Budget Speech 2017

The right choices to secure better days ahead.

Thank you Mr Speaker, I move that this Bill now be read a second time.

For many years now, as our economy has gone through major changes, Australians have had to dig deep to keep our economy on the right track.

During this time we have consistently outperformed the top advanced economies in the world.

However, not all Australians have shared in this hard won growth. Many remain frustrated at not getting ahead.

This is especially true in areas where technological change, globalisation and the end of the mining investment boom has had a significant impact.

Small business owners have gone without to keep their businesses open. Australians have taken second jobs, where they can, so bills can be paid.

And it’s been a fair while since most hardworking Australians have had a decent pay rise.

I know this has put real pressure on Australians and on their families. Terribly, this has meant some families have even broken apart.

I believe, though, that we are now moving towards the end of this difficult period.

The signs of an improving global economy are there to see.

There is clearly the potential for better days ahead.

But success cannot be taken for granted. We must be determined to secure our opportunities.

This Budget is about making the right choices to secure the better days ahead.

Our choices are based on the principles of fairness, security and opportunity.

We must choose to focus on growing our economy to secure more and better paying jobs.

We cannot succumb to the laziness that thinks growth will take care of itself.

We must choose to guarantee the essential services that Australians rely on.

We cannot underestimate just how important these services are to people.

We must choose to tackle cost of living pressures for Australians and their families.

We cannot agree with those who say there is nothing that the Government can do.

And we must choose to ensure the Government lives within its means.

Because we cannot pass a burden and forsake our obligations to the next generation.

Mr Speaker, tonight I announce a fair and responsible path back to a balanced budget.

Having exhausted every opportunity to secure savings from our 2014–15 and 2015–16 Budgets, we have decided to reset the Budget by reversing these measures at a cost of $13 billion.

Despite this, I can confirm tonight that the Budget is projected to return to balance in 2020–21 and remain in surplus over the medium term.

The underlying cash balance will improve from a forecast deficit of $29.4 billion in 2017–18 to a projected surplus of $7.4 billion in 2020–21.

Growth in payments has been restricted to less than 2.0 per cent per year.

Since coming to Government we have arrested growth in our debt by more than two-thirds.

Around three quarters of the increase in our debt since 2007-08 has been driven by welfare, health and education spending.

To respect future taxpayers, this everyday spending should be funded from the first dollar we receive in taxes, not debt.

The Budget papers show, after you take into account the net operating balance, infrastructure grants, and non–cash accounting provisions, the Government will no longer be borrowing to pay for our everyday expenses from 2018-19.

There is now a clear and growing consensus that the global economic outlook is improving.

We have positioned Australia well to take advantage.

At home, we expect real growth to rebound to three percent over the next two years, after a temporary slowing this year, that takes into account Cyclone Debbie.

Household consumption, non-mining business investment and exports are expected to support growth.

Wage growth is expected to increase from around two per cent to above three per cent over the next four years.

Given commodity prices continue to be volatile, we have maintained conservative assumptions.

Mr Speaker, in this Budget, we have chosen to grow our economy to support more and better paying jobs.

For the past year we have been delivering our national economic plan for jobs and growth.

The first phase of our enterprise tax plan is now law. Our export trade deals are bearing fruit, with additional access secured. And our investments in science and innovation and our defence industries are breaking ground.

Tonight we add to this plan.

And we start by backing in small business even further.

Small business owners are out there fighting for growth in their businesses every day. They deserve our respect and support.

Backing up our recently legislated tax cuts, small businesses with a turnover up to $10 million will continue to be able to immediately write off expenditure up to $20,000 for a further year.

And we will take further action to reward States and Territories that cut red tape costs for small business.

To support growth we choose to invest in building Australia, rail by rail, runway by runway and road by road.

We will establish the Western Sydney Airport Corporation to build and operate the new Western Sydney airport, creating 20,000 jobs by the early 2030s and 60,000 in the longer term.

We will inject up to $5.3 billion in equity over the next ten years into this company.

Earth moving works will commence on the 1800-hectare site in the second half of next year and Western Sydney Airport will be delivered in 2026.

The Snowy Mountains Scheme is the benchmark for nation building infrastructure.

The Prime Minister has announced our intention to further develop the Snowy Hydro with Snowy 2.0. Tonight we announce our intention to go further.

The Commonwealth is open to acquiring a larger share or outright ownership of Snowy Hydro, from the NSW and Victorian State Governments, subject to some sensible conditions.

First, all funds received by the States would need to be reinvested in priority infrastructure projects.

Second, Snowy Hydro’s obligations under its water licence would be reaffirmed and we would commit to work together to expedite and streamline environmental and planning processes associated with Snowy 2.0, without compromising any standards or controls.

Third, Snowy Hydro would have to remain in public hands.

We have already begun discussions with NSW and invited similar discussions with Victoria.

Tonight, we announce we will deliver $75 billion in infrastructure funding and financing over the next ten years.

$844 million will be used to upgrade the Bruce Highway, including $530 million for works from Pine Rivers to Caloundra.

In Western Australia we are investing $1.6 billion in infrastructure, including funding for better road access to the Fiona Stanley Hospital precinct.

In Victoria, we will make $1 billion available for regional rail and other infrastructure projects, including $30 million to develop a business case for a rail link to Tullamarine Airport. A new $500 million Victorian regional rail fund will include $100 million for the duplication of the Geelong-Waurn Ponds line.

In addition, the Turnbull Government will establish a $10 billion National Rail Programme to deliver rail projects that provide better connections for our cities and regions and create new opportunities to grow our economy.

Projects such as Adelink, Brisbane Metro, Tullamarine Rail link, Cross River Rail in Brisbane, and the Western Sydney Airport Rail link, all have the potential to be supported through this programme, subject to a proven business case.

It is important to invest in infrastructure, but we have to make the right choices on projects, as part of a broader economic growth strategy.

Our new Infrastructure and Projects Financing Agency will help us make those right choices, recruiting people with commercial experience to ensure we use taxpayers’ money wisely.

We must also choose to invest specifically for growth in our regions.

The Productivity Commission recently highlighted that some regional areas have been disconnected from our national growth.

So we will establish a $472 million Regional Growth Fund to back in the plans that regional communities are making to take control of their own economic future. This includes $200 million in funding to support a further round of the successful Building Better Regions programme.

In one of the biggest investments ever seen in regional Australia, the Government will fund the Melbourne to Brisbane Inland Rail project with $8.4 billion in equity to be provided to the Australian Rail Track Corporation. Construction on this 1,700 kilometre project will begin in 2017-18 and will support 16,000 jobs at the peak of construction. It will benefit not just Melbourne and Brisbane, but all the regions along its route.

Skilled migration has always played a significant role in driving our economic growth.

But it must be on our terms and we must skill more Australians to secure jobs.

Until now, employers have had to contribute 1 or 2 per cent of their payroll to training if they employ foreign workers. These requirements have proven difficult to police.

Accordingly, we are replacing these requirements with an annual foreign worker levy of $1,200 or $1,800 per worker per year on temporary work visas and a $3,000 or $5,000 one-off levy for those on a permanent skilled visa.

Over the next four years, $1.2 billion will be raised from this levy that will contribute directly to a new Commonwealth-State Skilling Australians Fund.

States and Territories will only be able to draw on this fund when they deliver on their commitments to train new apprentices.

Mr Speaker, in this Budget we have chosen to guarantee the essential services that Australians rely on.

The first duty of a national Government is to keep Australians safe.

In 2020-21, we will meet our commitment to increase defence spending to two per cent of GDP, three years ahead of schedule.

We are supporting our 2,300 Defence force personnel serving overseas.

We are investing over $300 million to ensure the AFP can continue to lead the charge against terrorism, organised crime, child exploitation and other crimes.

And we will continue to ensure Operation Sovereign Borders has the resources needed to do its job.

I know that ‘stopping the boats’ was something many said could not be done. What others mocked as a slogan we turned into an outcome.

Every Australian understands the importance of health care. 

Tonight, we put to rest any doubts about Medicare and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

We are lifting the freeze on the indexation of the Medicare Benefits Schedule.

We are also reversing the removal of the bulk billing incentive for diagnostic imaging and pathology services and the increase in the PBS co-payment and related changes.

