Socialists everywhere you turn

My wife knows I don’t read The Oz any more so she opened the paper to the page while I sat down to dinner. And on the page there was this: Does the National Broadband Network work? What a question! Initiated by Labor and then taken up by Malcolm, with a pair of socialists responsible for the outcomes you shouldn’t even have to ask. But the newspapers have got to pretend, but it’s hard going. This is the contrast the story will provide.

(1) It’s a huge drain on the nation’s finances and a source of political division and grandstanding.

(2) But Australia’s National Broadband Network is starting to pay dividends for some everyday users.

So what we find are first discussions about what a pile of junk it all is:

The just-released Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman annual report cites a doubling in complaints about the NBN from July last year to July this year. New complaints about faults with NBN services jumped by 147.8 per cent and complaints about NBN connections rose by 63.2 per cent. NBN complaints represent 11.9 per cent of new complaints to the ­ombudsman.

Complaints span all modes of NBN delivery: fibre to the home, fibre to the node, the Sky Muster satellite service and fixed wireless. “But the rate of growth is lower than the growth of active services,” says ombudsman Judi Jones. “Delays in connections, faults including unusable services and dropout of services were regularly reported, which is of concern.”

In the bush, people battle to get NBN satellite connections and suffer prolonged outages and high costs. Being offline in the bush means not only digital isolation but potential safety hazards such as missing a bushfire alert.

All this is contrasted with Mr and Mrs Untypical who have experienced an improvement from their dial-up.

But there are some happy NBN customers. For Geoff Quattromani at The Ponds, in Sydney’s northwest, the NBN transition was effortless. Quattromani and his wife simply walked into a new home with the pre-installed NBN fibre to the home.

In their previous home in Windsor, the family had ADSL1. It forced them to be “picky and choosy” about visiting websites — those with autoplay videos were a no-no. The family could connect online only one device at a time. They couldn’t watch YouTube, and Netflix, subject to pausing and data buffering, was a pain to watch.

Great, they move from the bush to Sydney and find their internet service has improved. Billions of dollars later, we are dealing with possibly the most expensive white elephant ever, but since both sides are complicit, it will remain a political secret. Let me add a couple of comments that follow the story just to round it off.

1) I have had nothing but trouble since connecting to NBN. It is a bit like the little girl with the curl. My main complaint is with the complaints process. The call centre, which sounds as if it is in India, seems incapable of communicating with local service providers. The steps one is asked to perform to get the same advisor do not work and no notice is taken of information one gives to the ‘support person’.

I had a technician working in the Telstra pit outside my home and the Internet and phone ceased working while he was there. He assured me he would check with me before leaving. He did not. It took me a month, several no shows and two technician visits before somebody went to the pit and discovered wrong connections. I was then told I should not attribute the loss of Internet to any action by the technician in the pit.

There is poor communication between Telstra and the NBN and the inability to speak to a local technician is maddening, particularly when one has to identify oneself over the phone with full name, date of birth and drivers licence number every time one communicates with someone with an alias in a call centre.

2) I have fibre to the home in an apartment in inner city Melbourne. After multiple inconvenient and unpredictable contractor visits in the installation process, none of whom seemed to be in communication with the others, I now have a considerably worse service than prior to NBN. There are times when it is so slow during the day that it is impossible to work and frequently the internet drops out altogether. Progress??? i don’t think so. It has been suggested that I should complain to Telstra, but I know the frustration that is involved with that process so I will just battle on with a lesser service than I had before.

It is just socialism “at work” which both parties seem to prefer. And if you think that we will be spared from these idiocies by our journalist class even within our major financial press, right opposite the story on the NBN was another about Cuba, reprinted from The Wall Street Journal, which is about as cluey nowadays as The Economist. The sickening part of the story is how benign the transition appears, as if the past fifty years have not been a horror story of the deepest kind. Two examples.

1) The economy has been hit hard by the decline of Venezuela, its key ally and a source of billions of dollars in free oil for the past decade.

2) “Would a new leader be able to secure legitimacy without free elections?” said Carlos Pagni, a ­renowned Argentine political commentator.

These people are so ignorant that “the decline in Venezuela” is simply isolated from the even greater decline in Cuba. And the notion that the Cuban terrorist government that has existed since the 1950s is in any way concerned with legitimacy is an idiocy almost too breathtaking to believe. Do these people have any idea about anything?

