Cross Post: John Adams The coming storm

The election of Donald Trump has increased Australia’s strategic vulnerability in the Asia-Pacific region.

Trump’s policy of ‘America first’ and his doctrine of policy unpredictability has caused significant alarm among America’s traditional allies who rely on America for military protection and to guarantee global stability.

This includes Australia which has relied on America since Churchill left Australia to the fate of Japan in 1942 after the fall of Singapore.

In particular, Trump has publicly criticised America’s open ended protection of Japan and South Korea suggesting either a request for additional financial compensation or a military withdrawal from the region.

Trump has also provoked China both diplomatically through initiating direct communications with Taiwan as well as economically through a confrontational trade agenda and the appointment of aggressive trade representatives.

As a result of increased economic and military regional uncertainty, Paul Keating and Penny Wong have called for a rethink of the American alliance and a shift towards greater economic and diplomatic engagement in Asia.

However, the rise of Chinese power and their quest for regional hegemony coupled with the decline of America’s global presence has been entirely predictable for years.

As a policy advisor to Senator Sinodinos (now Cabinet Secretary) in 2012-13, Sinodinos and I had several conversations regarding the US Government’s disastrous financial position and the unsustainability of its global military footprint.

Much like the Roman and British empires or the Soviet Union, an over extended government will ultimately collapse financially or cede large swaths of territory in a protracted military confrontation.

Obama and the US Congress have left the American economy weak and the federal government in financial ruins.

For example, under Obama, the American economy grew at a paltry 1.46% per annum against a long‑term average of 3.35% (1930 – 2015).

Moreover, according to the US Congressional Budget Office, the US Government, under Obama, has doubled its gross debt to $US 19.9 trillion and is budgeted to deliver 10 years of future deficits. Gross federal debt is projected to reach $US 28.2 trillion in 2026.

Obama’s debt and deficits were financially possible through controversial ultra-low interest rates and three rounds of quantitative easing, resulting in the US Federal Reserve and other government agencies now holding $US 5.49 trillion of US Treasury Bonds.

Yet despite these extraordinary monetary interventions, the US Government was still required to pay $US 433 billion in interest expenses in FY 2015-16.

Given this situation, Trump’s campaign assessment that America cannot afford to be the policeman of the world without adequate financial compensation is both nationalistically necessary and realistic.

Whilst Prime Minister Turnbull remains publicly confident that America will supplement Australia’s national security infrastructure, Trump has multiple contradictory policy positions which are both economically and financially unsustainable that challenge this assumption.

For example, Trump has repeatedly warned that Americans are trapped in a large financial bubble through ‘politically manipulated’ low interest rates and that interest rates need to rise.

Alternatively, Trump’s economic plan assumes an annual real growth rate of 4 per cent per annum and is built on corporate and personal income tax cuts larger than the George W Bush tax cuts, record infrastructure spending and a significant expansion in the size of the US military, while leaving social welfare and health care entitlements untouched.

Raising interest rates is unlikely to generate Trump’s planned 4 per cent real economic growth given the indebtedness of US corporations and households which combined stands at over $US 19 trillion.

Moreover, Trump’s budget plan will likely explode the size of the US Government’s budget deficit, requiring global investors to fund additional debt while simultaneously needing to meet higher interest costs on existing debt.

Trump’s plan is unsustainable, particularly as since the US elections there has been a significant international sell-off in the global bond market, which is driving up long term interest rates.

In the final equation, in order to resolve these contradictions Trump will either need to insist on the US Federal Reserve reversing course and artificially suppressing interest rates again through further rounds of quantitative easing which would risk the US dollar’s reserve currency status, or Trump will be required to scale back his budgetary and America’s military commitments.

Either way, Australia cannot place any long-term faith in America’s military protection.

Australia’s elites have for years falsely assured the Australian people that Australia’s national security is well in hand. The reality is that the nation is not economically, financially, militarily, diplomatically or psychologically prepared for a world without America’s defence shield.

Australia’s current predicament was entirely foreseeable. The gross incompetence of Australia’s elites has led to failed national leadership.

John Adams is a former Coalition Advisor. This op-ed was first published in the Daily telegraph.

This entry was posted in Cross Post. Bookmark the permalink.

