“I don’t think voters know quite how vindictive Turnbull is”

Any idea what Andrew Bolt means?

I don’t think voters know quite how vindictive Turnbull is, and what depths his media team have stooped to in trying to intimidate journalists.

When I am permitted to reveal some confidences I will. I am not quite saying Turnbull is a Rudd, but I am saying that the advertising does not resemble the goods and there will be buyers’ remorse. Already many Liberal MPs are worried. The superannuation strife is just a hint of what’s to come.

I know he is shallow, mean-spirited, narcissistic and incompetent. He is a left-wing troll heading a party of what ought to be liberal conservatives. If there’s more, it is pointless to wait till the 3rd of July to let us know.

Meanwhile, we have Malcolm’s father-in-law venting steam on Tony Abbott in his new book just published. Either the author is incoherent or the writer of the article, since I really could not work out from this what he was saying. Ravings of an old man, I suppose. You work this out and get back to me:

The book also republishes a blistering letter Mr Hughes sent to his brother, the late Robert ­Hughes, world-renowned as an art critic and accomplished historian, when Mr Abbott became Liberal leader.

”This is a potentially catas­tro­ph­ic decision,” he wrote. “To elect Abbott in his place is the equivalent of putting the bull in charge of the china shop or the principal ­lunatic in charge of the asylum. Abbott’s behaviour in relation to the risks of global warming may be compared to the oscillations of the weather vane.”

Well, the catastrophe turned out to be that Abbott had a fantastic win at the 2013 election which allowed Malcolm to stage a coup to become the Prime Minister he could never have become on his own. If he meant anything else, I could not work it out.

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159 Responses to “I don’t think voters know quite how vindictive Turnbull is”

  1. Mundi

    Its simple really: the MPs (like Wyatt Roy) backed Turnball because he convinced then his approval rating was better than Abbotts, so they would have much better change at another term under him.

    The values of the party don’t matter. Even winning a majority I don’t think even matters. Certainly they don’t give a toss about the Senate, otherwise they would have never triggered a DD.

  2. Iren

    I think the appointment of a Green to a senior position in his department gives a hint. Locking Abbott, who initiated the fallen soldiers’ return, out of the welcoming committee while not attending himself because he was too busy inspecting mattresses 47 km. away is another hint.

  3. cuckoo

    Abbott’s behaviour in relation to the risks of global warming may be compared to the oscillations of the weather vane.

    What does that even mean? I think it’s time for someone’s afternoon nap.

  4. Anne

    The best scenario would be for Turnbull of Wentworth and the infamous 54 to lose their seats to Independents and the minor Right Wing Parties.

  5. Bruce of Newcastle

    Any idea what Andrew Bolt means?

    Very funny Steve!

    Apart from running on his policies, exploiting the success of OSB, welcoming home the remains of service personnel he repatriated and reluctantly granting the popularity of the carbon and mining tax repeals he fought for what has Tony Abbott ever done for us?

    Worryingly Turnbull’s lot are now acting rather like the Judean People’s Front crack suicide squad.

  6. Baldrick

    I am not quite saying Turnbull is a Rudd, but I am saying that the advertising does not resemble the goods and there will be buyers’ remorse. Already many Liberal MPs are worried. The superannuation strife is just a hint of what’s to come.

    It’s exactly what the Cat Collective have been saying ever since Lord Kardashian stole office and somehow this is a revelation for Blot. Go figure.

  7. notafan

    I think shorter Hughes is

    ‘Unless Malcolm is the leader of the liberal party, the planet is doomed’

    Marvel should pick up his character for a new movie starring Malcolm the Superman and Abbott as Climate Deathstroke (mixing my heroes and super-villians here)

  8. Brett

    Tom Hughes, with whatever respect is due to him, is well past his peak in any endeavour.

  9. Iren

    The best scenario would be for Turnbull of Wentworth and the infamous 54 to lose their seats to Independents and the minor Right Wing Parties.

    I’m not quite so ambitious. Just getting rid of Turnbull himself would do for me.

  10. Anne

    Iren, if I lived in Wentworth or any of the Turncoat seats I’d don a sandwich board and be walking the shopping centres.

    Who’s on the ballot in Wentworth, anybody know?

  11. Politichix

    Baldrick
    #2046900, posted on June 3, 2016 at 4:10 pm

    It’s exactly what the Cat Collective have been saying ever since Lord Kardashian stole office and somehow this is a revelation for Blot. Go figure.

    Yikes! Bolt has been consistently in line with what the Cat Collective has been saying which makes it rather horrifying to know there are greater levels of hideousness that are as yet undiscovered.

  12. struth

    Bolt doesn’t read catallaxy, obviously.

    We are actually quite a good representation of the right, centre right voter here.

    From my extensive travels around Australia, and the many people I have met from Kununurra to Wilson’s prom, Cooktown to Pemberton, from kikatinalong to weelabarraback, and talked about the state of affairs, I suggest that might be a bit condescending.
    Malcom doesn’t get right wing votes because right wing people can see straight through him and can guess how bad he is.
    He fools lefties.
    As a recent convert to the right, Bolt may not quite get that yet.
    So Bolt, why do you think Malcom is so hated by the right?
    We get it.
    It’s all about Malcom, at all costs, anyway possible.

  13. Iren

    Who’s on the ballot in Wentworth, anybody know?

    Apart from one Christian Democrat, no one worth voting for. I’ll vote for Beresford Thomas and give Labor my preference before Turnbull. That’s how desperate I am.

    Labor Evan Hughes
    Liberal Malcolm Turnbull
    Greens Dejay Tuborek
    CDP Beresford Thomas
    Arts Anthony Ackroyd
    SP Peter Xing

  14. Menai Pete

    Malcolm Turnbull does not have to be Prime Minister if the Liberal Party and National Party win a majority of seats at the election. He is caretaker Prime Minister until the Governor General swears in a new Prime minister after declaration of the polls when the GG is convinced that the person he swears in has the support of a majority in the Lower House. But, if enough elected Liberal Party and National Party members were to hold a meeting before Malcolm T gets to see the GG and at that meeting pass a motion of no confidence in his leadership then he will be unable to convince the GG that he has the support of the House. He would have no option but to resign as leader of the Liberal Party and the party would be free to elect a new leader who would be sworn in as Prime Minister. The Party would not be deposing a sitting PM because he would not have been sworn in as PM in the new Parliament.

  15. Mayan

    The thing about elections is that a politician always wins. Think of Leyonhjelm, caught with his snout in the trough, abusing travel allowance to buy another house, like the rest of the politicians. The only surprising thing is that people are surprised by what any of them do.

    As for Bolt: he needs to stop insinuating and just word up.

  16. Wys

    Sorry but you are trying to prove the delcon sobriquet accurate with this. This is delusional stuff – what someone’s father-in-law criticized someone who took his son’s job? Wow fancy that?

