Budget Speech 2017

The right choices to secure better days ahead.

Thank you Mr Speaker, I move that this Bill now be read a second time.

For many years now, as our economy has gone through major changes, Australians have had to dig deep to keep our economy on the right track.

During this time we have consistently outperformed the top advanced economies in the world.

However, not all Australians have shared in this hard won growth. Many remain frustrated at not getting ahead.

This is especially true in areas where technological change, globalisation and the end of the mining investment boom has had a significant impact.

Small business owners have gone without to keep their businesses open. Australians have taken second jobs, where they can, so bills can be paid.

And it’s been a fair while since most hardworking Australians have had a decent pay rise.

I know this has put real pressure on Australians and on their families. Terribly, this has meant some families have even broken apart.

I believe, though, that we are now moving towards the end of this difficult period.

The signs of an improving global economy are there to see.

There is clearly the potential for better days ahead.

But success cannot be taken for granted. We must be determined to secure our opportunities.

This Budget is about making the right choices to secure the better days ahead.

Our choices are based on the principles of fairness, security and opportunity.

We must choose to focus on growing our economy to secure more and better paying jobs.

We cannot succumb to the laziness that thinks growth will take care of itself.

We must choose to guarantee the essential services that Australians rely on.

We cannot underestimate just how important these services are to people.

We must choose to tackle cost of living pressures for Australians and their families.

We cannot agree with those who say there is nothing that the Government can do.

And we must choose to ensure the Government lives within its means.

Because we cannot pass a burden and forsake our obligations to the next generation.

Mr Speaker, tonight I announce a fair and responsible path back to a balanced budget.

Having exhausted every opportunity to secure savings from our 2014–15 and 2015–16 Budgets, we have decided to reset the Budget by reversing these measures at a cost of $13 billion.

Despite this, I can confirm tonight that the Budget is projected to return to balance in 2020–21 and remain in surplus over the medium term.

The underlying cash balance will improve from a forecast deficit of $29.4 billion in 2017–18 to a projected surplus of $7.4 billion in 2020–21.

Growth in payments has been restricted to less than 2.0 per cent per year.

Since coming to Government we have arrested growth in our debt by more than two-thirds.

Around three quarters of the increase in our debt since 2007-08 has been driven by welfare, health and education spending.

To respect future taxpayers, this everyday spending should be funded from the first dollar we receive in taxes, not debt.

The Budget papers show, after you take into account the net operating balance, infrastructure grants, and non–cash accounting provisions, the Government will no longer be borrowing to pay for our everyday expenses from 2018-19.

There is now a clear and growing consensus that the global economic outlook is improving.

We have positioned Australia well to take advantage.

At home, we expect real growth to rebound to three percent over the next two years, after a temporary slowing this year, that takes into account Cyclone Debbie.

Household consumption, non-mining business investment and exports are expected to support growth.

Wage growth is expected to increase from around two per cent to above three per cent over the next four years.

Given commodity prices continue to be volatile, we have maintained conservative assumptions.

Mr Speaker, in this Budget, we have chosen to grow our economy to support more and better paying jobs.

For the past year we have been delivering our national economic plan for jobs and growth.

The first phase of our enterprise tax plan is now law. Our export trade deals are bearing fruit, with additional access secured. And our investments in science and innovation and our defence industries are breaking ground.

Tonight we add to this plan.

And we start by backing in small business even further.

Small business owners are out there fighting for growth in their businesses every day. They deserve our respect and support.

Backing up our recently legislated tax cuts, small businesses with a turnover up to $10 million will continue to be able to immediately write off expenditure up to $20,000 for a further year.

And we will take further action to reward States and Territories that cut red tape costs for small business.

To support growth we choose to invest in building Australia, rail by rail, runway by runway and road by road.

We will establish the Western Sydney Airport Corporation to build and operate the new Western Sydney airport, creating 20,000 jobs by the early 2030s and 60,000 in the longer term.

We will inject up to $5.3 billion in equity over the next ten years into this company.

