Enlightenment principles

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enlightenment

This statement is from an exhibit in the Arts Museum in Aarhus and captures the values of the enlightenment in a way that spells them out so that they can be understood in the times in which we live.

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14 Responses to Enlightenment principles

  1. stackja

    The elite’s will be done is the rule now. Free will is obsolete.

  2. billie

    it would probably offend someone here in Australia

  3. Vicki

    I love this interpretation of the heritage of European civilisation based on Greek humanism, Roman law & Christian free will. I have not read anything of Ludwig Holberg before.

    I would add the tradition of critical thought derived from the practice of Talmudic questioning. This completes the background of our Judaeo-Christian heritage.

  4. P

    I’d like to quote here from a poem circa 1840.
    And thou must doff that squalid weed,
    And don this garment gay;
    And as thou art of Christian creed,
    Mark well the words I say !

    Squalid weed above refers to dress, garment or attire.
    I was thinking of it more as a contemporary person.

  5. Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker!) Gray

    Now if you just put that into Arabic, it would fit our Judao-Christina-Muslim Civilisation! Otherwise, there’ll be Holy war to pay!

  6. Well, waddya know. Appropos of precisely the words in the photograph, in the last few years I have been on a bit of a Western Civ binge. In recent months I have read, and thoroughly recommend: –

    How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization by Thomas E. Woods
    How the West Won: The Neglected Story of the Triumph of Modernity by Rodney Stark
    God’s Battalions: The Case for the Crusades by Rodney Stark
    The Politically Incorrect Guide to Western Civilization by Anthony Esolen

    Europe based on Greek humanism, Roman law and Christian free will – I would argue there is a bit more to it than that, but yep, at a pinch, that’s a valid argument.

  7. Nicholas (Unlicensed Joker!) Gray

    You also need a European landmass, making it impossible to impose uniformity on all people. The diverse landscape couldn’t help but produce diverse cultures. Other places weren’t so blessed.

  8. H B Bear

    Anything there on Eurabia?

  9. P

    How the Catholic Church Built Western Civilization by Thomas E. Woods

    This book was recommended here on Catallaxy by Ellen of Tasmania I believe, and I thank her today for this.

  10. Roger

    The “Christian free will” cited in the text is too ambiguous to be very helpful here. Most Christian traditions regard free will as limited by the condition of original sin, although they define those limitations variously. It was the belief in original sin which led Christian theorists to propose checks and balances on the sovereign power of any polity, whether that be a monarchy or the electorate in a democracy. The founding fathers of the US, perhaps the most vibrant democracy in history, were under no illusions about the fragility of the democracy they were proposing – they knew it would only survive and prosper while the people remained virtuous.

  11. Roger

    Btw, those interested in how Christianity re-formed Western civilisation after the collapse of the Roman empire should read Larry Seidentop’s “Inventing the Individual: The Origins of Western Liberalism”. He is, afaik, a secular Jew, so he has no religious axe to grind.

  12. Roger

    Alas…into moderation; try again:

    Btw, those interested in how Christianity re-formed Western civilisation after the collapse of the Roman empire should read Larry Seidentop’s “Inventing the Individual: The Origins of Western Liberalism”. He is, afaik, a secular J e w, so he has no religious axe to grind.

  13. Herodotus

    Aarhus is a very, very, very fine hus ….

  14. Alexi the Conservative Russian

    Does anyone know the name of the book Steve photographed for his exhibit?

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