Monday Forum: March 20, 2017

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1,317 Responses to Monday Forum: March 20, 2017

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  1. Diogenes

    God bless this thread and all who sail on her

  2. .

    Good morning JC, good morning TonyN and good morning Victoria.

  3. Carpe Jugulum

    Top ten, woo Hoo

  4. JC

    Who’s Victoria, Dot. Is she hot?

  5. Roger

    If you have ten thousand regulations, you destroy all respect for the law.

    Winston Churchill

    And no respect for the law inevitably leads to more regulations.

  6. lotocoti

    Is she hot?

    Only if you like sock wearing keyboard warriors.

  7. Ragu

    Struth, while you are about. Did you ever meet a bloke named George in Alice Springs? Drove a red combie van and had a huge white beard.
    Ragu
    #2331448, posted on March 20, 2017 at 11:18 am
    Was also looking after the RSL when I met him

  8. srr

    WND EXCLUSIVE
    MERKEL’S SECRET MIGRANT DEAL WITH TURKEY
    German leader agreed to take up to 250,000 Syrians each year

    Published: 1 day ago

    When German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other leaders of European Union countries reached a deal with Turkey in March 2016 to try to manage the migrant crisis, they conceded far more than a down payment of 3 billion euros, it turns out.

    Merkel, along with Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, secretly agreed to accept 150,000 to 250,000 Syrian migrants directly from Turkey into Europe each year, according to the German newspaper Die Welt. Merkel, Rutte and Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu reached an understanding on the number through a “gentleman’s agreement,” Die Welt reported, and they did not reveal this number to their fellow European leaders or the public.

    Leo Hohmann, a veteran WND journalist and news editor, believes Merkel and Rutte kept the agreement secret primarily for political reasons: Both leaders knew they faced elections in their respective countries in 2017.

    In Rutte’s case, the secrecy appears to have paid off, as his VVD party maintained its majority in the Dutch parliament in Wednesday’s elections, allowing Rutte to retain his position as prime minister.

    However, the nationalist Party for Freedom of Geert Wilders surged all the way to second place. In the process, Wilders had forced Rutte to move further towards the nationalist-populist right to win Party for Freedom voters.

    Germany, meanwhile, will hold elections in September, and …

    Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2017/03/merkels-secret-migrant-deal-with-turkey/#fwBuJVXoSztVr2XE.99

  9. Helen

    So Truffles is rising? I wonder when he will proof himself and cook?

    Meanwhile, improvements in the national identity Do I read this right? Now whities are allowed to be multiculti?

    Australia’s national identity will be redefined along fundamental principles of integration, citizenship and unity in a pointed shift away from welfare entitlement, in the first multicultural statement by a federal government to also recognise the impact of ­terrorism on the nation’s social fabric.

    In a landmark departure from the 2011 statement delivered by then-Labor prime minister Julia Gillard, the Turnbull government has ­included for the first time a list of individual freedoms, including freedom of speech, as core Australian values. The statement, ­released to The Australian ahead of its launch today, is a rejection of multiculturalism as a vehicle for grievance and identity politics.

    The government has dropped past emphasis on equitable access to welfare and services for new ­migrants, and instead promotes values of opportunity, self-reliance­ and aspiration.

    In an implicit reference to the controversial provisions of section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act, it has moved away from Labor’s past reference to the use of the “full force of the law” while denouncin­g ­racism and discrimin­ation, and promoting mutual respect­.

    A keystone of the document is the inclusion of white Australia — British and Irish settlers — in a broadening of the definition of multicultural Australia to beyond ethnic minorities and indigenous people. Introducing “integration” as the core principle over ethnic segregation to guide government policy, the statement signals a delibera­te shift away from the ­emphasis placed on services articulated by Labor.

  10. srr

    Social Justice vs Freedom of Speech | BillC16 Debate:

    Jordan Peterson vs Bruce Pardy

  11. Trader Perth

    ‘NAB sells gender equality bond’….WTF are gender equality bonds?

  12. srr

    Democrats Love Socialism
    Ami Horowitz

    15 Mar 2017
    Democrats love socialism. Ami goes to Venezuela to find out how well Socialism is working out for people there.

  13. Muddy

    Helen.
    There is something more behind this I think. The anniversary of the ’67 referendum is coming up, and what better way for Mal to get his name into the history books than a parliamentary vote on constitutional vandalism and by foisting a ‘treaty’ upon us? This is a ‘softening-up’ process before the real ‘shock and fock!’

  14. Bruce of Newcastle

    Giggle.

    Signing up to the ‘fair-go’ will keep Australia safe, government tells migrants

    “We are defined not by race, religion or culture, but by shared values of freedom, democracy, the rule of law and equality of opportunity—a ‘fair go’,” Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull says in a foreword to the statement.

    The statement will be released on Monday by Mr Turnbull and the Assistant Minister for Multicultural Affairs Zed Seselja. Mr Turnbull asked Senator Seselja to have the policy ready by Harmony Day on March 21, when he was appointed a junior minister in July 2016.

    I can’t remember the surah which mentions “a fair go”.
    This thoughtbubble will disappear without trace in about a week.

  15. Helen

    Meanwhile the PC Brigade storm the Kokoda Trail

    PC assault takes aim at Kokoda ‘mateship’

    Apparently those ignorant PNG wontoks do not understand or have a word for ‘mate’ so new signage used ‘frienship’.

    Also mate is not – according to ivory tower committee – gender neutral.

    Well I’ve got news for you, mate! It is gender neutral and has many many meanings, depending on the inflexion and the circumstance. In it’s purest forms it can be the greatest insult and also the highest testament. It invokes courage, loyalty, sacrifice.

    The PC Brigade would know none of these things, what they are or what they mean.

    I wonder how Bill would have drawn it. Such a feast. Maybe the ragged bloody heros storming a hill line to be stopped by the gimp for some gender neutral lecture?

  16. egg_

    Is she hot?

    Only if you like sock wearing keyboard warriors.

    And has a goatee?

  17. .

    Great. Now NAB is going to lend to women preferably over men.

    How is this not akin to apartheid?

    What if I identify as a gender void silver grey foxkin?

  18. ‘NAB sells gender equality bond’….WTF are gender equality bonds?

    I think the Dutch had something similar a few hundred years ago – they were called tulips.

  19. Muddy

    WTF are gender equality bonds?

    Unisex underwear?

  20. Helen

    Ahh Muddy, you are right. There will be more behind it. And I keep forgetting about the sinister picture behind recognition for the people that were here when Cook got here beyond what is already in the constitution – thanks for reminding me.

  21. Roger

    We are defined not by race, religion or culture, but by shared values of freedom, democracy, the rule of law and equality of opportunity—a ‘fair go’,

    Ahistorical liberal tosh.

    Those shared values derive from the Christian culture/religion and its J e wi sh antecedent.

    Do not expect them to be so easily “shared” by those from other religio-cultural backgrounds.

  22. Andrew

    .
    #2331472, posted on March 20, 2017 at 11:29 am
    Great. Now NAB is going to lend to women preferably over men.

    How is this not akin to apartheid?

    What if I identify as a gender void silver grey foxkin?

    Fortunately the gender bonds are not hypothecated to lend to wymminz so there is no lending apartheid yet.

    They are hypothecated to lend to CORPORATES that practice employment apartheid.

    (Also, these are not tulips. They are priced exactly where the bank issues Green bonds, gender fluid bonds and Dirty Coal bonds. At 5bp wider than the major bank credit curve.

  23. Gab

    the Turnbull government has ­included for the first time a list of individual freedoms, including freedom of speech, as core Australian values.

    What a hypocrite. Pays lip service to free speech but the AHRC and 18C are still not abolished.

    Listen, turnbull you inauthentic human and spineless moron posing as a “leader”, 18C and freedom of speech CANNOT coexist. QED.

  24. thefrolickingmole

    For those confused about gender, perhaps this will help (pinched from Takimag)

    [People] with menstruating uteruses may identify on any number of points along the multidimensional gender spectrum. There are agender menstruators, genderqueer menstruators (like me!), other non-binary menstruators, and yes trans menstruators who are men or boys. We simply seek to be inclusive of all menstruators, no matter how you identify.

    The Adventures of Toni the Tampon: A Period Coloring Book

    Dont blame me I voted SMOD/Cthulhu…

  25. Roger

    They are hypothecated to lend to CORPORATES that practice employment apartheid.

    No, no; it’s “positive discrimination”, Andrew.

    The weaker sex needs a boost.

  26. .

    The Adventures of Toni the Tampon: A Period Coloring Book

    Here is a review of a book that “customers also viewed”.

    But back to Hannah, daughter of former Senator Justin Cocker… Now 28 years old, she’s having trouble finding the love of her life. She dreams of being a mom first and foremost, but she’s had to navigate through the cess pool of unworthy men who are just with her for either her fame, her money or her family’s connections. Hannah has a tough time trusting that she’ll ever find a man who loves her just for her.

    After another disastrous break up and the subsequent fallout between Cocker crew and her former fling, she hits the road with her wild and fierce cousin Sofia Sol. She longs to go somewhere she can be free, unrecognized and enjoy life. Hannah doesn’t expect to meet a gorgeous MMA fighter who is ready to battle her insecurities and break down her walls to get to know her. She doesn’t expect to open her heart again so soon. She doesn’t expect to feel so strongly for Tobias after such a short time.

    Wow. Just wow.

  27. Bruce of Newcastle

    NAB sells gender equality bond

    I approve so long as the bonds get 100 basis points over normal paper.
    That would be about right for the risk of backlash from righties quietly taking their business elsewhere.

    When will Oz companies learn that playing the SJW game wins them no friends and loses them lots of customers?

  28. Slayer of Memes

    From the Paywallian (no link):

    Truth for all beats sensitivity of a few
    Chris Mitchell
    The Australian
    March 20, 2017

    How have all the pious race protesters squealing in the wake of Bill Leak’s death missed the seachange in discussion of Aboriginal affairs these past three decades towards a balance between rights and responsibilities and away from victimhood?

    One answer might be that they are too young to have seen the debate morph under the inspiration of the nation’s most senior traditional elder, Galarrwuy Yunu­pingu, its greatest Aboriginal intellect Noel Pearson and its most popular political and media advocate Warren Mundine.

    After all, last Monday’s stand-in Q&A host, Tom Ballard, born in 1989, was not alive when Yunu­pingu kicked off the debate about welfare dependency in speeches he made in 1978, when he was named Australian of the Year. Ballard was too young for kindy when Galarrwuy started labelling the problem “sit-down money”.

    All the outraged moral posturers on Twitter calling racism on Bill Leak’s cartoon in the wake of the Four Corners’ Don Dale ­detention centre program last August seem to have missed the point entirely. Twitter is a world in which the feelings of self-­identifying urban Aboriginal university students and their friends trump the rights of outback Aboriginal children to grow up safely under the care of their parents, including their fathers.

    And remember the boy in the spit hood and restraint chair, Dylan Voller: his mum and siblings were deserted by his father when he was three in Adelaide, scene of last Monday’s Q&A artsy love-in.

    Ballard opened discussion of Leak with an admission he had signed a letter to the editors of The Australian complaining about the cartoon in which an ­Aboriginal policeman accompanying an Aboriginal boy is asked by the boy’s father: “What’s his name then?”

    Warren Mundine said last Tuesday that the protesters who interrupted the program to defame Leak as a racist were “idiotic morons” who should “grow up and confront the real issues in our community”. Exactly.
    And yet David Marr had a point in The Guardian on Wednesday when he said campaigners for free speech and the rewriting of section 18C of the ­Racial Discrimination Act could not really complain when Leak’s opponents exercised their own rights to free speech. Marr accepts 18C needs changing, and would likely concede Leak himself would have been robust in his response had he been alive to hear the program.

    The Aboriginal cartoon issue raises many questions about the modern Left.

    Why do progressives who insist white fathers need to play a bigger role in the raising of their children not agree the same applies to black fathers? It has been clear since this paper’s Rosemary Neill won a Walkley Award for a piece in 1994 detailing at length how crime rates against Aboriginal women and children were almost all due to Aboriginal fathers that this is a serious issue.

    Can we, 25 years later, really place the feelings of offended Aboriginals from good homes ahead of the wellbeing and physical ­safety of Aboriginal women and children in danger?

    Of course there are many good Aboriginal dads and Leak knew plenty. Yet that does not diminish Bill’s point, as Mundine argued cogently in this paper on Friday.

    The Australian has dominated coverage of Aboriginal affairs for three decades, something acknowledged widely by Aboriginal leaders. If you doubt it, google my piece published last August 15 in defence of Leak’s cartoon for a potted history of the awards this paper has received for stories broken in Aboriginal affairs. It is also a paper that made Eddie Mabo its Australian of the Year at a time many feared Mabo would destroy regional Australia.

    For the past 30 years the paper has been largely alone among the media in this reporting. Why?

    It goes to the racist culture of low expectations that dominates left-wing thinking about Aboriginal life, even in journalism. Noel Pearson was greeted with outrage when he spoke about this culture within the ABC at the launch of Troy Bramston’s book, Paul ­Keating: The Big-Picture Leader, late last year.

    Noel was right and the Leak cartoon is at the heart of why. People who think the cartoon is racist — like those on the Q&A panel and its youthful host — are implying black fathers should not be held to the same standards as white fathers. In my book Making Headlines, released last October, I write at length of this culture of low expectations and the unchallenged racism behind it.

    As an ambassador for the ­Australian Indigenous Education Foundation and a close friend of its founders, Andrew and ­Michelle Penfold, I cannot tell you how often I have confronted wealthy, left-wing parents who sent their own children to prestigious GPS schools but think there is something wrong with scholarships to such schools for bright Aboriginal kids. They see it as destroying Aboriginal communities and families rather than lifting those communities and families.

    This is the Left’s unconscious but real racism. The racism that says Aboriginal people should not aspire to the same things white people do. They should be happy with their collectivist, primitivist conditions, as if their lives were part of some academic experiment by French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau about the noble savage.

    People who have read the Northern Territory’s “Little Children are Sacred” report, the one that prompted John Howard’s 2007 NT intervention, understand there is not a lot of nobility for many in these traditional communities, racked as they are by poverty, homelessness, drugs, alcohol, pornography and child abuse.