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69 Responses to Socialists everywhere you turn

  1. Zyconoclast

    Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right…

    https://youtu.be/daUytJ6fJzA

  2. they move from the bush to Sydney and find their internet service has improved.

    Lol. They moved from Windsor to The Ponds. A bit long for a jog, but I cycle further every day.
    Both are inside the boundary of the Sydney Metropolitan Taxi Zone (ie. if you jump in a cab anywhere in Sydney the driver cannot refuse a fare to Windsor)
    Both are on the Sydney Metropolitan Commuter Train Network.

    Case Closed.

  3. entropy

    I was at an NBN and natural disaster events meeting the other day. The current copper landline network do not go down if there is an extended power outage and you can still make calls/be contacted.

    Discussions centred on what to do in NBN areas if there is an extended power outage. This a problem because the local back up batteries for the home connection degrade over time, particularly as they are always connected to power most of the time, and therefore might not have any meaningful battery life left when it is actually needed. And of course in major events like a cyclone, the heavy cloud cover and rain means that that loverly big Sky Muster in the sky is useless.

    So the recommendation from the meeting was that people getting NBN in cyclone prone regional areas would be wise to also pay the $30/month to keep their old copper landline.

  4. entropy

    Wait! Someone listens to an Argentine political commentator?

  5. mareeS

    It doesn’t work. I wish we had ADSL2+ back, along with our old landline phone.

  6. So the recommendation from the meeting was that people getting NBN in cyclone prone regional areas would be wise to also pay the $30/month to keep their old copper landline.

    Ex-cuse me?

  7. entropy

    NBN phone and old PMG landline

  8. NBN phone and old PMG landline

    You couldn’t make up this sorta stuff!

  9. Mark A

    Don’t know why the surprise?
    Government enterprises seldom perform.
    Reason? No penalties for failure and no incentive to succeed.

    Try doing it on the open market and see how long you last if you offer overpriced crappy service?

  10. Herodotus

    What was touted as a fantastic NBN speed – 100mbps – can be had via Bigpond cable. It was never, repeat never going to be delivered to every home in Australia via FTTH. It was always going to be the case that a good increase, not necessarily all the way there, could be delivered one day by one means or another, even later generation wireless or satellite.
    The NBN was a big lie that should have been exposed as such from day one.

  11. Diogenes

    One only needs to go onto any of the broadband Whirlpool forums to see what a clustf… the NBN has been.

    If you are on FttN and have temerity to ask for FttP that you want to pay for yourself , it costs 360 for an initial estimate , which comes back in the $30-50k range, and then you have to pay an additional $360 for a more detailed quote

  12. Sydney Boy

    I had NBN in my previous residence. It was great. FTTH from one of the original roll-outs. It stopped working just once, for one day, in 12 months. I have now moved and gone back to ADSL 2+. No real discernible difference. I don’t understand why the government is spending $Bs of our money just so people can download movies from the internet? Sure, institutions such as universities and hospitals probably want really fast internet; and maybe most technology businesses. But the fact is that places like high schools and shopping centres and the average homes does not need super-fast internet.

  13. mundi

    What I can’t believe about the NBN is the way in which the financials are spun.

    They never release a financial roll out position, such as x% spent for y% built. They only release the general year on year accounting information, which is useless.

    As best I can tell, the NBN co. has spent $38b and so far has completed just 22% of network and only has 9% of houses connected. The total spend per customer on the NBN is over $35,000.

  14. mundi

    The funniest part of the NBN buisness case is how it only even remotely stacked up because they just assumed they would be able to charge every house $20/month for 12/1, taking over copper rental.

    Also remember when the NBN buisness case said that wireless only households would ‘level off’ around 12%, they are still growing. We are now at 29% of houses that only have mobile phones, no land line and no land line rental, and 20% of households now have only wireless internet.

    Now keep in mind that telecos like optus are offering $80/month for 200GB on wireless, and when 5G hits this is likely to increase to 1TB per month for $60.

    NBN will be a white elephant, by the time it is finished 40%+ of the population will be wireless only.

  15. Rod W

    I worked for Telstra for over 30 years in the network construction department. When Conroy and Rudd had the gun at Telstra’s head (imposing the NBN concept) back in the late 2000s I wrote to my work colleagues that this could be a very positive step for Telstra. The reasons were (1) the access network is the most troublesome and costly part of the overall network, (2) the prices Telstra was allowed to charge competitors for access (pre-NBN) did not cover full costs so Telstra was subsidising its competitors, (3) handing all that over to NBN and being charged a standard a standard industry fee for access to the line meant that the key to profitability was scale, and Telstra had a massive incumbency advantage.

