Government as an exemplar

Australia-2016-Census-logoI just knew this part was always put there as a joke of the National Innovation and Science Agenda, just to make sure we were all listening.   You know the one: WELCOME TO THE IDEAS BOOM (OK, that bit might have been a joke, too).

Government as an exemplar

We will lead by example by making data available to the public and making it easier for startups and innovative small businesses to do business with the government.

Reading into the document, we learn:

Government has consistently lagged behind the private sector in innovation.  We must back new way of ‘doing business’ and learn from mistakes.

We will lead by example by becoming more innovative in how we deliver services and make data openly available to the public and make it easier for startups and innovative small businesses to sell technology services to government.

We will place innovation and science at the centre of the Government with a new sub-committee of Cabinet and will establish Innovation and Science Australia as an independent advisory board.

So that does it – a Cabinet sub-committee and new independent advisory board.

I’m just putting it out there: Government as an exemplar is looking like an incredibly sick puppy after the Census debacle.

But more worrying, in my opinion, is the idea that the government will package up your personal information and data you are required to provide to government agencies and make it “OPENLY AVAILABLE” in order to make it easier for start-ups.

Where is Turnbull’s ethical compass on this?

You are forced to provide information to the government – think ATO, Medicare, Centrelink, ABS – and Turnbull has no reservations in reusing this information – which is given with a particular purpose in mind, not for others – and handing it over to hipsters in Surry Hills?  Am I the only one who thinks we have a problem, Houston.

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36 Responses to Government as an exemplar

  1. Sparkx

    We will lead by example by becoming more innovative in how we deliver services and make data openly available to the public and make it easier for startups and innovative small businesses to sell technology services to government rip the taxpayer off just like IBM. FIFY

  2. Zatara

    We will lead by example by becoming more innovative in how we make your data openly available thus making it easier for anyone looking to rip you off. FIFY

  3. RobK

    In this day and age when data is collected by anything and everyone simply because they can(think Google, banks etc) the government’s ABS is at risk of being irrelevant. Most people are numbingly oblivious to the rights they have assigned to the tech companies to collect personal data. The government’s data base isn’t the rate determining obstacle to innovation or agility. Government-Keep to core business and let them get on with it.

  4. Ant

    Maol could solve all his woes with some clever, innovative and agile thinking.

    Has he thought about something new and fresh like a ‘Summit’ where could invite a nice catchy number of our nation’s leading thinkers and innovators – say 1,000 – and get them to convene in Canberra with some butcher paper and textas and just go for it?

    It needs a catchy name as well, of course.

    How about: “2020 Summit”

    He’s free to borrow that name if he likes.

  5. Tel

    If only someone would offer uneconomical highly subsidised fiber broadband with a rollout way behind schedule and cost overheads through the roof. That would be an innovative approach to pissing away taxpayers’ funds.

  6. strange

    The usual tosh from Sloan. Am I the only one who thinks we have a problem Yes, and you are also displaying your ignorance. The data you cite is a small fraction of data held by government. So what would be best? Let data languish in repositories not realising their value, or use it to gain a better understanding about social, economic, environmental issues? The whole open data initiative is happening in a number of OECD countries, and we are laggards in a world where other nations are using government data to advance their interests.
    But no, Sloan’s frame of reference is so narrow and blinkered that her normal government bad mantra leads her off into a world of conspiracy theories. But hey, I think Trump is looking for a new adviser. I’m just putting it out there – ha, ha she even uses his rhetorical devices!

  7. RobK

    Data mining is the new player on the block. The government is not in the lead in this field although it holds vast resources. The government should collect/collate data for it function to govern. That data should be publicly available.

  8. Habib

    Turnbull’s ethical compass, like his moral one and everything else about him, swings wildly to the left. Stupidity is oddly magnetic.

    BTW, anyone read the Oz’s colour mag and have the misfortune to wade through Phatty Adams’ incoherent polemic? He said at the end of the turgid piece Rudd on his worst day is better than Turnbull on his best. Snicker. Wasn’t the reason this pillock was foisted on us was to lure the left to the dark side? That’s worked out about as well as everything else these cretins have attempted.

    Also I note taxpayers are to be hosed for treatment of type 2 diabetes patients, the most self-inflicted ailment this side of drug addiction. What a wunnerful conservative guvvimint. This level of false pretences should be punishable by infection with all three types of plague.

  9. Dr Faustus

    Data mining is the new player on the block. The government is not in the lead in this field although it holds vast resources.

    It does indeed.

    My business is a user of mass government data – mainly production, geophysical and geospatial. One of my major cost items is checking, validating and correcting records: about 15% is unusable (actually, far worse than that, usable but wrong) due to clerical, processing, or storage errors.

    I know nothing much about all the other information government holds, but if the standard is the same as the Nation’s geosciences data, we can look forward to some interesting innovations, courtesy of GIGO Mining.