Earth moving works will commence on the 1800-hectare site in the second half of next year and Western Sydney Airport will be delivered in 2026.

The Snowy Mountains Scheme is the benchmark for nation building infrastructure.

The Prime Minister has announced our intention to further develop the Snowy Hydro with Snowy 2.0. Tonight we announce our intention to go further.

The Commonwealth is open to acquiring a larger share or outright ownership of Snowy Hydro, from the NSW and Victorian State Governments, subject to some sensible conditions.

First, all funds received by the States would need to be reinvested in priority infrastructure projects.

Second, Snowy Hydro’s obligations under its water licence would be reaffirmed and we would commit to work together to expedite and streamline environmental and planning processes associated with Snowy 2.0, without compromising any standards or controls.

Third, Snowy Hydro would have to remain in public hands.

We have already begun discussions with NSW and invited similar discussions with Victoria.

Tonight, we announce we will deliver $75 billion in infrastructure funding and financing over the next ten years.

$844 million will be used to upgrade the Bruce Highway, including $530 million for works from Pine Rivers to Caloundra.

In Western Australia we are investing $1.6 billion in infrastructure, including funding for better road access to the Fiona Stanley Hospital precinct.

In Victoria, we will make $1 billion available for regional rail and other infrastructure projects, including $30 million to develop a business case for a rail link to Tullamarine Airport. A new $500 million Victorian regional rail fund will include $100 million for the duplication of the Geelong-Waurn Ponds line.

In addition, the Turnbull Government will establish a $10 billion National Rail Programme to deliver rail projects that provide better connections for our cities and regions and create new opportunities to grow our economy.

Projects such as Adelink, Brisbane Metro, Tullamarine Rail link, Cross River Rail in Brisbane, and the Western Sydney Airport Rail link, all have the potential to be supported through this programme, subject to a proven business case.

It is important to invest in infrastructure, but we have to make the right choices on projects, as part of a broader economic growth strategy.

Our new Infrastructure and Projects Financing Agency will help us make those right choices, recruiting people with commercial experience to ensure we use taxpayers’ money wisely.

We must also choose to invest specifically for growth in our regions.

The Productivity Commission recently highlighted that some regional areas have been disconnected from our national growth.

So we will establish a $472 million Regional Growth Fund to back in the plans that regional communities are making to take control of their own economic future. This includes $200 million in funding to support a further round of the successful Building Better Regions programme.

In one of the biggest investments ever seen in regional Australia, the Government will fund the Melbourne to Brisbane Inland Rail project with $8.4 billion in equity to be provided to the Australian Rail Track Corporation. Construction on this 1,700 kilometre project will begin in 2017-18 and will support 16,000 jobs at the peak of construction. It will benefit not just Melbourne and Brisbane, but all the regions along its route.

Skilled migration has always played a significant role in driving our economic growth.

But it must be on our terms and we must skill more Australians to secure jobs.

Until now, employers have had to contribute 1 or 2 per cent of their payroll to training if they employ foreign workers. These requirements have proven difficult to police.

Accordingly, we are replacing these requirements with an annual foreign worker levy of $1,200 or $1,800 per worker per year on temporary work visas and a $3,000 or $5,000 one-off levy for those on a permanent skilled visa.

Over the next four years, $1.2 billion will be raised from this levy that will contribute directly to a new Commonwealth-State Skilling Australians Fund.

States and Territories will only be able to draw on this fund when they deliver on their commitments to train new apprentices.

Mr Speaker, in this Budget we have chosen to guarantee the essential services that Australians rely on.

The first duty of a national Government is to keep Australians safe.

In 2020-21, we will meet our commitment to increase defence spending to two per cent of GDP, three years ahead of schedule.

We are supporting our 2,300 Defence force personnel serving overseas.

We are investing over $300 million to ensure the AFP can continue to lead the charge against terrorism, organised crime, child exploitation and other crimes.

And we will continue to ensure Operation Sovereign Borders has the resources needed to do its job.