The cost of reversing these measures is $2.2 billion over the next four years.

Tonight, I also announce we will legislate to guarantee Medicare and the PBS with a Medicare Guarantee Bill.

This new law will set up a Medicare Guarantee Fund to pay for all expenses on the Medicare Benefits Schedule and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Proceeds from the Medicare Levy will be paid into the fund.

An additional contribution from income tax revenue will also be paid into the Medicare Guarantee Fund to make up the difference.

The Bill will provide transparency about what it really costs to run Medicare and the PBS and a clear guarantee on how we pay for it.

$1.2 billion in new medicines will be made available, including for patients with chronic heart failure, funded by an agreement to decrease the cost of medicines for taxpayers.

The Commonwealth will increase hospitals funding by an additional $2.8 billion over four years.

Significantly, we will invest an additional $115 million in mental health, including funding for rural telehealth psychological services, mental health research and to prevent suicide.

We will also invest $1.4 billion in ground-breaking health research over the next four years, including $65.9 million this year, to help research into children’s cancer.

All up, our commitments equate to a $10 billion re-investment in Australia’s health care over four years, including the $2.8 billion increase in hospital funding.

They are underpinned by cornerstone partnerships struck by the Health Minister with our doctors, specialists, pharmacists and the medicines sector.

And tonight we have chosen to close the funding gap for our National Disability Insurance Scheme once and for all.

The funding gap is currently $55.7 billion over the next ten years. We have previously sought to close this gap with budget savings that we have not been able to get through the Parliament.

To ensure the NDIS is fully funded we will legislate to increase the Medicare Levy by 0.5 percentage points in two years’ time, when the extra bills start coming in.

This will also provide further time to explain to Australians what the NDIS will deliver.

Even if we are not impacted directly, this is all our responsibility.

Our decision to increase the Levy reflects the fact that all Australians have a role to play.

I also announce a commitment of $80 million for Australians with a mental illness such as severe depression, eating disorders, schizophrenia and post-natal depression resulting in a psychosocial disability, including those who had been at risk of losing their services during the transition to the NDIS.

The Turnbull Government will continue to invest record amounts in education.

After reversing proposed savings from the 2014-15 Budget, we will invest $18.6 billion in extra funding to educate our children in all schools over the next ten years.

Our schools funding package delivers a fairer and simpler way to meet our shared commitment to educate each and every child, in accordance with the Gonski needs-based standard.

In addition to the funds provided by the GST to the States, we will meet 20 per cent of the needs-based funding for every student in our public school system and 80 per cent for students in non-government schools by 2027. Funding for each student across all sectors will grow at an average of 4.1 per cent each year.

In Higher Education, we are launching a fairer system, with students asked to pay a bit more for their own education costs. However taxpayers will continue to subsidise more than half the cost of each student’s higher education.

A 2.5 per cent efficiency dividend will be applied to universities for the next two years to ensure taxpayers and students get better value for their investments.

This Budget also delivers important increased support for veterans mental health, protections for children within the family justice system, victims of domestic violence, closing the gap for Indigenous Australians and creating the National Redress Scheme for victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

Mr Speaker, in this Budget we have chosen to place downward pressure on rising costs of living.

The Prime Minister’s energy security plan provides reliable and affordable energy for Australians, coping with rising electricity prices.

He is securing access to our gas resources for domestic use. We have set aside around $90 million for this task in this budget.

He is ensuring energy consumers and businesses get a fairer deal, by funding the ACCC to investigate and police competition in retail electricity and gas markets.

The Prime Minister is working to improve energy regulation, with additional funding tonight to improve gas market efficiency and transparency.

He is investing in new generation, transmission and storage capacity. This includes Snowy 2.0, around $37 million to South Australia for new energy infrastructure and funding to prove up gas pipeline proposals to South Australia from Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

And more than $3 billion has already been provided to support new emissions technologies.

To support older Australians we are restoring the pensioner concession card to those impacted by the pension assets test change introduced earlier this year.

As a result, they will regain access to state and territory based concessions that were withdrawn after the change.

And we want customers and taxpayers to get a fairer deal from our banks.

For the system to be fairer, there needs to be greater competition and accountability – now.

In response to the Ramsay Review, we are establishing a simpler, more accessible and more affordable one-stop shop for Australians to resolve their disputes and obtain binding outcomes from the banks and other financial institutions, to be known as the Australian Financial Complaints Authority.

A new Banking Executive Accountability Regime will be introduced, requiring all senior executives to be registered with APRA. If in breach, they can be deregistered and disqualified from holding executive positions, and be stripped of their significant bonuses.

Banks will also be held to account if they try and hide misconduct by executives with new mandatory reporting requirements.

If banks breach misconduct rules, they will also face bigger fines starting at $50 million for small banks and $200 million for large banks.

As recommended by the Coleman Committee, a permanent team will be established within the ACCC to investigate competition in our banking and financial system.

The introduction of an open banking regime in 2018 will give customers greater access to their own data, empowering them to seek out better and cheaper services.

Tonight, I also announce a new six-basis point levy on the big banks’ liabilities, starting on July 1.

This represents an additional and fair contribution from our major banks, is similar to measures imposed in other advanced countries, and will even up the playing field for smaller banks.

The levy will only affect our five largest banks with assessed liabilities of $100 billion or more and does not apply to superannuation funds or insurance companies.

Importantly, customer deposits of less than $250,000 and additional capital requirements imposed on the banks by regulatory authorities are excluded from their assessed liabilities.

Unlike the previous bank deposit tax, this is specifically not a levy on pensioners’ and others’ ordinary deposit accounts, nor is it on home loans.

This measure will secure $6.2 billion over the Budget and forward estimates to support budget repair, including the reversal of significant budget savings measures.

We have also chosen to put downward pressure on rising housing costs

If a family or an individual has a roof over their head that they can rely on, then all of life’s other challenges become more manageable.

Whether you are saving to buy a home, spending a high proportion of income on your rent, waiting for subsidised housing, or you’re homeless, this is an important issue to you.

There are no silver bullets to make housing more affordable. But by adopting a comprehensive approach, by working together, by understanding the spectrum of housing needs, we can make a difference.

We will work with the States and Territories and local Governments to get more homes built, because prices are higher where demand is greater than supply.

The Commonwealth will replace the National Affordable Housing Agreement that provides $1.3 billion every year to the States and Territories, with a new set of agreements, with the same funding, requiring the States to deliver on housing supply targets and reform their planning systems.

We will also establish a $1 billion National Housing Infrastructure Facility, based on a UK model, to fund ‘micro’ city deals that remove infrastructure impediments to developing new homes.

An online Commonwealth land registry will be established detailing sites that can be made available for residential development.

In Melbourne, land for a new suburb that could cater for 6,000 new homes will be unlocked just 10km from the CBD, by releasing surplus Defence land at Maribyrnong.

The Turnbull Government will also help deliver tens of thousands of new homes needed in Western Sydney as part of our Western Sydney city deal.

A new National Housing Finance and Investment Corporation will be established by July 1 next year to provide long-term, low-cost finance to support more affordable rental housing. States and Territories will also be encouraged to transfer stock to the community housing sector.

Other measures to address supply include: allowing Managed Investment Trusts to be used to develop and own affordable housing, providing investors in affordable housing with greater income certainty by enabling direct deduction of welfare payments from tenants, and increasing the capital gains tax discount to 60 per cent for investments in affordable housing.

These measures will also support State, Territory and local governments imposing inclusionary zoning requirements on new development sites and provide more vehicles for superannuation funds to invest in affordable housing.

And tonight I announce $375 million for a permanent extension of homelessness funding to the States, with a continued focus on supporting young people and victims of domestic violence.

On the demand side, for those who are trying to save to buy their first home, we will support them by providing a tax cut on their first home deposit savings.

First home buyers will be able to save for a deposit by salary sacrificing into their superannuation account over and above their compulsory superannuation contribution from July 1.

The First Home Super Savers Scheme will attract the tax advantages of superannuation. Contributions and earnings will be taxed at 15 per cent, rather than marginal rates, and withdrawals will be taxed at their marginal rate, less 30 percentage points.

Savers will not have to set up another account, they can just use their existing super account and decide how much of their income they want to put aside to save for their first home deposit.