    Or the “shocking” fact that the chided Bolt (loved his stuff on the government needing more Peta Credlins – genius!), who writes an unending stream of abuse and criticism about MT, then tries to turn it up a notch as he suffers relevance deprivation when Alan Jones gets interviews.

    Or how about still using Peta Credlin as your go-to source on political wisdom? Just wow.

    You can make substantive points on Mal’s leftism on social policy, but you jump the shark when you go down this path.

    Yes let’s have BS run the joint, the Libs can go into decline and allow the state to get much bigger, fed by ever larger taxes. A captive over 50% (and growing) of the non-tax paying populace will then have an even greater imperative to keep Labor in power indefinitely.

    Or we could have a Coalition government with Nats having the balance of power and an election being won on the basis of budget repair and economic management. One option is a childish tantrum and the other deploys a triple figure IQ solution to the national interest.

    Your call.

  17. Anne

    Tony Abbott as Prime Minister ordered the bodies returned to Australia. Why was he not invited to the welcome ceremony? And is that why Malcolm Turnbull didn’t go?

    My money’s on the most obvious reason.

    Turnbull told Abbott, ‘It’s the PM’s place to officiate, you can’t go.’

    Then, of course, Turnbull, like all Globalists who loathe Patriotism, just didn’t show.

    Scum!

    .

    Thanks Iren.

  18. Rabz

    The Waffler’s about to discover just how vindictive voters can be.

  19. I think the appointment of a Green to a senior position in his department gives a hint. Locking Abbott, who initiated the fallen soldiers’ return, out of the welcoming committee while not attending himself because he was too busy inspecting mattresses 47 km. away is another hint.

    Iren, I’m curious as to where TA was, on that day. Juuust curious.

  20. Any idea what Andrew Bolt means?

    I’ve explained this to you lot before. Turdbull is a vindictive sociopath who has never forgiven the Liberals for dumping him in 2009, or the Australian people for endorsing that decision at the 2010 and 2013 elections. His overwhelming, driving ambition now is to inflict as much pain on both the party and the people as he can, before he is stopped.

    What happens next depends on the outcome of the election. If the Liberals lose we will have a Labor government with an almost certain Labor/Greens/Xenephon-controlled senate. Turdbull will resign, sit back, and enjoy the havoc he will have spawned, first in the Liberal Party as it tears itself apart playing blame game, and secondly as the country self-destructs, economically and socially.

    It will be bad, but not as bad as the alternative. If the Liberals win what follows soon after will be our equivalent of the German 1933 Enabling Act. However, instead of all power being vested in a Chancellor, it will be by way of Senate Committees. Labor/Greens/Xenephon-controlled Senate Committees. Government will be by regulation, not legislation, and the HoR will largely become redundant. What will follow won’t just be havoc, it will be disaster.

    Either way the Liberal Party in its current form, is history.

  21. incoherent rambler

    Any idea what Andrew Bolt means?

    Not sure if even Andrew can answer that question.

    Of more interest is whether Turnbull will join the ALP after the Libs devastating loss at the next election.

  22. Megan

    Menai Pete, I quite like that scenario. If only…

  23. Robbo

    Tom Hughes was a below average politician who had, and no doubt still has, an immensely over inflated opinion of his own importance and talent. He managed to scrounge an appointment of QC because he knew the “right” people rather than obtaining the appointment through legal talent and that added another layer to his puffed up opinion of himself. An ordinary individual, an ordinary lawyer and an ordinary politician who produced an ordinary daughter who then married an even more ordinary individual who, unsurprisingly, also has a huge opinion of himself. Birds of a feather actually do flock together.

  24. Anne

    He would have no option but to resign as leader of the Liberal Party and the party would be free to elect a new leader who would be sworn in as Prime Minister. The Party would not be deposing a sitting PM because he would not have been sworn in as PM in the new Parliament.

    Why don’t they do that now, Pete?

    Won’t a Coalition win validate his leadership or give him a mandate of sorts?

  25. Carpe Jugulum

    Either way the Liberal Party in its current form, is history.

    Correct, spend more time pandering to the left and isolating their base than making any coherent policy decisions.

    Under turdbull, they are dead to me, they have betrayed everything they were meant to stand for.

    *PS i am not able to vote in Australian elections.*

  26. mem

    Hmm, having followed Bolt for a bit my reckoning is that Turncoat has been setting things up behind the scenes to discredit Abbott in his electorate. Turncoat is totally unprincipled and uses other people like tools, pandering to their weaknesses and ambitions. My guess is a new runner in the electorate might have been given a promise or two from a most unlikely source. But watch this space.

  27. dweezy2176

    Bit fascinated by a couple of references to .. Tony ORDERED the bodies home .. “Tones”, obviously, appears to have initiated the process but he didn’t ORDER the event .. the families had to be consulted and agree before it could take place .. I also note there is NO mention of the 34th digger who remains in Malaysia .. reason .. he isn’t coming home as his family, staunch anti-Vietnam, rusted-on, have refused all requests for repatriation over the years .. still doesn’t make for great copy if folk were to understand that the only reason it has taken so long to bring these diggers home is the immediate families have consistently refused .. suppose the parents are gone now & the decision passed to other members so a positive result could be achieved, at long last…… I found all this out with a bit of digging as I was perplexed as to why the event was being kept very low-key publicity-wise compared to USA/UK and our own Afghanistan returns…….. They could have been repatriated anytime in the last 50 years if the immediate family(s) had of requested ……….

  28. Atoms for Peace

    I don’t think the LNP realises how vindictive thinking voters can be.I predict a victory that tastes of ashes as the Senate is placed out of reach.

  29. jupes

    He managed to scrounge an appointment of QC because he knew the “right” people rather than obtaining the appointment through legal talent and that added another layer to his puffed up opinion of himself.

    Wasn’t it Tom Hughes who was beclowned by Rose Porteous when he was representing Gina?

  30. jupes

    Either way the Liberal Party in its current form, is history.

    MV if you write is accurate – and I have no reason to doubt it – then Australia in its current form will be history as well. We’ll all be rooned.

  31. H B Bear

    However, instead of all power being vested in a Chancellor, it will be by way of Senate Committees. Labor/Greens/Xenephon-controlled Senate Committees. Government will be by regulation, not legislation, and the HoR will largely become redundant. What will follow won’t just be havoc, it will be disaster.

    Oooh I like the sound of this. A full blown Senate crisis combined with a Liberal split and a genuine Australian Conservative Party would be most interesting.

  32. vagabond

    Like many here I’m wishing for the libs to get a good kicking so I was quite upset to see the Sportsbet odds on the liars party lengthened today from $3.50 to $3.70 and the libs went to $1.28 from $1.30. What’s going on? I must be moving in the wrong circles ‘cos I don’t know anyone, left or right, who can abide Turdball. The hot air drying machine in a public toilet produces a more useful result than anything coming out of his mouth.