60 Responses to Cross Post: John Adams The coming storm

  1. feelthebern

    As a policy advisor to Senator Sinodinos

    Is it true that Uncle Arthur liked nothing better than an Eddie Obeid golden shower?

  2. incoherent rambler

    As a policy advisor to Senator Sinodinos…

    I stopped reading there.

    What a load of twittish garbage.

  3. If the US is no longer acting as global hegemon, then its reserve currency status will end.

  4. Clinton

    initiating direct communications with Taiwan

    I had read, seen and heard that Mr Trump answered a phone call from the president of Taiwan.
    He never initiated anything with them.

    As he implied afterwards, since when does China determine who an American can talk to on the phone?

  5. A Lurker

    Scare mongering article, I suspect that if Australia was threatened, the US would indeed come to our aid as well as Britain and Canada.

  6. rickw

    What a load of rubbish!

    The real issues identified are the consequences of Obama and the Democrats.

    Rather than a threat, Trump represents a best possible outcome for Australia to the whole malaise, the only down side is that we will probably be required to pull our weight.

    If this represents some sort of considered strategic analysis, we are rooted, not because of Trump, but because we are bereft of any sort of intelligence and insight.

  7. John Carpenter

    To the $20 trillion in federal debt add;$3 trillion in state and local debt;$7 trillion in the unfunded pension liabilities of government employees;$46 trillion in the unfunded future contributions to social security,medicare and medicaid for a grand total of $76 trillion not counting the off balance sheet debt of agencies like Fanny and Freddie.Social Security a key pillar of the new deal is expected to run out of money by 2035.

  8. Wal of Ipswich

    Speculation on future world affairs is fine for those suffering from attention deficit disorder. But the glib reference to Churchill abandoning Australia is a stretch: he was rather busy at the time and the British did lose two capital ships sent to Singapore’s defence. Denigration of the UK’s support of Australia is generally the job of the Curtin fellators in the ALP.

  9. mem

    The author keeps referring to Trump’s economic plan. I don’t recall Trump releasing such a plan. But I have been camping so may have missed it? Trump isn’t even inaugurated yet so I’d be holding back with all the conjecture.The author also seems very excited about something. A bex and a good lie down might help.

  10. Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker!) Gray

    What are you complaining about? We’ll just ask China to come in to protect us from those border-changing Indonesians! We’ll love being a protectorate of China, as they’ll buy up all our coal, and our uranium. And many of them speak English. No worries Comrade-mate!

  11. struth

    Who is this wanker?
    Firstly, of course a couple of communists want us to have closer ties with China. That chap Wong and Puller Keating.
    He does understand that it is a necessary move to ask the allies to get off their lazy, parasitic butts……fair enough.
    But can you see the mindset that the liberals have?
    This bloke has it in spades.
    They just don’t believe that less taxation will in the long run create more revenue.
    He just doesn’t believe it and is looking for anything he can pull from under a rock to prove it.
    They argue from a position far removed from the political ideology of the right.
    So they are confused, and therefore weak and irrelevant.

    Whilst Prime Minister Turnbull remains publicly confident that America will supplement Australia’s national security infrastructure, Trump has multiple contradictory policy positions which are both economically and financially unsustainable that challenge this assumption.

    When it comes to “both economically and financially unsustainable” the Liberals like this chap, ARE.
    You are that monster, sir.
    The Don hasn’t even come to office yet.
    Stop shitting yourself about Trump showing you guys up for the incompetents you are.
    Accept it.
    It’s only just started.
    Shape up or ship out.

  12. stackja

    Hasluck wrote both WSC and FDR wanted the help in Burma, FDR offered 41st American Division, then SWPA under MacArthur. WSC did not have any real say.

  13. dweezy2176

    When this missive hit the Keating, Wong button I felt a “golden shower” coming on but involving “Arfur” and some context of knowledge .. the cold tap took over! ..no idea how it ended but with these 3 “experts” involved … “agilile & innovative” ……. duuuuuuuh!

  14. old bloke

    Paul Keating and Penny Wong have called for a rethink of the American alliance and a shift towards greater economic and diplomatic engagement in Asia.

    I’m sure that Bob Carr and Sam Dastyari would agree with Keating and Wong.

    The reality is that the nation is not economically, financially, militarily, diplomatically or psychologically prepared for a world without America’s defence shield.