Contributions will be limited to $30,000 per person in total and $15,000 per year.

Under this plan, most first home savers will be able accelerate their savings by at least 30 per cent.

We will encourage older Australians to free up housing stock, by enabling downsizers over the age of 65 to make a non-concessional contribution of up to $300,000 into their superannuation fund from the proceeds of the sale of their principal home.

And on demand management, we will continue to prefer the scalpel to the chainsaw, to avoid a housing shock.

Mum and dad investors will continue to be able to use negative gearing, supporting the supply of rental housing and placing downward pressure on rents.

Our regulatory agencies will continue to use the flexible and calibrated controls they have available.

And we will legislate to extend APRA’s ability to apply controls to the non-ADI sector and explicitly allow them to differentiate the application of loan controls by location.

Even tougher rules on foreign investment in residential real estate will be introduced, removing the main residence capital gains tax exemption, and tightening compliance.

We will also apply an annual foreign investment levy of at least $5,000 on all future foreign investors who fail to either occupy or lease their property for at least six months each year.

And we will restore the requirement that prevents developers from selling more than 50 per cent of new developments to foreign investors.

Together, these measures represent a comprehensive package that can make a difference.

Finally Mr Speaker, we have chosen to ensure the Government lives within its means.

We will continue our crackdown on multinationals not paying their fair share of tax.

The ATO has already raised $2.9 billion in tax liabilities this year against a group of just seven large multinational companies, and expects to raise more than $4 billion in total this financial year from large public companies and multinationals.

Tonight we are toughening the Multinational Anti-Avoidance Law to extend the rules to structures involving foreign partnerships or trusts and clamping down on aggressive structuring using hybrids.

We will also be introducing new tax integrity measures as recommended by our Black Economy Taskforce.

We will continue the fight against serious financial and organised crime by providing the Australian Taxation Office with additional funding to chase and tax the crooks.

From 1 July 2017, the Government will improve the integrity of negative gearing by disallowing deductions for travel expenses and, for properties bought after today, the Government will also limit plant and equipment depreciation deductions to only those expenses directly incurred by investors.

Together all of these measures are estimated to provide a gain to revenue of $2.1 billion over the forward estimates.

And we will continue to stop people trying to take an easy ride on our welfare system to protect it for those who need it most.

The best way to get your welfare budget under control is to get Australians off welfare and into work.

We will support young parents to get jobs by expanding the successful ParentsNext programme from 13,000 vulnerable young parents to 68,000 in more than 20 new locations, especially those with high Indigenous populations.

The programme supports young parents, mainly mothers, with child care, pre-employment training, financial literacy and numeracy skills and linking up with other education and training opportunities.

We are also strengthening mutual obligation requirements.

Those who do not meet their responsibilities and either fail to turn up to appointments or take on suitable work will face escalating financial penalties, ranging from reduced to cancelled payments.

We want to support job seekers affected by drug and alcohol abuse, but to protect taxpayers, it has to be a two-way street.

We will no longer accept, as an excuse from repeat offenders, that the reason they could not meet their mutual obligation requirements was because they were drunk or drug-affected.

In addition we will commence a modest drug testing trial for 5,000 new welfare recipients.

JobSeeker recipients who test positive would be placed on the Cashless Debit Card for their welfare payments and be subjected to further tests and possible referral for treatment.

Other welfare measures include: strengthening verification requirements for single parents seeking welfare, a crackdown on those attempting to collect multiple payments, stricter residency rules for new migrants to access Australian pensions, and denying welfare for a disability caused solely by their own substance abuse.

Conclusion

Mr Speaker, this is a responsible Budget.

It sets out a credible and affordable plan, based on the principles of fairness, security and opportunity.

Above all this is an honest Budget.

It is honest about our challenges and opportunities.

It does not pretend to do things with money we do not have.

It does not indulge simplistic solutions to what we know are complex problems.

This is a Budget that makes the right choices for Australians who are working hard to secure the better days ahead for themselves and their families.

That is why this Budget is a plan that can be trusted and supported.

So to be clear, our plan is,

  • to grow our economy to create more and better paid jobs,
  • to guarantee the essentials that Australians rely on,
  • to reduce cost of living pressures, and
  • to ensure that the government lives within its means.

Once again Mr Speaker, I commend our plan, this Budget and this Bill to the House.

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370 Responses to Budget Speech 2017

  1. twostix

    Back in Victorian times, which was the grump conservative utopia, they used to pump out children like nobody’s business.

    Why?

    Because people saw what life was like for people who had no children once they reached old age in a society like that.

    Some people need to be careful what they wish for.

  2. In actual fact, the NDIS keeps no old people at home, it quits at 65,
    then you go on the pension. Unless that got changed tonight.

    Factcheck = Almost True.

    NDIS quits on attaining retirement age, which is now on a sliding scale.
    Last year it was 65, in 2019 it will be 66, and so on. One year added every three years. (I think).

  3. hzhousewife

    Great strategy Mote, followed carefully in this house, luckily our needs are few.

  4. twostix

    MV you missed the bit where recently NSW “agreed” (lol) to “let” anyone on the NDIS at 65 to “stay” on the NDIS forever.

    In ten years the age limit will be abolished and Commonwealth Aged Care will be rolled into it.

  5. Oh FFS. The articles on “Winners” and “Losers” from the Budget are already out.
    The only winners from Budgets are pollies, public servants and bludgers and the losers are always the mug taxpayers.

  6. Marcus Classis

    Hopefully, senate blocks it all, the trainwreck leads to a no confidence motion, The Great Dud loses it due to normal SCOAMFing on his part and the government falls.

    At this stage I just do not care if Manboobs the Accused Rapist and his incompetent Squandermonkeys buttrape the country or if Manchurian Malcolm’s Squandermonkeys buttrape the country.

    There is no difference between the bastards.

  7. Tim Neilson

    and denying welfare for a disability caused solely by their own substance abuse

    If that includes junk food abuse leading to contracting the fat turd virus, we’ll have hardly any DSP recipients left.

  8. twostix

    There is no difference between the bastards.

    There is a world of difference between now and the Labor years.

    You’re not under daily, relentless political attack against home and hearth by the government to start with as you were under Labor.

    If Labor were in you’d have fag marriage and mandatory muslim trannies as school toilet supervisors by now.

    Stop being austistic.

    The only logical and possible way for the right to make any gains is under long periods of Liberal governance.

  9. Habib

    The only logical and possible way for the right to make any gains is under long periods of Liberal governance. Only if there’s an eventual slight relaxation in weapons laws and we can go full Ceaușescu on the kleptocratic cretins.

  10. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    At this stage I just do not care if Manboobs the Accused Rapist and his incompetent Squandermonkeys buttrape the country or if Manchurian Malcolm’s Squandermonkeys buttrape the country.

    I’m resigned to at least two terms of a Shortfilth Government, with death duties, and a wealth tax. They can’t cancel Christmas, or shoot the Easter bunny, can they?

  11. Nathan

    Go home Treasurer. Your drunk.

  12. Crossie

    It does not pretend to do things with money we do not have.

    No, it says outright it will do things with money we do not have.

    Oy vay.

  13. Crossie

    They can’t cancel Christmas, or shoot the Easter bunny, can they?

    ZK2A, I’m sure they will give both a try. Labor in power can’t resist social engineering and any whiff of Christian culture will have to go to make way for their perfect world.

  14. twostix

    The western left has only achieved what appears to be unstoppable political singularity today because in the 1990’s they decided (as can be witnessed in Julia Gillards paper advocating exactly this) to stop fighting the centre left parties, stop seeking immediate gratification (which they sought but had eluded them for 70 years) and instead go long, be patient, accept taking two steps forward and one step back and that it was better to be, at worst, making no ground under Labor / Labour / Democrat parties, than going backwards under Liberal / Tory / Republican governments.

    25 years later and their patience has earned them an absolute bonza harvest.

    The right are at the same position today.

  15. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    ZK2A, I’m sure they will give both a try

    Sorry, Crossie, it’s one of those bitter jokes the military breeds. Others include

    “Big boy’s game, big boy’s rules.”

    “Roll on death, demob (demobilization) is too far away.”

    “They can root you up the ar$e, but you don’t have to love the child.”