  33. Ross B

    The over-inflated egos in the Turnbull-Hughes camp are the stuff of legend, or mirth – depending on which side of the harbour you live. Let’s face it, the evidence of Turnbull delusion is all around us. Turnbull actually thinks we’re all in thrall to the Turnbull Coalition Team, and we all love robo-calls. The guy pumps up his own tires. He doen’t need Old Tom blowing any air…

  34. Kool Aid Kid

    Turnbull is not a force. But he is a conservative. Abbott is neither a force nor a conservative. Turnbull will win and will prevent a transfer of power to a labor party that is now more closely controlled by troglodyte influences than it was in 1969.
    Kates is an indulgent Weiner who longs for the beer hall s of munchen.

  35. Menai Pete

    Anne, they can’t do it now as he’s still technically the elected Prime Minister. They would destroy their election prospects. They have to wait till after election day then strike. Remember half of the sitting MPs voted against him when he dumped Abbott and a lot of those who voted for him have now realised the error of their ways. My guess is that he does not have the numbers in the party room anymore and won’t have them after the election. The time to strike is before he is sworn in as PM in the new Parliament.

  36. Viva

    I don’t think voters know quite how vindictive Turnbull is

    Maybe so but one thing’s for sure – I had no idea how vindictive Bolt could be.

  37. then Australia in its current form will be history as well. We’ll all be rooned.

    Australia in its current form, is actually already a corpse. It’s just that people are only now beginning to notice. “Australia” as most people think of it, died soon after Menzies retired, but only now is the smell of putrification reaching peoples’ nostrils.

    The best “old” Australia can hope for now is a decent, dignified burial, and rebirth as part of a SE Asia alignment, most probably around either China or Japan.

  38. Turnbull is not a force. But he is a conservative.

    Yeah, right. And Mr Squiggles drew porno pictures.

  39. Anne

    Hope so Pete, but it can’t be Abbott.

    Whom should they choose?

  40. Eddystone

    As a recent convert to the right, Bolt

    I’ve been reading his columns since 1998, and he’s been consistently conservative, so not quite sure what you mean by “recent”, struth?

  41. Oh come on

    I don’t think voters know quite how vindictive Turnbull is, and what depths his media team have stooped to in trying to intimidate journalists.

    When I am permitted to reveal some confidences I will.

    I am not quite saying Turnbull is a Rudd, but I am saying that the advertising does not resemble the goods and there will be buyers’ remorse.

    Come off it, Andrew. Don’t cast these vague, cliche-ridden aspersions against Turnbull when we all know Abbott was your man. Give us the facts, or hold your peace. Stuff like this undermines your credibility.

    Already many Liberal MPs are worried.

    Yep, many Liberal MPs supported Abbott in the leadership ballot which he lost, so that’s not surprising.

  42. H B Bear

    “Upside down Miss Jane.”

  43. candy

    M. Turnbull not showing up at the ceremony for the interning of those soldiers’ remains who went to Vietnam is the last straw.
    I can’t bear the fellow, but this is just so low. So young and conscripted and gave their lives.
    The most one can do for one’s country. I feel tearful thinking about those lads – “only 19” as the song goes.
    And Mr Turnbull did not attend. That shows that any conservative government is gone now. Ordinary good values and we will have SSM and that slippery slope too, good values that hold society together just gone thanks to Malcolm Turnbull.

    And his father-in-law is a hideous snob and no wonder Mrs Turnbull has that demeanour she has. They keep her out of the media now. Textor people cottoned on to what the public perceive about Lucy Turnbull.

  44. candy

    Maybe so but one thing’s for sure – I had no idea how vindictive Bolt could be.

    I beg to disagree, Viva. He is sticking up for a mate and the values of loyalty and honesty.

    Which your chap Mr Turnbull does not display.

  45. Stimpson J. Cat

    I’d pay good money for Malcolm to try and stick me in a f?cking freezer.

  46. Bruce of Newcastle

    But, if enough elected Liberal Party and National Party members were to hold a meeting before Malcolm T gets to see the GG and at that meeting pass a motion of no confidence in his leadership then he will be unable to convince the GG that he has the support of the House. He would have no option but to resign as leader of the Liberal Party and the party would be free to elect a new leader who would be sworn in as Prime Minister.

    Menai Pete – That’s very good, and optimistic, but you are assuming that most of the Lib party room aren’t a big slimy pile of kale and wet lettuce. Which is in contrast with reality.

  47. Notafan

    So vote for the super duper slippery sloper Shorten

    I can’t bear either of those fellows.

    And I’ve thinking about those lads too

  48. JC

    I’d pay good money for Malcolm to try and stick me in a f?cking freezer.

    So would I.

  49. So vote for the super duper slippery sloper Shorten

    Vote however you like in the HoR Notafan. It’s going to make SFA difference who wins there. The only way you can make an HoR vote count for anything, is to cast an identifiable, quantifiable informal vote telling the Libs they have lost your confidence, and giving the few remaining conservatives a confidence boost to break away.

    The REAL battle, and only immediate defence left, is a bloc of conservatives in the Senate. That is really up to the minor parties themselves. If they resist the temptation to include the Libs/Nats in their “above the line” preference allocations, there is a slim hope. If not, we’re stuffed.

  50. Viva

    I beg to disagree, Viva. He is sticking up for a mate and the values of loyalty and honesty.

    Candy – if you think Bolt turning his blog/TV show/radio program into a non stop hatefest against Turnbull is a noble mission in the service of loyalty to a mate then think again. Being buddies with the Prime of Minister of Australia brought him all the associated benefits of inside information, high level access, media clout and career status. Who took all that away from him and left him out in the political cold?

  51. Notafan

    Don’t worry MV it’s minor parties only in the upper house from me.

    Criticising that chap Turnbull on slippery slope ssm when the LNP are committed to a plebiscite and Labor would simply impose it, seems sloppy to me.

  52. cynical1

    What’s going on? I must be moving in the wrong circles ‘cos I don’t know anyone, left or right, who can abide Turdball. The hot air drying machine in a public toilet produces a more useful result than anything coming out of his mouth.

    And then you see Shorten and Mal’s odds (ahem) shorten

    A “Get well soon” card from Al Capone has more sincerity than that crumb.

  53. mem

    Quite off topic but I couldn’t help but notice that US Speaker Ryan has got behind Trump.”US House Speaker Paul Ryan has endorsed Donald Trump’s bid for president, bringing an end to the extraordinary public split between the White House nominee and the nation’s top Republican in office.
    “I had friends wishing I wouldn’t support him. I had friends wishing I would,” Ryan said in an exclusive interview with The Associated Press.
    “I really didn’t feel any pressure, other than my goal is to make sure that we’re unified so that we’re at full strength in the fall so we can win the election.”
    Makes for a very stark contrast with what is happening here in OZ with Turnbull’s continued undermining of Abbott. Not once have I ever heard Turnbull talk about the Party and its unity. It is all me, me, me, and team Turnbull. link

  54. candy

    I still must disagree, Viva.