    Correct, so why are we spending $50 Billion for French submarines which we may see sometime in the future when we could have leased US Virginia class submarines now?

  15. ella answer-key

    If Clinton had been elected Australia would be in an impossible position.

    The Green/Labor/Liberal Alliance has been sending taxpayers money to the Clinton campaign. Where did the cash go from there? Was it into the Clinton Foundation where the Grifters skim the top and send the rest through to the Fabian communists, along with the rest of the rights of the American people Obama has been slowly transferring to the UN.

    Banging the war drums with Russia was another Obama/Clinton brainwave.

    There is the idea floating around that the Chinese have an alliance with the Russians. Does anyone know if this is true?

    Who would Australian soldiers be fighting for if Clinton had become President? The Fabian communists in the United Nations?

  16. Barry

    Time to go nuclear.

    In the 1960’s, we were ready to go. Lucas Heights and the delivery system (F-111s), but we didn’t go through with it. Time for a re-think.

  17. incoherent rambler

    Time to go nuclear.

    A bit hasty.

    I would allow Canberra one more government before nuking it.

  18. jupes

    This clown shows just how deeply ingrained the stupid is within the Liberal Party.

    The Donald offers opportunity. Maybe not so much for crony-capitalists such as Arfur but that too is win / win for the humble taxpayer.

  19. JohnA

    As a result of increased economic and military regional uncertainty, Paul Keating and Penny Wong have called for a rethink of the American alliance and a shift towards greater economic and diplomatic engagement in Asia.

    So these two left-leaners are frothing at the mouth for a change in direction. Along with a couple of other responders, I believe that this indicates only one policy response, first uttered in the Pacific War:

    “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!”

  20. Robber Baron

    Adviser to the Turnbull Coalition Team…ha ha ha ha…oh dear, why would any sane person put that on their CV? That’s career poison. Just say you worked at Bunnings or Woolies stacking shelves. At least it proves you are prepared to work in a shitty job. Adviser to Sinodinos…ha ha…still can’t stop laughing.

  21. Mique

    Our “coalition advisor” should consider recent history and ponder on the difference, if any, of Trump’s policy and Nixon’s Guam Doctrine of 1969. We’ve survived that, so we should manage under Trump.

  22. louis

    Paul Keating has been calling for a rethink of the American alliance and a shift towards greater economic and diplomatic engagement in Asia….since the 1980s!

    I assume this chap is too young to remember PM Keating. I don’t know why people put any weight into ‘adviser to X politician’. Almost all advisers are nothing more than family, friends, mates and party hacks (young liberal and young Labor kids straight out of uni, sometimes not even). Ministers advisers are the prime example of who you know, not what you know.

  23. King Koala

    Senator Sinodinos

    That wanker should be in a cell next door to Obeid.

  24. Stan

    Have I accidentally linked to The Onion?

  25. Mother Lode

    It is as if the Libs want to scare us into voting for them. “The Reaper is near, but you can cower behind us!”

    Not that different to Labor or the Greens.

    I am lookink for a party that offers me my freedoms, and which has articulted a plan that I can trust.

  26. Penny

    Soon as I read the name Sinodinos I gave up

  27. ella answer-key

    Right to life, right to defend that life; right to free speech are not at the whim or offering of politicians. These righrs are inalienable.

    A Constitution does not confer, it protects.

    Australians need a Constitution that protectss our rights from infringment by the government.

    If it is not obvious now, it will be very soon.

  28. Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker!) Gray

    Why doesn’t some libertarian scientist breed a cold-water crocodile that could flourish in Melbourne? Let them into the wild and claim it’s just natural selection. Then people will arm themselves against aggressive wildlife, and bureaucrats!

  29. Rev. Archibald

    Thanks for this post.
    It is a pretty good insight as to why the liberals are fucked.
    You fucking clown.

  30. Boambee John

    Wal at 1437,

    Churchill also sent an extra British division to Singapore, and thus to the prison camps.

    Once the British and US lost control of the seas around Singapore, Malaya, the Philippines and the NEI, no number of additional ground troops sent to Singapore would do more than boost the final number of prisoners.

  31. Dr Faustus

    The gross incompetence of Australia’s elites has led to failed national leadership.

    Hard to fault that…

  32. alexnoaholdmate

    Just a note, JohnA, but the expression “Damn the torpedoes, full steam ahead!” dates back to David Farragut and the Civil War. The “torpedoes” referred to were floating Confederate mines.