I know that ‘stopping the boats’ was something many said could not be done. What others mocked as a slogan we turned into an outcome.

Every Australian understands the importance of health care. 

Tonight, we put to rest any doubts about Medicare and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.

We are lifting the freeze on the indexation of the Medicare Benefits Schedule.

We are also reversing the removal of the bulk billing incentive for diagnostic imaging and pathology services and the increase in the PBS co-payment and related changes.

The cost of reversing these measures is $2.2 billion over the next four years.

Tonight, I also announce we will legislate to guarantee Medicare and the PBS with a Medicare Guarantee Bill.

This new law will set up a Medicare Guarantee Fund to pay for all expenses on the Medicare Benefits Schedule and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. Proceeds from the Medicare Levy will be paid into the fund.

An additional contribution from income tax revenue will also be paid into the Medicare Guarantee Fund to make up the difference.

The Bill will provide transparency about what it really costs to run Medicare and the PBS and a clear guarantee on how we pay for it.

$1.2 billion in new medicines will be made available, including for patients with chronic heart failure, funded by an agreement to decrease the cost of medicines for taxpayers.

The Commonwealth will increase hospitals funding by an additional $2.8 billion over four years.

Significantly, we will invest an additional $115 million in mental health, including funding for rural telehealth psychological services, mental health research and to prevent suicide.

We will also invest $1.4 billion in ground-breaking health research over the next four years, including $65.9 million this year, to help research into children’s cancer.

All up, our commitments equate to a $10 billion re-investment in Australia’s health care over four years, including the $2.8 billion increase in hospital funding.

They are underpinned by cornerstone partnerships struck by the Health Minister with our doctors, specialists, pharmacists and the medicines sector.

And tonight we have chosen to close the funding gap for our National Disability Insurance Scheme once and for all.

The funding gap is currently $55.7 billion over the next ten years. We have previously sought to close this gap with budget savings that we have not been able to get through the Parliament.

To ensure the NDIS is fully funded we will legislate to increase the Medicare Levy by 0.5 percentage points in two years’ time, when the extra bills start coming in.

This will also provide further time to explain to Australians what the NDIS will deliver.

Even if we are not impacted directly, this is all our responsibility.

Our decision to increase the Levy reflects the fact that all Australians have a role to play.

I also announce a commitment of $80 million for Australians with a mental illness such as severe depression, eating disorders, schizophrenia and post-natal depression resulting in a psychosocial disability, including those who had been at risk of losing their services during the transition to the NDIS.

The Turnbull Government will continue to invest record amounts in education.

After reversing proposed savings from the 2014-15 Budget, we will invest $18.6 billion in extra funding to educate our children in all schools over the next ten years.

Our schools funding package delivers a fairer and simpler way to meet our shared commitment to educate each and every child, in accordance with the Gonski needs-based standard.

In addition to the funds provided by the GST to the States, we will meet 20 per cent of the needs-based funding for every student in our public school system and 80 per cent for students in non-government schools by 2027. Funding for each student across all sectors will grow at an average of 4.1 per cent each year.

In Higher Education, we are launching a fairer system, with students asked to pay a bit more for their own education costs. However taxpayers will continue to subsidise more than half the cost of each student’s higher education.

A 2.5 per cent efficiency dividend will be applied to universities for the next two years to ensure taxpayers and students get better value for their investments.

This Budget also delivers important increased support for veterans mental health, protections for children within the family justice system, victims of domestic violence, closing the gap for Indigenous Australians and creating the National Redress Scheme for victims of institutional child sexual abuse.

Mr Speaker, in this Budget we have chosen to place downward pressure on rising costs of living.

The Prime Minister’s energy security plan provides reliable and affordable energy for Australians, coping with rising electricity prices.

He is securing access to our gas resources for domestic use. We have set aside around $90 million for this task in this budget.

He is ensuring energy consumers and businesses get a fairer deal, by funding the ACCC to investigate and police competition in retail electricity and gas markets.