    Into this feeds the new Left’s post-materialist abandonment of economic empowerment in favour of the identity politics that now dominates tertiary education in the US and Australia. Paul Kelly wrote a brilliant piece last Wednesday linking this to the Leak matter and 18C.

    Aboriginal thought leaders have for decades understood the perverse racism in the Left’s elevation of feelings over material wellbeing. I first published Pearson on the perils of what he called “ethnic essentialism” in The Courier-Mail in the late 1990s.

    So where does this culture of offence — typified by the reaction to Leak’s death — take our society?

    As Media Watch pointed out last Monday week, it has already generated self-censorship in the progressive media. Host Paul Barry outed Fairfax and the ABC for failing to report stories about the radicalisation of Islamic school students in Sydney. This is journalism surrendering truth in the name of not offending racial minorities.

    Anecdotal it may be, but ask any senior teacher about classroom discussion in secondary schools today and he or she will tell you the dialogue with modern year 11 and 12 students is dominated by what cannot be said. “You can’t say that sir. It’s offensive. You can’t ask that miss. It’s racist.”

    Who is standing up for the role of truth in education, the media and public discussion?

    This is where the rubber hits the road for modern Western democracies. Voters will not cop laws and governments that elevate this politically correct offence culture.

    Voters will react with the sort of blowback we saw in favour of Donald Trump, Brexit and Pauline Hanson. The Left cannot fool all of the people all of the time, even if it is fooling many politicians and the deluded business leaders at the forefront of some of the most stultifyingly PC campaigns in modern Australia that seem to have zero to do with their fiduciary responsibilities to shareholders.

    Here’s the thing. So what if Bill Leak occasionally drew things some people found offensive. Some Aboriginal dads do have disproportionate numbers of interactions with the criminal justice system for offences against their families. Islamic terrorism is real. The radicalisation of young Muslims in the West does need to be confronted honestly. Leak risked his life to do so.

    And portraying a young Muslim woman in full covering asking “Does my bomb look big in this?’’ is surely an amusing way to handle a serious point.

    Did Bill desperately want legal changes so he could be more offensive? Of course not.

    Bill was the sweetest man I knew. But he understood the damage being done to Western civilisation by the amalgam of postmodern Marxist thought and the politics of identity. In the Middle Ages and later, academics used to risk death at the stake to speak the truth. Now many seek to suppress it in the mad assumption the feelings of a section of society are more important than truths for the whole society.

  29. C.L.

    The War on Drugs is lost … former cops say it’s time to withdraw from the field:

    Former top cops want ‘white market’ in illicit drugs, decriminalisation.

  30. Tom

    Cat boffins: all my video playbacks in Windows 10 are suddenly giving me a super close-up of the images in the frame. Has anyone else encountered this? Does anyone know a way to get video images back to normal size? Thanks.

  31. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    It was thickly rendered because the walls were uneven and had to be straightened up ready for the tiling.
    Would have been a lot easier for plumber and tiler to use metal channels and wet area plasterboard or AC sheets to even out the roughness.

    I expect the builder had his reasons for doing what they did; he seems pretty capable. Possibly to do with the tradies they use etc. and the walls were rough, but not majorly out of alignment. They’ve put in a new plasterboard ceiling; I’ve just chosen the cornices. Personally, I think I’d prefer not to have too much wall tiling on plasterboard, it’s better on cement. They are using plasterboard and tiles around the island bath. I’ve seen bathrooms where tiles on plasterboard fall off after a few years. It amuses Hairy that I’m getting so involved with it all. Let dem get on wit’ it, is his view.

    He won’t do a final payment till it’s all done and he’s happy with the job and he has a guarantee; but he doesn’t micromanage.

    ——

    Victoria still in the news on this thread? We should not continue giving her airtime. I suspect Victoria may be ‘P’. P clearly hasn’t been smote, as she commented here after Grigs and B Shaw disappeared. It’s an old-fashioned name for a ‘dear concerned old lady’ too, isn’t it? She’s possibly an early Grigs iteration, as previously discussed, and she is currently displaying all of Grig’s obsession with my travels and identity. Ms D would understand. And Dot, Grigs may not be as stupid as SfB (although at times that would be debatable) but he is far more malign and creepy. ‘Sadist’ (see Notafan’s link on the previous OT) would be absolutely true there.

  32. srr

    😆

    The BBC comment

    And the BBC comment was also posted here at the cat, long before you got around to giving it your approval for discussion.

    But, whatever, who cares, so long as anonymous names can continue bitching about anonymous names and keeping attention away from the big issues that are solvable with just a little attention, all’s good, right … 🙄

  33. .

    A new report into drug-related deaths has proposed the decriminalisation of drug use in Australia.

    The Australia21 report has the backing of former police commissioners and assistant commissioners, two former heads of Corrective Services, a former Supreme Court Judge and a former Director of Public Prosecutions.

    I don’t like arguments from authority, but that lends huge credibility.

  34. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Cat boffins: all my video playbacks in Windows 10 are suddenly giving me a super close-up of the images in the frame. Has anyone else encountered this? Does anyone know a way to get video images back to normal size? Thanks.

    Yes. It happened to mine too. I opened and closed all the doors and turned off the engine and it went away. In other words, I rebooted. But I guess you’ve already tried that. You could do a ‘recover’ to a few days back, tho’ WIN10 doesn’t give you much choice re dates.

  35. Slayer of Memes

    From the Paywallian (no link):

    Truth for all beats sensitivity of a few
    Chris Mitchell
    The Australian
    March 20, 2017

    How have all the pious race protesters squealing in the wake of Bill Leak’s death missed the seachange in discussion of Aboriginal affairs these past three decades towards a balance between rights and responsibilities and away from victimhood?

    One answer might be that they are too young to have seen the debate morph under the inspiration of the nation’s most senior traditional elder, Galarrwuy Yunu­pingu, its greatest Aboriginal intellect Noel Pearson and its most popular political and media advocate Warren Mundine.

    After all, last Monday’s stand-in Q&A host, Tom Ballard, born in 1989, was not alive when Yunu­pingu kicked off the debate about welfare dependency in speeches he made in 1978, when he was named Australian of the Year. Ballard was too young for kindy when Galarrwuy started labelling the problem “sit-down money”.

    All the outraged moral posturers on Twitter calling racism on Bill Leak’s cartoon in the wake of the Four Corners’ Don Dale ­detention centre program last August seem to have missed the point entirely. Twitter is a world in which the feelings of self-­identifying urban Aboriginal university students and their friends trump the rights of outback Aboriginal children to grow up safely under the care of their parents, including their fathers.

    And remember the boy in the spit hood and restraint chair, Dylan Voller: his mum and siblings were deserted by his father when he was three in Adelaide, scene of last Monday’s Q&A artsy love-in.
    Ballard opened discussion of Leak with an admission he had signed a letter to the editors of The Australian complaining about the cartoon in which an ­Aboriginal policeman accompanying an Aboriginal boy is asked by the boy’s father: “What’s his name then?”

    Warren Mundine said last Tuesday that the protesters who interrupted the program to defame Leak as a racist were “idiotic morons” who should “grow up and confront the real issues in our community”. Exactly.

    And yet David Marr had a point in The Guardian on Wednesday when he said campaigners for free speech and the rewriting of section 18C of the ­Racial Discrimination Act could not really complain when Leak’s opponents exercised their own rights to free speech. Marr accepts 18C needs changing, and would likely concede Leak himself would have been robust in his response had he been alive to hear the program.

    The Aboriginal cartoon issue raises many questions about the modern Left.

    Why do progressives who insist white fathers need to play a bigger role in the raising of their children not agree the same applies to black fathers? It has been clear since this paper’s Rosemary Neill won a Walkley Award for a piece in 1994 detailing at length how crime rates against Aboriginal women and children were almost all due to Aboriginal fathers that this is a serious issue.

    Can we, 25 years later, really place the feelings of offended Aboriginals from good homes ahead of the wellbeing and physical ­safety of Aboriginal women and children in danger?

    Of course there are many good Aboriginal dads and Leak knew plenty. Yet that does not diminish Bill’s point, as Mundine argued cogently in this paper on Friday.

    The Australian has dominated coverage of Aboriginal affairs for three decades, something acknowledged widely by Aboriginal leaders. If you doubt it, google my piece published last August 15 in defence of Leak’s cartoon for a potted history of the awards this paper has received for stories broken in Aboriginal affairs. It is also a paper that made Eddie Mabo its Australian of the Year at a time many feared Mabo would destroy regional Australia.

    For the past 30 years the paper has been largely alone among the media in this reporting. Why?
    It goes to the racist culture of low expectations that dominates left-wing thinking about Aboriginal life, even in journalism. Noel Pearson was greeted with outrage when he spoke about this culture within the ABC at the launch of Troy Bramston’s book, Paul ­Keating: The Big-Picture Leader, late last year.

    Noel was right and the Leak cartoon is at the heart of why. People who think the cartoon is racist — like those on the Q&A panel and its youthful host — are implying black fathers should not be held to the same standards as white fathers. In my book Making Headlines, released last October, I write at length of this culture of low expectations and the unchallenged racism behind it.

    As an ambassador for the ­Australian Indigenous Education Foundation and a close friend of its founders, Andrew and ­Michelle Penfold, I cannot tell you how often I have confronted wealthy, left-wing parents who sent their own children to prestigious GPS schools but think there is something wrong with scholarships to such schools for bright Aboriginal kids. They see it as destroying Aboriginal communities and families rather than lifting those communities and families.

    This is the Left’s unconscious but real racism. The racism that says Aboriginal people should not aspire to the same things white people do. They should be happy with their collectivist, primitivist conditions, as if their lives were part of some academic experiment by French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau about the noble savage.

    People who have read the Northern Territory’s “Little Children are Sacred” report, the one that prompted John Howard’s 2007 NT intervention, understand there is not a lot of nobility for many in these traditional communities, racked as they are by poverty, homelessness, drugs, alcohol, pornography and child abuse.

    Into this feeds the new Left’s post-materialist abandonment of economic empowerment in favour of the identity politics that now dominates tertiary education in the US and Australia. Paul Kelly wrote a brilliant piece last Wednesday linking this to the Leak matter and 18C.

    Aboriginal thought leaders have for decades understood the perverse racism in the Left’s elevation of feelings over material wellbeing. I first published Pearson on the perils of what he called “ethnic essentialism” in The Courier-Mail in the late 1990s.

    So where does this culture of offence — typified by the reaction to Leak’s death — take our society?

    As Media Watch pointed out last Monday week, it has already generated self-censorship in the progressive media. Host Paul Barry outed Fairfax and the ABC for failing to report stories about the radicalisation of Islamic school students in Sydney. This is journalism surrendering truth in the name of not offending racial minorities.

    Anecdotal it may be, but ask any senior teacher about classroom discussion in secondary schools today and he or she will tell you the dialogue with modern year 11 and 12 students is dominated by what cannot be said. “You can’t say that sir. It’s offensive. You can’t ask that miss. It’s racist.”

    Who is standing up for the role of truth in education, the media and public discussion?

    This is where the rubber hits the road for modern Western democracies. Voters will not cop laws and governments that elevate this politically correct offence culture.

    Voters will react with the sort of blowback we saw in favour of Donald Trump, Brexit and Pauline Hanson. The Left cannot fool all of the people all of the time, even if it is fooling many politicians and the deluded business leaders at the forefront of some of the most stultifyingly PC campaigns in modern Australia that seem to have zero to do with their fiduciary responsibilities to shareholders.

    Here’s the thing. So what if Bill Leak occasionally drew things some people found offensive. Some Aboriginal dads do have disproportionate numbers of interactions with the criminal justice system for offences against their families. Islamic terrorism is real. The radicalisation of young Muslims in the West does need to be confronted honestly. Leak risked his life to do so.

    And portraying a young Muslim woman in full covering asking “Does my bomb look big in this?’’ is surely an amusing way to handle a serious point.

    Did Bill desperately want legal changes so he could be more offensive? Of course not.

    Bill was the sweetest man I knew. But he understood the damage being done to Western civilisation by the amalgam of postmodern Marxist thought and the politics of identity. In the Middle Ages and later, academics used to risk death at the stake to speak the truth. Now many seek to suppress it in the mad assumption the feelings of a section of society are more important than truths for the whole society.

  36. Slayer of Memes

    hmmm… seems an article in the Paywallian I am trying to post is offending the Cat’s spamminatore so much, it won’t even post it as “awaiting moderation”…

  37. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    the decriminalisation of drug use in Australia.

    I’d like it if they used the Portuguese method. Off to the reformatory you go, user.

  38. Slayer of Memes

    From the Paywallian (no link):

    Truth for all beats sensitivity of a few
    Chris Mitchell
    The Australian
    March 20, 2017

    How have all the pious race protesters squealing in the wake of Bill Leak’s death missed the seachange in discussion of Aboriginal affairs these past three decades towards a balance between rights and responsibilities and away from victimhood?

    One answer might be that they are too young to have seen the debate morph under the inspiration of the nation’s most senior traditional elder, Galarrwuy Yunu­pingu, its greatest Aboriginal intellect Noel Pearson and its most popular political and media advocate Warren Mundine.

    After all, last Monday’s stand-in Q&A host, Tom Ballard, born in 1989, was not alive when Yunu­pingu kicked off the debate about welfare dependency in speeches he made in 1978, when he was named Australian of the Year. Ballard was too young for kindy when Galarrwuy started labelling the problem “sit-down money”.

    All the outraged moral posturers on Twitter calling racism on Bill Leak’s cartoon in the wake of the Four Corners’ Don Dale ­detention centre program last August seem to have missed the point entirely. Twitter is a world in which the feelings of self-­identifying urban Aboriginal university students and their friends trump the rights of outback Aboriginal children to grow up safely under the care of their parents, including their fathers.

    And remember the boy in the spit hood and restraint chair, Dylan Voller: his mum and siblings were deserted by his father when he was three in Adelaide, scene of last Monday’s Q&A artsy love-in.
    Ballard opened discussion of Leak with an admission he had signed a letter to the editors of The Australian complaining about the cartoon in which an ­Aboriginal policeman accompanying an Aboriginal boy is asked by the boy’s father: “What’s his name then?”