  33. Entropy

    Must rely on own defence: stop $50b on yet to be designed dieselbarracudas over fifty years and buy of the shelf Virginia class nukes right now. savings $25b or so. Better defence, and cheaper. Sounds like winning!
    Higher interest rates will discourage frivolous spending, more savings and investment. More winning.
    No more money to buy access and future employment opportunities for the bishop via Clinton foundation. Another half bill saving. Moar winning! Moar!

  34. Machaggis

    Nothing to see here. Like all the rest, absolutely no idea what the Donald will do when he gets started. In the meantime all the pontification from all the know-alls of left and right are just “blowing in the wind”. He will not be as bad as many make out nor as good as many hope. He has to get through congress and if they don’t like it, it won’t happen if they like it then Congress bears the burden along with him and the mob can’t complain.

  35. Chester Draws

    Everything ends. Few saw the Soviets collapsing. But overspending is a curse that brings countries to their knees.

    Yet all the comments here think the US will be able to spend beyond its means forever.

    Dream on!

    It might not happen under Trump, but soon enough the US will have to rein in their desire to fight everyone who so much as sneezes at them.

  36. Tim Neilson

    For example, Trump has repeatedly warned that Americans are trapped in a large financial bubble through ‘politically manipulated’ low interest rates and that interest rates need to rise. …
    Trump’s plan is unsustainable, particularly as since the US elections there has been a significant international sell-off in the global bond market, which is driving up long term interest rates.

    In other words, Trump understands economic reality, and the author doesn’t.

  37. Jo Smyth

    This article should be in the Guardian. Is it a test piece.

  38. entropy

    Yet all the comments here think the US will be able to spend beyond its means forever.

    No one can. The point is that regardless, we should stop being so dependent on them, and learn to stand on our own. So for example, defense spending should be about and for defense, not sheltered workshops in the mendicant state.

    the most lethality at the lowest price.

  39. Ross B

    Imagine if the ALP wanted for the political optics to hand the keys to all of Greater Sunrise over to Timor-Leste walk-in walk-out. Then imagine Turnbull not wanting to be painted as the villainous bandit to Steve Kates perfect Tweety Bird in Timor. Then, stick with me, a certain nation that we cannot mention in case we offend someone, decides we’re as weak as water, the RAN is a con, ANZUS ain’t worth a pinch, and declare they actually own their own piece of Greater Sunrise given new maps of a surprising new continental shelf movement on maps never before seen. Then what?
    Fantasy stuff, but if we repeatedly show you’re as weak as water in every negotiation, have no military teeth of any note, and a budget position in tatters….

  40. Paul Farmer

    Yes its wake up call time for our US Alliance but I am growing tired of people writing off the United States Alliance in that its just inevitable we have to forget them and go some other mystical Asian way and forge more links with other Asian nations. And I am growing tired of these comparisons of the US to Ancient Rome. Even Rome took hundreds of years to collapse and a large part of it was a loss of belief in what they stood for……Trump whether you agree with him or not at least recognizes what he stands for.

    Its also just a little premature to write off the US just yet when every major technology company in the world is based in Silicon valley and you can put every Navy in the world together and it wont even then add up to anywhere near being close to the US’s 11 Carrier strike fleets. China is trying to close the gap in military and nuclear by subterfuge but that is why Trump is over with just constantly giving them a leg up through the World trading system. This is the angle that all the people who just keep banging on about free trade for free trade’s own sake often forget about. People should read Peter Navarro’s recent book – who Trump chose to be one of his trade advisors, called “Crouching Tiger” if they want to get a feel for just how much China are building arms and why changing tact if we are to take the threat seriously is imminently sensible.

    No one ever actually ever articulates either exactly what “Getting closer to Asia” actually means in terms of details. Politicians like Rudd and Keating have built careers on it but without little substantive detail other than to just join more regional talk fests like APEC. But how the rhetoric translates into changing foreign policy and defence policy positions is never articulated and moreover we can subverting our own defence policy to create industry handouts in states too lazy to encourage proper industry competition themselves.