  10. Wozzup

    No you are not alone in worrying about this.

    Thus sounds like another Turnbull brain fart. There is a Privacy Act. The principle underlying this Act is that private data provided to parties by private citizens must be treated as private and only used for the purposes agreed to by the provider of that information. For example info on me held by a bank cannot be sold to a 3rd party or even an associated entity for commercial purposes such as telemarketing me. I have not stopped to check the extent to which the Cth is subject to the Act, but even if it is not, that is not the point. The principle is that information concerning me is private and must remain so. Arguably the Government has an even higher requirement to treat such information with proper regard. In particular privare information about you is yours, not theirs. Incidentally this is a principle that that I believe even Turnbull’s left leaning mates would shit on him for not adhering to. And properly so.

    Another good reason to dump a Turnbull led Liberal Party in favor of a conservative alternative that has principles.

  11. Zatara

    The whole open data initiative is happening in a number of OECD countries, and we are laggards in a world where other nations are using government data to advance their interests.

    Says the Strange person using an alias.

  12. john constantine

    Here is a link to a presentation by an asx listed company that can run the checks in an hour that take the state police 240 hours to deliver.

    http://www.asx.com.au/asxpdf/20160810/pdf/4396p4pbm717nq.pdf

    CV1 operates in a dataworld already interlinked.

  13. Fred Lenin

    Hey ant ,brilliant idea ,you forgot to mention the celebrites surely they will contribute their valuable thoughts to compound turnbulls problems . I feel almost sorry for the old merchant wanker As that naughty Lord Monckton called him . He loves being number one ,but no one mentioned he would actually have to Work ! Quelle Batard.

  14. Bruce of Newcastle

    Government has consistently lagged behind the private sector in innovation.

    So…if government is so crap at innovation…um…perhaps it might…
    um…
    stop funding the crap lot…
    and, um…
    fund the good lot instead…??

    You know, like shut down CSIRO and use the money to give tax holidays to innovation start ups? Or cash grants? Or prizes?

    Wash me brain out with environmentally sensitive Great Barrier Reef certified soap for even thinking such a heretical thought.

  15. strange

    Dame Groan might like to look at the range of data sets available, most of which do not rely on citizen originated data. As I said, ignorant and blinkered.
    http://archive.govhack.org/2015-data/

  16. RobK

    Strange,
    You make the point that much data is available already. I think the fear of many is that the government may, inadvertently or otherwise, subcontract out or sell data that isn’t striped of individual identifiers. It’s easy to say it won’t happen but no one will believe that. There have been too many instance of hacking, thieft and carelessness with bulk data. It leaks like a sieve.

  17. Data will help you market and provide services. For innovation you need…well, whatever is the opposite of whatever Turnbull does with his day.

    If you are tied to a whole bunch of data-fed assumptions and literal-minded extrapolations you won’t get innovation or science. You will get climate science, of course. And monorails. And marching bands. Right here in River City.

  18. Linden

    Like hi I’m from the government and I’m here to help? I know from our own small business that the government is not here to help, and in our own case we are not allowed to perform certain business activities for both Fed and State institutions where as our neighboring businesses in nearby suburbs do. Why because certain govt departments have made ‘convenient’ selections for themselves but no considerations at all for the general public, and I mean particularly the elderly folks who are forced to go into large shopping centers and alike instead of being to able to do it locally, so if it like this in the metro areas of the cities how hard is it for country elderly folks. I’ll let you work out why kind of business I am talking about here. So Mr Turnbull and his big ideas, I could give him a few, but his departments don’t want to know about it.

  19. Jannie

    It is either a joke or a sad delusion to even suggest a government, or a committee, could be capable of innovation, or providing advice to practical people on how to innovate. This is irony.

  20. Linden

    Yes one wonders what Oscar Wilde would of thought of that little gem.

  21. Crossie

    Speaking of census, I was finally able to log on this afternoon and complete it. That is five days after the debacle. The entire upper management in ABS must be sacked over this and not only because of the census stuff up. This incident brought to light a whole raft of mismanagement in that organisation which had previously enjoyed a high degree of public trust.

  22. strange

    It is either a joke or a sad delusion to even suggest a government, or a committee, could be capable of innovation, or providing advice to practical people on how to innovate. This is irony.
    Was it a private sector firm or NASA who put a man on the moon?

  23. Habib

    which had previously enjoyed a high degree of public trust. With who? Anyone who’s ever had any dealings with them know they’re utterly useless and compromised. I wouldn’t trust those incompetent cretins as far as I could spit a live rat.

  24. Bruce of Newcastle

    Was it a private sector firm or NASA who put a man on the moon?

    As I understand it the people who put men on the moon were taxpayers.
    They didn’t get a lot in return for their involuntary investment.

  25. Habib

    Was it a private sector firm or NASA who put a man on the moon? Mostly private contractors. NASA was basically project management and mission control. Didn’t do too bad a job, which was reflective of government at the time, before it got fat, lazy, stupid, incompetent and intrusive. I doubt they could put a person on a bus these days.

  26. struth

    Was it a private sector firm or NASA who put a man on the moon?

    Paid for by a vibrant world power private sector.
    Supported and serviced by the private sector.
    In the sixties, the united states had small government , especially federally, and now a days, NASA costs much more and they don’t put anything into space.
    Now just another do nothing, bloated, bureaucratic tax hoover.
    Because it was government, and of course still is, Americans are still paying for it.
    It would have happened with private sector far cheaper if there had been reason to go there, if the government did what it used to , with regards to exploration.
    Stay out of it and offer a reward at best.
    Very poor example.

  27. Linden

    NASA actually took the cheapest option which was made from private companies, I once listened to a yank business speaking about that at big to do years ago, and I think you find that is about what happened.

  28. A Lurker

    This is innovative space flight – brought to you by the Free Market.

    As for NASA?
    *crickets*

  29. Squirrel

    It’s far too much to hope for from the never-really-at-fault folk in government, but if one useful thing comes out of this fiasco, the vicious financial penalties available to the ABS will be severely cut back by the Parliament.

    It is very difficult to see why non-compliance with Census requirements can potentially attract a much higher financial penalty than for not voting – people have fought and died for the right to vote, but not, so far as I know, for the right to be surveyed by census takers. As for the various other surveys which the ABS conducts in between census times, there should be no threats and no penalties for non-compliance with those, particularly if the real purpose of such surveys is to provide data which can then be flogged off to commercial users and researchers.

  30. Andrew

    OMG, OldStrangeM0Numbers actually went there! NASA! Yes, the people whose job it was to contract out the delivery of basically 100% of the bits required to do something that Big Govt wanted done.

    Now that our new rakeologist has stepped on that rake, here’s another interesting fact: Under the Kenyan’s “Administration,” NASA has no capability of putting man in space. If they wanted to launch a man into LEO, step 1 is to ring the people running the Soyuz.

    Leftards’ heads explode when I bring this up. They say “but, but – deep space programme, private sector next-gen shuttle, testing from 2017, ready for missions in 2026,…” They even accuse me of lying. But only the Soyuz is available right now for a manned mission of any kind.

  31. yackman

    Strange:
    useful background reading re USA rocketry & NASA are:
    “Flight” – Chris Kraft; “A Fiery Peace” – Sheehan; “Von Braun” – Neufeld.
    As stated above Taxpayer money, Military/ NASA project management, private construction.

  32. Paul

    “Was it a private sector firm or NASA who put a man on the moon?”

    I think it was taxpayers.

  33. mem

    “Also I note taxpayers are to be hosed for treatment of type 2 diabetes patients, the most self-inflicted ailment this side of drug addiction.”
    Be wary of the type 2 statistics. Major alert! My other half being a bit pudgy got hauled over by the GP stand-in young bloke to be included in diabetes testing and preventative counselling exercise. Next thing we know he receives pre-diabetes at risk stuff, next he is addressed as being on the diabetes register, next we receive diabetes magazine plus huge quantity of counselling and information materials including recipes etc sent to us by Diabetes Australia supported by government and asking for donations. My estimate is at least $200 worth of stuff in 6 months arrived. He has never had a blood sugar problem. He is not diabetic nor is judged pre diabetic. What Diabetes Australia has done is take a naturally slightly overweight person, classify them as pre-diabetic then put them on their list and bang oh now they have a new customer that they can call their own and to put pressure on the government to get more money. Multiply this by thousands and I reckon you have your answer to why we have a huge increase in our diabetes problem in Australia. I’m calling this out now and would say at least 20% of their client list are not diabetic or pre-diabetic. Prove me wrong Diabetes Australia? PS Have you seen the size of this organization, it’s a mini UN and about to grow even bigger at our expense! Nothing they can do that a good GP can’t do.

  34. Jim

    I’ve never met anybody in a start-up that is even remotely interested in census data. Whatever the ABS might think it is selling, the hipsters in Surrey Hills won’t be buying it….

  35. strange

    Thanks to all those who commented on NASA. I think what it demonstrates is that innovation doesn’t only occur in one part of the economy, but is frequently reliant on interactions involving the private (technical expertise), and public (military, organisation) sectors. The dogmatism of, It is either a joke or a sad delusion to even suggest a government, or a committee, could be capable of innovation, or providing advice to practical people on how to innovate simply gets in the way of rational analysis.

    For those who argue Under the Kenyan’s “Administration,” NASA has no capability of putting man in space. , might reflect on the fact that it was under good ol’ George W that the Columbia shuttle disaster happened in 2003, which led him to cancel the program in 2004, with effect from 2010.Its a bit hard to launch when you predecessor winds the program down like that. But Andrew could probably launch a shuttle all by himself the way he is beating himself into a frenzy over “the Kenyan”.

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