    Warren Mundine said last Tuesday that the protesters who interrupted the program to defame Leak as a racist were “idiotic morons” who should “grow up and confront the real issues in our community”. Exactly.

    And yet David Marr had a point in The Guardian on Wednesday when he said campaigners for free speech and the rewriting of section 18C of the ­Racial Discrimination Act could not really complain when Leak’s opponents exercised their own rights to free speech. Marr accepts 18C needs changing, and would likely concede Leak himself would have been robust in his response had he been alive to hear the program.

    The Aboriginal cartoon issue raises many questions about the modern Left.

    Why do progressives who insist white fathers need to play a bigger role in the raising of their children not agree the same applies to black fathers? It has been clear since this paper’s Rosemary Neill won a Walkley Award for a piece in 1994 detailing at length how crime rates against Aboriginal women and children were almost all due to Aboriginal fathers that this is a serious issue.

    Can we, 25 years later, really place the feelings of offended Aboriginals from good homes ahead of the wellbeing and physical ­safety of Aboriginal women and children in danger?

    Of course there are many good Aboriginal dads and Leak knew plenty. Yet that does not diminish Bill’s point, as Mundine argued cogently in this paper on Friday.

    The Australian has dominated coverage of Aboriginal affairs for three decades, something acknowledged widely by Aboriginal leaders. If you doubt it, google my piece published last August 15 in defence of Leak’s cartoon for a potted history of the awards this paper has received for stories broken in Aboriginal affairs. It is also a paper that made Eddie Mabo its Australian of the Year at a time many feared Mabo would destroy regional Australia.

    For the past 30 years the paper has been largely alone among the media in this reporting. Why?
    It goes to the racist culture of low expectations that dominates left-wing thinking about Aboriginal life, even in journalism. Noel Pearson was greeted with outrage when he spoke about this culture within the ABC at the launch of Troy Bramston’s book, Paul ­Keating: The Big-Picture Leader, late last year.

    Noel was right and the Leak cartoon is at the heart of why. People who think the cartoon is racist — like those on the Q&A panel and its youthful host — are implying black fathers should not be held to the same standards as white fathers. In my book Making Headlines, released last October, I write at length of this culture of low expectations and the unchallenged racism behind it.

    As an ambassador for the ­Australian Indigenous Education Foundation and a close friend of its founders, Andrew and ­Michelle Penfold, I cannot tell you how often I have confronted wealthy, left-wing parents who sent their own children to prestigious GPS schools but think there is something wrong with scholarships to such schools for bright Aboriginal kids. They see it as destroying Aboriginal communities and families rather than lifting those communities and families.

    This is the Left’s unconscious but real racism. The racism that says Aboriginal people should not aspire to the same things white people do. They should be happy with their collectivist, primitivist conditions, as if their lives were part of some academic experiment by French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau about the noble savage.

    People who have read the Northern Territory’s “Little Children are Sacred” report, the one that prompted John Howard’s 2007 NT intervention, understand there is not a lot of nobility for many in these traditional communities, racked as they are by poverty, homelessness, drugs, alcohol, pornography and child abuse.

    Into this feeds the new Left’s post-materialist abandonment of economic empowerment in favour of the identity politics that now dominates tertiary education in the US and Australia. Paul Kelly wrote a brilliant piece last Wednesday linking this to the Leak matter and 18C.

    Aboriginal thought leaders have for decades understood the perverse racism in the Left’s elevation of feelings over material wellbeing. I first published Pearson on the perils of what he called “ethnic essentialism” in The Courier-Mail in the late 1990s.

    So where does this culture of offence — typified by the reaction to Leak’s death — take our society?

    As Media Watch pointed out last Monday week, it has already generated self-censorship in the progressive media. Host Paul Barry outed Fairfax and the ABC for failing to report stories about the radicalisation of Islamic school students in Sydney. This is journalism surrendering truth in the name of not offending racial minorities.

    Anecdotal it may be, but ask any senior teacher about classroom discussion in secondary schools today and he or she will tell you the dialogue with modern year 11 and 12 students is dominated by what cannot be said. “You can’t say that sir. It’s offensive. You can’t ask that miss. It’s racist.”

    Who is standing up for the role of truth in education, the media and public discussion?

    This is where the rubber hits the road for modern Western democracies. Voters will not cop laws and governments that elevate this politically correct offence culture.

    Voters will react with the sort of blowback we saw in favour of Donald Trump, Brexit and Pauline Hanson. The Left cannot fool all of the people all of the time, even if it is fooling many politicians and the deluded business leaders at the forefront of some of the most stultifyingly PC campaigns in modern Australia that seem to have zero to do with their fiduciary responsibilities to shareholders.

    Here’s the thing. So what if Bill Leak occasionally drew things some people found offensive. Some Aboriginal dads do have disproportionate numbers of interactions with the criminal justice system for offences against their families. Islamic terrorism is real. The radicalisation of young Muslims in the West does need to be confronted honestly. Leak risked his life to do so.

    And portraying a young Muslim woman in full covering asking “Does my bomb look big in this?’’ is surely an amusing way to handle a serious point.

    Did Bill desperately want legal changes so he could be more offensive? Of course not.

    Bill was the sweetest man I knew. But he understood the damage being done to Western civilisation by the amalgam of postmodern Marxist thought and the politics of identity. In the Middle Ages and later, academics used to risk death at the stake to speak the truth. Now many seek to suppress it in the mad assumption the feelings of a section of society are more important than truths for the whole society.

    Let’s see if the spamminator likes this version…

  39. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    so long as anonymous names can continue bitching about anonymous names

    Wells said, srr.
    It’s so good you don’t do this.

  40. Tom

    Thanks, Lizzie. Rebooting has made no difference.

  41. herodotus

    “… keeping attention away from the big issues …”
    Activist judges appointed by the left is a big issue. But even a GWB appointee sailed off course as part of the three judge panel that’s now copped a caning from a five judge panel.
    https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/03/19/five-9th-circuit-judges-eviscerate-the-fundamental-errors-in-ruling-against-trumps-muslim-ban/

  42. Slayer of Memes

    From the Paywallian (no link):

    Truth for all beats sensitivity of a few
    Chris Mitchell
    The Australian
    March 20, 2017

    How have all the pious race protesters squealing in the wake of Bill Leak’s death missed the seachange in discussion of Aboriginal affairs these past three decades towards a balance between rights and responsibilities and away from victimhood?

    One answer might be that they are too young to have seen the debate morph under the inspiration of the nation’s most senior traditional elder, Galarrwuy Yunu­pingu, its greatest Aboriginal intellect Noel Pearson and its most popular political and media advocate Warren Mundine.

    After all, last Monday’s stand-in Q&A host, Tom Ballard, born in 1989, was not alive when Yunu­pingu kicked off the debate about welfare dependency in speeches he made in 1978, when he was named Australian of the Year. Ballard was too young for kindy when Galarrwuy started labelling the problem “sit-down money”.

    All the outraged moral posturers on Twitter calling racism on Bill Leak’s cartoon in the wake of the Four Corners’ Don Dale ­detention centre program last August seem to have missed the point entirely. Twitter is a world in which the feelings of self-­identifying urban Aboriginal university students and their friends trump the rights of outback Aboriginal children to grow up safely under the care of their parents, including their fathers.

    And remember the boy in the spit hood and restraint chair, Dylan Voller: his mum and siblings were deserted by his father when he was three in Adelaide, scene of last Monday’s Q&A artsy love-in.
    Ballard opened discussion of Leak with an admission he had signed a letter to the editors of The Australian complaining about the cartoon in which an ­Aboriginal policeman accompanying an Aboriginal boy is asked by the boy’s father: “What’s his name then?”

    Warren Mundine said last Tuesday that the protesters who interrupted the program to defame Leak as a racist were “idiotic morons” who should “grow up and confront the real issues in our community”.

    Exactly.

    And yet David Marr had a point in The Guardian on Wednesday when he said campaigners for free speech and the rewriting of section 18C of the ­Racial Discrimination Act could not really complain when Leak’s opponents exercised their own rights to free speech. Marr accepts 18C needs changing, and would likely concede Leak himself would have been robust in his response had he been alive to hear the program.

    The Aboriginal cartoon issue raises many questions about the modern Left.

    Why do progressives who insist white fathers need to play a bigger role in the raising of their children not agree the same applies to black fathers? It has been clear since this paper’s Rosemary Neill won a Walkley Award for a piece in 1994 detailing at length how crime rates against Aboriginal women and children were almost all due to Aboriginal fathers that this is a serious issue.

    Can we, 25 years later, really place the feelings of offended Aboriginals from good homes ahead of the wellbeing and physical ­safety of Aboriginal women and children in danger?

    Of course there are many good Aboriginal dads and Leak knew plenty. Yet that does not diminish Bill’s point, as Mundine argued cogently in this paper on Friday.

    The Australian has dominated coverage of Aboriginal affairs for three decades, something acknowledged widely by Aboriginal leaders. If you doubt it, google my piece published last August 15 in defence of Leak’s cartoon for a potted history of the awards this paper has received for stories broken in Aboriginal affairs. It is also a paper that made Eddie Mabo its Australian of the Year at a time many feared Mabo would destroy regional Australia.

    For the past 30 years the paper has been largely alone among the media in this reporting. Why?
    It goes to the racist culture of low expectations that dominates left-wing thinking about Aboriginal life, even in journalism. Noel Pearson was greeted with outrage when he spoke about this culture within the ABC at the launch of Troy Bramston’s book, Paul ­Keating: The Big-Picture Leader, late last year.

    Noel was right and the Leak cartoon is at the heart of why. People who think the cartoon is racist — like those on the Q&A panel and its youthful host — are implying black fathers should not be held to the same standards as white fathers. In my book Making Headlines, released last October, I write at length of this culture of low expectations and the unchallenged racism behind it.

    As an ambassador for the ­Australian Indigenous Education Foundation and a close friend of its founders, Andrew and ­Michelle Penfold, I cannot tell you how often I have confronted wealthy, left-wing parents who sent their own children to prestigious GPS schools but think there is something wrong with scholarships to such schools for bright Aboriginal kids. They see it as destroying Aboriginal communities and families rather than lifting those communities and families.

    This is the Left’s unconscious but real racism. The racism that says Aboriginal people should not aspire to the same things white people do. They should be happy with their collectivist, primitivist conditions, as if their lives were part of some academic experiment by French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau about the noble savage.

    People who have read the Northern Territory’s “Little Children are Sacred” report, the one that prompted John Howard’s 2007 NT intervention, understand there is not a lot of nobility for many in these traditional communities, racked as they are by poverty, homelessness, drugs, alcohol, pornography and child abuse.

    Into this feeds the new Left’s post-materialist abandonment of economic empowerment in favour of the identity politics that now dominates tertiary education in the US and Australia. Paul Kelly wrote a brilliant piece last Wednesday linking this to the Leak matter and 18C.

    Aboriginal thought leaders have for decades understood the perverse racism in the Left’s elevation of feelings over material wellbeing. I first published Pearson on the perils of what he called “ethnic essentialism” in The Courier-Mail in the late 1990s.

    So where does this culture of offence — typified by the reaction to Leak’s death — take our society?

    As Media Watch pointed out last Monday week, it has already generated self-censorship in the progressive media. Host Paul Barry outed Fairfax and the ABC for failing to report stories about the radicalisation of Islamic school students in Sydney. This is journalism surrendering truth in the name of not offending racial minorities.

    Anecdotal it may be, but ask any senior teacher about classroom discussion in secondary schools today and he or she will tell you the dialogue with modern year 11 and 12 students is dominated by what cannot be said. “You can’t say that sir. It’s offensive. You can’t ask that miss. It’s racist.”

    Who is standing up for the role of truth in education, the media and public discussion?

    This is where the rubber hits the road for modern Western democracies. Voters will not cop laws and governments that elevate this politically correct offence culture.

    Voters will react with the sort of blowback we saw in favour of Donald Trump, Brexit and Pauline Hanson. The Left cannot fool all of the people all of the time, even if it is fooling many politicians and the deluded business leaders at the forefront of some of the most stultifyingly PC campaigns in modern Australia that seem to have zero to do with their fiduciary responsibilities to shareholders.

    Here’s the thing. So what if Bill Leak occasionally drew things some people found offensive. Some Aboriginal dads do have disproportionate numbers of interactions with the criminal justice system for offences against their families. Islamic terrorism is real. The radicalisation of young Muslims in the West does need to be confronted honestly. Leak risked his life to do so.

    And portraying a young Muslim woman in full covering asking “Does my bomb look big in this?’’ is surely an amusing way to handle a serious point.

    Did Bill desperately want legal changes so he could be more offensive? Of course not.

    Bill was the sweetest man I knew. But he understood the damage being done to Western civilisation by the amalgam of postmodern Marxist thought and the politics of identity. In the Middle Ages and later, academics used to risk death at the stake to speak the truth. Now many seek to suppress it in the mad assumption the feelings of a section of society are more important than truths for the whole society.

  43. stackja

    LDP wants drugs camps for the gullible? With fences?

  44. Slayer of Memes

    well… f*cked if I know which word has the spamminator’s knickers in a twist…

    You’ll all have to wait for Sinc to (belatedly) release the post(s) from moderation to see what the article said about Bill Leak…

    (unfortunately by the time Sinc DOES release it from ‘spamminator purgatory’, the thread will have moved on 2 or 3 pages and no-one will actually see it….)

  45. Gab

    Slayer, any chance you can post the title of the article?

  46. Dr Faustus

    Looks like The Michael Trumble Multiculturalism Policy is shaping up to be Team Australia redux – with light bladder leakage.

    Hope he gets the “tone” right, or he will have Tiny Tim and the Usual Suspects all over him.

  47. dopey

    ABC: Australia chasing a draw in Test.
    “Chasing” a draw?

  48. Slayer of Memes

    Gab

    Truth for all beats sensitivity of a few
    Chris Mitchell
    The Australian
    March 20, 2017

    No link because… Paywallian

  49. egg_

    all my video playbacks in Windows 10 are suddenly giving me a super close-up of the images in the frame

    A quick Googling says resetting your browser’s zoom may fix it if it’s a flash player issue.