The Prime Minister is working to improve energy regulation, with additional funding tonight to improve gas market efficiency and transparency.

He is investing in new generation, transmission and storage capacity. This includes Snowy 2.0, around $37 million to South Australia for new energy infrastructure and funding to prove up gas pipeline proposals to South Australia from Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

And more than $3 billion has already been provided to support new emissions technologies.

To support older Australians we are restoring the pensioner concession card to those impacted by the pension assets test change introduced earlier this year.

As a result, they will regain access to state and territory based concessions that were withdrawn after the change.

And we want customers and taxpayers to get a fairer deal from our banks.

For the system to be fairer, there needs to be greater competition and accountability – now.

In response to the Ramsay Review, we are establishing a simpler, more accessible and more affordable one-stop shop for Australians to resolve their disputes and obtain binding outcomes from the banks and other financial institutions, to be known as the Australian Financial Complaints Authority.

A new Banking Executive Accountability Regime will be introduced, requiring all senior executives to be registered with APRA. If in breach, they can be deregistered and disqualified from holding executive positions, and be stripped of their significant bonuses.

Banks will also be held to account if they try and hide misconduct by executives with new mandatory reporting requirements.

If banks breach misconduct rules, they will also face bigger fines starting at $50 million for small banks and $200 million for large banks.

As recommended by the Coleman Committee, a permanent team will be established within the ACCC to investigate competition in our banking and financial system.

The introduction of an open banking regime in 2018 will give customers greater access to their own data, empowering them to seek out better and cheaper services.

Tonight, I also announce a new six-basis point levy on the big banks’ liabilities, starting on July 1.

This represents an additional and fair contribution from our major banks, is similar to measures imposed in other advanced countries, and will even up the playing field for smaller banks.

The levy will only affect our five largest banks with assessed liabilities of $100 billion or more and does not apply to superannuation funds or insurance companies.

Importantly, customer deposits of less than $250,000 and additional capital requirements imposed on the banks by regulatory authorities are excluded from their assessed liabilities.

Unlike the previous bank deposit tax, this is specifically not a levy on pensioners’ and others’ ordinary deposit accounts, nor is it on home loans.

This measure will secure $6.2 billion over the Budget and forward estimates to support budget repair, including the reversal of significant budget savings measures.

We have also chosen to put downward pressure on rising housing costs

If a family or an individual has a roof over their head that they can rely on, then all of life’s other challenges become more manageable.

Whether you are saving to buy a home, spending a high proportion of income on your rent, waiting for subsidised housing, or you’re homeless, this is an important issue to you.

There are no silver bullets to make housing more affordable. But by adopting a comprehensive approach, by working together, by understanding the spectrum of housing needs, we can make a difference.

We will work with the States and Territories and local Governments to get more homes built, because prices are higher where demand is greater than supply.

The Commonwealth will replace the National Affordable Housing Agreement that provides $1.3 billion every year to the States and Territories, with a new set of agreements, with the same funding, requiring the States to deliver on housing supply targets and reform their planning systems.

We will also establish a $1 billion National Housing Infrastructure Facility, based on a UK model, to fund ‘micro’ city deals that remove infrastructure impediments to developing new homes.

An online Commonwealth land registry will be established detailing sites that can be made available for residential development.

In Melbourne, land for a new suburb that could cater for 6,000 new homes will be unlocked just 10km from the CBD, by releasing surplus Defence land at Maribyrnong.

The Turnbull Government will also help deliver tens of thousands of new homes needed in Western Sydney as part of our Western Sydney city deal.

A new National Housing Finance and Investment Corporation will be established by July 1 next year to provide long-term, low-cost finance to support more affordable rental housing. States and Territories will also be encouraged to transfer stock to the community housing sector.

Other measures to address supply include: allowing Managed Investment Trusts to be used to develop and own affordable housing, providing investors in affordable housing with greater income certainty by enabling direct deduction of welfare payments from tenants, and increasing the capital gains tax discount to 60 per cent for investments in affordable housing.