    And so now we find running a telecommunications (access) network isn’t quite as easy as it must have seemed to Messrs Conroy and Rudd.

    As a bonus I managed to buy big (in my frame of reference, at least) into Telstra near the share price nadir, so now I receive a 31c per share (fully franked) annual dividend on my initial sub-$3 investment. Thanks ALP!

  16. A Lurker

    It doesn’t work. I wish we had ADSL2+ back, along with our old landline phone.

    We don’t have it here yet, is it possible to decline to have it connected?

  17. Entropy

    Now keep in mind that telecos like optus are offering $80/month for 200GB on wireless, and when 5G hits this is likely to increase to 1TB per month for $60.

    NBN will be a white elephant, by the time it is finished 40%+ of the population will be wireless only.

    The Shorten Government’s answer to this inconvenient fact will be obvious. No 5G for you!*

    Unless you are prepared to pay a ruinous access charge.

  18. Entropy

    So the recommendation from the meeting was that people getting NBN in cyclone prone regional areas would be wise to also pay the $30/month to keep their old copper landline.

    Maybe “recommendation” was not the word I should have used, they aren’t that stupid. But it was presented as a wise option.
    It would only last until the old network degrades anyway.

  19. Baldrick

    The just-released Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman annual report cites a doubling in complaints about the NBN from July last year to July this year.

    This is actually a simple fix for the government – redefine the definition of an NBN ‘complaint’. Exclude any criticism relating to NBN performance of service, installation or price and direct the complainant to discuss their issues with their preferred provider.
    NBN complaints should fall dramatically.
    sarc off /

  20. Crossie

    Billions of dollars later, we are dealing with possibly the most expensive white elephant ever,

    All these taxpayer funds and they still offshored the complaints process. I can understand private businesses going offshore, after all it’s their money, but if it’s my money I want the jobs to stay in Australia. How do unions square that circle?

  21. We had the NBN installed recently and while the speed (measured via Ookla) shows a substantial increase in both upload and download, in reality, things don’t appear to be any faster than our previous ADSL2+. Additionally, we have far more downtime and no landline when it goes down. Of course we have mobile, but we had that previously as well.

  22. Rabz

    I now have a considerably worse service than prior to NBN

    But they’ll no doubt keep voting for the greenfilth*, regardless.

    *Yes, I know it’s a labor monstrosity but the greenfilth are fully on board with this type of insanity.

  23. Mike of Marion

    bemused
    #2223390, posted on November 30, 2016 at 8:16 am

    Same with our household

    Most annoying is the loss of home monitoring (security alarm) arrangement that was available on the analogue system.

  24. Neil

    It should be noted that Conroy broke signed OPEL/Optus contracts to bring broadband to regional areas. We are now being sued by Optus because Conroy broke Howard govt contracts

    http://www.techworld.com.au/article/395910/opel_would_serving_bush_broadband_today_turnbull/

    Federal opposition communications spokesman Malcolm Turnbull has used his National Press Club address to argue the decision to scrap the Howard government’s OPEL network for an NBN has denied the bush broadband services over the past three years.

    Turnbull gave familiar arguments against the NBN saying the network is too costly, won’t result in more affordable broadband services and will stifle competition………It is no accident the technologies to be deployed by the NBN are the same as those which would have been used by OPEL. And, had that scheme not been cancelled by Labor in 2008 would today be providing fast broadband to Australians in those areas.

  25. HRT

    1. Conroy agrees to forego his pension and perks in an attempt to make up for his poo storm.

    2. Turnbull agrees Pyne submarines, Obamacare and the NBN are fine examples of the benefits of politicians at play. He too has agreed to pass on the goodies although, he does think a state funeral would be nice.

    3. Baird has ordered a chestful of medals, a high peaked gold encrusted cap and official paper embossed: Premier for Life.

    You read it here first.

  26. Rabz

    The NBN is the most obscene example of governmental obstinacy, stupidity and overreach in this country’s history.

    All work on it should have ceased the day Abbott and his imbeciles assumed government, offering to pay out any contracts that couldn’t be voided.

    It would have been cheaper to do so regardless.