  50. Slayer of Memes

    Alternatively, and for those who want to brave Facebook, here is a link to Jacinta Price’s page where the article is reproduced in full…

  51. Gab

    See if this works …
    Truth for all beats sensitivity of a few
    Chris Mitchell
    How have all the pious race protesters squealing in the wake of Bill Leak’s death missed the seachange in discussion of Aboriginal affairs these past three decades towards a balance between rights and responsibilities and away from victimhood?

    One answer might be that they are too young to have seen the debate morph under the inspiration of the nation’s most senior traditional elder, Galarrwuy Yunu­pingu, its greatest Aboriginal intellect Noel Pearson and its most popular political and media advocate Warren Mundine.

    After all, last Monday’s stand-in Q&A host, Tom Ballard, born in 1989, was not alive when Yunu­pingu kicked off the debate about welfare dependency in speeches he made in 1978, when he was named Australian of the Year. Ballard was too young for kindy when Galarrwuy started labelling the problem “sit-down money”.

    All the outraged moral posturers on Twitter calling racism on Bill Leak’s cartoon in the wake of the Four Corners’ Don Dale ­detention centre program last August seem to have missed the point entirely. Twitter is a world in which the feelings of self-­identifying urban Aboriginal university students and their friends trump the rights of outback Aboriginal children to grow up safely under the care of their parents, including their fathers.

    And remember the boy in the spit hood and restraint chair, Dylan Voller: his mum and siblings were deserted by his father when he was three in Adelaide, scene of last Monday’s Q&A artsy love-in.

    Ballard opened discussion of Leak with an admission he had signed a letter to the editors of The Australian complaining about the cartoon in which an ­Aboriginal policeman accompanying an Aboriginal boy is asked by the boy’s father: “What’s his name then?”

    Warren Mundine said last Tuesday that the protesters who interrupted the program to defame Leak as a racist were “idiotic morons” who should “grow up and confront the real issues in our community”. Exactly.

    And yet David Marr had a point in The Guardian on Wednesday when he said campaigners for free speech and the rewriting of section 18C of the ­Racial Discrimination Act could not really complain when Leak’s opponents exercised their own rights to free speech. Marr accepts 18C needs changing, and would likely concede Leak himself would have been robust in his response had he been alive to hear the program.

    The Aboriginal cartoon issue raises many questions about the modern Left.

    Why do progressives who insist white fathers need to play a bigger role in the raising of their children not agree the same applies to black fathers? It has been clear since this paper’s Rosemary Neill won a Walkley Award for a piece in 1994 detailing at length how crime rates against Aboriginal women and children were almost all due to Aboriginal fathers that this is a serious issue.

    Can we, 25 years later, really place the feelings of offended Aboriginals from good homes ahead of the wellbeing and physical ­safety of Aboriginal women and children in danger?

    Of course there are many good Aboriginal dads and Leak knew plenty. Yet that does not diminish Bill’s point, as Mundine argued cogently in this paper on Friday.

    The Australian has dominated coverage of Aboriginal affairs for three decades, something acknowledged widely by Aboriginal leaders. If you doubt it, read my piece published last August 15 in defence of Leak’s cartoon for a potted history of the awards this paper has received for stories broken in Aboriginal affairs. It is also a paper that made Eddie Mabo its Australian of the Year at a time many feared Mabo would destroy regional Australia.

    For the past 30 years the paper has been largely alone among the media in this reporting. Why?

    It goes to the racist culture of low expectations that dominates left-wing thinking about Aboriginal life, even in journalism. Noel Pearson was greeted with outrage when he spoke about this culture within the ABC at the launch of Troy Bramston’s book, Paul ­Keating: The Big-Picture Leader, late last year.

    Noel was right and the Leak cartoon is at the heart of why. People who think the cartoon is racist — like those on the Q&A panel and its youthful host — are implying black fathers should not be held to the same standards as white fathers. In my book Making Headlines, released last October, I write at length of this culture of low expectations and the unchallenged racism behind it.

    As an ambassador for the ­Australian Indigenous Education Foundation and a close friend of its founders, Andrew and ­Michelle Penfold, I cannot tell you how often I have confronted wealthy, left-wing parents who sent their own children to prestigious GPS schools but think there is something wrong with scholarships to such schools for bright Aboriginal kids. They see it as destroying Aboriginal communities and families rather than lifting those communities and families.

    This is the Left’s unconscious but real racism. The racism that says Aboriginal people should not aspire to the same things white people do. They should be happy with their collectivist, primitivist conditions, as if their lives were part of some academic experiment by French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau about the noble savage.

    People who have read the Northern Territory’s “Little Children are Sacred” report, the one that prompted John Howard’s 2007 NT intervention, understand there is not a lot of nobility for many in these traditional communities, racked as they are by poverty, homelessness, drugs, alcohol, pornography and child abuse.

    Into this feeds the new Left’s post-materialist abandonment of economic empowerment in favour of the identity politics that now dominates tertiary education in the US and Australia. Paul Kelly wrote a brilliant piece last Wednesday linking this to the Leak matter and 18C.

    Aboriginal thought leaders have for decades understood the perverse racism in the Left’s elevation of feelings over material wellbeing. I first published Pearson on the perils of what he called “ethnic essentialism” in The Courier-Mail in the late 1990s.

    So where does this culture of offence — typified by the reaction to Leak’s death — take our society?

    As Media Watch pointed out last Monday week, it has already generated self-censorship in the progressive media. Host Paul Barry outed Fairfax and the ABC for failing to report stories about the radicalisation of Islamic school students in Sydney. This is journalism surrendering truth in the name of not offending racial minorities.

    Anecdotal it may be, but ask any senior teacher about classroom discussion in secondary schools today and he or she will tell you the dialogue with modern year 11 and 12 students is dominated by what cannot be said.

    “You can’t say that sir. It’s offensive. You can’t ask that miss. It’s racist.”

    Who is standing up for the role of truth in education, the media and public discussion?

    This is where the rubber hits the road for modern Western democracies. Voters will not cop laws and governments that elevate this politically correct offence culture.

    Voters will react with the sort of blowback we saw in favour of Donald Trump, Brexit and Pauline Hanson. The Left cannot fool all of the people all of the time, even if it is fooling many politicians and the deluded business leaders at the forefront of some of the most stultifyingly PC campaigns in modern Australia that seem to have zero to do with their fiduciary responsibilities to shareholders.

    Here’s the thing. So what if Bill Leak occasionally drew things some people found offensive. Some Aboriginal dads do have disproportionate numbers of interactions with the criminal justice system for offences against their families. Islamic terrorism is real. The radicalisation of young Muslims in the West does need to be confronted honestly. Leak risked his life to do so.

    And portraying a young Muslim woman in full covering asking “Does my bomb look big in this?’’ is surely an amusing way to handle a serious point.

    Did Bill desperately want legal changes so he could be more offensive? Of course not.

    Bill was the sweetest man I knew. But he understood the damage being done to Western civilisation by the amalgam of postmodern Marxist thought and the politics of identity. In the Middle Ages and later, academics used to risk death at the stake to speak the truth. Now many seek to suppress it in the mad assumption the feelings of a section of society are more important than truths for the whole society.

  52. Combine Dave

    If they could effectively blockade* us to the point our Navy couldn’t defend shipping or be deployed against them to stop them how would we stop them from simply torching our strategic reserve?

    Not saying we shouldn’t have one but it would certainly make a bit of a display if it went up!

    *And apparently make it not worthwhile for regional powers who rely on our coal etc for their own industries and power generation, China, SKorea, Japan etc to casually stomp them with an ‘anti-piracy action’

  53. Stimpson J. Cat

    That’s another thing that annoys me.
    Why is it called “menstruation” for f☆cks sake?
    It’s got nothing to do with us and I want no part of it.
    Bloody women.

  54. .

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.
    #2331547, posted on March 20, 2017 at 12:26 pm
    the decriminalisation of drug use in Australia.

    I’d like it if they used the Portuguese method. Off to the reformatory you go, user.

    ???

    That’s not what happens. That isn’t decriminalisation either. All users are not addicts. Nor is the Portuguese policy perfect or entirely unobjectionable .

    You need to be accurate when describing how things like this work, it is too easy to argue over stuff that is off base.

  55. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Also in Takimag:

    Mother and son become father and daughter as they see a TV program and are hit with the interesting idea that they both ‘need’ to transition:

    It follows the warped saga of 39-year-old Eric Maison—who was born a woman with a pair of exemplary, and some would even say enviable, breasts—and her son Corey, who was born a boy and retains the telltale XY chromosomes. “Eric” claims that one night after watching a TV documentary about transgender people, she and her son both suddenly realized they were trannies. They then made the utterly rational and scientific decision to declare that they were not in fact mother and son, but father and daughter.
    “Eric” started receiving testosterone injections, had her wonderful boobs sawed off, and now looks like an ugly lesbian. Corey pulls off the “girl” shtick more convincingly than his mom’s posturing as a man, albeit a “girl” that has a 41% likelihood of attempting suicide at some point along his wondrous journey of self-discovery and surgical mutilation.

    Please share this article by using the link below. When you cut and paste an article, Taki’s Magazine misses out on traffic, and our writers don’t get paid for their work. Email [email protected] to buy additional rights. http://takimag.com/article/the_week_that_perished_takimag_march_19_2017/print#ixzz4bpHROdHL

  56. Tom

    A quick Googling says resetting your browser’s zoom may fix it if it’s a flash player issue.

    Thanks, Egg. Can you explain in English what you’d like me to do?

  57. Slayer of Memes

    So why did that work for Gab, and not me?

  58. notafan

    In the Middle Ages and later, academics used to risk death at the stake to speak the truth

    Great piece, except this silly sentence

    “truth’

    You sure about that?

  59. Gab

    No idea, Slayer. It’s happened to a few of us over time.

  60. incoherent rambler

    Cat boffins: all my video playbacks in Windows 10 are suddenly giving me a super close-up of the images in the frame. Has anyone else encountered this? Does anyone know a way to get video images back to normal size? Thanks.

    Try standing on one leg, while scratching your arse and simultaneously rebooting* the PC.

    * During a full moon.

  61. notafan

    Os Peter Dutton being mean again

    A former bikie boss has chosen to leave Australia rather than risk deportation.
    Italian-born Vince Focarelli, who calls Adelaide home, told 9 News he feared he would end up in a detention centre if he does not leave Australia on his own accord.
    The former Comancheros leader turned devout Muslim was told in February the Federal Government wanted to cancel his visa because of his criminal past, The Advertiser reported.


    Sad news. What is it about bikies and islam?

  62. Joe

    Re: Video.

    It’s Windows. Not even Microsoft developers can predict what it will do each time you start it.
    It is not consistent in its behaviour.

    Try something else.

  63. Baldrick

    Tom, are you using Chrome?

  64. Senile Old Guy

    A quick Googling says resetting your browser’s zoom may fix it if it’s a flash player issue.

    Thanks, Egg. Can you explain in English what you’d like me to do?

    Find the ‘zoom’ setting in your browser and set it to 100%. This is on the Menu for Opera, so look for a setting on the menu. Alternatively, in most browsers, holding CONTROL down and scrolling the mouse wheel will change the zoom. I have no idea if that will fix your problem.

  65. egg_

    Tom:

    https://forums.adobe.com/thread/572588

    You’ll have to Google for your browser’s zoom reset instructions.

  66. Tom

    Tom:

    https://forums.adobe.com/thread/572588

    Thanks, Egg. That post is for those who have accidently changed the browser zoom (in my case IE). My browser zoom is 100%. The problem is only with video playback.

  67. stackja

    Using mouse scroll wheel while pressing Ctrl key can give zoom adjustment change.

  68. Tom,

    1) – Don’t watch your videos in the Windows supplied viewer.
    2) – Download and install VLC player. (It’s free and open source).
    3) – Set all media files to play in VLC by default.

    That should fix your problems.

  69. Baldrick

    Agree with MV. Use VLC and give Windows Media Player the boot.

  70. stackja

    memory vault I agree on vlc.

  71. egg_

    (in my case IE)

    CTRL-0 and make sure it’s default 100% (the system may have altered it).

  72. Helen

    I stopped reading Takimag because I was shocked at the Jewelhate written there.

  73. Democrats Love Socialism

    And Muttley love donuts. Who knew?

  74. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Race Discrimination Commissioner Tim Soutphommasane has issued a lengthy defence of his decision to publicise the Human Rights Commission’s complaints process in response to Bill Leak’s controversial cartoon, denying that he encouraged or solicited complaints.

    The August cartoon depicted an indigenous father who did not know his son’s name.

    On the day The Australian published it, Dr Soutphommasane tweeted a Fairfax article quoting numerous parties condemning the cartoon as “racist”, and commented: “Our society shouldn’t endorse racial stereotypes of Aboriginal Australians — or, for that matter, of any other group.”

    The commissioner subsequently issued repeated advice to the public about how to make a complaint to the HRC about behaviour which they believe may contravene Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act.

    Dr Soutphommasane’s statement today comes less than a fortnight after Mr Leak’s death, and ahead of a Coalition partyroom meeting tomorrow where the government is expected to make a decision about changes to 18C and the HRC’s complaints process.

    The impending government decision comes after a parliamentary inquiry into free speech, which was set up in response to the commission’s handling of allegations made against several Queensland University of Technology students, and three (ultimately unsuccessful) complaints which were made against Mr Leak and The Australian.

    From the Oz. Funny how Bill Leak’s death has them all scurrying for cover…

  75. stackja

    Flash Player | Change Settings | Chrome, Opera, and other Chromium based browsers – PPAPI
    Search Adobe Support
    Applies to: Flash Player
    Last Published: December 10, 2015
    Note: If you are using Chrome or Chromium browser, to change the Flash Player settings, use the Flash Player Online Settings Manager.
    Note that if you have installed the PPAPI version of Flash Player, you must use the Flash Player Native Control Panel to configure your update settings. If you are using Chrome, you will get the updated versions of Flash Player through the Google Chrome update mechanism.

    Adobe Security Bulletin
    Security Bulletins and Advisories

  76. Tom

    Thanks, Egg. Browser text size is not the problem. It is just that video playback has magnified images so much it’s impossible to make out what’s in the image inside the video frame (youtube, etc).