    Andrew Bolt has the same feelings as conservatives , okay then, supporters of T Abbott, who appreciate loyalty and honesty and other true conservative values. It’s ingrained, it’s just there. Tony Abbott has those.

    It’s not to do with benefits. It’s about connecting with someone who has the same values. No more, no less. Just that.

  55. Notafan

    Bolt doesn’t act out of loyalty to Abbott, way to late for that.

    He was once a Turnbull booster.

    He’s also mates with Shorten iirc.

    I’s say Bolt is an excitable chap who wants to be one of the lads, poor old fellow.

  56. Pedro the Ignorant

    They could have been repatriated anytime in the last 50 years if the immediate family(s) had of requested

    dweezy 2176.

    Out and out bullshit.

    You dishonour those, who behind the scenes, fought the diplomatic and political battles for years to secure the repatriation from Terendak.

  57. struth

    I’ve been reading his columns since 1998, and he’s been consistently conservative, so not quite sure what you mean by “recent”, struth?

    He worked for the Labor Party.
    I must be getting old.
    That long hey?
    I could google him I suppose but couldn’t be rooted, so I’ll take your word for it.

  58. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    M. Turnbull not showing up at the ceremony for the interning of those soldiers’ remains who went to Vietnam is the last straw.
    I can’t bear the fellow, but this is just so low. So young and conscripted and gave their lives.

    I’ll disagree with you there, Candy – it was no place for politicians. Sir Peter Cosgrove, certainly. And, FWIW, I think you will find that any conscripts killed in Viet Nam would have had their bodies returned to Australia.

  59. Don’t worry MV it’s minor parties only in the upper house from me.

    Yes, me too, Nota. But those few of us prepared to vote “below the line” are far outnumbered by those who will vote “above the line”. So, if FF, LDP or ALA, for instance, have Libs or Nats anywhere in their twelve allocated preferences, then our efforts are vastly overwhelmed.

    I will not be deciding my Senate vote until the minor parties disclose their preference allocation.

  60. Linden

    ‘Tony Abbott would of been there’, one dignified lady, a war widow, eloquently tips the bucket on Turnbull.

  61. Bruce of Newcastle

    Speaker Paul Ryan has endorsed Donald Trump’s bid for president

    Speaker Paul Ryan is in dire danger of not being preselected for his own seat.

    Paul Ryan’s primary opponent: I’ll support Trump

    When their balls are being gently squeezed in your hand their hearts and minds magically follow.

  62. Linden

    yes concrispts, I can remember vividly the funeral of one Tony Purcell killed in Vietnam in 1966 ( I think he was the 6th conscripted serviceman to be kill in action) and the military funeral that took place at his home town at Mansfield Victoria, I was in grade 3 high school and the whole school was sent down for it, and the entire town’s population (towns folk all the farmers from all around) it was horse drawn gun carriage and they sure put on a show. And I still remember the last time him, yes people have long memories about stuff like that.

  63. Caveman

    I will not be deciding my Senate vote until the minor parties disclose their preference allocation.

    Yep agree . The Waffler may well waffle but hes hedged his bets with the Senate. Hence all the Green luv by him.

  64. Viva

    Andrew Bolt has the same feelings as conservatives , okay then, supporters of T Abbott, who appreciate loyalty and honesty and other true conservative values.

    Funny. I always thought that moral vanity was the preserve of the left.

  65. Linden

    whoops should proof read first, typos but you get my drift.

  66. DrBeauGan

    Candy, if MT had turned up and stood with his hand on his heart, then everyone here would have called him a hypocrite. And they’d have been right.

  67. candy

    I’ll disagree with you there, Candy – it was no place for politicians.

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha, Bill Shorten now apologies for not being there. We can read into that various things.

    The PM should have been there. It would not have taken much time out of his day, surely.

  68. Linden

    wasn’t it the left wing unions who went on the (political) war path against the diggers from that era?

  69. Oh come on

    It was always only a matter of time. Once it had been established that Ryan would not be running, who else was he going to endorse, apart from the eventual nominee? If the Speaker of the House didn’t endorse his party’s POTUS nominee, the Speaker’s position would surely be untenable. IMO, Ryan was posturing well above his pay grade by not immediately endorsing Trump once he had the numbers. Who gives a shit who or what Ryan is “comfortable with”? The guy’s acting as though he’s still on the ticket – what a prima donna!

    And I think Ryan’s intellect is overrated, anyway. I haven’t forgotten the fact he failed to land a glove on old Slow Joe in the 2012 VP debate, which everyone assumed he’d win by KO.

  70. Menai Pete

    The Minister for Defence and the NSW Premier were there. Was any Labor politician at the ceremony?

  71. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha, Bill Shorten now apologies for not being there. We can read into that various things.

    For Bill Shorten to have been there would have been an act of sheer, stinking hypocrisy of the first order. Bill Shorten got his start in the Union movement – the same Union movement who refused to handle soldier’s mail, the same union movement that refused to load supply ships for Viet Nam, the same Union movement that hindered the deployment of the Centurion tank unit by stealing all the tools off every tank, the same Union movement that issued a call for soldiers in Viet Nam to refuse duty, at their annual conference in Melbourne in 1970? If Bill Shorten HAD have attended, he should have apologized.

  72. Pedro the Ignorant

    There were five National Servicemen killed in action in Vietnam buried in Terendak. All the other National Servicemen KIA were buried in Australia.

    Only three soldiers KIA in Vietnam and buried in Terendak remain there. They are;

    Private Dal Abbott,
    Gunner Thomas Simpson, and
    Major Peter Badcoe VC.

    Google Dal Abbott’s name and you will see the sorry story of how his activist family sought (but failed) to erase his memory forever.

  73. PeterF

    What got up my nose was a post on Lord Wentworths Facebook page today celebrating his win in the Spycatcher case,30 years ago. In comparison Tony Abbott showed his humility by posting about the returned servicemen. I’m sure Waffle has put something about their return by now, but his first post this morning was about himself.

  74. Stimpson J. Cat

    So would I.

    Ha ha ha ha ha ha!

    Cold as Ice.

  75. PeterF

    Of course politicians should be there,after all they are the ones that sent them there in the first place. The GG didn’t.

  76. Jo Smyth

    If Bolt knows something about Turdball that we should know, it is his duty to tell us otherwise his street cred will be zilch.

    Bolt also has Clive Palmer on his show on Monday. I have every confidence he will get a soft interview because for some reason, when Bolt is face to face with someone like Palmer, he goes all weak kneed..

  77. old bloke

    The REAL battle, and only immediate defence left, is a bloc of conservatives in the Senate. That is really up to the minor parties themselves. If they resist the temptation to include the Libs/Nats in their “above the line” preference allocations, there is a slim hope. If not, we’re stuffed.