  16. The only logical and possible way for the right to make any gains is under long periods of Liberal governance.

    By “Liberal governance” you mean like tonight’s budget?

  17. a reader

    Well that was a clusterf*** and a waste of an evening. I’m looking forward to those greedy pricks taking at least another $500 from me just in medicare levy alone. Bolt has gone in hard; I can’t wait to see what Blair comes up with. I can only imagine it will leave ScoMo and Chairman Mal quivering with rage that only brilliant satire can bring forth.

  18. Labor in power can’t resist social engineering and any whiff of Christian culture will have to go to make way for their perfect world.

    Safe Schools, as approved and funded by Christopher Pyne, isn’t social engineering or anti-Christian?
    Who’da thunk it?

  19. 132andBush

    I work too hard to deserve being governed by these a-holes!

  20. twostix

    MV in your entire life’s work you’ve gotten us to…here.

    I think we’re going to try something new old timer. Thanks anyway.

  21. Faye

    May I repeat my comment from Bolt’s blog. I felt a bit lonely. I was the only comment there.
    It is a coward’s political budget to save Turnbull, purge any whiff of Abbott, position Labor to criticize a Labor budget, cut out the cuts, spend and tax, put the revenue on steroids, sting the banks and presto – a make believe surplus in four years. Did the economy get a mention?

  22. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    I work too hard to deserve being governed by these a-holes!

    Well said. I’ m a self funded retiree, but I don’t see why I should pay thirty cents in the dollar to fund a bankrupt social experiment.

  23. Cpt Seahawks

    I just read Atlas Shrugged. I didn’t need to.

  24. Ubique

    The bloke armed with the meringue pie today was confused. He was incandescent with rage about the government robbing his superannuation and pillaging WA’s GST. He just mistook poor old Alan Joyce for ScoMo.

  25. Cpt Seahawks

    Obama has lost it. 16 feet of sea level rises. For f sake F off you disgusting excuse for a man. Look at the ocean you fool. CO2 is a trace gas. 0.04 of one percent. The life giver. I’m frantic over the Moronian ways that are In My Face and in my way. Get Out Of My Way.

  26. a reader

    Joe Hildebrand has gone in HARD in the Telegraph today:
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C_ZCXHdXoAQeHjD.jpg:large

  27. Digger

    What is this absolute bullshit. Morrison has used this speech to give Turnbull a verbal blowjob. He has promoted the narcissistic, egotistical prick as if he was paying for, running and building the entire future energy system himself. An absolute disgrace…

    The Prime Minister’s energy security plan provides reliable and affordable energy for Australians, coping with rising electricity prices.

    He is securing access to our gas resources for domestic use. We have set aside around $90 million for this task in this budget.

    He is ensuring energy consumers and businesses get a fairer deal, by funding the ACCC to investigate and police competition in retail electricity and gas markets. The Prime Minister is working to improve energy regulation, with additional funding tonight to improve gas market efficiency and transparency.

    He is investing in new generation, transmission and storage capacity. This includes Snowy 2.0, around $37 million to South Australia for new energy infrastructure and funding to prove up gas pipeline proposals to South Australia from Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

    And more than $3 billion has already been provided to support new emissions technologies.

  28. Cpt Seahawks

    Now CNN showing a violinist refusing to stop playing during the “the daily anti-government protests” no ironic understanding they think he is strong artist. Wow.

  29. Cpt Seahawks

    Sorry Venezuela

  30. Oh come on

    Game, set and match to Shorten.

  31. Oh come on

    Abbott, immensely disappointing shit PM that he was, would never had let the ALP humiliate his government in the way Turnbull has.

    The Liberal Party of Australia. Burn the motherfucker to the ground.

  32. So, things going well then. Carry on!

  33. OneWorldGovernment

    So to be clear, our plan is,

    to grow our economy to create more and better paid jobs,
    to guarantee the essentials that Australians rely on,
    to reduce cost of living pressures, and
    to ensure that the government lives within its means.

    hahahahahahaha.

    Can’t wait to see you tell your constituents.

    Obviously there needs to be more SA stocking persons in the liberal party of Australia.

    If you were fair dinkum you would commit to another billion dollars.

  34. cynical1

    and denying welfare for a disability caused solely by their own substance abuse

    Is this smack freaks?

    Ice addicts?

    Fatties?

    Cig smokers?

    Surfers with terminal melanoma?

    They really haven’t thought this through, have they?

  35. Senile Old Guy

    There are many good comments in this thread, almost all suggesting that the LNP take it up the *rse. This is good:

    Abbott, immensely disappointing shit PM that he was, would never had let the ALP humiliate his government in the way Turnbull has.

    The Liberal Party of Australia. Burn the motherfucker to the ground.

    Yes, the LNP is now dead; it should be embalmed and buried. Prior to this budget, I would have voted against the LNP but not for the ALP. Now, things have changed. This is a terrible budget. It is an awful ultra left wing budget. It is loading enormous debt onto our children.

    It is utterly immoral.

    The ALP will be awful, but they will be better than this utterly immoral and illiberal LNP.

  36. Senile Old Guy

    The $6.2 billion the Government will raise through a 0.06 per cent levy on bank liabilities has been met with predictable fury from across the financial sector. Those that the ABC spoke said there is no way the cost will not be passed on to customers in some way.

    Any charge on any industry is always passed on to customers, so this is just a new tax.

    Former liberal leader Dr John Hewson said Treasurer Scott Morrison cannot make any guarantee that the levy will not be passed on.

    Why the media go to Hewson is a mystery as he was the worst recent LNP leader…but he is right.

    “The banks always find a way to pass on cost increases,” he said, adding that the banks should not be so surprised by the measure. This has been coming for quite some time, the Government has been warning that the banks have a social license that they haven’t lived up to, the banks have done little in response and done nothing to change their culture,” he said.

    This nonsense about ‘social license’ is simply communism, that’s all it is and every was.

    “They report one large profit after another, and so the sector was an obvious candidate for this sort of tax increase. “Banks are resigned to the fact that no-one will be in their corner to fight back against the levy. “It is certainly likely to be popular, it is populist, and apart from the banks I suspect there will be very few people arguing against it,” Ms Proust said.

    Anyone with any sense will be arguing against it because it will simply be passed on to us.

    This is a new tax. This is a tax increase.

    Utterly, utterly despicable and appalling.

    The LNP must be destroyed, burned to ash, buried and erased from memory.

  37. Senile Old Guy

    The ABC headline for this budget is:

    Federal budget 2017: Here’s how much extra tax you’ll pay per year

    Sums it up.

  38. Senile Old Guy

    Oh, and by the way…

    F*ck Malcolm Turnbull: the millionaire is raising taxes on everyone else.

    And…

    F*ck the LNP who are now worse than the ALP. The ALP have principles, the LNP do not.

  39. Tel

    This nonsense about ‘social license’ is simply communism, that’s all it is and every was.

    I’ve said before, the easiest decoder ring is just replace the adjective “social” with “socialist”.

    Socialist justice.
    Socialist media.
    Socialist license.

    Hiding in plain sight.

  40. OldOzzie

    Comment from today’s The Australian on Budget Article sums up the Turdbull Party

    Not only has this government stolen my SMSF earnings they are now slogging the dividends from my bank shares . The sooner this Government is dumped the better With last nights budget we might as well have a labour government ,it couldn’t be any worse . I will never vote liberal again they no longer exist .We now have two labour parties one led by Shorten and one led by Turnbull . Do these pathetic self interested politians really think this budget will win back their core loyalists .Us core loyalists can see right thru it . I WILL NEVER VOTE LIBERAL AGAIN AND I GUARANTEE THERE ARE AFEW MILLION EX LOYALISTS LIKE ME

  41. OldOzzie

    Meanwhile The Malcolm Party/Turdbull Coalition becomes even more so

    Liberal state chiefs in revolt over moves to appoint Andrew Bragg as federal director

    Malcolm Turnbull is facing a rebellion from Liberal Party state presidents over the expected appointment of family friend Andrew Bragg as the party’s new federal director, with the federal executive likely to oppose any move to shift control of the campaign machine into the Prime Minister’s office. Several Liberal Party state directors have been summoned to Canberra for meetings tomorrow in which they will be asked to submit applications for the job, a process that has been described to The Australian by many of those involved as a “sham”.