  77. Gab

    Tim Southmouth can try to lie all he wants but he actively sought people out by encouraging them to complain about Bill Leak. His tweets live on as proof.

  78. Mike of Marion

    Tom,

    Go to bottom left hans corner (MS Window) – Open.

    Select “Settings” – Open.

    Select “Systems – Open

    Select “Default Apps” – Open

    For “Videos” – Open and select an appropriate player other than MS player.

    ( Mine is “VLC” as highlighted by others above.

  79. .

    It’s not working, Lieutenant General Brewster.

    At 2:05 pm, AEDT, 20 March 2017, MS Windows became self aware and crashed.

  80. For “Videos” – Open and select an appropriate player other than MS player.
    ( Mine is “VLC” as highlighted by others above.

    It won’t show as a choice unless he downloads and installs it first, Mike.

  81. Andrew

    Yes!!!!!
    We are coming for you Normies!

    I think they prefer the term “neurotypical” or “NTs.”

  82. stackja

    SA nurse rapist, killer appears in court
    March 20, 2017 1:39pm
    About 20 victim impact statements will be presented to the South Australian Supreme Court when Mimili man Dudley Davey faces sentencing submissions in May over the murder and rape of outback nurse Gayle Woodford.
    In court on Monday, defence counsel Nick Vadasz raised concerns over the lack of a Pitjatjantjara interpreter for his client.
    He told the court that he had not been able to get an interpreter for any of Davey’s appearances or for when he spoke with the 35-year-old in custody.

  83. Mike of Marion

    memoryvault
    #2331618, posted on March 20, 2017 at 1:43 pm

    Correct

    I also have GOM as another player up my sleeve!1

  84. srr

    Rewarding Disobedience

    https://www.media.mit.edu/posts/disobedience-award/

    On July 21, 2016 we announced the creation of a $250K cash prize award for responsible disobedience. This idea came after a realization that there’s a widespread frustration from people trying to figure out how can we effectively harness responsible, ethical disobedience aimed at challenging our norms, rules, or laws to benefit society.

    And so we begin the process of searching for the first MIT Media Lab Disobedience Award recipient. The award will go to a living person or group engaged in what we believe is extraordinary disobedience for the benefit of society. Specifically, we’d like to call out action that seeks to change society in positive ways and is consistent with a set of key principles. These principles include non-violence, creativity, courage, and taking responsibility for one’s actions. We’re seeking both expected and unexpected nominees. This could include–but isn’t limited to–those engaged in scientific research, civil rights, freedom of speech, human rights, and the freedom to innovate.
    ___________________

    Jordan B Peterson‏ @jordanbpeterson 11m11 minutes ago

    I’ve been nominated twice for the MIT Media Lab Disobedience Award:

    🙂

  85. Rabz

    denying that he (Southpossumarse) encouraged or solicited complaints

    What a loathsome scumbag he is.

  86. Stimpson J. Cat

    I think they prefer the term “neurotypical” or “NTs.”

    I don’t speak for Normies.
    I speak for myself as the sole founder and member of the Aut Right.

  87. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Disgraced former NSW minister Eddie Obeid and his three sons have been ordered to pay at least a million dollars in legal fees after losing an appeal against the Independent Commission Against Corruption.

    Obeid, the former Labor powerbroker who was jailed for at least three years in December, unsuccessfully sued former ICAC commissioner David Ipp and others over an investigation into the granting of a coal exploration licence.

    In 2013, the anti-corruption watchdog found the Obeid family made $30 million after obtaining such a license and using it in a deal involving its property in Bylong Valley, NSW. Obeid, 73, and his sons Moses, Paul and Eddie Jr, launched an appeal that claimed the corruption investigation had denied them procedural fairness and that officials “engaged in misfeasance in public office”.

    In the NSW Supreme Court this morning, Justice David Hammerschlag ruled the Obeids had “wholly failed in every claim” and ordered they pay the legal costs of most defending parties on the ordinary basis, and to pay higher indemnity costs plus interest in relation to Mr Ipp.

    Mr Ipp’s fellow defendants included other ICAC investigators Geoffrey Watson, Grant Lockley and Paul Grainger, as well as the State of New South Wales and ICAC.

    Justice Hammerschlag said indemnity costs could be ordered when “unreasonable, inappropriate or otherwise unjustifiable behaviour of significance” had been committed in the conduct of proceedings.

    “The plaintiffs made allegations against the Commissioner, in his capacity as the holder of significant public office, of misconduct of the gravest kind,” said Justice Hammerschlag.

    “These allegations were abandoned without explanation. They were unmaintainable and irresponsibly made.”

    From the Oz.

  88. cynical1

    Why do progressives who insist white fathers need to play a bigger role in the raising of their children not agree the same applies to black fathers? It has been clear since this paper’s Rosemary Neill won a Walkley Award for a piece in 1994 detailing at length how crime rates against Aboriginal women and children were almost all due to Aboriginal fathers that this is a serious issue.

    Because they don’t know their arse from their elbow.

    These same “progressives” are quite happy for a white boy to have two “Dads”.

    Both of them lesbians…

  89. Tom

    For “Videos” – Open and select an appropriate player other than MS player.
    ( Mine is “VLC” as highlighted by others above.

    Thanks, Mike. It gives me dozens of options, but not VLC.

    Thoughts?

  90. .

    In 2013, the anti-corruption watchdog found the Obeid family made $30 million after obtaining such a license and using it in a deal involving its property in Bylong Valley, NSW. Obeid, 73, and his sons Moses, Paul and Eddie Jr, launched an appeal that claimed the corruption investigation had denied them procedural fairness and that officials “engaged in misfeasance in public office”.

    Are they bankrupt yet? Surely they’d be ruined by now?

  91. Stimpson J. Cat

    Thoughts?

    Download VLC and Media Player Classic from videolan.org and mpc-hc.org.
    Then install.

  92. stackja

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2331635, posted on March 20, 2017 at 2:06 pm
    Thoughts?

    Download VLC and Media Player Classic from videolan.org and mpc-hc.org.
    Then install.

    VLC is a better option IMHO.

  93. Thanks, Mike. It gives me dozens of options, but not VLC.

    You have to download and install it first.
    The link is included in my post at 1.09pm.
    DON’T download it from anywhere else!

  94. Geriatric Mayfly

    Labor has brought a swag of impoverished hard working Australians into The Gallery today. Trixie is going to lose squillions as is Troy because of the FWC’s decision to cut penalty rates. Or so the first two questions from Shortfilth and The Hag suggest.

  95. Tom

    Many thanks, Mike and MV. I’ve downloaded VLC and the problem is fixed.

  96. srr

    Paul Joseph Watson Retweeted
    Caolan Robertson @CaolanRob 5h5 hours ago

    This is what happens when you criticise Islam in the UK.
    @TheRebelTV @TRobinsonNewEra
    https://twitter.com/CaolanRob/status/843588816074170368

    Full video here – http://goo.gl/TWyKWa

  97. Top Ender

    Apologies if posted before:

    Australian-funded projects have removed “mateship” from the lexicon used in Papua New Guinea to describe the heroism of Diggers fighting the Japanese on the ­Kokoda Track, in what a prominent critic describes as politically correct revisionism to “demilitarise” the battleground’s history in the lead up to its 75th anniversary.

    According to former Australian Army major, Vietnam War veteran and NSW Liberal state MP Charlie Lynn, who for the past 25 years has run treks on the ­Kokoda Track, $65 million of Australian taxpayers’ money has been directed through “a conga line of consultants” to green-leaning and leftist development projects promoting Australian liberal values such as gender equity on the track.

    At the same time, he claims, bridges and toilets on the track have fallen into disrepair and Australian-sponsored aid projects such as schools have no desks and clinics no medicines.

    The reinterpretation of the World War II campaign, during which Australian troops started to turn the tide against Japanese forces, has been carried out under the Department of the Environment and the Department of Foreign Affairs.

    “They are anti the military heritage of the trail,” Mr Lynn told The Australian, adding that he believed Australia’s Kokoda Track effort should have been under the charge of Veterans Affairs.

    “Now, they are starting to subtly rewrite the history of the track.”

    Mr Lynn pointed to a departure from the four words traditionally used to sum up the Australian war effort on the track, a campaign waged with the assistance of PNG communities: Courage, Endurance, Mateship, Sacrifice.

    Each of the four words is ­engraved on one of the four marble pillars in the war memorial established by the Howard govern­ment at Isurava, the site of a major battle in August 1942.

    “The power of that memorial is in the simplicity of the memorial and those four words,” Mr Lynn said.

    By contrast, he observed, a set of new interpretative panels erected at Owers Corner at the entrance to the track drops the word “mateship”, and instead refers to “friendship”, which Mr Lynn said reflected a preference for gender neutrality.

    One of the panels speaks of how “Australians, Papuans, and New Guineans served side-by-side in atrocious conditions”.

    “The Track has become a shrine to their courage, endurance and sacrifice,” the panel says. “It is an enduring reminder of the unity and friendship shared by the ­people of Papua New Guinea and Australia.”

    Another section quotes a PNG man as having said “Friend … I’ll walk with you” with regard to the help he provided to Australian soldiers. Mr Lynn claims the line was ­selected to mimic the fake social media campaign “I’ll ride with you” to combat supposed anti-Muslim sentiments after Sydney’s Lindt cafe siege.

    A spokeswoman for Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said the signs at Owers Conner were part of a project managed by the PNG Tourism Promotion Authority, funded by the Australian Environment Department.

    “The Foreign Minister had no role in the approval of the language used in the signs,” the spokeswoman said. “The word ‘friendship’ has been chosen as this is understood by Papua New Guineans. ‘Mateship’ is a uniquely Australian term and we will ­request both words are used as part of the new signage.”

    The spokeswoman said the “I’ll walk with you” line was simply a referral to the iconic image of the Kokoda campaign in which a blinded Australian soldier is being led by a Papua New Guinean, and had nothing to do with the “I’ll ride with you” campaign.

    Mr Lynn said Australian authorities had employed Australian consultants at a cost of millions of dollars to undertake leftist social engineering projects such as a gender equity study of PNG women on the track, where more than 600 Australian fighting men were killed and 1680 wounded during the campaign.

    Entitled A Gender Snapshot of the Kokoda Initiative, the 2014 study laments that “indigenous women and children, more than half the population are neither visible nor heard in most existing literature on Kokoda war history”.

    “Most accounts of the war on Kokoda are Australian and male, thus bringing a specific lens … Women are hardly mentioned.”

    Mr Lynn said rather than get PNG villagers to do the work on the track, Australians were being flown in. Ms Bishop’s spokeswoman said this project “twinned” PNG rangers with the Australians.

    Mr Lynn claimed bureaucrats and consultants missed the point of what attracted Australians to Kokoda. “They don’t go up there to have a bloody environmental levitation, they are going there to walk in the footstep of the ­Diggers,” he said.

    The result had been a decline of more than 50 per cent in the number of trekkers over the nine years since the Department of Environment took charge of the Kokoda project.

    Ms Bishop’s spokeswoman did not directly respond to Mr Lynn’s claims of a deterioration of facilities on the track, but said: “The Australian government is working with the Kokoda Track Authority to improve safety, including by upgrading roads, installing a weather station, improving the Kokoda airstrip and updating the VHF radio network along the track to ­improve communications.”

    From the Oz

  98. Atoms for Peace

    We should just swamp the AHRC with complaints when we see any disparaging commentary about anglo saxons.

  99. notafan

    For those who pay lipservice to our Christian heritage.

    Looking forward to Australia being Swedezuela .

    The empty, unheated, unlit, room.

    . If both father and mother attend regularly, 33 percent of their children will end up as regular churchgoers, and 41 percent will end up attending irregularly. Only a quarter of their children will end up not practicing at all.


    Why islam has it all over Christianity

  100. Stimpson J. Cat

    VLC is a better option IMHO.

    Tom needs both in case he wants to watch anime fansubs.
    😆

  101. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    “Most accounts of the war on Kokoda are Australian and male, thus bringing a specific lens … Women are hardly mentioned.”

    The last stand of the First Feminist Fusileers, or the crucial counter attack, spearheaded by Wnnynses in Tanks, continues to be overlooked, I see.

  102. val majkus

    “… keeping attention away from the big issues …”
    Activist judges appointed by the left is a big issue. But even a GWB appointee sailed off course as part of the three judge panel that’s now copped a caning from a five judge panel.
    https://pjmedia.com/trending/2017/03/19/five-9th-circuit-judges-eviscerate-the-fundamental-errors-in-ruling-against-trumps-muslim-ban/

    thanks herodutos, if anyone is wondering this judgment does not effect the Hawaiian and Marylands restraining orders against the current Trump EO. What it does do is explained in this comment which I’ve cut and pasted:

    The original 9th Circuit panel ruling (in February, with three judges making up the panel) upheld the TRO of the first executive order from a district court in Washington state. The Trump administration appealed to have an en banc hearing from the whole 9th Circuit. But before that hearing took place, Trump wrote a new executive order. The Trump administration then filed a motion to dismiss the en banc appeal because of the new executive order. This most recent 9th Circuit ruling granted that motion after deciding that there was no reason to revisit what had become moot (the first executive order). The 5 dissenting judges believed that the hearing should have taken place, and why the TRO of the first executive order should have been lifted and why.
    No ruling at this point has been overturned.

    What it does do is indicate how the appeal court is looking at the issues

  103. The last stand of the First Feminist Fusileers, or the crucial counter attack, spearheaded by Wnnynses in Tanks, continues to be overlooked, I see.

    The definitive movie of Western women in wartime, has already been made.

  104. Zyconoclast

    NAB sells gender equality bond’….WTF are gender equality bonds?

    Could be an abbreviation for bondage.
    It’s the only way they could get it through their anti-virus programs.

  105. val majkus

    more detail here (written by an attorney)

    The five judges note some of the absurdities in the original 3-judge panel decision: claiming a consular officer must be deferred to more than the President of the United States; claiming first amendment rights exist for foreigners when the Supreme Court twice ruled otherwise; the claim that people here could claim a constitutional right for someone else to travel here, a decision specifically rejected by the Supreme Court just a year ago; and analogous Trumpian kind of immigration exclusion was uniformly approved by Circuit courts across the country in decisions issued between 2003 and 2008. As the five panelists conclude, the overwhelming precedent and legal history reveals a court simply cannot “apply ordinary constitutional standards to immigration policy.”