    MV – I’ve heard that the ALA is advising voters to vote above the line, vote for six candidates or parties, as long as they are conservative or liberal. They were told to NOT vote for any of the four majors, i.e., no preferences to Labor, Liberal, National or Greens (and definitely none to Socialist Alliance of course).

  78. Pedro the Ignorant

    The RAAF Richmond ramp ceremony was a solemn and ceremonial occasion, not a campaigning politician’s photo opportunity.

  79. Oh come on

    Right, Jo. All this winking and dog-whistling at the electorate only undermines Bolt’s credibility.

  80. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    There were five National Servicemen killed in action in Vietnam buried in Terendak.

    That’s news to me, thanks, Pedro. I was under the impression that Erroll Noack was killed in action, all KIA’s were repatriated to Australia.

  81. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I was under the impression that Erroll Noack was killed in action,

    Sorry, should read “that, beginning with when Erroll Noack was killed in action”

  82. jupes

    M. Turnbull not showing up at the ceremony for the interning of those soldiers’ remains who went to Vietnam is the last straw.
    I can’t bear the fellow, but this is just so low. So young and conscripted and gave their lives.

    I’ll disagree with you there, Candy – it was no place for politicians. Sir Peter Cosgrove, certainly. And, FWIW, I think you will find that any conscripts killed in Viet Nam would have had their bodies returned to Australia.

    My thoughts:

    I suspect John Howard started the practice of Prime Ministers attending the funerals of soldiers killed in Afghanistan. I understand why he did it and I reckon the families would have appreciated it. However I always thought he was making a rod for his – and his successors – back. What would happen if we ever get serious about war and started taking too many casualties for the PM to attend the digger’s funerals? Surely the first family this happened to would feel slighted.

    On the other hand this latest ceremony is different. Thirty three dead soldiers returning home at the same time is unprecedented. It had a historical significance second only to the return of the unknown soldier.

    Vietnam veterans rightly feel aggrieved because at the time of their service they were shown no appreciation by their country. The Prime Minister should have been there. That he chose to attend a campaign event at a mattress factory tells us everything about what he thinks of the sacrifice that these men made. He couldn’t care less.

    As to why they were buried overseas: I reckon they must have been killed before Australia began the practice of bringing our war dead home. As far as I can recall, this started when a member of the AATTV was killed and his US comrade was shocked that his body wasn’t going to be sent home, so he volunteered to pay for it thus embarrassing the Australian government into changing their policy.

  83. JC

    It shouldn’t be a public spectacle, Jupes. It’s as close to a funeral as you can get and ought to be a private affair for the families. Perhaps Turnbuckle thinks like that and ended what Howard started.

  84. Stimpson J. Cat

    Credlin has the dirt.
    She thinks Mal instigated the campaign against her.
    Prove me wrong Bolta!

  85. They were told to NOT vote for any of the four majors, i.e., no preferences to Labor, Liberal, National or Greens

    That may well be the case, Old Bloke. But having been involved in the preference horse-trading of many an election, I will hold off judgement until the actual official preference allocations are made available by the AEC. In God we trust. Everybody else we check.

    And I’m a Philosophical Taoist – we have no God.

  86. JC

    Does anyone know the protocol in the US is as I think I’ve presidents on the tarmac/ funeral at times and other times not.

  87. jupes

    The RAAF Richmond ramp ceremony was a solemn and ceremonial occasion, not a campaigning politician’s photo opportunity.

    No. This was a national occasion. The Governor General should have had to conduct all the ceremonial aspects however the Prime Minister needed to attend.

    Turnbull didn’t need to make any speech or do anything except stand there and pay his respects when the caskets passed.

  88. Notafan

    Bringing home the dead is a nice sentiment.

    Not always possible. Like the cat banner shows its not always possible.

    I doubt the families would have appreciated having Shorten or Turnbull there.

    Reckon TA would have been welcome.

  89. Stimpson J. Cat

    Jupes
    Australian of the Year David Morrison was a no show too.
    Maybe because the dead soldiers were all guys.

  90. jupes

    It shouldn’t be a public spectacle, Jupes.

    No. It was a public spectacle. After the ramp ceremony there was a motorcade of hearses through Western Sydney. People lined the streets to pay their respects. It was a national occasion.

    The re-internment ceremonies will be private affairs for the families.

  91. JC

    People lined the streets to pay their respects. It was a national occasion.

    Fair enough. But I don’t believe the PM needs to be there. It’s a GG thing.

    Why was the motorcade going through Sydney’s West. Presumably they weren’t all from there.

  92. Menai Pete

    ought to be a private affair for the families

    It was. Their other family was on parade and lining the streets, at attention, with their hands over the medals on their left breast

  93. jupes

    Only three soldiers KIA in Vietnam and buried in Terendak remain there.

    Pedro do you know why Simmo and Peter Badcoe didn’t return?

  94. Pedro the Ignorant

    This is a list of Australian soldiers KIA in the Vietnam war who were buried in Terendak;

    http://www.vvaa.org.au/terendak.htm

    Errol Noack was the first National Serviceman (NS) killed in action in Vietnam on 24 May 1966.

    The five NS buried in Terendak are;

    Dal Abbott,
    Norman Allen
    Gary Archer
    Tony Holland, and
    John Pearce.

    The earliest Vietnam KIA burial date is 21 Sep 1965 and the latest is 4 Feb 1969.

    The only explanation as to why some were buried in Terendak after the change in Australian government policy to bring all KIAs home is perhaps family wishes at the time.

  95. Oh come on

    We have the Turnbull camp’s unauthorised (wink, wink) account of the events that they believe justified Abbott’s dumping in the form of Nikki Savva’s book.

    Bolt would be a good choice to write the Abbott camp’s version of events. But this is just shabby journalism that takes its readers for mugs, isn’t fair to Turnbull, and does the voter a disservice. Bolt should come clean with what he knows.

  96. Jo Smyth

    As each day passes Turnball shows just what a useless excuse for a Leader he is. Up until yesterday there was always a chance I could have swallowed my pride and put my cross next to the Libs. The fact he could not even be bothered to show respect to the returning soldiers, spouses and children was the last straw for me. Words cannot describe what a low life I think he is. There is NO defence for not attending. He is only walking around a free man because of the sacrifices of thousands of ordinary people.

  97. Oh come on

    Maybe because the dead soldiers were all guys.

    And evidently saw action, unlike our reigning AOTY. Morrison shouldn’t have attended out of shame; good thing he didn’t.

  98. jupes

    Why was the motorcade going through Sydney’s West.

    Not sure. They landed at Richmond then had to be taken somewhere for the bodies to be held until they are transported to their final resting places throughout Australia.

    Don’t know why this couldn’t have occurred at Richmond other than to give the (closest) public the chance to pay respect.

    Like the PM should have done.

  99. Pedro the Ignorant

    Pedro do you know why Simmo and Peter Badcoe didn’t return?