    However, the party’s state presidents, who sit on a subcommittee of the party’s executive and who are being pushed to rubberstamp Mr Bragg’s appointment, are threatening insurrection, claiming that they could not endorse someone who had never run a federal election campaign.

    “There is a massive rearguard action being mounted against this,” a senior Liberal Party source said. “The overwhelming view is that they can’t abide having someone with no campaign experience running the party.”

    Another senior party figure said the appointment of Mr Bragg, the 32-year-old policy director at the Menzies Research Centre and branch official in Mr Turnbull’s electorate of Wentworth, would be disastrous and warned that several members of the executive would seek to block it.

    While Mr Bragg is regarded as highly skilled, questions have been raised about his credentials to head up the party’s organisational wing. “State presidents are bewildered by the notion of Andrew Bragg not ever having run a campaign,” a source said. “It appears to be part of a plan for the next election to be run out of the PMO.”

    Turnbull loyalists, Victorian senator Scott Ryan and Queensland senator James McGrath are said to have effectively tried to run the 2016 campaign from the PMO.

    It is understood that the Liberal Party’s West Australian state director Andrew Cox, Tasmanian state director Sam McQuestin and former NSW director Mark Neeham have been called to Canberra to submit applications before the party’s audit and governance committee, a move that sources claim was unprecedented.

    Victoria’s state director Simon Frost is believed to have declined to submit an application.

    A revolt within the senior levels of the party to block Mr Turnbull’s favoured appointment risks a significant split within the party machine and a blow to the Prime Minister’s authority.

    The move to permanently appoint Mr Bragg, who is acting in the role, follows the resignation of former federal director Tony Nutt ahead of a highly critical review last month of the Liberal Party’s election campaign last year.

    The push to take campaign functions away from the party machine would turn on its head the traditional structure, which historically has vested control and responsibility for running election campaigns with the federal director, as a measure to keep the parliamentary wing quarantined from strategic and tactical campaign decisions.

    It would end the successive dynasty of heavy-hitting party directors including former trade minister Andrew Robb, Brian Loughnane and Lynton Crosby.

    Mr Bragg did not respond to a request from The Australian for comment.

    From the comments

    – Yup. The Liberal Party is revolting. Irreparable brand damage has been done to it by the Turnbull Team.

    – It is the Turnbull Coalition, part funded by Turnbull.

    – So Turnbull is trying to impose a ‘family friend’ to run the Liberal Party and the wiser heads within the organisation say he is unsuitable for the job.

    Why am I not surprised.

    Turnbull has to go. Unfit to lead.

    – Turnbull Coalition Team … no mention of the word ‘liberal’ in that.

    Let MT register that party and donate his millions to it.

    Then, he can join the likes of Clive Palmer on the political junk heap.

    – He even uses letterheads now with “Malcolm Turnbull – Prime Minister of Australia”. LOL He doesn’t even pretend nowadays to be a “real” Liberal.

    – The New Malcolm Party of Australia. The Australian Conservatives now look very attractive.

    Essential Report
    Two Party Preferred: 9 May 2017
    Labor54%+1Coalition46%-

  42. lotocoti

    including $530 million for works from Pine Rivers to Caloundra.

    Well that’s just great.
    The only bit not embuggered with perpetual roadworks.

  43. Combine Dave

    The ALP will be awful, but they will be better than this utterly immoral and illiberal LNP.

    Guess again:

    + SSM
    + Vote herds reentering via boats
    + Safe schools pedo grooming

  44. Gab

    Do these pathetic self interested politians really think this budget will win back their core loyalists

    Turnbull and the rest of the rotting fish don’t care about that. Turnbull will have a lovely fat pension and the prime minister job. That’s all that matters.

    Gosh, if only someone could have warned us just what a useless pathetic leftard Turnbull is – oh wait …

  45. Senile Old Guy

    The ALP will be awful, but they will be better than this utterly immoral and illiberal LNP.

    Guess again:

    + SSM
    + Vote herds reentering via boats
    + Safe schools pedo grooming

    Anyone who thinks we won’t get this under Turnbull is fooling themselves. Turdbull, in particular, is in favour of SSM.

  46. stackja

    Federal Budget 2017: Terry McCrann says Budget a dangerous disgrace
    Terry McCrann, Herald Sun
    May 9, 2017 8:12pm

    Subscriber only

    PETA Credlin was exactly right. This is a budget for the next Newspoll.

    It is not the budget that should follow an election win, even a narrow win. That’s when you are supposed to take the tough decisions. This is the budget version of “fake news” — “fake fiscal frugality.”

    It is not a budget from a Liberal treasurer. It increases taxes big-time. And even that’s not been done to slash the deficit, but to fund even more spending, off its already high base.

    Most importantly — and dangerously ——of all, it is not a budget for our volatile, ultimately unpredictable, times.

    And the debt keeps rising, to over $600 billion gross, $375 billion net — even on these optimistic numbers. It is in sum, a dangerous disgrace.

  47. Rohan

    Worst PM ever status is now guaranteed. Jabba the Hutt has given Turncoat the tongue of approval on the today show.

  48. stackja

    Andrew Bolt: Desperate Liberals try big-taxing Labor Budget
    Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun
    May 9, 2017 9:00pm

    Subscriber only

    THE Turnbull Liberal Government on Tuesday gave us a Labor Budget to save itself from election wipeout.

    Treasurer Scott Morrison has done exactly what Labor has done before and would do again: hit us with big new taxes to pay for a spending spree while debt continues to soar.

    Yet one massive assumption does seem heroic. The government admits it will raise spending to an astonishing 25.4 per cent of GDP in 2019, which just happens to be election year when it will want to splash cash. Then, it says, our politicians will suddenly become prudent and cut spending to 25 per cent of GDP so the Budget finally balances in 2021 and we can slowly start to repay our monster debt.

    It must be kidding. For one, Labor will almost certainly be in charge by then. Does anyone seriously believe it would spend less than this lot? Be afraid. Very afraid.

  49. Baldrick

    This little Twitter exchange sums things up quite nicely:

    Peter Phelps MLC ✔ @PeterPhelpsMLC
    Budget 2017
    O M F G
    Taxes up; spending up; lots of SJW rhetoric.
    What is the difference between this and a Labor Budget?

    Matt Bevan ✔ @MatthewBevan
    Replying to @PeterPhelpsMLC
    broad church mate

    Peter Phelps MLC ✔ @PeterPhelpsMLC
    Replying to @MatthewBevan
    It’s a church, not a brothel

  50. Sparkx

    The Prime Minister’s energy security plan……….

    He is securing access to our gas……….

    He is ensuring energy consumers and businesses get a fairer deal

    The Prime Minister is working to improve energy regulation

    He is investing in new generation, transmission and storage capacity.

    I’m surprised Morriswan didn’t give us “All hail the great Malcolm”
    Oh, and the word “Liberal” is nowhere in the speech, but “Turnbull Government” is.

  51. Mother Lode

    Anyone who thinks we won’t get this under Turnbull is fooling themselves. Turdbull, in particular, is in favour of SSM.

    Under the Libs (even that paunch-bellied fop, Trumble) these things move slower. And under other Liberal leaders like Howard (like him or loathe him) and even Abbott (ditto) these policies would be fought.

    The lowest point for the Libs (aforementioned misshapen lump of blubber and ego) skims the middle point in Labor.

    That the Libs let themselves be dragged to this place just shows what weak venal people they are who won’t fight for their constituents. Labor, on the other hand, actively fights against the bulk of the country.

    The Libs by themselves would never introduce SSM, open borders, p3d0 grooming etc. Labor and the Greens do, and the Libs (overall) reluctantly go along with it. Their reluctance, their fear, their addle-wittedness is their only virtue.

  52. Anyone who thinks we won’t get this under Turnbull is fooling themselves.

    It’s okay, SOG. It’s all in hand, there is nothing to worry about.
    Dave, Twostix and others here have a cunning plan to save the nation:

    Vote Liberal ‘cos at least they’re not Labor.

  53. Shy Ted

    Dear Donald, please save us. Start by rejecting the Manus deal.