    The five judges don’t quit there, though. They go on to identify other “obvious” errors. As the 5 judges note, the 3-judge panel hid from the most important statute, noting the 3-judge panel “regrettably” “never once mentioned” the most important statutory authority: section 1182(f) of title 8. Additionally, the 3-judge panel failed to even note the important Presidential power over immigration that all courts, Congress, and the Constitution expressly and explicitly gave him in all of its prior precedents.

    Unsatisfied with that harsh condemnation, the five judges go even further. The judges concur with the Boston judge’s understanding of “rational basis” review, and condemn the Seattle judge’s and the 3-judge panel’s misapplication and elemental misunderstanding of what “rational basis” is. As the 5 judges note, “so long as there is one facially legitimate and bona fide reason for the President’s actions, our inquiry is at an end.” The issue is whether a reason is given, not whether a judge likes or agree with that reason. That means the executive order sufficed, and no further consideration of the reasons for Trump’s order were allowed.
    The five judges still weren’t finished. Next up, the ludicrous suggestion the President had to produce classified and national security information to explain and explicate publicly all the empirical reasons he felt the order needed for safety rationales. As the five judges panel note, judges are not New York Times editors here to substitute for the President at their unelected will. A gavel is not a gun; a judge is not the commander in chief. And, again the 5 panel judges noted the Supreme Court specifically condemned just this kind of demand from judges — demanding classified information to second guess executively privileged decisions. As the court concluded, “the President does not have to come forward with supporting documentation to explain the basis for the Executive Order.”

  106. srr

    🙂 … Gotta love Farage 🙂

    Mike Cernovich 🇺🇸 Retweeted
    Jack Posobiec 🇺🇸‏ @JackPosobiec 2h2 hours ago

    Good night, sweet prince
    https://twitter.com/JackPosobiec/status/843633046821703680

  107. Infidel Tiger

    Same sex marriage vote by post
    EXCLUSIVE: Conservative Turnbull Government ministers are pushing to hold a national plebiscite on same sex marriage by postal vote.

    Bugger me drunk. They really really hate us.

  108. val majkus

    you can get the opinion at that link it’s here

  109. stackja

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2331651, posted on March 20, 2017 at 2:30 pm
    VLC is a better option IMHO.

    Tom needs both in case he wants to watch anime fansubs.

    VLC allows addition of subtitles.

  110. feelthebern

    by postal vote.

    Can’t we just log on like we did with the census & click a button?

  111. Infidel Tiger

    I was listening to the wireless this morning and they had a report on the word “mateship” being banned by DFAT.

    Next story was that Sesame Street was introducing an autistic puppet that has trouble acknowledging Big Bird when he says hello.

    Switched over to Racing Radio for some normalcy.

  112. Hydra

    Bugger me drunk. They really really hate us.

    Millenials won’t be able to find the post office box.

  113. Andrew

    How did 5 judges of the 9th Circus come to such a radically different decision than 3 other judges of the 9th Circus?

  114. stackja

    Top Ender
    #2331647, posted on March 20, 2017 at 2:25 pm

    2GB speaks with former Australian Army major and NSW Liberal MP Charlie Lynn, about the politically correct changes.

  115. Same sex marriage vote by post

    Not doubting you, IT, but do you have a source for that news?
    I’m interested to see if they intend it to be a voluntary postal vote.

  116. stackja

    Andrew
    #2331675, posted on March 20, 2017 at 2:59 pm
    How did 5 judges of the 9th Circus come to such a radically different decision than 3 other judges of the 9th Circus?

    Ask who selected them. Clinton/Obama?

  117. cohenite

    val majkus

    #2331668, posted on March 20, 2017 at 2:51 pm

    you can get the opinion at that link it’s here

    Extraordinary; the ‘Judgment’ defending the 9th Circuit rejection of the EO is:

    REINHARDT, J., concurring in the denial of en banc rehearing:
    I concur in our court’s decision regarding President Trump’s first Executive
    Order – the ban on immigrants and visitors from seven Muslim countries. I also
    concur in our court’s determination to stand by that decision, despite the effort of a
    small number of our members to overturn or vacate it. Finally, I am proud to be a
    part of this court and a judicial system that is independent and courageous, and that
    vigorously protects the constitutional rights of all, regardless of the source of any
    efforts to weaken or diminish them

    That says it all; these ‘judges’ rejecting the EO of Trump are not Judges but activists who have made no attempt to justify their position within the law. It is as plain an example of noble cause corruption as you would find.

    I have no doubt Trump will appeal this egregious decision when his appointee takes his place in the SC.

  118. feelthebern

    Bert Newton could be next on the block.

  119. Nick

    Most accounts of the war on Kokoda are Australian and male, thus bringing a specific lens … Women are hardly mentioned.”

    Funny that….
    I’ve made made mention here before the touring exhibition at the Brunswick Library that recognised the Centenary of the Gallipoli landing. Women, Turks, all lavishly mMost accounts of the war on Kokoda are Australian and male, thus bringing a specific lens … Women are hardly mentioned. mentioned, except those who actually fought, white males.

  120. C.L.

    Aboriginal artist supports Bill Leak, Fairfax journalist “shocked” at the black woman’s temerity.

  121. Nick

    Bert Newton could be next on the block.

    I saw a poster with his missus warbling about gambling debts. Maybe he’ll be on “I’m a celebrity get me out of here” next year?

  122. Infidel Tiger

    Not doubting you, IT, but do you have a source for that news?
    I’m interested to see if they intend it to be a voluntary postal vote.

    Daily Telegraph.

  123. Zyconoclast

    Sad news. What is it about bikies and islam?

    Motor bikes are the modern camel?

  124. srr

    With Jordan retweeting Rita … shit just got serious 😉 …

    Jordan B Peterson‏ @jordanbpeterson 1m

    Jordan B Peterson Retweeted Rita Panahi

    Only 125 million mutilated women. Comment, feminists? Post modernists? Marxists?
    Oh, you’re busy worrying about Western patriarchy…

    Rita Panahi‏Verified account
    @RitaPanahi

    Horrifying. Every single girl suffered FGM…majority of the girls had the most extreme kind of FGM. #Sweden

    https://twitter.com/RitaPanahi/status/843589658541883392

  125. Empire GTHO Phase III

    How did 5 judges of the 9th Circus come to such a radically different decision than 3 other judges of the 9th Circus?

    Five judges conveniently ignored the oath they once took, said be damned with rule of law and instead followed orders from the OiC, as dictated by CAIR.

  126. King Koala

    and its J e wi sh antecedent.

    Please point me to where in the j ewish antecedent you find those values? And where in the Torah and Talmud you find them today?

  127. stackja

    Only women in PNG were nurses. Front line men only.

  128. val majkus

    Extraordinary; the ‘Judgment’ defending the 9th Circuit rejection of the EO is:

    cohenite the way I’m reading it is the majority judges are these BYBEE, Circuit Judge, with whom KOZINSKI, CALLAHAN, BEA, and IKUTA, Circuit Judges who say

    I regret that we did not decide to reconsider this case en banc for the purpose
    of vacating the panel’s opinion. We have an obligation to correct our own errors,
    particularly when those errors so confound Supreme Court and Ninth Circuit
    precedent that neither we nor our district courts will know what law to apply in the
    future.

    REINHARDT, J. is a dissenting judge who does not join in the majority opinion which is so critical of the original ruling

  129. Boambee John

    Top Ender at 1425

    “The spokeswoman said the “I’ll walk with you” line was simply a referral to the iconic image of the Kokoda campaign in which a blinded Australian soldier is being led by a Papua New Guinean, and ha…”

    As I am sure you know, that photo of Private GC Whittington,was taken at Buna on Christmas Day 1942.

    This was almost two months after the recapture of Kokoda.

    Either (most probably) the DFAT spokesperson is totally ignorant of the matter or there is a lot of squirming going on.

    Or perhaps both.

  130. Daily Telegraph.

    Thanks, IT.
    Unfortunately I can’t seem to be able to get around the subscriber wall.

  131. .

    Yeah right. You’re a farmer King Koala (who dropped his lot when an article by the NFF pronounced the benefits of a policy you’re opposed to and you reckon “no” farmers supported), an ex-J e w who hates Judaism and much prefers Christianity (but you’re an atheist) and also are a white ethnic nationalist.

    Suuure…

  132. val majkus

    at pages 23-24 in the majority opinion they say:

    The panel’s errors are many and obvious. Had it applied the proper
    standard, the panel should have stopped here and issued the stay of the district
    23
    court’s TRO. Instead, the panel opinion stands contrary to well-established
    separation-of-powers principles. We have honored those principles in our prior
    decisions; the panel failed to observe them here. If for no other reason, we should
    have gone en banc to vacate the panel’s opinion in order to keep our own decisions
    straight.
    III
    We are all acutely aware of the enormous controversy and chaos that
    attended the issuance of the Executive Order. People contested the extent of the
    national security interests at stake, and they debated the value that the Executive
    Order added to our security against the real suffering of potential emigres. As
    tempting as it is to use the judicial power to balance those competing interests as
    we see fit, we cannot let our personal inclinations get ahead of important,
    overarching principles about who gets to make decisions in our democracy. For
    better or worse, every four years we hold a contested presidential election. We
    have all found ourselves disappointed with the election results in one election cycle
    or another. But it is the best of American traditions that we also understand and
    respect the consequences of our elections. Even when we disagree with the
    judgment of the political branches—and perhaps especially when we disagree—we
    have to trust that the wisdom of the nation as a whole will prevail in the end.

  133. BrettW

    Top Ender,
    The Kokoda “mateship” issue was red hot on 2GB this morning (please note I have not sought approval for this post so it may trigger you know who).

    Lots of outraged calls after Charlie Lynn explained the scenario. Chris Smith was on the rampage and in my view a bit over the top. Seemed to think Ministers preparing for Question Time should drop everything to answer his questions immeadiately and was beating it up and suggesting people should not vote Coalition because of it. Please note I totally disagree with use of the word friendship instead of mateship in context of Kokoda.

    What was interesting is that the issue was not under Veterans Affairs area but the Environment which probably explains the stuff up.

    Frydenburg came on and said as far as he was aware no Minister was involved in the decision. The issue apparently was there is no word in NG language that equates to mateship so they used the word friendship instead. Word will now be changed to Mateship.

    Seems Vet Affairs Minister will be on Fordham show soon also discussing this.

    (with apologies to the Traditional Owner of this blog JC the Omnipotent who is allergic to all references to news obtained by radio – or perhaps just my posts !).

    PS Radio now mentioning possibility of voluntary postal vote on SSM.

  134. stackja

    Fake history on Kokoda. Fitzy?

  135. srr

    val majkus
    #2331657, posted on March 20, 2017 at 2:37 pm

    “… keeping attention away from the big issues …”

    Activist judges

    val, do you by any chance know if there’s been any complaints or rumblings against a Vic Supreme Court Judge who told a new crop of Vic Lawyers to go out and be Activist Lawyers?

    It was his big message to them at the official admissions do, a couple or few years ago.

  136. Senile Old Guy

    CONSERVATIVE Turnbull Government ministers are pushing to hold a national plebiscite on same sex marriage by postal vote.

    The Daily Telegraph understands conservative Liberal MPs have held recent discussions with their cabinet colleagues about the feasibility of holding a plebiscite by postal vote.

    Under this model, the Australian Electoral Commission would send out postal ballots and it would be voluntary for Australians to partake in the vote on same sex marriage.

    MPs told The Daily Telegraph this option does not require legislation change and would get around the decision by Labor and the Greens to kill-off the plebiscite.

    The Australian Electoral Commission’s chief legal officer Paul Pirani has confirmed to the parliament that a plebiscite could be held without the Parliament passing enabling legislation, using a “voluntary postal vote methodology.”

    But moderate MPs have expressed reservations that this model would create public anger that the party was bypassing the parliament.

    It would also be a non-compulsory ballot, so could undermine the outcome if there is a low voter-turnout.

    There are also concerns a plebiscite of any nature would also dominate the political agenda for the months leading up to it.

  137. Mark A

    Infidel Tiger
    #2331671, posted on March 20, 2017 at 2:54 pm
    Switched over to Racing Radio for some normalcy.

    Hope you didn’t catch the female race analyst/expert?

  138. BrettW

    Listening to Vet Affairs Minister and he was not aware of wording used and confirming word will be changed to mateship.

    Fordham just asked him about postal vote on SSM and his position is there should be a vote by the public as taken to election. Did not specifically mention if that could be by post.

  139. val majkus

    val, do you by any chance know if there’s been any complaints or rumblings against a Vic Supreme Court Judge who told a new crop of Vic Lawyers to go out and be Activist Lawyers?

    No, don’t know, sorry. Doesn’t sound like the level of impartiality required of judges does it?

  140. val majkus

    in case you’re a Federer fan:

    ROGER Federer has claimed a record-equalling fifth ATP Indian Wells Masters title, continuing his career resurgence with a 6-4, 7-5 victory over Stan Wawrinka.

    Federer, sidelined some six months after knee surgery last year, returned to win his 18th Grand Slam title at the Australian Open in January.

    With Monday’s triumph in the all-Swiss final, Federer joined Novak Djokovic as the only men to win five Indian Wells titles, adding to those he won in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2012.