    No idea. I do know that all known living relatives were contacted by the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Commonwealth Office of War Graves and asked about their wishes regarding re-interment, and that those wishes were followed to the letter.

  100. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    As far as I can recall, this started when a member of the AATTV was killed and his US comrade was shocked that his body wasn’t going to be sent home, so he volunteered to pay for it thus embarrassing the Australian government into changing their policy.

    From what I understand , the policy changed just after “Dasher” Wheatley, AATV, was killed, – his family started asking pointed questions about why they would have to pay to have the body of a Victoria Cross winner brought home. A Sydney business man paid to have the first Australian, killed with the Task Force – Billy Carroll – brought home.

  101. JC

    They landed at Richmond then had to be taken somewhere for the bodies to be held until they are transported to their final resting places throughout Australia.

    Don’t know why this couldn’t have occurred at Richmond other than to give the (closest) public the chance to pay respect

    Oh Okay.

  102. TC

    It would not have been political for Turnbull to attend , Shorten would have been invited as leader of the opposition , he didn’t attend because he didn’t want to.

  103. JC

    We have the Turnbull camp’s unauthorised (wink, wink) account of the events that they believe justified Abbott’s dumping in the form of Nikki Savva’s book.

    Bolt would be a good choice to write the Abbott camp’s version of events. But this is just shabby journalism that takes its readers for mugs, isn’t fair to Turnbull, and does the voter a disservice. Bolt should come clean with what he knows.

    PM’s generally are the pits of humanity and in most cases serious psychopaths? Naaa really? 🙂

  104. Mike of Marion

    Memory Vault @20.26
    Green is saying that the Preference Lists won’t apply in the Senate becuase the voter does the 1 to 6 minimum. The Voter determines the exhausted vote.http://blogs.abc.net.au/antonygreen/2016/06/2016-senate-calculators.html

  105. Mike of Marion

    The new Senate voting system, passed by the parliament after a marathon Senate sitting in March, has abolished group preference tickets. Parties no longer lodge tickets and therefore have no control over the between-party preferences of ballot papers completed by voters above the line.

    Parties can try to influence voters by distributing how to vote material, but it is no longer possible for any party or candidate to determine the between-party preferences of a ballot paper.

    Antony Green

  106. Malcolm

    What it means is that Kates and Bolt are deluded. They are both Shorten lovers. There was no coup – the party room rightly found that Abbott was incompetent and would lead the Coalition to a major defeat. Turnbull has his faults, but he is intelligent, ethical and a true capitalist.

  107. Google Dal Abbott’s name and you will see the sorry story of how his activist family sought (but failed) to erase his memory forever.

    A most profound thankyou to you Pedro.
    Google I did.
    A most…. .. (how to find the words?)…. soul destroying story.

    Leaves me numb.

  108. Gab

    Oh bugger off “Malcolm”. Go visit another mattress factory.

  109. MD

    Wow, some Mr Hughes sent some Robert Hughes a letter. I guess that must have been the end for Abbott.

  110. SJC & OCO

    Maybe because the dead soldiers were all guys.

    More likely because they were soldiers

  111. Stimpson J. Cat

    Turnbull has his faults, but he is intelligent, ethical and a true capitalist.

    Also all of his friends are mirrors and he has one in every room.

  112. Old School Conservative

    Why was the motorcade going through Sydney’s West?

    Yesterday, arrive Richmond. Travel through Sydney’s west to Rookwood Cemetery.
    15 funerals there today, the others proceeded to private ceremonies elsewhere at family discretion.

  113. Stimpson J. Cat

    Malcolm for future reference you lost me after “but”.

  114. P

    Many thanks Pedro for your contribution to this thread.
    Much appreciated.

  115. Green is saying that the Preference Lists won’t apply in the Senate becuase the voter does the 1 to 6 minimum.

    All well and good, Mike, if that is really how it turns out to be. However, the inference is that a party’s “above the line” vote is all for the party. However, as this is a DD, individuals are required to vote for twelve preferences if they vote “below the line”. It is difficult to believe it is any different for allocation of votes “above the line”. That is, a minor party will have to number twelve preferences.

    Since most, if not all, minor parties will be running one, two of three candidates at best in each state, that means they must nominate another nine plus from nowhere. I am quite possibly wrong in this. But the very fact that nobody seems to have a definitive answer to these matters, tends to suggest to me that we are getting the wool pulled over our eyes. Again.

    The only sure solution is for minor parties NOT to include major party candidates in their preference allocation at all. I hope you are right. But I will wait and see what transpires.

  116. Turnbull has his faults. but h
    He is intelligent cunning, ethical devious and a true crony capitalist.

    FIFY

  117. Rabz

    Rookwood Cemetery

    My mum and dad are buried there, side by side as they would have wanted.

  118. H B Bear

    Green is saying that the Preference Lists won’t apply in the Senate becuase the voter does the 1 to 6 minimum.

    What Green is saying is there is no “simply just vote 1” option that used to apply the preference allocation registered with the AEC that allowed all the preference whispering to take effect. Parties still have the option to issue How to Vote cards in the Senate but just like the House of Reps there is no guarantee that anyone will follow them.

    A Senate vote with a single “1” above the line will be a valid vote for the party but has a higher chance of exhausting than one numbered 1 to 6 above the line.

  119. struth

    Jupes
    Australian of the Year David Morrison was a no show too.
    Maybe because the dead soldiers were all guys.

    The best comment of the day IMHO.

  120. JohnA

    Menai Pete #2046999, posted on June 3, 2016, at 6:16 pm

    Anne, they can’t do it now as he’s still technically the elected Prime Minister. They would destroy their election prospects. They have to wait till after election day then strike. Remember half of the sitting MPs voted against him when he dumped Abbott and a lot of those who voted for him have now realised the error of their ways. My guess is that he does not have the numbers in the party room anymore and won’t have them after the election. The time to strike is before he is sworn in as PM in the new Parliament.

    MP and Anne,
    If the LP party rules are the same as a few years back, all positions are automatically spilled after an election. Therefore, it is part of the rules to elect a new leader and deputy when the writs are returned, or at least when things are clear enough to have an assured party room vote.

    If the caretaker PM doesn’t get back (Bennelong) s/he can’t be voted for. If the caretaker PM is back, he still has to run the gauntlet of the numbers in the Party Room.

    That’s precisely the time to get rid of him!

  121. sdfc

    A Senate vote with a single “1” above the line will be a valid vote for the party

    A far more sensible system than the previous bullshit.

  122. Tim

    Yeah, no, MV.

    You have it wrong. The parties can suggest how voters vote. But the voters get to choose how to allocate their preferences this time. And the minor parties don’t have the people to hand out HTVs to seriously influence the voters preference.

    It will almost certainly be a train-wreck of exhausted votes, and final candidates elected on 2% or less of the vote.

  123. Iren

    That’s precisely the time to get rid of him!