  27. H B Bear

    The NBN is a nice counter balance to KRudd”s greatest policy failure, dismantling Howard’s border protection regime to satisfy the moral vanity of the ALP Left at a cost of 50,000 illegal entrants and $10bn plus in direct costs.

    The real fun will be watching how they continue the fiction that the NBN is a commercial enterprise to keep the tens of billions of dollars of debt off the government balance sheet.

  28. Dr Faustus

    What was touted as a fantastic NBN speed – 100mbps – can be had via Bigpond cable.

    In theory. Ookla tells me 8.6 down, 1.2 up – which appears to be fairly typical inner-city Brisbane.

  29. Entropy

    We had the NBN installed recently and while the speed (measured via Ookla) shows a substantial increase in both upload and download, in reality, things don’t appear to be any faster than our previous ADSL2+. Additionally, we have far more downtime and no landline when it goes down. Of course we have mobile, but we had that previously as well.

    I went from a 3 Mbps ADSL2+ connection to 115 Mbps cable. Truth is that for a lot of web pages and smaller files there isn’t much difference except maybe snappier. Even skype or FaceTime which has good quality compression it isn’t that different unless you go full screen.the times you really notice the difference is streaming movies, where there is less compression, and downloading large files (Chanel BT for example). My meter rarely shows more than 6 or 7 Mbps downloading web pages, around 10 when streaming an SD movie, and the only time I max out to 115 Mbps would be when downloading system upgrades or iOS apps from Apple servers.

    The big difference that NBN internet brings is actually for cloud service users because the higher upload speeds would make storing your home movies and photos on the cloud less time consuming. Definitely a good return for the billions and billions of dollars. /sarc.

  30. Ant

    With the exception of 2 journalists who I recall writing scathing attacks on the monumentally useless Vic desal plant ($6B build; $28B lease over 3 decades), most of the rest pretty much went along with the propaganda that, firstly, it was critical to the state’s wellbeing because the then drought was “the new normal” coz Global Warming!, and secondly, when the rains inevitably returned, that the desal was a critical and useful bit of infrastructure necessary as “insurance” for the next drought.

    Oh, and dams “don’t work!”, even though without them Melbourne would never have existed.

    (Those two journos were Kenneth Davidson, old commie from The Age and Terry McCrann.)

    The desal plant was the ultimate litmus test for stupidity, and Labor got away with it.

    Bring on the NBN!

  31. Entropy

    Dr Faustus
    #2223421, posted on November 30, 2016 at 8:44 am
    What was touted as a fantastic NBN speed – 100mbps – can be had via Bigpond cable.

    In theory. Ookla tells me 8.6 down, 1.2 up – which appears to be fairly typical inner-city Brisbane.

    You might need to reset your connection. Turn off your modem router, disconnect the power and the coaxial cable, wait thirty seconds before reconnecting everything and turning it on again. I find this resets your IP and for some reason that seems to once again allow higher speed. I think it is a problem with cable, it can get congested and for some reason new connections end up getting priority, or something. Maybe Telstra hates online gamers, of which master entropy is a dedicated participant. Anyhow works for me.

  32. Entropy

    The key is disconnecting the coax, not just the power.

  33. Dr Faustus

    The key is disconnecting the coax, not just the power.

    Thanks. I will try that now.

    I had a very pleasant conversation this morning with an Indian call centre operator about Australia’s Test chances against Pakistan – he neglected to suggest that step.

  34. Cris

    I have had NBN fibre to the home for several months. When working it is about same as ADSL. The fitment was not as previously advised as no back up power source was provided. Internet and phone now fail with mains power. Significant outage occurs about twice per month due to “issues” never adequately explained. This would be perhaps acceptable if fault management was adequate which it is not. It is impracticable to have useful fault finding discussion with Australian technical staff. As helpful as they invariably try to be offshore shop front staff (when you can get through) appear unable to help in most cases. Yesterday while the current ongoing “issue” with NBN continues (in southern NSW). I was advised by aforesaid shop front 1. that current “issue” was not the cause of my dysfunction so further help is now “out of scope.” 2. If I purchased “Telstra Platinum Support Plan” @ $180 pa extra, life would be better.

  35. There are years and years of delicious salty tears ahead for those of us who were mocked and sneered at years ago when we told people what a disaster the NBN would be. Now, one-by-one as they are connected, disconnected, connected again, disconnected for a month for “upgrades to the line” and then finally get a working service which is not much better than an ADSL2+ copper connection I laugh in their faces and say those three delicious words; “TOLD YA SO”.