    On the point of realism , who else is even remotely comparable in this region if we move away from the US Alliance ? I mean give me a break…………..the second and more valid point is we share largely the same values as the US, we are not communist totalitarian dictatorship……..so I frankly am not interested one jot in being more friendly and closer with Asia and more so China either, I want someone who at least I share some values with and if the Chinese at some point in the next hundred years push for regional hegemony….and they will, there is at least someone upon whom we are aligned who might be willing and able to help…………proviso being of course we stop this dicking around and actually start taking the defence of our own country seriously……….Time for people to grow up and not take our liberty for granted is at the core of Trump’s message to international partners of the US and his is on the money and I can only hope that penny starts dropping in the some of the empty heads who inhabit Canberra.

  41. tgs

    In the 1960’s, we were ready to go.

    Pretty sure Aus didn’t get F-111s til the 70s.

    Also, discretionary military spending by the US could be reined in and made more efficient but the real cause of their fiscal woes is not military spending but unfunded non-discretionary items like medicare, pensions, etc.

  42. John Carpenter

    Paul Farmer is going to be waiting a long time for Australian’s to take the defence of our sovereignty seriously.Both the LNP and the ALP regard the defence of our country as a milch cow.Just look at the stupid,wasteful major weapons acquisition programs both have approved ever since the advent of the Collins tubs.

  43. Zulu Kilo Die Onuitspeeklike

    Pretty sure Aus didn’t get F-111s til the 70s.

    First ordered 1963, not delivered until 1973.

  44. Roger

    The gross incompetence of Australia’s elites has led to failed national leadership.

    The lucky country’s luck as run out.

  45. Monkey's Uncle

    Scare mongering article, I suspect that if Australia was threatened, the US would indeed come to our aid as well as Britain and Canada.

    I believe that if Australia was ever under threat a Trump administration would likely come to our aid. The difference is that Trump would make extensive demands in exchange for any assistance offered. So really, the question is probably not can Australia cope with a world without US protection?. Rather, it is can Australia (or others such as Europe) cope with a world where US protection will come at a vastly higher price?

    Trump is a complete pragmatist and utilitarian whose moral philosophy largely boils down to how can maximum benefits from every transaction be gained for Donald J. Trump? and who has just been elected on a platform of America has been the world’s patsy for too long! No more! The thought of Australia’s senior government ministers, public servants and security and defence establishment being schooled by the Donald in The Art of the Deal is enough to fill anyone with dread.

  46. Chris M

    Have I accidentally linked to The Onion?

    I suspect it is Sinclair’s evil sense of humour at play here.

    Can we get an article from Gillard next please?

  47. Adelagado

    Sinodinos should be in jail. Anyone who would use his name to booster his own authority must be a dickhead.

  48. Nato

    I’m heartened by previous commenters that the Dunning Kruger effect isn’t as cool at the Cat as some editorial decisions would suggest.
    From the results that Trump has pulled from nowhere, that all the political blahblah fiends have been so eloquent in pronouncing to be DooooomeD, can’t we try seeing what effect comes?
    As William Hill said in a similar I Lack The Ability To Think At Trump’s Level article at Spectator “You want one thing, you ask for another and you settle for another” and while quoting, might as well reference Scott Adams’ observation that Trump literally wrote the book on effective negotiations.
    I suspect that Donald Trump is as smart as Kevin Rudd thinks Kevin Rudd is and am looking forward to the spill-over effects to Western civilization from a resurgent US under Trump.

  49. Oh come on

    This most conventional of conventional wisdom is what the Inner Party members in Canberra are nervously whispering about? LOL what a ship of fools.

    Look, the US government has a 20 trillion dollar debt, sure. It also has a 20 trillion dollar economy. US debt is not trivial, but it is far from unmanageable, either. Nor is it growing at an unsustainable rate, and it should start being paid down in real terms within the next decade or two.

    Now China – the country that the author and many others seem to think should be our new best friends and protectors in Asia – now their public debt is mindblowing. I keep saying 240% of GDP, but that’s just the official number. It’s probably far higher. And it’s increasing at an accelerating pace. If the author is concerned that the US will not be fiscally able to maintain a military footprint in Asia sufficient to protect Australia should we require it, then he has nothing to fear from China, which will struggle to afford batteries for the PLA’s walkie-talkies – let alone the sort of foreign military adventures that could conceivably threaten our sovereignty.