    No party who just won an election will dump their leader. Nothing enhances their position more than winning an election. Name just one occasion when this has happened.

  124. If the caretaker PM doesn’t get back (Bennelong) s/he can’t be voted for. If the caretaker PM is back, he still has to run the gauntlet of the numbers in the Party Room.
    That’s precisely the time to get rid of him!

    True. Please remind me, for I have forgotten.
    When was the last time any party dumped a leader who had just taken them to an election victory?

  125. struth

    No party who just won an election will dump their leader. Nothing enhances their position more than winning an election. Name just one occasion when this has happened.

    ????????????????????????

  126. Iren

    It will almost certainly be a train-wreck of exhausted votes, and final candidates elected on 2% or less of the vote.

    In which case, the best idea might be to number all the candidates below the line who you don’t mind getting in. Even though we’re being told that 12 is the minimum, Antony Green confirms that less is still valid, and there’s also nothing to stop you going beyond 12, so you can number as many or as few as you like and make your own decision about preferences.

  127. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Australian of the Year David Morrison was a no show too.

    Anybody imagine David Morrison being cornered by a few old soldiers and ancient warriors, and being told just what a disgusting piece of shyte he actually was? “Call yourself an officer, Sir? I”ve pissed better officers then you, Sir.”

  128. Iren

    ????????????????????????

    I’m talking about JohnA’s idea of dumping Turnbull straight after the election and better he’s even sworn in. Talk about pipe dream!

  129. H B Bear

    It will almost certainly be a train-wreck of exhausted votes, and final candidates elected on 2% or less of the vote.

    I don’t disagree with you. Unfortunately in the democratic basket case that is the Australian Senate that is still an improvement and probably represents the high water mark of reform achievable in that festering shit hole.

  130. You have it wrong. The parties can suggest how voters vote. But the voters get to choose how to allocate their preferences this time.

    Tim, if I vote [1] above the line for ALA, for instance, and they don’t get a quota, where does my vote go? To the the ALA’s nominated second preference, or to the party/person I number [2] above the line?

  131. Clam Chowdah

    Vote labour. Otherwise the Liberals won’t recalibrate.

  132. sdfc

    Recalibrate to what? Your conservative dream?

  133. Vote labour. Otherwise the Liberals won’t recalibrate.

    Vote Labor, and the Liberals will simply “calibrate” further to the the left.

  134. Oh come on

    If the caretaker PM doesn’t get back (Bennelong) s/he can’t be voted for. If the caretaker PM is back, he still has to run the gauntlet of the numbers in the Party Room.

    That’s precisely the time to get rid of him!

    Dear lord, do you honestly think that the voting public would appreciate such a degree of trickery, should Turnbull lead the coalition to victory? I want to see the Liberal Party burn to the ground, sure. But I’d kinda like something better to take its place. What I don’t want to see is a destroyed Liberal Party, with some limp-wristed centrist party filling the political vacuum and a generation or more in which small government conservative politics (which will bear the brunt of public anger should Turnbull be removed in the manner you describe) is totally sidelined from the mainstream running of government.

    Where on earth have all these kooky fantasies about a party dumping their leader immediately after he’s led them to an election victory sprung from? It’s just never going to happen.

  135. H B Bear

    Tim, if I vote [1] above the line for ALA, for instance, and they don’t get a quota, where does my vote go? To the the ALA’s nominated second preference, or to the party/person I number [2] above the line?

    There is no such thing as the ALA’s nominated second preference. Your vote would be allocated to the party number [2] (assuming you vote above the line) who would be elected if they make quota. If no 2 is eliminated it goes to party [3] and so on. Your vote exhausts if there is not a valid preference indicated when it is required to be transferred. The same thing happens below the line except with people directly. Above the line party votes are applied to candidates in the order nominated by their party.

  136. There is no such thing as the ALA’s nominated second preference. Your vote would be allocated to the party number [2] (assuming you vote above the line) who would be elected if they make quota.

    Sorry, but that does not make sense. Forget the ALA. Let’s consider Liberal or Labor. People vote [1] above the line for Liberal, for instance. Their first preference vote goes to whoever the Liberals have standing in that state as their number one candidate. Then, according to you, any carry-over vote goes to whichever party the voter nominates as [2].

    This is bullshit. If true, there would be no point in a political party nominating any more than one candidate. Obviously the the above surplus quota vote flows to whoever is nominated by the party as their number two candidate, NOT to whoever the voter numbers as number [2] preference, which, by necessity, is a candidate for another party, the way you explain it.

  137. H B Bear

    MV – the party vote above the line is allocated to the various candidates in the order they are nominated by the party. My explanation probably didn’t make that clear. Votes above the line are for a party that are simply applied to the candidates below. It is simply a mechanism to require fewer numbers to be written.

    The whole above the line/below the line distinction is only required because clearly the AEC doesn’t consider enough voters can number the minimum 1 to 12 below the line without f**king it up. That probably says as much about the state of Australian democracy as anything I could say. The Senate informal voting numbers will be interesting.

  138. M Ryutin

    Heh, I just had to reply to this pap:-

    “Being buddies with the Prime of Minister of Australia brought him all the associated benefits of inside information, high level access, media clout and career status. Who took all that away from him and left him out in the political cold?”
    Viva June 3, 2016 at 7:03 pm

    Abbott PM a decade ago was he? Take you hand off it.
    The one good thing you do by your rot is allow me to point that while the majority of Cats seem to be aligned with me and find Turnbull poison there are a number pf people who are Turnbull types through and through. Although most are silent about that right now – never stooping to ever actually criticise him – none of them are so bankrupt intellectually as to invent such rubbish as was in that post.

  139. Craig Mc

    With all due respect Tom, you’re a stupid, old fucker.

  140. Oh come on

    I’ve never understood the excessive concern over exhausted votes/vote wastage etc. I mean, the difference between my first and second preference is generally a mile wide. Why should my ‘meh’ second preference or ‘uber-meh’ third preference, perhaps on its second or third reallocation, carry the same weight as someone else’s passionately cast first preference? I really am starting to come around to the FPTP system. The person who attracts the most votes in their electorate wins. If a voter decides to vote tactically because they don’t believe enough of their fellow citizens will back their preferred candidate and so instead votes for a more popular candidate who most closely aligns with their preferred candidate, then so be it – that’s their choice. The same thing happens here – if you award your first preference to a Socialist Party candidate, the odds are pretty damn good that your vote will sooner or later end up in the ALP candidate’s pile. The only difference is that, with the latter system, your vote won’t be considered ‘wasted’ – if the ALP candidate wins, anyway.

    As for the Senate, it may be unrepresentative, but it was cast that way by design. There would have been no Federation without the assumption that a powerful Senate would be able to protect the rights of the more numerous but less populous States, with the Big Two running riot in the HoR with their greater number of MPs attempting to deliver as many goodies to their States as possible. Of course, all that fretting over achieving a balance between NSW/Vic and the rest of Oz was a complete waste of time, as party discipline soon rendered the State allegiances of MPs in both chambers a trivial matter.

    Plus, the Senate can be said to be more democratic than the HoR, as its MPs and their parties represent a more accurate cross-section of the public’s voting intentions than the two-party reality in the HoR that satisfies few. Personally, I’d like to see proper proportional allocation of seats in the Senate (with a relatively low minimum threshold), not the messy ‘preferential system with proportional outcomes’ we currently have, and I’d like to see the end of the ridiculous charade that the Senate is a House of the States. It’s not, it never really was, and consequently it should be made more representative by removing geography from the equation. I understand this would require a major constitutional overhaul, something I’m leery of until the number of SJWs who walk amongst us is sharply culled so we don’t end up with a document that guarantees everyone everything, to be paid for by Someone Else. Still, it’d be a sensible reform.

  141. John Constantine

    Their hussein Obama would have gone golfing, and their media would have cradled his balls every minute of the way.

  142. Clam Chowdah

    Recalibrate to what? Your conservative dream?

    A Turnbull-free and Bishop-free leadership team. Fucking duh.

  143. duncanm

    I must say, I think its a bit childish when Bolt goes off on these ‘I know something but can’t tell you’ lines.

    Not very professional as a journalist / opinion writer.

  144. Old School Conservative

    duncanm
    #2047320, posted on June 4, 2016 at 7:56 am
    I must say, I think its a bit childish when Bolt goes off on these ‘I know something but can’t tell you’ lines.
    Not very professional as a journalist / opinion writer.

    Spot on. I can’t think of any other journalist of any political persuasion who does it.
    Some others may hint about issues in their written text, but I’m not aware of such school-yard boasting elsewhere in the Australian media.
    It’s sad, because Andrew Bolt is such a champion of so many conservative ideals.

  145. dweezy2176

    On who was and wasn’t there … “Rama” Baird must have got a leave pass from “Lakemba” as he was on the tarmac … very low key … didn’t see/hear any media cover for him.

  146. Robber Baron

    Politics is a vindictive business. What Abbott and Turnbull do to each other is irrelevant. Both are grown-up and both can look after themselves. The damage they do to the country is another matter. The only thing I worry about is if Turnbull is a Rudd. If this is the character of the man, he must not be elected under any circumstances and Bolt is duty bound to reveal what he knows.

  147. Faye

    So the main talking point around the dinner table would have been “get Abbott”.
    Second, it would have been “the risks of global warming”.

  148. duncanm

    “Rama” Baird must have got a leave pass from “Lakemba” as he was on the tarmac … very low key … didn’t see/hear any media cover for him.

    … and that’s the way it should be. Present to show due respect, but low key in order not to dirty the atmosphere with politics.

    Good on him.

  149. Occam's Blunt Razor

    It is very clear that the critics of Bolt here have not read his columns over the years, read his blog or watched his show.

  150. Motelier

    Do not worry about the polls.

    I predicted about when the DD was called that the polls will remain steady until a couple of days before the election. Then they will drop and the populace tells the vindictive leader of the Libs that he is not wanted.

    Where the votes go I do not know, but I am hoping that hey head over to the ALA. It appears that candidates are putting their hand up in electorates over Australia

    The last meeting for the ALA Election Support Group wargamed the preference flows from the last election.

    Given that PUP is not standing, they assumed that PUP voters would go to the ALA. When working out preferences they believe that they will have a fair number of first preference votes (that is money for the warchest) and a very slim chance of sneaking a victory.

    Hinkler covers an area of approximately 3 504 sq km starting at the Burnett River at Burnett Heads in the north, continuing west along the Burnett River following the Bundaberg Regional Council boundary, bordering the locality Duckinwilla in the south and following the Susan River to River Heads at the mouth of the Mary River. The major population centres are Bundaberg and Hervey Bay. Other towns include Bargara, Childers and Burrum Heads.

    The Hinkler Electorate.

  151. I Am the Walras, Equilibrate and Price Take

    So, Blot is telling us that Lord Waffleworth is a nasty, vindictive prat.

    Well, bugger me. Who’da thunk it??

  152. Pusnip

    Bringing dead bodies ‘home’ is a waste of public money. I’m therefore not surprised that our former PM, and non-practising small government advocate, Tony Abott, ordered it.

  153. Oh come on

    You are a waste of public money, pustule. You have permission to leave the table and go and look for a job. The grown-ups are talking now.

  154. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Bringing dead bodies ‘home’ is a waste of public money. I’m therefore not surprised that our former PM, and non-practising small government advocate, Tony Abott, ordered it.

    You really are beneath contempt, aren’t you, pustule?

  155. What ever it takes

    I would like to know where Abbott was when the coffins were driven through the suburbs. I doubt he would have appeared anywhere along the route showing his respects, that would have been construed as a slight to Malcolm.
    Pity he didn’t think, FU Mal, its more important to show respect to the fallen. A photo of him standing among other ordinary people would have had the Lord of the Manor foaming at the mouth. Mal never missed those opportunities on his long march.

  156. Pusnip

    So, you Cats think Abbott should have been making political mileage out of dead soldiers. And apparently I am beneath contempt for saying they should have been left where they fell. LOL.

  157. A Lurker

    You have it wrong. The parties can suggest how voters vote. But the voters get to choose how to allocate their preferences this time. And the minor parties don’t have the people to hand out HTVs to seriously influence the voters preference.

    My NSW Senate choice will look something like this..

    Kirralie Smith – ALA
    Gary Anderson – ALA
    Phil Jobe – Family First
    Nella Hall – Christian Democratic Party
    Brian Tucker – Rise Up Australia Party
    Maree Nichols – Rise Up Australia Party
    First Candidate – Australia First Party
    Brian Burston – One Nation
    Dean Mackin – One Nation
    Jim Moylan – Liberals
    John Williams – Nationals
    First Candidate – Shooters, Fishers & Farmers Party

  158. Nelson Kidd-Players

    Since the old senate system had ticket voting, parties were required to lodge a ticket to show how they wanted a 1 above to line to be expanded into a full preference vote.

    I don’t see anything on the AEC website that talks about HTVs having to be lodged, whether for the House of Reps or the Senate under the new system. Perhaps it is up to the parties to ensure no one hands out counterfeit HTVs with doctored preferences.

    So the senate is now completely up to the voter, whether they vote above or below the line. Since the saving provisions allow for just a 1 above the line, this should lead to only the one party getting your vote, subject to proper validation by the AEC officials running the count and/or an alert party scrutineer.

    I’m not sure of the AEC employees properly understanding (or respecting) the savings provisions for a 1 vote (as opposed to tossing it in the ‘informal’ pile) or of the minor parties being able to rustle up enough scrutineers for each polling station so, especially for minor parties, I’d suggest doing the full 1…6 above the line or 1…12 below the line.

Comments are closed.