    This line from here sums up the clusterfuck best;
    “unlike say The Apollo Program or Three Gorges Dam, the NBN – if it is ever completed – will not be admired or marvelled at but ridiculed, mocked and an international embarrassment.”
    Of course, with the spineless panty wetting pansies of the LNP, the left will be allowed to re-write the narrative that the NBN was on course to be the greatest technological achievement of the 21st Century but was ruined by the mean, nasty LNP and AbbottAbbottAbbott.

    Any half decent Government would hang this albatross round the neck of Labor and parade them through the streets on a daily basis shouting out “Shame Socialism. Shame!” then use it as the reason to defund and demolish every single Government program introduced since 2007 and shut down every lefty institution (AHRC, ABC, yartz) to pay for the money already wasted on pink batts, BER, NBN etc.

    Instead the Liberal fucksticks pick up the stinking carcass, sling it over their shoulders and then get flogged by the opposition and MSM for walking too slowly.
    SFL (STUPID. FUCKING. LIBERALS)

  36. Tel

    The problem of the Telstra contractor in the pit who disconnects your copper then does a runner has been a consistent problem with all copper connections in Australia for the past 20 years.

    The fundamental problem is that the copper connections were structured as a centralized monopoly from the start and basically that’s never changed. Then there’s government price fixing to add insult to injury.

  37. .

    Just remember old Uncle Dot said: at least 250bn AUD + and it will never be completed.

  38. Tel

    As best I can tell, the NBN co. has spent $38b and so far has completed just 22% of network and only has 9% of houses connected. The total spend per customer on the NBN is over $35,000.

    Yeah, looks pretty sad.

    Their argument against that is to say that accelerating economies of scale exist. For example, the software for provisioning, tracking, and billing needs only to be built once. Training programs and operating procedures can get refined and settled in. Having said that, there’s a number of limitations:

    * There’s absolutely no economy of scale on the physical labour of putting cables in the ground, connecting up customers, nor on the ongoing maintenance of the physical layer.

    * With a “mix of technologies” approach you still don’t get economies of scale at the training & procedural level because you have: satellite, wireless, copper, fiber each of which is a whole different animal. I should also point out that the mix is unavoidable given the Australian geography.

    * Even at best estimate, suppose a factor of 10 improvement might bring the per-customer cost from $35,000 down to maybe $3,500 it’s still kind of expensive, and frankly pretty hopeful to think such massive gains are available.

  39. The big difference that NBN internet brings is actually for cloud service users because the higher upload speeds would make storing your home movies and photos on the cloud less time consuming. Definitely a good return for the billions and billions of dollars.

    I store everything on external portable drives. I wouldn’t trust storing anything in the ‘cloud’.

  40. JohnA

    bemused #2223390, posted on November 30, 2016, at 8:16 am

    We had the NBN installed recently and while the speed (measured via Ookla) shows a substantial increase in both upload and download, in reality, things don’t appear to be any faster than our previous ADSL2+. Additionally, we have far more downtime and no landline when it goes down. Of course we have mobile, but we had that previously as well.

    I don’t want to say “I told you so” but this outcome was predicted. 🙂

    Right from the beginning, it was explained that making internet access faster within Australia was not going to do anything for perceived speed or actual downloads from overseas connections.

    The fraud of the Conroy/Rudd re-nationalisation plan was that they won an election by over-trumping (with a completely unsubstantiated “big number”) the Coalition plan to upgrade the backbone network and let private competition deal with delivery to consumers.

  41. .

    Indeed John A. All hail Uncle Dot’s forecasting skillz.

  42. Anything initiated by Labor was going to be a cluster and when Lord Waffleworth took over it was a ‘lay down misère’.

  43. johanna

    The NBN is available where I live, and I constantly get junk mail from providers trying to sell it.

    Thing is, when I do the sums, it is more expensive than my current arrangements, and since I am not a gamer and don’t want to download movies or pron, it is irrelevant.

    That may change, but meanwhile my wireless broadband and mobile phone are doing everything I need.

  44. The only real benefit we did get from the NBN is that our internet is now $40/month cheaper and a Telstra TV box was thrown in for free.

  45. Senile Old Guy

    We had the NBN installed recently and while the speed (measured via Ookla) shows a substantial increase in both upload and download, in reality, things don’t appear to be any faster than our previous ADSL2+. Additionally, we have far more downtime and no landline when it goes down. Of course we have mobile, but we had that previously as well.