  54. Vote Liberal ‘cos at least they’re not Labor.

    Add Mother Lode to the list.

  55. Shy Ted

    The Guardian seems to like it.

  56. Combine Dave

    + SSM
    + Vote herds reentering via boats
    + Safe schools pedo grooming

    Anyone who thinks we won’t get this under Turnbull is fooling themselves. Turdbull, in particular, is in favour of SSM.

    So why don’t we?

    Because whatever Turnbull’s personal beliefs there are plenty in the LNP against this (and they know the punters out in voter land are majority against it as well).

  57. Faye

    So what are we going to do? I suggest we just let the LNP commit suicide and we put all our forces behind Cory Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives. We have till 2019 to make it a viable party for Australian voters.

  58. Mother Lode

    Oh, don’t be a retard MV. I said no such thing.

  59. Anton

    Faye
    put all our forces behind Cory Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives

    What is their position on:
    *ABC funding
    *Lifetime dole recipiants
    *offshoring Australian manufacturing
    *violation of farmers’ land rights

    I don’t think Cory’s party will become a rallying point for conservatives.

  60. john constantine

    The money is gone. the super is gone.

    Their turnfailure debacle coalition might as well squander the little they can before their shorten coalition drives Australia over the Cliffs of Doom and onto the Rocks Of Stalin’s Vengeance.

    At least I might have railway lines that can carry wheat during summer, like we used to have in the 1980’s.

  61. cynical1

    I know that Turnbull, the budget, and the Libs are an absolute clusterfuck, but is the GST on goods under $1000 happening next tax year?

    Perhaps it was just a Mal thought bubble?

    Good Lord, the dollar will have to be renamed soon.

    How many oz Pezos to a greenback?

    Still all those Fender guitars from the glory days just appreciated muchly.

    And good luck to Australian music stores selling $500 Mexican Fenders for 2K.

  62. Oh, don’t be a retard MV. I said no such thing.

    Didn’t you, Mother Lode? My apologies, I was sure you did. Let’s see – yes, here it is:

    The Libs by themselves would never introduce SSM, open borders, p3d0 grooming etc. Labor and the Greens do, and the Libs (overall) reluctantly go along with it.

    The only reason Abbott floated the idea of a plebiscite in the first place, was because half his backbenchers and two thirds of his Cabinet supported SSM.

    Australia has had much the same “open borders” policy since Howard.

    The Safe Schools Coalition was approved and funded by Christopher Pyne.

  63. Rabz

    Morrison just said to David Speers: “The difference between us and labor is that our budget is paid for”

    This is simply unbelievable – the gall of that stupid, lazy and utterly expedient prick. He’s as bad if not worse than frigging Swan.

    A thirty billion dollar shortfall (i.e. “deficit”) is not evidence that your inexcusably wasteful and quite frankly criminal “budget” is “paid for”.

    Suffice to say, this clusterf*ck doesn’t look any better in the cold light of day.

  64. Senile Old Guy

    Why would you invest in Australia?

    Foreigners will additionally be made to rue the day they were ever born anywhere else by copping new capital gains taxes ($581 million) and higher visa application charges ($410 million). They will be pinged $5,000 if they buy an Australian house and fail to put someone in it (a measure that, it is understood, will be policed by a voluntary army of cheesed-off neighbours) and prohibited from buying more than half the units in any development.

    Unbelievable! A vacant property tax on foreign investors. What could possibly go wrong?

    A handful of giant foreign companies, the Treasurer shyly revealed, will be contributing $4 billion in tax revenue this financial year thanks to the “Google tax” he announced last year.

    Oh, I doubt that very much. This is made up money.

  65. Roger

    $600, 000, 000, 000!

    Bloody hell; I go to bed in a constitutional monarchy and wake up in a banana republic.

    There’s only Eric Abetz standing between us and Venezuela!

  66. Leigh Lowe

    Winners … tax-eaters.
    Losers … tax-payers.

  67. Mother Lode

    This is what you accused me of, MV.

    Vote Liberal ‘cos at least they’re not Labor.

    Add Mother Lode to the list.

    I am not suggesting anyone vote Liberal on any basis. Merely making an observation as to how the two main parties perform: One actively malicious, the other feeble.

    The only reason Abbott floated the idea of a plebiscite in the first place, was because half his backbenchers and two thirds of his Cabinet supported SSM.

    Australia has had much the same “open borders” policy since Howard.

    The Safe Schools Coalition was approved and funded by Christopher Pyne.

    The plebiscite meant that it was not going to be delivered at once, as it would have under Labor. Moreover, the plebiscite seems quite likely to have seen SSM blocked – hence the frantic rhetoric from Labor and the Greens that it should not be voted on by the electorate.

    With regards to open borders – Howard staunched the flow. Rudd/Gillard re-opened the sluices. Abbott closed them again. Perhaps you missed that. It still remains to be seen that the Libs will always be so assiduous in this but they on the whole do more to secure the borders than the other guys.

    Safe schools? Yes, they funded it (although I doubt Pyne or the others knew the details, they just saw ‘anti-bullying’ and thought it was a good thing), but in any event that just makes it another kind of stupid.

    But even from the three examples you brought up, we have 1 out of 3 through, while under Labor it would be 3 out of 3. And it is only a matter of changing fads that will cause the Libs to change their mind on the 2 points which are in their favour.

    I said that under the Libs these policies move slower.

    And no, this is still not an endorsement. Merely an observation.

    If you think slowing down Labor/Greens policies is a strategy, then vote for them. If you think we need a crisis to jolt the electorate out of the complacency then vote against.

    In the last election I voted for Abbott (my electorate) because I knew he was a thorn in the side for Trumble. I didn’t vote for them in the upper house.

    So there. *Pokes tongue out* Nyerrr.

  68. mundi

    This happens every year.

    We secretly hope we will see an actual budget having tax cuts and and spending cuts.

    And every year, it’s tax hikes and sending increases.

    The LNP is a left socialist party. Nothing about them is “right” except being slightly less left than labor.

    Please stop voting using for these clowns.

  69. Motelier

    There is only one solution to this.

    Support the cash and barter economies.

  70. Diogenes

    FMD
    The federal government has allocated $374.2 million towards moving the My Health Record system to opt-out in tonight’s federal budget.

    Fscking socialist swine

    Factio Liberalis delenda est !

  71. You’re still wearing those rose coloured glasses, Mother Lode:

    the plebiscite seems quite likely to have seen SSM blocked – hence the frantic rhetoric from Labor and the Greens that it should not be voted on by the electorate.

    Liberal Tim Wilson led the campaign against the plebiscite.

    Safe schools? Yes, they funded it (although I doubt Pyne or the others knew the details, they just saw ‘anti-bullying’ and thought it was a good thing),

    Here is Senator Scott Ryan’s speech at the opening of the Safe Schools Symposium.
    Tell me again how he didn’t know it was about “gender and sexuality issues”.

    With regards to open borders – Howard staunched the flow.

    No, Howard stopped the illegal boat entries. The total number of Muslim country shoppers remained the same. Krudd and Gillard opened the gates to the boats, but reduced the number flying in to compensate. The total remained the same. Abbott stopped boats, but actually opened the borders even further by increasing the total number of country shoppers from 160,000 to 180,000.

    So there – Puts thumb on nose and wiggles fingers – nyah nyah nyah.

  72. Motelier;

    How much will the cash and barter economies grow after this?

    The barter economy is going to boom.
    A slab of full strength is currently priced at $60.

  73. struth

    The unelected U.N. just enacted a wealth transferring, western destroying budget as planned.

  74. Senile Old Guy

    The federal government has allocated $374.2 million towards moving the My Health Record system to opt-out in tonight’s federal budget.

    Not quite correct.

    The federal government will spend $374.2 million over the next two years giving every Australian an electronic health record by default. The policy change from an opt-in to opt-out approach for the My Health Record scheme has been on the cards since 2015 when the government took up the recommendations of the Royle Review and announced trials that would automatically create e-records for individuals. The review was undertaken as a result of poor adoption rates of the formerly named personally controlled electronic health record (PCEHR) scheme since 2012. It looked even more likely earlier this year when the Health department quietly published the results of the trials, revealing that only 1.9 percent of the 971,000 trial participants had asked not to have a record created for them.

    The money goes to creating the system. It will be ‘opt out’ but the money is for creating the system. Anyone who thinks this will be secure and free of errors…please contact me, I have a bridge…

  75. Squirrel;

    Revenue estimated to rise from $405bn in 2016-17 to $526bn in 2020-21 (29.9% increase)

    Is there a way to plot this on the Laffer curve?
    I’d bet we are way over the hump and picking up speed on the farside.

  76. Mother Lode

    Cripes MV, so immigration is equivalent to open borders? If you are talking about the ones flying in, then they will have done the documentation thing.

    And again you are missing the point. I am not saying the Libs are champions. I said they are slower at bringing these things in.

    So, unless your point is that the Libs bring in the same policies as Labor at the same rate as Labor, or faster even, then my point stands.

    And, one more time, I am not saying anyone should vote for the Libs because they are ‘better than Labor’.

  77. Candy;

    I think they would send people to QML etc, although I would have thought only a doctor could authorise a urine test, not a Centrelink staffer. And surely a doctor would need to be involved to read the results. How could they rely on an administrative person to read a medical pathology result, would that be legal? What a big ordeal to catch how many.

    No Candy. It will be like a roadside test.
    If the preliminary test shows positive, it has no evidentiary standing, but is grounds for demanding such evidence is sought.
    “Bring back your clearance and your payments will resume. Oh, and your DNA is now on record, and it shows, Mohammed, that you are claiming for 23 children not biologically related to you. Please explain this discrepancy.”

  78. Notafan

    Mother Lode

    Mv thinks spoiling your vote will learn em.

    Bring on Latham and Bernardi I say.

  79. incoherent rambler

    Regardless of how cats vote, the next election belongs to the ALP.
    They can’t fsck you over any worse than the Liberals have done, but they will roll you over and do it differently.
    Our best medium to long term hope is that the next ALP government is so bad that the electorate casts them out as a potential government for a subsequent decade. Just as they will have done to the Liberals at the upcoming election. The political vacuum will open the door for significant change, the best we can do is ensure that it is not a change like that which swept through Europe in the 1930s.
    History shows us that significant political change for the better does not arrive gently. The peasants tolerance must be more than stretched, it must break. The ALP and the Liberals look like achieving this.
    Both parties are now agents of their own destruction.

  80. Baldrick

    Make no mistake, this tax mooching budget has Turnbull’s and Parkinson’s fingerprints all over it.

  81. So, unless your point is that the Libs bring in the same policies as Labor at the same rate as Labor, or faster even, then my point stands.

    Pretty much so, yes. Politicians no longer formulate policy, and haven’t done so for since Whitlam/Fraser. Policy is formulated by the bureaucrats, which is why it largely remains the same regardless of who is in government. For example, our current “green”, “save the planet” policies were formulated and introduced under Howard, continued under KRudd, adopted by Turdbull as leader of the Opposition, continued under Gillard, continued under Abbott, and now continued under Turdbull.

    How is this possible? Simple.
    The same senior public servant has been in the driver’s seat for the whole journey.

  82. Mv thinks spoiling your vote will learn em.

    I accept that my plan is vastly inferior to to your plan, Nota.
    Which was . . . remind me please.

  83. struth

    During this time we have consistently outperformed the top advanced economies in the world

    By what measure?
    Didgeridoo playing?
    This could mean anything.
    Have we outperformed them in buckling to the U.N., or have we outperformed them in not performing?

    However, not all Australians have shared in this hard won growth. Many remain frustrated at not getting ahead

    Da inequalidy requiring a socialist wealth redistribution , comment.

    This is especially true in areas where technological change, globalisation and the end of the mining investment boom has had a significant impact.

    Globalism?
    Have we not always traded with the big wide world?
    What manner of beast does thou speaketh of?
    Open borders, of which you and your U.N. buddies have been pushing for, and mass immigration of our self declared enemies?
    Who caused it, whatever it is?
    The end of the mining boom was also caused by an uncompetitive Australia caused by government regs and taxation.
    Mining went elsewhere, and there is still lots of it going on elsewhere, just not in resource rich Australia.

    And it’s been a fair while since most hardworking Australians have had a decent pay rise.

    Total socialist.

    If the government didn’t tax so much and made our power and housing the most expensive on earth, how much more could we buy with our static wages?

    I know this has put real pressure on Australians and on their families. Terribly, this has meant some families have even broken apart.

    See immediately above.

    I believe, though, that we are now moving towards the end of this difficult period.

    The signs of an improving global economy are there to see.

    There is clearly the potential for better days ahead.

    Translation.
    I’m about to spend up even bigger and base it on flawed projections of revenue which will never eventuate.

    Oh God.
    It’s just sickening.
    That’s only the first couple of lines, but I can’t take another bite of this shit sandwich.

  84. Libby Zee

    Winners … tax-eaters.
    Losers … tax-payers.

    Clearly a Budget to try to stem the downward slide of Turnbulls poll numbers, keep the Nationals in the tent and neutralize Tony Abbott. Incidentally, perhaps accidentally, life may have been made a little more difficult for Shorten.

    Bring on the next Newspoll.

  85. Mother Lode

    For example, our current “green”, “save the planet” policies were formulated and introduced under Howard, continued under KRudd, adopted by Turdbull as leader of the Opposition, continued under Gillard, continued under Abbott, and now continued under Turdbull.

    Howard succumbed to the nonsense in a panic as he was about to lose an election. Labor wanted more faster, and did just that when they got in.

    Turnbull got dumped as leader for wanting the same policies as Labor.

    Abbott made a few minor changes like dumping Tim Flannery’s Fright Club – largely just a symbolic step backwards for the warmist agenda. He did dump the CO2 tax though, a pretty big step back. If Labor had been in power at this time then the agenda would have continued forward.

    Trumble, as I said in my original post, is like a middling Labor creature, easily dudded by the fantasy press and utterly in the thrall of the ABC.

    If you are right that it all comes down to the public servants then this history would be inexplicable. The APS has enormous power, but they do not explain everything. The parties do matter – they just aren’t in charge as much as they are supposed by themselves to be.

  86. There is only one solution to this.
    Support the cash and barter economies.

    It’s a start, Motelier, but currently only a drop in the ocean.
    Maybe we could look at instituting an IOU system, where we write each other tradeable cheque-like notes payable in an amount equal to a number of splots, where a splot is the non-special price of a roll of Sorbent toilet tissue at Coles on July 1 each year.

  87. Notafan

    MV

    Im voting for Australian Conservatives and maybe LDP now Latham is there.

    If enough people do the same they’ll at least have some influence in the parliament.

    Spoilt votes, not so much.

  88. Senile Old Guy

    He did dump the CO2 tax though, a pretty big step back.

    And then the LNP brought in an emissions trading scheme, established July last year.

    Can we, please, once and for ever, banish the idea that Abbott dumped the CO2 tax. He got rid of the original version, that’s all.

  89. Im voting for Australian Conservatives and maybe LDP now Latham is there.

    Good luck with that.
    I’m sure it will be every bit as successful as people voting ALA in the HoR** last election.

    .
    ** – Remember, the WDM campaign was only ever aimed at the HoR.

  90. He got rid of the original version, that’s all.

    It goes further than even that, SOG.
    Howard’s original plan was an ETS.
    Gillard’s slightly altered plan was a tax until July 1, 2015, then an ETS.
    Abbott’s changes resulted in an ETS introduced as of July 1, 2016.

    So, despite nearly a decade of debate, and five changes in leadership/government, we got exactly what was planned right from the beginning, just twelve months later than intended.

  91. Diogenes

    The federal government will spend $374.2 million over the next two years giving every Australian an electronic health record by default.

    Same effect – we will have one created for us unless we opt out.

    Letters have been drafted to go to my Drs surgery, the lab I use for bloods and xray place I use, directing them to NOT provide my information to eHealth .

    I ended up delaying my first appointment by an hour when I completed the privacy form at my GPs, I crossed out a whole swathe of “permitted” sharing , wrote “NO” in red and signed each change. Apparently I was the first person in the history of the surgery to do and the poor ladies at reception had to ring the vendor of their surgery management system to find out how to turn these off. I asked the ladies to show me the screen to ensure my requests were complied with.

  92. john constantine

    Their australian kleptocratic corruptocracy is gloating that its debt funded mass importation of unskilled tenants has created enough demand to beat the housing cycle, and that the sheer bulk of borrowed money thrown at australian housing has enriched their oligarchy and enabled Stalinist state governments and local councils to progress deep green socialism funded by stamp duty and rates as a tax on capital.

    Anybody hoping that their shorten foundation will be a one or two term government is ignoring the willingness to import masses of tenants and voters to first beat the property cycle, then to beat the electoral cycle.

    Their shorten has branch stacked and bribed his way to power all his career, once able to run australias borders and treasury, watch the branch and electoral stacking eternally transform the country into an electoral cycle between slow Stalinism with labor or sudden glorious Stalinism with the greens.

    [with the feckless team turnfailure debacle coalition gutting itself to outflank all of them to the left.]

  93. I asked the ladies to show me the screen to ensure my requests were complied with.

    You do realise, Diogenese, that all you have blocked is the sharing of your health record. The record itself still exists and can still be accessed by those with the approval to do so, without your permission or even knowledge.

  94. Senile Old Guy

    You do realise, Diogenese, that all you have blocked is the sharing of your health record. The record itself still exists and can still be accessed by those with the approval to do so, without your permission or even knowledge.

    Aside from going completely ‘off the grid’, I don’t know that people can do anything about this.

    And the people who can do things with these records are often supremely unaware of their responsibilities. I have been in meetings…well, I won’t write more except to say that I had to remind some present that ‘you can’t do that without permission from the individual’.

  95. Libby Zee;

    Clearly a Budget to try to stem the downward slide of Turnbulls poll numbers, keep the Nationals in the tent and neutralize Tony Abbot

    If the Nats don’t try to join the Rightist umbrella organisations, then the good ship Lollipop will pull them under.
    And really, they bloody well deserve the undertow to happen to them – they, by their own inaction, allowed it to happen along with every Liberal politician.

  96. Tel

    Socialist justice.
    Socialist media.
    Socialist license.

    Hiding in plain sight.

    Oh yeah and “socialist market economy”, “socialist democracy”.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_market_economy

  97. I won’t write more except to say that I had to remind some present that ‘you can’t do that without permission from the individual’.

    Trouble, is SOG, in most cases the permission has already been given. Just about anything to do with any government department includes a statement which has to be signed, which says something like “I give the department permission to access any information required to assist in assessing my eligibility”. Similar provisions are made on hospital forms, various specialist treatments, and so on.

  98. Tintarella di Luna

    “I give the department permission to access any information required to assist in assessing my eligibility”. Similar provisions are made on hospital forms, various specialist treatments, and so on.

    Just change the form to what you want them limited to finding out and time limit it to say 6 or 12 months – and always keep a copy or ask them to give you a copy.

  99. Tintarella di Luna

    First thing I read this morning was the Professor’s footnote and the day has improved with some pecan meringue roulade

  100. H B Bear

    Bloody hell; I go to bed in a constitutional monarchy and wake up in a banana republic.

    Relax Roger, I’ve got some great flamingo recipes printed out. Now just got to go and collect some firewood and we’re set.

  101. Just change the form to what you want them limited to finding out

    Dear Mrs di Luna,

    I am writing to you today about your application for [insert subject here].
    Unfortunately, without full access to your [insert record here], we are unable to process your request. Therefore your claim has been rejected.

  102. Senile Old Guy

    Trouble, is SOG, in most cases the permission has already been given. Just about anything to do with any government department includes a statement which has to be signed, which says something like…

    In the situation I was referring to, this was definitely not the case. It was to do with students and would have been in violation of the institution’s own privacy provisions.

  103. Tinta;

    Just change the form to what you want them limited to finding out and time limit it to say 6 or 12 months – and always keep a copy or ask them to give you a copy.

    You can’t stop this one, Tinta.
    We will have DNA files within ten years.
    Save your energy for the big pushback.

  104. John constantine

    Collecting firewood is obsolete and deplorable.

    Too many rural pensioners attempt to collect firewood without first undergoing safe firewood council training and accreditation courses and applying for permits.

    Collecting firewood must be banned to save the planet from racists.

  105. Diogenes

    You do realise, Diogenese, that all you have blocked is the sharing of your health record. The record itself still exists and can still be accessed by those with the approval to do so, without your permission or even knowledge.

    This is the surgery’s management system – not ehealth. As soon as the appropriate form is available I shall opt out. The record will exist and there should be nothing it – which is fine with me.

    I was at the quack’s the other day to get a repeat prescription. The quack quickly got the BP thing done (sky high as it was after work after 2 year 8 classes last up and the other 3 periods were junior classes including an extra for a PE teacher ) and I asked to see that the screen was still set the way I expected, and asked if the surgery logged requests and accesses of individuals for “anonymised” data for epidemiological studies, he said yes, had a look and no my data had not be shared. The quack, a Sri Lankan, trusts government even less than I do

  106. Diogenes

    I am still waiting for a response to my latest missive to Unique Student Identifier people, who in their first response tapdanced around answering my question eg “in 1492 the council of education ministers agreed …”

    I asked for the specific state legislation referring powers to the commonwealth. – Followed up with email to NSW eductaion minister.

  107. Dr Faustus

    Incidentally, perhaps accidentally, life may have been made a little more difficult for Shorten.

    Judging by the screechy edge to his voice today, he certainly seems to have been taken aback by the extent to which Turnbull has tried to infiltrate ALP pasture. He has, however, retained complete monopoly on his very attractive line of 1930’s caricature class warfare: “He gave a tax cut to millionaires and multinationals. That’s not a Labor budget.

  108. classical_hero

    Fair is a term politicians should never use.

  109. Louis

    I think the surprising thing about Malcom is that he has shown just how many other Liberal politicians really wanted to be in the Labor party as well.

    Alas, one day their unrequited love for the ABC will be rewarded.

  110. Eddystone

    Louis
    #2376706, posted on May 10, 2017 at 12:47 pm

    I think the surprising thing about Malcom is that he has shown just how many other Liberal politicians really wanted to be in the Labor party as well.

    Spot on Louis.

    Abbott had his hands full trying to keep this mob on the reservation.

  111. H B Bear

    Don’t forget this is the tough first year Budget after the efforts of the “election winning machine” (thanks Chrissy) that is the Waffleworth Coalition Team. Can’t wait for the next two as they go back into election mode.

  112. Louis;

    I think the surprising thing about Malcom is that he has shown just how many other Liberal politicians really wanted to be in the Labor party as well.

    Very nicely put, Louis.
    A very large kernel of truth in those few words.

  113. Can someone with a little more political nouse than I, figure out from policies voted for, how many liberal party members are left?
    From a rough count, I think the party split would be around 12 Liberal, the rest split between the Nats/Labour/others.

  114. H B Bear

    The Green-Left Weekly Radio Hour (Lunch time edition) formerly known as The World Today having to scrape the bottom of the barrel interviewing failed State senators Xylophone and Lambie over the budget. Needless to say both were reading from the Dickens classic, Oliver Twist.

  115. truth

    If we stage a voters’ strike…millions not voting at all …or just defacing our ballot paper…en masse…would that delegitimize any election result…or just make it easier for Labor? Anyone know?

    In any case it’s what I’m doing because a lower house vote for Australian Conservatives would still go to Turnbull’s LNP in the end and I won’t risk that …even though I’ve voted Liberal from my first vote and worked for Libs on polling booths.

    If Tony Abbott is reinstated as PM , I’m back with the Libs in a heartbeat….but ONLY THEN.

  116. Nelson Kidd-Players

    I’m waiting for Abbott to miss out on pre-selection with Diet-Labor, stand as an Australian Conservative and retain the seat.

    Hard to know how he shall do it without the support of Chairman Maol’s robo calls, though.

  117. H B Bear

    I’m waiting for Abbott to miss out on pre-selection with Diet-Labor, stand as an Australian Conservative and retain the seat.

    We had an Independent in our blue ribbon WA seat of Churchlands after favoured candidate of power-broker Noel Crichton-Browne was given pre-selection. She went on to become the longest serving female MP.

    Liberal voters won’t wear the Lieboral Party machine dumping candidates on them.

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