  141. cohenite

    val majkus

    #2331699, posted on March 20, 2017 at 3:26 pm

    at pages 23-24 in the majority opinion they say:

    The panel’s errors are many and obvious. Had it applied the proper
    standard, the panel should have stopped here and issued the stay of the district
    23
    court’s TRO. Instead, the panel opinion stands contrary to well-established
    separation-of-powers principles. We have honored those principles in our prior
    decisions; the panel failed to observe them here. If for no other reason, we should
    have gone en banc to vacate the panel’s opinion in order to keep our own decisions
    straight.
    III
    We are all acutely aware of the enormous controversy and chaos that
    attended the issuance of the Executive Order. People contested the extent of the
    national security interests at stake, and they debated the value that the Executive
    Order added to our security against the real suffering of potential emigres. As
    tempting as it is to use the judicial power to balance those competing interests as
    we see fit, we cannot let our personal inclinations get ahead of important,
    overarching principles about who gets to make decisions in our democracy. For
    better or worse, every four years we hold a contested presidential election. We
    have all found ourselves disappointed with the election results in one election cycle
    or another. But it is the best of American traditions that we also understand and
    respect the consequences of our elections. Even when we disagree with the
    judgment of the political branches—and perhaps especially when we disagree—we
    have to trust that the wisdom of the nation as a whole will prevail in the end.

    Bingo; the activist Judges who this group are opposing have subverted the separation of powers and cloaked themselves in Executive powers because they don’t allegedly like what Trump has done. But even this is wrong because Trump is doing no more than what Obama did in 2015. So, in actual fact, the activist judges are sabotaging the electoral will of the people; they are subverting democracy because they don’t like Trump.

  142. val majkus

    agree cohenite! tell me, does an en banc hearing comprise all judges of the 9th circuit; if so there should be other opinions filed in future days

  143. srr

    Doesn’t sound like the level of impartiality required of judges does it?

    No, it doesn’t, not at all.

  144. val majkus

    However, the count is now roughly even for the first appeal of the order

  145. Bruce of Newcastle

    Bwahahahahaha!

    Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz to Step Down in April

    Schultz’ resignation as CEO follows his recent commitment to hire 10,000 refugees at Starbucks over the next five years as an act of protest against President Trump’s temporary travel halt. Shortly after this announcement, a YouGov survey showed that the public perception of the Starbucks brand was declining. The survey questioned potential customers and asked if they had, “heard anything about the brand in the last two weeks, through advertising, news or word of mouth, was it positive or negative.”

    In the week before the company’s commitment to hire 10,000 refugees, 30 percent of the people surveyed stated that they would consider spending money at Starbucks. After Starbucks’ pro-refugee statement, that number fell to 24 percent. Another study performed by the Swiss financial services company Credit Suisse stated that Starbucks’ comments had negatively impacted sales and damaged the company’s brand.

    “Our work shows a sudden drop in brand sentiment following announcement of the refugee hiring initiative on Jan. 29th

    You’d think these people would be bright enough to realise that even though some people are not loud excitable protestors they might still have strong views about stuff such as PC crap. And that going the full SJW might put them off buying your product. Mr Schultz has just been painfully served that lesson.

  146. srr

    Bill Mitchell‏Verified account @mitchellvii 13h13 hours ago

    WINNING! In First 2 Months in Office:
    Trump Reduced Debt by $100 Billion –
    Obama Increased Debt by $400 Billion

  147. Stimpson J. Cat


    an ex-J e w who hates Judaism and much prefers Christianity

    What exactly is the problem with this Dot?

    Christianity is way cooler, and way more popular, and rightly so.
    Beards and religion should never mix.
    Every goy knows this.
    Santa is the only one who gets a pass.

  148. Beachside

    @ Bruce of Newcastle

    ‘MR. PRESIDENT’&‘THE FIRST LADY’
    WASHINGTON, DC BALD EAGLE NEST CAM

    Welcome to the DC Eagle Cam

    In 2014, a pair of mated Bald Eagles chose the most idyllic of nest sites within the United States’ National Capital (Washington, DC), nestled high in a Tulip Poplar tree amongst the Azalea Collection at the U.S. National Arboretum, which is operated by the United States Department of Agriculture. This is the first Bald Eagle pair to nest in this location since 1947. The two Eagles have been iconically named ‘Mr. President’ and ‘The First Lady.’ Join the American Eagle Foundation and the USDA in viewing this most patriotic nest cam 24/7, in HD quality, and now…with sound!

    Watch live. Enjoy!

  149. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Dot. Re reformatory. Just joking. Although many could do with a visit.
    Tom. I think Da Hairy Ape may have thrown my laptop around as apes do to fix it. He admits to fiddling with the hated Win10 on it. So it wasn’t just my rebooting that did the repair. He just nodded when I mentioned your problem. He mentioned flash drives but I am no wiser.

  150. srr

    Jordan B Peterson Retweeted
    Nature is Scary‏ @NatureisScary Mar 17

    Worm taken prisoner

    https://twitter.com/NatureisScary/status/842920313562320896

    Nature is Scary‏ @NatureisScary Mar 9

    That’s a big snake

    https://twitter.com/NatureisScary/status/840036292054376448

    Nature is Scary‏ @NatureisScary Jan 1

    The goblin shark

    https://twitter.com/NatureisScary/status/815756256761810948

  151. zyconoclast

    The Marcus Review

    You Are Going to Push What(?!) Up a Hill?

    Funny stuff.

  152. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Gail from Westpac. Have you heard the news about the Starbucks’ CEO? SJW concerns negative for sales. Hostages at Coopers you can come out now. You’re free again.

  153. Mark A

    Stimpson J. Cat
    #2331651, posted on March 20, 2017 at 2:30 pm
    VLC is a better option IMHO.
    Tom needs both in case he wants to watch anime fansubs.

    Don’t know what “anime fansubs” is but you need flash player if you want to watch Sky racing on the TAB website.
    It’s a pain but there you are.

  154. egg_

    Tonight’s Q&A:
    Panellists: Wadah Khanfar, Former director-general of the Al Jazeera Network; Claire Wardle, First Draft News; Mark Day, Journalist The Australian; Zed Seselja, Assistant Minister for Social Services and Multicultural Affairs; and Terri Butler, Queensland Labor MP.

    Not the Butler again?

  155. JC

    Not the Butler again?

    Lets hope it’s another lawsuit.

  156. Elizabeth (Lizzie) B.

    Stimps, Santa in my book is a terrible old pagan: Father Christmas in drag.

  157. Bruce of Newcastle

    Beachside – That’s fun! It’s around midnight and Mrs Bald Eagle is asleep in the middle of the nest, so being early Spring I suspect some eaglets will arrive soon.

    Café Bruce has a quiet patch at the moment. The rain means the kookas have been in clover, feasting on worms driven to the surface by the wet. Berry season has arrived too, so the currawongs are mostly away to load up on fruit and search out nice places to nest. Even the rainbow lorikeets have disappeared – I haven’t seen any today.

  158. egg_

    You Are Going to Push What(?!) Up a Hill?

    Pumped hydro sh1te?
    Werribee that?

  159. JC

    On the Terri Butler thing… Can any lawyer explain how it was that she was sued rather than Their ABC. Do you sign a waiver if you go on their ABC?

    I would have thought they were liable rather than a panelist -even though it was good to see that arsehole cop a damages claim.

  160. .

    Why do NSW Supreme Court justices look like Santa Claus?

    Did St Nick really wear green before Coke changed it all?

  161. JC

    Did St Nick really wear green before Coke changed it all?

    Always loved Coke Xmas ads, makes me really miss American Xmas.

  162. cohenite

    val majkus

    #2331717, posted on March 20, 2017 at 3:59 pm

    However, the count is now roughly even for the first appeal of the order

    Yes and a majority will see the appeal granted. The analysis you link to says it all in the first line:

    Despite a surprising lack of media attention, the Ninth Circuit saw a relatively rare filing of a dissent in the appeal of the first executive order.

    Trump knew the stinking msm was his opposition but he didn’t appreciate how entrenched the progressives were in the engine rooms of the US legal structure.

  163. JC

    It’s starting – just as I thought.

    GM Tries a Subscription Plan for Cadillacs—a Netflix for Cars at $1,500 a Month
    Move is latest effort to test whether people favor on-demand access over ownership

    Ashley Sandall recently set aside the keys to her Porsche sport-utility vehicle for three months to try out a few Cadillacs. When the Caddy she was driving proved too small for her weekend plans, she ordered up a different model with her smartphone. It would arrive the next day.

    Ms. Sandall, a 35-year-old fashion executive who lives in New York City, used Cadillac’s brawny Escalade SUV for trips to the Hamptons and a football game in New Jersey. “It was great to have your pick of the vehicle best suited for what you’re doing,” she said.

    After participating free of charge in a three-month pilot of General Motors Co.’s new Book by Cadillac subscription plan, Ms. Sandall said she is considering becoming a full-time member when it is time for a new vehicle. For $1,500 a month, the program covers ownership costs and lets members trade in and out of Cadillac’s 10 models up to 18 times a year.

    The effort is the latest experiment by a car company to test whether people are willing to treat personal transportation like a Netflix account, where temporary, on-demand access outweighs the benefits of ownership.

    GM’s Book Cadillac service, which started late last year, is available only in metro New York City but likely will expand to Los Angeles and other major markets, Cadillac marketing chief Uwe Ellinghaus said. Subscribers pay month-to-month, without a long-term commitment.

    So far, nearly 5,000 people have registered on the plan’s website, GM said, but the company declined to disclose how many are paying for the service and how many are using a free-trial offer.

    The concept of shared ownership of premium cars isn’t new. Startups are testing the model: Atlanta-based Clutch Technologies, begun in 2014, works much like Cadillac’s service but gives users access to multiple brands and models for $950 or $1,400 a month. And exotic-car clubs and small-fleet operators have long offered programs that allow people to swap in and out of high-end cars.

    GM believes its approach will differentiate its offering from car-sharing services such as Avis Budget Group Inc.-owned Zipcar that operate like a commodity, with usage allocated on an hourly basis. GM is also trying to get on the radar with more luxury-oriented consumers, Mr. Ellinghaus said. Young and affluent buyers are prized by auto makers, but those prospects often head to German brands like Volkswagen AG’s Audi or BMW AG.

    BMW considered a subscription service but ultimately decided against it because of potential logistical hurdles and doubts about the size of the market, said the car maker’s North America chief executive, Ludwig Willisch.

    “I’m not sure how big the demand really is,” Mr. Willisch said in a recent interview. Instead, BMW has expanded its ReachNow car-sharing service to several U.S. cities, allowing customers to book a car through an app and drop it off at any public parking space in the area.
    A Cadillac CT6. GM’s Book by Cadillac subscription plan is the latest experiment by a car company to test whether people are willing to treat personal transportation like a Netflix account,
    A Cadillac CT6. GM’s Book by Cadillac subscription plan is the latest experiment by a car company to test whether people are willing to treat personal transportation like a Netflix account, Photo: Cadillac

    I like this sort of deal.

  164. srr

    Tommy Robinson‏Verified account @TRobinsonNewEra 7h7 hours ago

    So , on Saturday I attended a uk anti islamophobia march.
    Here’s what happened

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YfIAQnzkM_U … PLEASE SHARE
    ..
    Gavin McInnes Retweeted Tommy Robinson

    NAZI!
    “How am I a Nazi?”
    Sorry, I don’t talk to Nazis.

  165. calli

    The Lipsticked Drain on Q&A tonight?

    Here’s one that Bill prepared earlier.

  166. srr

    Greg Cook‏ @ImGregCook 6h6 hours ago

    Greg Cook Retweeted Tommy Robinson

    Guy at 6.17 “What do you do? Do you do any marching or campaigning?”

    He asked @TRobinsonNewEra that.
    😂😂😂😂😂😂

  167. val majkus

    thanks to who (or should that be ‘which’) ever Cat posted a link to the 9th circuit court matter; it’s surprising how little MSM attention it’s received, it’s clear to me that the court has copped a lot of criticism over the original panel ruling and that can’t be a bad thing

  168. calli

    The Spaminator ate my homework! 😢

  169. duncanm

    I personally think you must be gay (as in man-man, not lesbian) if you’re a woman who wants to become a man.

    I mean — why would you ditch your own breasts otherwise ?

  170. Snoopy

    Ms. Sandall, a 35-year-old fashion executive who lives in New York City, used Cadillac’s brawny Escalade SUV for trips to the Hamptons and a football game in New Jersey.

    LOL

  171. Elizabeth (Libby) Zee

    Same sex marriage vote by post

    The proponents of SSM are desperate to avoid any possibility of a plebiscite that reflects the true opinion of the Australian people. No doubt they are well aware that any plebiscite relying solely on postal votes will be seriously distorted by a massive number of non-returns. That distortion will be even worse if voting is voluntary and is their next best chance of getting SSM outside a Parliamentary vote. That is what they are relying on.

  172. Mark A

    Some coloured pictures from WWII (scroll please)

  173. JC

    Snoopy
    #2331769, posted on March 20, 2017 at 5:00 pm

    Ms. Sandall, a 35-year-old fashion executive who lives in New York City, used Cadillac’s brawny Escalade SUV for trips to the Hamptons and a football game in New Jersey.

    LOL

    You have to go through some tough terrain there snoop. There are the exits on the NJ Turnpike and of course you have to get to exit 70 on the 495 to finally reach the outskirts of the Hamptons. You need a tough car for all that. 🙂

  174. JC

    Facebook already saturated domestically, looks overseas for growth. And the consequences?

    While Facebook’s monthly active user growth is definitely overseas, the earnings they enjoy, which has driven the stock to record highs, are predominately made here. Per active user, revenues derived from North American (US, Canada) users are 15x than that made overseas.

    The future of Facebook’s growth lies overseas, with North American markets already saturated. It should come as no surprise to anyone using the platform that Zuckerberg and co. have a vested interest in suppressing news that might be deemed ‘anti-globalist.’

  175. Harlequin Decline

    Mark A
    #2331777, posted on March 20, 2017 at 5:07 pm

    Great photos, the colourisation process is excellent and really brings the pictures to life.

  176. thefrolickingmole

    Potential greatness…???

    This is some 1/2 smart legislating (as long as they get it through)
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2017/mar/20/coalition-plans-to-criminalise-payments-that-induce-unions-to-trade-workers-rights

    Making or receiving payments that encourage unions to improperly trade off workers’ rights will be criminalised under a plan unveiled by the federal government.

    Malcolm Turnbull and the employment minister, Michaelia Cash, announced the policy on Monday in Canberra, arguing it was necessary to ensure unions put members’ interests first.

    Under the proposal payments made with a “corrupting motive or intent” of inducing unionists to act improperly will be punishable by up to 10 years in prison, up to a $900,000 fine for an individual or $4.5m for a company.

    Turnbull said that any payment made from an employer “other than for a clearly legitimate purpose, such as payment of union dues” will be punishable by up to two years in prison, or up to a $90,000 fine for an individual or $450,000 for a company.

    Both measures will apply to both employers who make the payments and unions who solicit or receive them.

    Legislation to be introduced on Wednesday will also require unions to disclose payments made by employers at the time a workplace deal is put up for vote.

  177. val majkus

    in other circuits the en banc court consists of all active judges, the Ninth Circuit convenes a “limited en banc court” composed of the Chief Judge Kozinski and ten other judges selected at random for each case.

    http://michellawyers.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Ninth-Circuit-En-Banc-Procedure-Guide.pdf

  178. Bruce of Newcastle

    Some coloured pictures from WWII

    Awesome colour work.

    Third pic was interesting as I have just read Popski’s Private Army. The jeep configuration was very similar to what the PPA used all the way up the spine of Italy. It’s amazing what such a simple asset can do with the right guys, élan and surprise. I suppose that is why the jihadi kiddies favour “technicals”.

    (I’ve also read Virginia Cowles’ marvellous “The Phantom Major” several times.)

  179. egg_

    2x Social Meeja News staffers, 1x M, 1x F, on Teh Dumb, both resembling couch potatoes – no coincidence?

    Tomorrow’s Insiders couch bookends?

  180. Top Ender

    BrettW:
    Frydenburg came on and said as far as he was aware no Minister was involved in the decision. The issue apparently was there is no word in NG language that equates to mateship so they used the word friendship instead. Word will now be changed to Mateship.

    Maybe a case of the department(s) out of control and doing what they like even if does embarrass the Minister.

    Sounds like there might be a result on this one….

    Or not.

  181. JC

    Very funny, but also possibly true.

    Ann Coulter‏Verified account @AnnCoulter

    Turkey’s Erdogan threatening to send Europe 15K refugees a month. So even Muslims consider Muslim migrants a threat.

  182. vr

    JC.

    Facebook already saturated domestically, looks overseas for growth. And the consequences?

    Sure, the growth is in the 3rd world, but the money is in the first world. The conservatives are hopping mad that article they share have a “disputed story/source” tag to them. If half the customer base disappears, it will be interesting to watch.

  183. notafan

    And then, just as senselessly as our grief began, it ended. For no particular reason, the expected bad baby news never arrived and now the complexity of having an imagined child will become a concrete ethical entanglement.

    But she is having a daughter anyhow

    These people are nuts.


    I’m worried having a baby will make climate change worse

  184. egg_

    Some coloured pictures from WWII

    Lurv the Thunderbolt.

  185. Leigh Lowe

    I’m worried having a baby will make climate change worse

    Yeah?
    I’m worried that you having a baby will lower the net IQ of the planet by half a point you dumb bint.

  186. egg_

    Turkey’s Erdogan threatening to send Europe 15K refugees a month. So even Muslims consider Muslim migrants a threat.

    A parasitic attack?

  187. notafan

    Yeah?
    I’m worried that you having a baby will lower the net IQ of the planet by half a point you dumb bint.

    Just reading the article did that.

  188. Atoms for Peace

    Proudly Facebook free. If I want likes, I’ll join the Exclusive Bretheren. Any other hold outs out there ?

  189. Stimpson J. Cat

    But she is having a daughter anyhow
    These people are nuts.

    That is an incredible slur against myself and my mentally ill brethren.
    The truth is far simpler.
    I apologize for my language, but what a f☆cking stupid b☆tch.

    “the pitter-patter of tiny feet is inevitably the pitter-patter of giant carbon footprints”

    I am going to go and bite some trees now to calm down.

  190. vr

    Just reading the article did that.

    I made the mistake of reading the comments.

  191. Tintarella di Luna

    Yeah?
    I’m worried that you having a baby will lower the net IQ of the planet by half a point you dumb bint.

    I read that article via the Bolt Hole having reached the end I was appalled she’d gone ahead and had a child — Given what’s in the article I think child protection agencies in the ACT should hasten quickly lest some terrible evil is visited upon this stupid bint’s little daughter. I was hoping that she’d acted on her carbonfootprintophobia and refrained from tainting the gene pool but alas a narcissist is a narcissist is a narcissist. Only in academia

  192. Stimpson J. Cat

    Goddamn hippies trigger me every time.

  193. Tintarella di Luna

    Proudly Facebook free.

    I devalued, decoupled and defaulted to Facebook Freedom two weeks ago — marvellous. It’s a swamp.

  194. notafan

    at least she is using LED lights

  195. Bruce of Newcastle

    I’m worried having a baby will make climate change worse

    One of my favourite climateers is Eric Holthaus.

    A weatherman breaks down in tears and considers having a vasectomy, vows NEVER to fly again due to grim UN climate report: Eric Holthaus tweeted ‘no children, happy to go extinct’

    That didn’t work out apparently…

    Eric Holthaus [email protected]
    Even with two small children, I’d gladly house a refugee family. We are all in this together. It’s what our country was built on. https://twitter.com/PoliticalBrah/status/778137886004830208
    3:39 AM – 21 Sep 2016

    Lefties are a lot of fun.

  196. Atoms for Peace

    Just have the kid in South Australia. As a bonus, you get to pick an appropriate kid’s name like
    Solar Intermittent Boondoggle or Blackout Bubba.

  197. notafan

    There is fun to be had on Facebook

    I belong to a couple of very non PC forums inhabited by folks who who are very free with their opinions.

    They seem to be at war with Mariam Veishzadeh.

  198. DrBeauGan

    notafan
    #2331798, posted on March 20, 2017 at 5:51 pm
    And then, just as senselessly as our grief began, it ended. For no particular reason, the expected bad baby news never arrived and now the complexity of having an imagined child will become a concrete ethical entanglement.

    But she is having a daughter anyhow

    These people are nuts.

    You can see why she had trouble getting in the club. She looks like a bloke.

  199. Bruce of Newcastle

    Snapped by Nota on the other side of the planet. Ouch!

  200. Baldrick

    Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, who has fast earned a reputation for shooting from the lip, had nothing but praise for Australia’s smooth-talking foreign minister, even when asked if Australia raised concern over the delicate question of almost 8000 Filipinos killed in his so-called war on drugs.
    “We never discussed human rights,” Mr Duterte told local media at the weekend.
    “During my conversation with President Duterte we discussed the country’s anti-drug campaign at length,” Ms Bishop said in a statement to Fairfax Media.

    Hmmm, who to believe? A socialist sociopath or the Philippine president.

  201. calli

    Snapped by Nota on the other side of the planet. Ouch!

    The snowflake response to that is “Oops!”.

    😃

  202. egg_

    had nothing but praise for Australia’s smooth-talking foreign minister

    ‘Buried the Bishop’?

  203. Pedro the Ignorant

    Bruce of Newcastle’s post (at 5.37pm) brought back a memory of my father, a WW2 veteran of the middle East conflict.

    He had a solid gold officer’s cap badge from Popski’s Private Army, allegedly won in a card game in Cairo.

    The badge was in the form of an astrolabe, an ancient celestial navigation device. It disappeared after his death in 1976, never to be seen again. It would have been worth a lot of money to a collector.

    A genuine “other ranks” white metal PPA astrolabe badge is worth north of $3000 these days.

  204. BrettW

    Good to hear Turnbull fighting back (ie. mentioning Clean Event) and socking it to Shorten when Shorten raised penalty rates in Parliament today.

    Cash on radio also socking it to Shorten and Unions over Labor supporting cutting penalty rates to help big Unions but not for small business which still has to pay more on Sundays than workplaces where EBAs agreed by Unions.

    Every time Shorten and the Unions open their mouth on this subject the Coalition should just keep emphasising the sheer hypocrisy of their position. Make sure it getting plenty of radio time.

    The next wedge is the legislation regarding Unions receiving undisclosed payments from businesses. Going to be fun seeing Shorten etc squirm on this subject.

  205. calli

    “During my conversation with President Duterte we discussed the country’s anti-drug campaign at length,” Ms Bishop said in a statement to Fairfax Media.

    Many of us would like a statement (to any media) from Bishop on her department’s efforts to locate and repatriate Dr Ken Elliott.

  206. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    The next wedge is the legislation regarding Unions receiving undisclosed payments from businesses

    Pyne raising the issue of Thiess, John Holland, Bruce Wilson and the A.W.U. Workplace Reform Association in Question Time, and Shorten was , indeed, squirming.

  207. Empire GTHO Phase III

    Depending on which role/method one has assumed in the war on leftism, going dark on social media may be a bare necessity.

    For others, doing business and building networks is impossible without it.

    Avoiding lefty trigger words in social media posts helps one blend in with the noise. All the usual security tips we get from experts here apply.

  208. rickw

    “Most accounts of the war on Kokoda are Australian and male, thus bringing a specific lens … Women are hardly mentioned.”

    Is there any country on the planet riper for revolution than Australia?

  209. thefrolickingmole

    Atoms for Peace

    Watched “Grimsby” last night with the missus, slightly juvenile and over the top, but fun.

    13 kids, the 2 whos names stuck in my mind were “Skeletor” (the eldest) and “Django unchained” (the youngest)

    And somewhat alarmingly the bad guy was a greenie…

  210. Atoms for Peace

    Do climate scientists have pets or,when the Gaian koolaid hits, do they get euthansed to save the planet?

  211. Elizabeth (Libby) Zee

    Pyne raising the issue of Thiess, John Holland, Bruce Wilson and the A.W.U. Workplace Reform Association in Question Time, and Shorten was , indeed, squirming.

    He didn’t seem to be squirming to me, not at all. His demeanor didn’t show any discomfort during Turnbull’s references to Cleanevent either.

  212. Baldrick

    Many of us would like a statement (to any media) from Bishop on her department’s efforts to locate and repatriate Dr Ken Elliott.

    She’s there for a good time, not a hard time calli.

  213. stackja

    rickw – Australians don’t like BS! Next election could be very interesting!

  214. Baldrick

    Elizabeth (Libby) Zee

    Cut the crap Septimus, GrigoryM, 1234, Robbie Mac et al. We all know it’s you.

  215. H B Bear

    Another Gargooglery sockpuppet?

  216. val majkus

    and about time!

    Pyne raising the issue of Thiess, John Holland, Bruce Wilson and the A.W.U. Workplace Reform Association in Question Time, and Shorten was , indeed, squirming

    think before the TURC he adopted the ‘didn’t know’ defence

  217. Baldrick

    Lizzie, pay no heed to the troll.
    ‘Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.’ – some smartarse.

  218. Rabz

    Any other hold outs out there?

    Yep. Banned spacechook from my life back in mid 2010 (after telling a whole bunch of lefties on it to go and insert the rough end of a pineapple up their fundaments) and haven’t regretted it for a nanosecond.

  219. Empire GTHO Phase III

    The next wedge is the legislation regarding Unions receiving undisclosed payments from businesses. Going to be fun seeing Shorten etc squirm on this subject.

    I’ve had cause to background union corporate governance of late. So far it’s a black hole. You’ve gotta work old school hard for info.

    Compared with say – AiGroup, which is relatively an open book.

    The whole shebang is a one-sided contest. Organized Slime® is institutionally protected, courtesy of other people’s money.

  220. Bruce of Newcastle

    The badge was in the form of an astrolabe

    Pedro – Yes, that’s the description in Bob Yunnie’s book.
    Rare critter indeed it would be if you can find it, as so very few people served in that unit.

    The postscript from his son was interesting, as Bob obviously had the itch in the worst way. After emigrating to South Africa after WW2, he signed up as a merc in the Congo War in 1960, which was described in Forsyth’s “The Dogs of War”. Yunnie was caught and executed.
    Respect to your dad’s memory.

  221. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Another Gargooglery sockpuppet?

    Be the shortest lived of Grogaarly’s sockpuppets – FWIW, didn’t 1234 turn out to be Numbers?

  222. .

    Atoms for Peace
    #2331806, posted on March 20, 2017 at 5:59 pm
    Proudly Facebook free. If I want likes, I’ll join the Exclusive Bretheren. Any other hold outs out there ?

    Amen brother. Miraculously, friends don’t disappear, sporting clubs still function and bucks parties still get organised by phone calls and sms.

    FACEBOOK LISTENS TO YOUR PRIVATE CONVERSATIONS:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/facebook-using-people-s-phones-to-listen-in-on-what-they-re-saying-claims-professor-a7057526.html

  223. Nick

    Is there any country on the planet riper for revolution than Australia?

    You just know that one day, that statement will refer to recognising gay and transgender citizens, following similar calls for them to be ‘recognised’.

  224. egg_

    Elizabeth (Libby) Zee
    #2331849, posted on March 20, 2017 at 6:42 pm

    Not Lizzie no phone from Tamworth?

  225. cohenite

    notafan

    #2331798, posted on March 20, 2017 at 5:51 pm

    And then, just as senselessly as our grief began, it ended. For no particular reason, the expected bad baby news never arrived and now the complexity of having an imagined child will become a concrete ethical entanglement.

    But she is having a daughter anyhow

    These people are nuts.

    I’m worried having a baby will make climate change worse

    The hubris of alarmists is putrid; this person, sophie lewis, actually believes her reproduction decision will determine the fate of the planet; from the lewis website:

    My primary research work involves investigating the contributions of human and natural influences to recent extreme climate events in Australia, such as heatwaves and floods. Using a set of climate model experiments, these types of studies calculate the probability of an extreme event occurring in a set of experiments that include only natural climate forcings, such as volcanic eruptions and solar variations. The probability of the extreme event is then calculated in a second set of experiments that use both natural and human forcing factors, such as greenhouse gases. When the probabilities of extreme events are compared between the two experiments, the change in risk that can be attribution to human influences, like greenhouse gases, can be calculated. Attribution studies are useful for understanding the potential risks and costs associated with future climatic changes.

    Both forcings for natural and human factors are made up and demonstrably wrong. This woman has a PhD in speculation.

  226. Mark A

    BoN

    Thanks for the tip about Popski, just borrowed the book from the Open Library.

  227. Baldrick

    FWIW, didn’t 1234 turn out to be Numbers?

    No, it was Gargoolery.

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