    Distinct improvement for me as the ADSL2+ was constantly going slow and breaking down. Once the NBN was connected, I have had perhaps 2 outages, and one of those was actually due to a day long power outage. The NBN worked until the batteries ran down.

  46. I haven’t been getting my bills from Telstra – via email – and was surprised to see a late payment fee of $15 arrive yesterday.
    Rang the Telstra mob, waited 15 minutes and eventually got Indian call centre. Wanted all my details again, and I couldn’t understand 2/5 of what the girl was saying. Eventually I gave up in disgust – asked to speak to her supervisor. Put on hold for 28 minutes and was then told supervisor unavailable.
    I know when I’m being dicked around and hung up.
    Telstra has just lost another customer.

  47. That experience doesn’t sound like a wrong number Winston. I’d say it certainly was Telstra that you called.

  48. Diogenes

    I will be roughly $40 a month better off with the plan I intend getting (same price, faster, more download and phone calls thrown in). Apart from the financial benefit I will get most benefit by increased upload speeds. Due to the Great Firewall of Redfern (aka the departmental poxy server) a lot of what I need to upload to our LMS and student work will not work at school so I do it from home

    However FttN will not solve my biggest cause of speed drops on ADSL2. I have an elevated joint and every so often (quarterly) have to open it up, give a good spray with insecticide & remove the ant colony that has taken up residence. What I am not looking forward to is the RSP – ‘not us, try the NBN’, NBN, not us try the RSP’, Rsp , ‘no seriously not us , try Telstra’, Telstra ‘not us contact your RSP’ treadmill.

  49. Antipodean

    With global satellite high speed internet emerging as a viable technology, the NBN get more rediculous by the day.

    SpaceX Satellite Net

  50. johanna

    When I worked in telecommunications in government, one of the biggest sources of angry letters to the Minister was duckshoving between infrastructure providers and service providers. Obviously, the Commonwealth couldn’t investigate and adjudicate all of those complaints.

    I don’t know what the answer is. The Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman (TIO) goes some way towards it, but there are still lots of unhappy punters out there.

  51. JC

    I have a friend who’s renovating an apartment at the moment. He also owns an apartment in London where they spend a decent part of the year. He pays around STG80 a month for the internet supplied through optic cable.

    He so dissatisfied with the service here that he’s having a dedicated optic fiber fed through the conduit in the building that will cost him $1200 per month and won’t be any faster than what he’s getting in London.

    That’s socialism.

  52. Aldrydd

    We are lucky (?) enough to have the wireless version of the NBN. We did hold out with ADSL for as long as we could, but the service deteriorated to a point where we switched. Our NBN service is now worse than the ADSL was prior to swapping over, we can’t even watch Netflix without it buffering.

    Even better is the fact that Ericsson didn’t test the equipment for Australian conditions, so when we get a thunderstorm and the accompanying lightning strike, it takes out the hardware and we are without internet for a week or so until they get around to coming and fixing/replacing everything. This has happened three times in just over 12 months.

    I work in Brisbane during the week and have ADSL2+ here which is faster & far more reliable (bizarrely enough I get NBN 2 hours north of Brisbane but can’t get it in the inner Brisbane suburbs). I curse the day the NBN was ever drawn on the back of a napkin/beer coaster, the bastards!

  53. Rohan

    bemused
    #2223390, posted on November 30, 2016 at 8:16 am
    We had the NBN installed recently and while the speed (measured via Ookla) shows a substantial increase in both upload and download, in reality, things don’t appear to be any faster than our previous ADSL2+.

    I had ADSL, not the ADSL2+ and now have a 25/5 FTTP connection which put me $800 out of pocket to have connected to my existing network as it required significant rewiring and power run to the NTD. There’s no perceptible difference during peak times and I’ve found out why. My work uses an ISP that runs an independent small fibre network. They told me the NBN charge a wholesale rate of $14 per Mb bandwidth per month (unlimited data). That’s not a typo. $14/Mb/month.

    So the retailers, who need to run at a profit, load up as many customers to their nodes as their equipment can handle. They are so heavily contested, when everyone is watching netflix or playing online etc, it screeches to a halt. Sure, my NBN is excellent at 3am, but I’m not a night owl.

    Well done Kevni and Chairman Mall. F..kwitts the pair of them.