    As for the bears and their doomsday claims that there are one hundred billion gazillion trillion dollars worth of unfunded future liabilities in the US economy – it’s quite simple. These debts will never be incurred. Yes, that’s going to make life uncomfortable for many, but such is the consequence of living beyond one’s means for a long period of time.

  50. max

    The Chinese face insurmountable economic challenges. This makes them more dangerous to their neighbours and it’s a question of what comes first: economic collapse or war. My bet is on war. Then collapse. We won’t hear any more of this drawing close to Asia nonsense after that.

  51. Jonesy

    Just proves why the Liberals have fallen so far. If this is the quality of “Advice” the government is receiving, no wonder we see wobbly feckless, spineless fools masquerading as politicians sitting to the right of the chair.

    Two points, Menzies order the F111 to put the fear of god into Sukarno over the Konfrontasi incident. The intent was to be able to strike Jakarta from Australia and return. Whilst the F111 was nuclear delivery capable, we got froze out of that club before we even ordered the frames. Why do you think we let the bloody poms explode nuclear weapons and dirty bombs on our mainland? We hoped to be let into the club but the door got slammed shut in our face.

    WRT the line between Timor Leste and Australia. The tell was Australia pulling out of the maritime court BEFORE we sent troops into the new nation after the hard won independence.

  52. Patriot

    It is amazing to me that many people on this blog think everything is fine and dandy!

    No nation or empire in the history of humanity has ever prospered by pursuing the fiscal and monetary policies of the United States.

    History gives us vivid examples which demands that Australia not be complacent. It would appear that contributors to the Cat suffer from the psychological condition of ‘normalcy bias’ which can be defined as:

    “The normalcy bias, or normality bias, is a mental state people enter when facing a disaster. It causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster and its possible effects.”

  53. Oh come on

    China won’t be able to acquire the logistical capacity to strike and hold any part of the Australian mainland for any period of time any time soon. The wheels will fall off the Chinese economic miracle* LONG before the Chinese acquire the capability to project the force required to invade Australia and securely keep its invasion force supplied. The PLA just doesn’t have the logistical capability to invade Australia, and I can’t see how it could possibly acquire it within the next decade or two. China’s neighbours in SE Asia and countries like Mongolia should definitely be worried, though. If China starts gearing up for war, Mongolia’s probably going to spend some time under occupation. ASEAN needs to get its act together militarily. Japan and S Korea ought to be pulling out all the fiscal stops and doing whatever Trump asks them to to ensure a continuing US presence in their countries.

    On the other hand, the trigger that puts China on a war footing could well be internal economic collapse; in which case the Chinese military will have a hard enough time quelling its own revolting population that have just seen their life savings disappear in a wholesale write-off of bad debt. In such a situation, it’s hard to see how the Chinese state (in whatever form it finds itself in) could manage what would be an existential crisis whilst engaging in foreign wars. The military would be stretched to the brink in an effort to keep the country from breaking up – hard to see how it could simultaneously mount campaigns against its neighbours, let alone Australia.

    *which really isn’t that miraculous at all – just a common-or-garden confidence trick on a massive scale that the rest of the world has bought into

  54. Cynic of Ayr

    Seems like this puss is a bit fearful that his little Taxpayer funded Security Blanket might be pulled from underneath him.

  55. Dr Fred Leni

    This guy is a creature of ruddbulls aparat acard carrying member of the right left sect of the communist UN party the centre left left is shortass and the greens are the left left left left ,some what to the left of the fascist communist party of Australian ,they are the moderates those stalinists . Career politics has abolished conservatives ,following the example of the comrades at the alpbc and all of our thousands of universities including the historic real universities all six of them .

  56. Paridell

    This includes Australia which has relied on America since Churchill left Australia to the fate of Japan in 1942 after the fall of Singapore.

    I think Mr Barnes meant to write “since Churchill left Australia to its fate at the hands of Japan”.

    Or did he really mean that Churchill left us to be A-bombed by the Americans?

  57. gabrianga

    Presume Putin supplied basis for this heap of faeces? “Where do we get them”?

  58. gabrianga

    Watching SKY UK link from Washington.

    Their anti Trump “expert” reporter has it down pat.

    Reports that Trump is “thin skinned” because he kicked the arse of CNN over the spreading of so called “salacious” rumours.

    BBC, ABC, SKY NEWS……..take your pick.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *