, not just the politically palatable easy bits – and the policy directions that the Turnbull Liberals intend to follow to manage them.

    A great communicator and strong economic hand should have no problem knocking this out in pretty short order.

  22. duncanm

    Turnbull made his fortune punting on an ISP in the early days.

    This seems to be an important driver of his behaviour — as you say, he’s trying to spot the next big disruption rather than focussing on the here and now and incremental improvements.

  23. mr skeletor

    Anyone who thinks Malcolm wont go “big vision” isn’t paying attention.
    He’ll go with some sort of “invention / technological” revolution where he thinks Australia will make a motza by inventing shit, with government backing.
    Kind of like how Australia’s last Boom was lead by WiFi royalties…

    Anyway it’s all moot. If the first proper 2 week poll is 50/50 (like todays snapshot one is) then Turnbull is already finished.

  24. Empire

    I’m looking for a clear statement of the economic problems/challenges/issues facing Australia – full range, not just the politically palatable easy bits – and the policy directions that the Turnbull Liberals intend to follow to manage them.

    You’ll die waiting. Neither of the major parties is remotely interested in “full range”.

    What you will get is a narrative crafted to appeal to swinging voters in marginal seats that leaves the door open to income tax cuts for middle income earners – “once sufficient budget consolidation has occurred so as to not unfairly burden future generations”.

    Of course you’ve heard that before, only not from Abbott or Hockey.

  25. Dr Faustus

    What you will get is a narrative crafted to appeal to swinging voters in marginal seats

    Delivered in mellifluous tones with a side serve of self-deprecating humour.

  26. Cassie of Sydney

    I am not happy about what happened on Monday evening. Not happy at all. However, the thought of billy boy as PM is not a happy prospect either. Rather it is a scenario that belongs in a gothic horror movie where the ending will be catastrophic. It is a sad indictment of the shallow and narcissistic society that Australia has become where a man like Tony Abbott, a very decent man, was not appreciated, was the but of countless jokes and was lampooned as the devil incarnate and so on. My issue with Tony was that he never took the fight to the enemy, sadly in that regard he was no Thatcher or Reagan. He may have gained more respect amongst the general populace if he had allowed himself to let loose and start attacking and showing up the shallow and venal left however he never did. He was very dignified. As PM, he maintained a very dignified and soft approach and quite frankly, that did not work. His approach allowed the scum at the ABC and Fairfax to constantly denigrate and undermine him. He only moved (and not strongly enough) after the Q&A Mallah affair but by then it was too late. He could have, and should have, taken the fight to the barricades. The right in this country are wimps by and large. We need to fight and speak up and not be cowed by the leftist parasites who have hijacked our institutions and airwaves. He and Hockey were not helped by a putrid senate however he should have called a DD late last year and I believe that he would have won it. We are living in dangerous times and when danger is about, we need to fight. As for Turnbull, well we will see, I suspect that Bishop and Morrison will keep a tight rein on him and his socially progressive views. However, I can’t allow this country to fall into the hands of shitty shorten and worse, the Slovenian slag (she really is the gothic nightmare). Despite the fact that, quite frankly, I am so revolted about what happened on Monday night, I will vote to Malcolm because I care about this country’s future and I have no choice. I had been attracted to Leyonjhelm’s party however his recent petulant behaviour with the Canning bi-election with the preferencing of Labor ahead of the Libs and his sitting on the fence re. the union legislation, was quite frankly, sickening. So, Leyonjhelm has actually lost a prospective voter with me. I am stuck with the Libs.

  27. outsider

    Everything thus far indicates he is surrounding himself with hard-headed political types – Nutt etc. Even calling the Senators. So we may hope MT will consult widely on all matter of serious import and will not indulge in personal flights of fancy like the predecessor – $20b ‘research’ funds, $6.4b PPL. Abbott came in looking to continue the RGR program with well-known exceptions but endorsed all the big ticket items – NDIS, etc. Abbott obviously hated the team orientation to tough challenges.

    Anyone who prefers consulting widely and balancing the varied views has a huge advantage over the bunker mentality type of leader – the kind which favours 1-2 trusted lieutenants, tolerates their petty power plays and bugger everyone else. Only one of these approaches works for long in the real world. Turnbull also – critically – listens to the growth engine of business. Abbott was a lifer in the closeted world of politics. It showed.

  28. Paul Farmer

    Alan…………..thank you for writing this piece. It is exactly the sentiments I felt listening to Turnball on Monday night, the old creative destruction idea as you say straight from Schumpeter, and you could hear the luvvies in the Canberra press gallery just lapping it up with their mainly undergraduate journalism degrees…………..that’s right its all about the internet and technology and future magical jobs that are just going to appear in Australia if we embrace change and futurism……………..oh please spare me the bullshit. You mention externalities in your piece and that is exactly why most of these it, high tech jobs will continue to be created in the main in places like silicon valley.

    I totally agree that what is more important to Australia is economic efficiency as we must trade with an open economy and be flexible. That means the less sexy things need to be improved like industrial regulations policy, minimum regulations and an end to the craziness of some of our environmental regulations and approval processes. I hate to say it as it sounds so out of date, but what Adam Smith articulated in the wealth of nations about specialization and constant improvement is much more relevant today to improving our future then Schumpeter’s grand notions of creative destruction.

  29. Ros

    Would a rain making pyramid rate as a big disruption. And the NBN? The great communicator left most of us completely in the dark as to how was managing this cocked up big disruptiom. My sense was that he wasn’t bothering much about it all, maybe because it wasn’t his idea? The rain maker says not a man of vision, the NBN left stumbling and crumbling says not a sound administrator either. And the big disruption for our body politic that he led the charge for, the Republic, he blew that as well.

    Listening to Peter Martin gushing this morning, Turnbull is a genius and great leader rolled into one, may save Australia, possibly the world, though Martin did concede that maybe he and many others might be projecting onto him.

    This belief that he is another messiah, not just economic but that he is going to remake the political landscape as well, all sweetness and light from now on, is scary. Even scarier is understanding that the person most likely to believe this is the “humble” man himself.

    What is it with our media, the need to create great men and prostrate themselves before them, Paul, Mark, Kevin, Julia, Malcolm. Even in his latter life the other Malcolm. And it always adds to their charms if they are nasty bullies to boot. And in the end despite their lefty ideals, they measure the value of individuals to society by how much money they acquire for themselves. Abbott, who gets not even the office or staff let alone the huge pension has accumulated very little from his time in politics. Another of his failings?

  30. rickw

    It is a sad indictment of the shallow and narcissistic society that Australia has become where a man like Tony Abbott, a very decent man, was not appreciated, was the but of countless jokes and was lampooned as the devil incarnate and so on.

    Steady on, it’s an indictment of The Liberal Party and The Media. Nothing more.

  31. rickw

    This seems to be an important driver of his behaviour — as you say, he’s trying to spot the next big disruption rather than focussing on the here and now and incremental improvements.

    There was a lot of people at that point in time who made a lot of money by sheer dumb luck and being in a financial position that allowed them to take a gamble. After taking that gamble and winning, they then strutted around pretending that they were smart.

    The vast majority of the companies involved in the IT Revolution had trajectories like artillery shells, if you got on and off at the right times, it could be very lucrative. For all of that disruption, the vast majority of those companies did a lot of talking and produced very little, how many still exist today in a recognisable form?

    The “disruption” that Turdbull managed to hitch his wagon to was very much an illusion, the real economy kept chugging along and the real benefits of that supposed IT revolution were actually very slow to take root. As an example we’re only just starting to see the real impact of this revolution on retail.

    I think why Turdbull is so focused on “Climate Change” and therefore “Carbon Trading” is that he see’s it as being the next big disruption. The difference this time is instead of it being a partial illusion like the “IT revolution”, the “Carbon Trading Revolution” will be a complete illusion. It will be almost perfect, The Nerds don’t even need to produce something that works, they just need to write papers that support the idea.

    Of course where did Turdbull’s money actually come from? It came from people in the real economy, who really worked and who really produced stuff and who just happened to not be as lucky as Turdbull with getting the timing right.

  32. Bruce of Newcastle

    Turnbull: man of vision or sound administrator?

    You have to not be blind to have vision, and to administrate well you need to embrace reality.

    So far on global warming he has shown he is blind to the empirical climate data and has yet to accept the reality that CO2 is too innocuous to cause any harm.

    We will be watching you Mr Turnbull. If you attempt to push action to address a non-problem because of the liars in CSIRO (eg this person today) then your voting base will spoil their ballots rather than vote for you or your party. As you saw with Mr Abbott and the polls: voters will wreak terrible vengeance on liars.

  33. H B Bear

    Anyone who prefers consulting widely and balancing the varied views has a huge advantage over the bunker mentality type of leader – the kind which favours 1-2 trusted lieutenants, tolerates their petty power plays and bugger everyone else.

    Lord Turnbull of Wentworth’s stint as Leader of the Opposition suggests this is about as credible as KRudd 2.0.

  34. What is it with our media, the need to create great men and prostrate themselves before them, Paul, Mark, Kevin, Julia, Malcolm.

    It’s Cult of Personality politics, strongly favoured by the left. In a perverse form of logic they love to smash everyone elses individualism and deny their rights whilst worshipping a beloved leader who is just an individual. Adolf, Josef, Vladimir, Pol, Mao; all worshipped from the get-go and had personality cults built around themselves. Such people are worshipped for things they haven’t even done yet and never will (Obumbaclot is given a Nobel Prize and then arms Iran!). Conservatives have their heroes too but generally they are worshipped AFTER they have achieved something (Reagan, Thatcher, Churchill). The problem is when you put your life and hopey changey in one person and they screw up, it is pretty hard and embarassing to admit you were wrong. Couple this with the fact that most lefties are narcissists and they can’t ever lose face because they love the reflection of their own face too much.
    It genuinely sends a chill down my spine me when I hear about people talking about the need for a leader “to move the country forward” or “have a vision for the future”, that is totalitarianism writ large.

  35. Viva

    those sorts of entrepreneurial gains that might be stifled by government

    Turnbull has always asserted that government should get out of the way of the market – so we shall see.

  36. JMH

    Turncoat will not blot his copybook up till the next election. If he wins that, as a Coalition – then all bets are off and we may as well have voted for the Filth.

    We need the Nats. We need the Nats to have a firm hand on the tiller. At the Nats’ weekend conference, they voted down a WA push to openly support renewaball energy. A huge tick from me on that score. The Nats are more than aware of what a rort renewables are – especially bird and bat murdering turbines.

  37. Kool Aid Kid

    All very well to make sweeping generalisations Alan. I want to know first and foremost whether Turnbull takes forward the Harper proposals in competition. This is fundamental and a vital corrective to the longstanding tendency toward anticompetitive behaviours in our corporate life (a major reason for the remaining influence of unions and other pilot fish).
    Next I want to know how we can put more pressure on the disciplines in education. There are far too many cushy roles and not enough emphasis on objective outcomes the of the STEM set.
    Finally I want to see the rotten compulsion around savings scrapped. It is miserable in performance and created a giant fee laden bureaucracy that pretends to be competitive without evidence of any such attribute.
    Ideally I would love a program to undo the soft and lazy policies that prop up middle class welfare and union interference and corporate bludging.
    A bit of economic liberalism please.

  38. hzhousewife

    Listening to Peter Martin gushing this morning, Turnbull is a genius and great leader rolled into one, may save Australia, possibly the world, though Martin did concede that maybe he and many others might be projecting onto him.

    Sadly, the Turncoat believes all this.

  39. Turnbull has always asserted that government should get out of the way of the market – so we shall see.

    Viva, I think you’ll find that Malcolm only ever wanted the government to get out of his way, while using it to confuse and delay his competitors.

  40. Ros

    I missed this, another opportunity for the great man to save Australia,

    “The Islamic Council of Victoria congratulates The Hon. Malcolm Turnbull MP as Australia’s 29th Prime Minister.

    ICV spokesperson Kuranda Seyit said, “This is a welcomed sea–?change, we hope that this will be the start of a fresh beginning that will unite Australians as one. We hope to have a genuine and sincere dialogue with Mr Turnbull, a dialogue that will promote social inclusion.”

    The Muslim community over the past 2 years, during Tony Abbott’s leadership, experienced an unprecedented amount of undue attention and has been the target of racially motivated demonstrations resulting in a backlash against normal everyday Australian Muslims.

    “While we welcome the change and have high expectations of Mr Turnbull, as a different style of leader, the litmus test will be his stance against racism and Islamophobia in Australia. We anticipate that he will strongly condemn the racist activities and send a message to Australia that bigotry has no place in our society.”

    Would getting that august association to support you be a good bit of administration or another big disruption to the Australian political and social fabric.

  41. Ros

    Off topic but entertaining. Zaky is thinking of going to Canberra and meeting with the new great man. Perhaps qanda could have them on together. Will he still do his qanda stints. Who will he drop excrement on now if he does.

  42. Alex Davidson

    In my experience, those who rise to the top in politics are usually those most skilled at deception and trickery. Success goes to the ‘clever bad’ types, as opposed to the ‘clever good’ types whose success is measured by the wealth they create by means other than rent-seeking.

    There is no doubt that Turnbull is very clever, but which camp is he really in? As others have pointed out, there are other explanations for his apparent wealth apart from adding value. His involvement as chairman of Axiom Forest Resources with logging in the Solomons in the early 1990s makes interesting reading.

  43. Pyrmonter

    Among all these laments for the departure for Abbott, what evidence is there that the last government had any interest in economic reform?

    The lived reality of it (as opposed to the occasional rhetorical flourish) was a government that centralized, politicized and played from the “state as a vast social utility” script of which Keith Hancock wrote with more enthusiasm than any coalition government since at least the 1960s.

    Setting aside the frankly rather trivial tax law repeals and (to their credit) the sale of Medibank, the Abbott government had foresworn any substantial labour relations reform; increased taxes and increase spending both on inherited programs and its own boondoggles. On the controversial issue of AGW, it repealed the debased and ineffective so-called “Carbon Tax”, but retained (and in cases, enhanced) still more expensive and inefficient measures such as the RET. It had sound advice from its own Commission of Audit on a range of reforms – not least to the pharmacy retail sector – but was spooked into abandoning them by the slightest opposition.

    Whatever one may think of the incoming PM – and I can see both favourable and unfavourable characteristics in him – the tendency to develop a Dolchstosslegende regarding his predecessor needs to be eschewed by any sound, sensible person of liberal or conservative thinking.

  44. Craig Mc

    Anyone else get some donation begging from the Liberal Party last night? I did. I sent a reply, but no donation.

  45. John Comnenus

    Turnbull promised a more collegiate and consensual leadership style as part of a much needed reversion back to proper cabinet style executive government. He promised no more captain’s picks.

    The first test of this approach was the National Party’s log of claims. A consensual and collegiate leader would have taken the claims to the Lib Cabinet members or party room to gain consensus. Such an approach would have also reassured the Nats that he will consult with them when necessary.

    Unfortunately Turnbull has failed his first test. He made a Captain’s Pick that reportedly costs $2 bn. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE just follow normal cabinet processes and stop thinking you are a President. Consult with your colleagues before making decisions, just like you said you would.

    The only two lessons a PM needs to learn from the last 8 years is to keep your word and include your colleagues in decision making. Don’t be a Gillard – Abbott or Rudd – Abbott.

  46. Jeremy Steyer

    If lord Turnbull sucks up to the muslim groups we will know the journey to the dark side for the libs is complete.

  47. And for the final frigging time, Australia is, according to the voodoo of the IPCC / UNFCCC… entirely CARBON POSITIVE.

    Positive.

    We do not “pollute”. We are a net carbon sink. Huge landmass, huge forests, huge coast with seagrass (where no one lives) = massive massive carbon sequestration.

    We are the ONLY country in that position.

    FFS.

  48. classical_hero

    #1799838, posted on September 17, 2015 at 8:53 am

    “Turnbull is a snake” and any other nasty slithering creature youcould imagine. http://stopturnbull.com

    Where is the stopshorten.com website, Sparkx?

    That is all that matters.

    Well we expect Shorten to act like a Labor leader, not a Liberal leader to be Labor leader in disguise.

  49. .

    “And for the final frigging time, Australia is, according to the voodoo of the IPCC / UNFCCC… entirely CARBON POSITIVE.”

    Hence we need no damned RET or carbon tax. Or ETS.

  50. Vicki

    While the Nats may have won back control of water rights, it remains to be seen whether the local govt changes to water usage (creeks, bores etc) can be easily reversed. I suspect not – the damage is already done. And can the extraordinary surveillance that rural properties are subject to ( RE water usage, land clearing, weeds, erosion, etc etc) be reduced? I doubt it. Nanny state? It’s a police state in rural areas. This country’s urban populace would never tolerate the sort of policing of their affairs that the rural Australia endures.

  51. wazsah

    Flying Tiger Comics is exactly correct – CSIRO has known for decades that Australian industrial emissions are sequestered by our landmass.
    “New research in Nature supports the CSIRO’s Dr Gifford who in 1992 said all Australian CO2 emissions could be sequestered in Australian plants and soils”
    http://www.warwickhughes.com/blog/?p=3036

    I was not aware that the IPCC are saying this too.

  52. Jim

    Turnbull: man of vision or sound administrator?

    Considering the previous PM was neither of these, Turnbull won’t need to be very good to improve the prospects of the Liberal party.

  53. Gerard

    MT will dud us on climate change. He or one of his minister will go to the Paris conference on Nov 30 and sign away our sovereignty. He will then tell the Australian people that we will need to ramp up our climate commitments to meet the terms of the treaty that has been signed.

    Of course, he is not the only leader of a Western democracy conned by the climate scam – a scam that appears to have as its main purpose the destruction of western capitalist economies.

  54. indigo

    Leopards don’t change their spots. True of Rudd on his return, and it will be true of Turnbull.

  55. Gerard

    Several comments have referred to the Turnbull decision to ban incandescent lights on the assumption that replacement globes would be the lower energy compact fluorescents. In fact, the government Regulatory Impact Statement made the statement that the regulation was needed because ordinary folk did not have the brains to make the choice to move to lower energy globes themselves.

    However, history has shown that little energy has been saved as a result. Apart from changes in usage patterns when CFLs were installed – people tended to leave them on because they were ‘low energy users’ and slow to warm up to full luminosity, the ban of incandescents saw an explosion in the use of halogen down lights which, although slightly more energy efficient, saw multiple globes replace a single light source with a corresponding INCREASE in energy use.

    We now have this genius as our PM.

  56. Walter Plinge

    the ban of incandescents saw an explosion in the use of halogen down lights which, although slightly more energy efficient, saw multiple globes replace a single light source with a corresponding INCREASE in energy use.

    And an increase in ceiling fires. Here’s one not far from my place. Family escaped OK. New building but has now been demolished and will be re-built:

    http://oi58.tinypic.com/5bvjag.jpg

  57. val majkus

    It is a sad indictment of the shallow and narcissistic society that Australia has become where a man like Tony Abbott, a very decent man, was not appreciated, was the but of countless jokes and was lampooned as the devil incarnate and so on.

    totally agree Cassise, we’ve come down to government by media
    I’m so disgusted I don’t even watch the news anymore
    Chaser is better

  58. Jock

    I noticed that 8 large companies including my old shop AGL have come out demanding action on climate policy. What, isnt the multiple cash rides enough? There are many avenues for these guys to relieve tax payers of dollars but they want more.

    As an accountant I know the CPA is all over Corp Social Responsibility (CSR) and Sustainability Reports. Those companies that go along with this hold themselves as paragons of virtue. But in the end what is the value to shareholders or the community or workers?

  59. 1234

    Societies are crippled by men of no vision such as Moran who place no value on the environment and only pray to the great god of Mammon. Moran knows the price of everything but the value of nothing. Yet another scorched earth, anti-democratic right winger. You know, some people value clean air and water and an environment that isn’t a wasteland?

  60. Jo Smyth

    Wish you had a ‘like’ or ‘dislike’ button by all the comments.

  61. .

    “1234
    #1800310, posted on September 17, 2015 at 4:20 pm
    Societies are crippled by men of no vision such as Moran who place no value on the environment and only pray to the great god of Mammon. Moran knows the price of everything but the value of nothing. Yet another scorched earth, anti-democratic right winger. You know, some people value clean air and water and an environment that isn’t a wasteland?”

    Some people like not dying in winter too, you stoned teenager.

  62. Leo G

    the ban of incandescents saw an explosion in the use of halogen downlight …

    The more serious issue involved the general replacement of incandescent lamps covering stairways and steps with unsuitable compact fluorescents, contrary to accepted safe practice. Accidents on stairs feature prominently in accidental death and injury statistics.

  63. Given that turnbull’s entire Obama-style deep red marxist path has come out, complete with his infamous desire to be PM by 40, the party he is in being irrelevant to that ambition, he is neither statesman nor administrator.

    Just another marxist elitist.

  64. GregJ

    I think of him every time I need to replace a light bulb. They are not happy thoughts.

    Thankfully, we grabbed a serious load of the old ones a year or so ago, so we are still to experience the ‘delights’ of Turnbull’s personal intervention into our lighting habits. But the idea of it is fairly typical of him isn’t it? He knows best which lights we all should use, so he legislates for it.

    One thing I want to know though, is this: If we are all so pissed off about these lights, why have we not made an absolute hue and cry about them? Why have we not insisted on the government getting rid of them? Why have we supinely accepted Turnbull’s ridiculous regulation?

    Why is that?

  65. Aussiepundit

    I think of him every time I need to replace a light bulb. They are not happy thoughts.

    Abbott/Hockey were the biggest spending government in Australian history.
    But you’re sad to see them go.

  66. Aussiepundit

    If we are all so pissed off about these lights, why have we not made an absolute hue and cry about them?

    Because it doesn’t fucking matter, that’s why.
    Turnbull regulated light bulbs.
    Abbott and Hockey screwed the entire national budget.

  67. Yohan

    Turnbull’s talk of entrepreneurship and technology will probably result in subsidizing new tech startups and forcing consumer preference through regulatory action (think CCFL light bulbs).

    Rather than let the market direct resources and R&D, the left thinks all new technology can only get going with government seed money. The ABC do entire documentaries about this, how government has been responsible for all technological advances.

    Who knows how far Turnbull buys into this.

  68. Aussiepundit

    Rather than let the market direct resources and R&D, the left thinks all new technology can only get going with government seed money. The ABC do entire documentaries about this, how government has been responsible for all technological advances.

    Indeed, it’s a pernicious myth.

    Who knows how far Turnbull buys into this.

    Not very far.

  69. Yohan

    Given that turnbull’s entire Obama-style deep red marxist path has come out, complete with his infamous desire to be PM by 40, the party he is in being irrelevant to that ambition, he is neither statesman nor administrator.

    Just another marxist elitist.

    I can understand people being left/Marxist when young and then seeing reality with age.

    But Malcolm was of the far left until the year 2000. He was in his mid 40’s, and then all of a sudden, hallelujah, he converted to Catholicism and becomes a free market, individualist, classical liberal.

    That’s too late for a genuine conversion of political views.

  70. Gab

    Who knows how far Turnbull buys into this.

    Well obviously aussiepundit does.

  71. Yohan

    I’m going by everything on that Stop Turnbull site, which may not give a balanced picture, but many of his actual statements even into the late 90’s shows someone who is not laissez faire on economics.

  72. Aussiepundit

    “Turnbull is a snake” and any other nasty slithering creature youcould imagine. http://stopturnbull.com

    A mixture of innuendo, dissembling, and smear.

    The site pretends it’s just by some guy who put it together on his own. Yeah, right. That’s rubbish. That website is nothing but a political attack site funded by Turnbull’s political enemies.

  73. Tim Neilson

    Bruce of Newcastle
    #1799984, posted on September 17, 2015 at 11:18 am
    We will be watching you Mr Turnbull. If you attempt to push action to address a non-problem because of the liars in CSIRO (eg this person today) then your voting base will spoil their ballots rather than vote for you or your party.
    Yes!!! Now people are starting to think clearly. Peanut Head in 2016 would be a disaster, but if Malcontent Turncoat looks like being anywhere near as bad (which I think is highly probable), the only sensible step is to look long term, and send the Coalition a message that can’t be misinterpreted as support for Peanut Head.
    Voting a minor party in the Reps is a waste of time because the Coalition will smugly congratulate themselves on getting the votes back via preferences. Voting for (or preferencing) Labor or the Greens will prompt Turncoat et hoc generis to go even further left in pursuit of mythical progressive swinging votes.
    The “message” via spoiled ballot papers is “you have gone so far left that we see little difference between you and Peanut Head’s mob. We’re willing to endure them in power for three years for two reasons:
    One, the emotional satisfaction of savagely buggering you up the tradesmen’s entrance so viciously that you’ll need a teflon rectum before you can start on the search for a real job;
    Two, the hope, slight though it is, that the Coalition will resume deserving membership of the human race by the time the next election comes around.
    Hop to it.

  74. I haven’t visited this stopturnbull.com site and I doubt I ever will, but I do know some of the people around him in the Libs, I’ve met him, had dinner with some of the others on occasion and put two of them into their seats way way back.

    And based on THAT, Mao Turnbull is further ideologically left than Shorten, by a country mile. He is an obese Hewson with the illegitimate child’s neurotic need for attention and the pathological narcissist’s ruthless amorality.

    For how that works out, check out recent years in America.

    Prepare for squalls, lubbers, there’s storms ahead.

  75. calli

    And based on THAT, Mao Turnbull is further ideologically left than Shorten, by a country mile. He is an obese Hewson with the illegitimate child’s neurotic need for attention and the pathological narcissist’s ruthless amorality.

    Jeff Kennett was right then.

  76. Habib

    There hasn’t been wholsale outrage over idiot lightbulbs and the statist swine that forced them on us because Australians are lazy, complacent, compliant invertebrates.

  77. Baldrick

    Everytime I go to the shitter and look up at that light bulb, I think of Malcolm.

  78. egg_

    Turnbull: man of vision…?

    Not if he’s using dim light bulbs?

  79. Habib

    Funny, every time I go to the shitter I look in the bowl, and think of Malcolm.

  80. Snoopy

    Funny, every time I go to the shitter I look in the bowl, and think of Malcolm.

    Habib doesn’t sound like a German name. Oh wait. Yes it does.

  81. cynical1

    I’m surprised nobody investigated just how much Lucy brought to the marriage.

    For it was a pretty penny…

  82. Habib

    And she’s a dimmer bulb than any of those compact flourescents. And given the Eastern Suburbs predilection for sashimi and such, probably has a higher mercury content.

  83. Andrew M

    This, and the fact that the supposed warming is not actually taking place, is glossed over by those with a preference for directing economies.

    Such as Steve Keen.
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/stevekeen/2015/08/28/why-i-support-corbyn-for-uk-labour-leader/

    Keen has jumped the shark on CAGW, and possibly interventionism in general.

  84. wreckage

    Measured piece from Moran, the comments here are up another octave.

    The guy gave water policy to Agriculture and Agriculture to the Nats. This is an excellent sign. If he does nothing else productive, this is going to add many millions to the bottom line, and that in primary production; which, as dot so often points out, actually has a multiplier in terms of “stimulus”.

    The other thing is the Nats are being much more assertive. And they are to the free market right of the Lib centre, that’s a simple fact. They are well riled and ready to kick heads, and it is LONG past time.

    I’m mildly optimistic. Tony may be a good bloke and a fighter, but he was strategically, tactically, and politically shitballs.

  85. Gab

    The guy gave water policy to Agriculture and Agriculture to the Nats.

    The guy had no choice as the Nats made it a condition.

  86. wreckage

    Oh, and as a Schumpetarian, Malcom might be the first PM in a long, long time, who wasn’t actively and devotedly anti-tech, anti-progress, and committed to pumping billions of dollars into industries long past dead.

    He might even believe that climate change is best addressed by next-gen nuclear power. In which case, I’m getting a t-shirt with his face on it.

  87. wreckage

    Yup, they did. And they will go on holding the torch to him in a way they never would Tony.

  88. Alan Moran, your are too kind to the Bishop snake.

  89. Senile Old Guy

    committed to pumping billions of dollars into industries long past dead.

    Turncoat was put in charge of the NBN, you numpty.

    The guy gave water policy to Agriculture and Agriculture to the Nats.

    The guy had no choice as the Nats made it a condition.

    Exactly. This was something Turncoat was forced to do, not something he chose to do.

    I loathed KR but his knifing by JG was pure political bastadry. Turncoat is only interested in Turncoat, he was a disaster as Opposition Leader and the 54 who voted for him will regret it.

  90. Combine Dave

    Abbott/Hockey were the biggest spending government in Australian history.
    But you’re sad to see them go

    Based on his current spending… he is set to surpass them by a fee billion.

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