  54. H B Bear

    Indeed John A. All hail Uncle Dot’s forecasting skillz.

    Dotty talking about yourself in the third person is an early warning sign of getting yourself turfed.

    Don’t say H B Bear didn’t warn you.

  55. thefrolickingmole

    At home now Im quite happy compared to be raped up the ass with rusty barbed wire my pre satalite days with the internet.

    Satellite with 60GB, good speed (with delays) and a few sites that wont load (Blairs) for $55 a month as opposed to paying $100 for 10GB of crappy wireless data. (the only other option)

    None of which justifies spending untold billions, plus the lefties latest line is “Its only so expensive because of Lib changes to St Kevins original plan…

  56. Stan

    Wow, $50BN so people can watch Youtube and Netflix. Well worth the investment.

  57. Stan
    #2223820, posted on November 30, 2016 at 3:32 pm
    Wow, $50BN so people can watch Youtube and Netflix. Well worth the investment.

    Don’t forget Stan…Stan.

  58. Snake Charmer

    Do these people have any idea about anything?

    If you look carefully at their foreheads, they all share a distinct birthmark that reads, I.H.N.F.I. It’s there, you just have to look really closely!

  59. EB

    Lucky dip really, thankfully I got lucky. If you were out in a regional area like me you were paying $99 for unlimited ADSL and phone and it was awful, everytime it rained the internet was gone. I assume water was working its magic somewhere.

    Was one of the last places to get FTTP, now pay $99 for unlimited 100/40 which is basically 90/35. Pay nothing for calls now either. Haven’t had an issue in whole 18 months. The speed and reliability is mindblowing vs the crap I used to deal with. However, I work in the postcode next door, where the majority of businesses in the area are, somewhere that wasn’t on the FTTP rollout map.

  60. Cannibal

    Just remember old Uncle Dot said: at least 250bn AUD + and it will never be completed

    .

    150bn in 2013

    That’s inflation for you.
    😀

  61. mareeS

    We have gone backwards from ADSL2+ since being moved over to NBN.

    Not only is our connection poorer, the service of NBN in rectifying problems is spectularly, abysmally, atrociously 3rd world.

    NBN is now an unfixable dogs’ breakfast bleeding the budget.

    Wait for the final rollout of the disability scheme, just to add to the fun.

  62. Malcolm

    This is an outrageous defamation against Malcolm Turnbull. It is well known and a fact that Turnbull did his best to halt the NBN. Blame Conroy and Rudd, not Turnbull. The Labor Government left a Gordian Knot impossible to stop contracts and Turnbull has saved the taxpayers billions of dollars. He didn’t want the NBN, but as Kates should know (he is supposed to be an economist isn’t he), it’s a damn sunk cost. Get your facts right Kates.

  63. .

    250 bn is where my predictions ended up. Plus with inflation it would be much more!

  64. Tel

    The Labor Government left a Gordian Knot impossible to stop contracts and Turnbull has saved the taxpayers billions of dollars.

    Really?!?

    Who signed those contracts? What were they backed by?

  65. Malcolm

    Stephen Conroy signed the contracts. They are a formal agreement by the Government of Australia. Do you expect the Commonwealth to rip up contracts? In any case the Australian Constitution provides for compensation. No, Turnbull’s hands were tied by the previous government.

  66. True socialism would replace the capitalist economy we live in now and replace it fully with a socialist one.

  67. cynical1

    Look on the bright side.

    The teleconference system is wonderful.

    We must be saving lots on those pollies not needing to travel overseas for meetings…

  68. CraigS

    I tried for 3 months to get a commercial building in Townsville connected.

    We are talking a two story 1000 sq metre building, NBN couldn’t find it in their system.

    I sent them the letter they sent to the property owner saying the NBN was available, I sent them the rates notice, there were 5 site visits.

    In the end they asked me to tell them what the building was called in their system, how am I supposed to the know that?

    I gave up and set the building up using wireless 4G.

    Just reminded me of the bad old days of Telecom.

  69. CraigS

    I tried for 3 months to get a commercial building in Townsville connected.

    We are talking a two story 1000 sq metre building, NBN couldn’t find it in their system.

    I sent them the letter they sent to the property owner saying the NBN was available, I sent them the rates notice, there were 5 site visits.

    In the end they asked me to tell them what the building was called in their system, how am I supposed to the know that?

    I gave up and set the building up using wireless 4G.

    Just reminded me of the bad old days of Telecom.

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