These measures will also support State, Territory and local governments imposing inclusionary zoning requirements on new development sites and provide more vehicles for superannuation funds to invest in affordable housing.

And tonight I announce $375 million for a permanent extension of homelessness funding to the States, with a continued focus on supporting young people and victims of domestic violence.

On the demand side, for those who are trying to save to buy their first home, we will support them by providing a tax cut on their first home deposit savings.

First home buyers will be able to save for a deposit by salary sacrificing into their superannuation account over and above their compulsory superannuation contribution from July 1.

The First Home Super Savers Scheme will attract the tax advantages of superannuation. Contributions and earnings will be taxed at 15 per cent, rather than marginal rates, and withdrawals will be taxed at their marginal rate, less 30 percentage points.

Savers will not have to set up another account, they can just use their existing super account and decide how much of their income they want to put aside to save for their first home deposit.

Contributions will be limited to $30,000 per person in total and $15,000 per year.

Under this plan, most first home savers will be able accelerate their savings by at least 30 per cent.

We will encourage older Australians to free up housing stock, by enabling downsizers over the age of 65 to make a non-concessional contribution of up to $300,000 into their superannuation fund from the proceeds of the sale of their principal home.

And on demand management, we will continue to prefer the scalpel to the chainsaw, to avoid a housing shock.

Mum and dad investors will continue to be able to use negative gearing, supporting the supply of rental housing and placing downward pressure on rents.

Our regulatory agencies will continue to use the flexible and calibrated controls they have available.

And we will legislate to extend APRA’s ability to apply controls to the non-ADI sector and explicitly allow them to differentiate the application of loan controls by location.

Even tougher rules on foreign investment in residential real estate will be introduced, removing the main residence capital gains tax exemption, and tightening compliance.

We will also apply an annual foreign investment levy of at least $5,000 on all future foreign investors who fail to either occupy or lease their property for at least six months each year.

And we will restore the requirement that prevents developers from selling more than 50 per cent of new developments to foreign investors.

Together, these measures represent a comprehensive package that can make a difference.

Finally Mr Speaker, we have chosen to ensure the Government lives within its means.

We will continue our crackdown on multinationals not paying their fair share of tax.

The ATO has already raised $2.9 billion in tax liabilities this year against a group of just seven large multinational companies, and expects to raise more than $4 billion in total this financial year from large public companies and multinationals.

Tonight we are toughening the Multinational Anti-Avoidance Law to extend the rules to structures involving foreign partnerships or trusts and clamping down on aggressive structuring using hybrids.

We will also be introducing new tax integrity measures as recommended by our Black Economy Taskforce.

We will continue the fight against serious financial and organised crime by providing the Australian Taxation Office with additional funding to chase and tax the crooks.

From 1 July 2017, the Government will improve the integrity of negative gearing by disallowing deductions for travel expenses and, for properties bought after today, the Government will also limit plant and equipment depreciation deductions to only those expenses directly incurred by investors.

Together all of these measures are estimated to provide a gain to revenue of $2.1 billion over the forward estimates.

And we will continue to stop people trying to take an easy ride on our welfare system to protect it for those who need it most.

The best way to get your welfare budget under control is to get Australians off welfare and into work.

We will support young parents to get jobs by expanding the successful ParentsNext programme from 13,000 vulnerable young parents to 68,000 in more than 20 new locations, especially those with high Indigenous populations.

The programme supports young parents, mainly mothers, with child care, pre-employment training, financial literacy and numeracy skills and linking up with other education and training opportunities.

We are also strengthening mutual obligation requirements.

Those who do not meet their responsibilities and either fail to turn up to appointments or take on suitable work will face escalating financial penalties, ranging from reduced to cancelled payments.

We want to support job seekers affected by drug and alcohol abuse, but to protect taxpayers, it has to be a two-way street.

We will no longer accept, as an excuse from repeat offenders, that the reason they could not meet their mutual obligation requirements was because they were drunk or drug-affected.

In addition we will commence a modest drug testing trial for 5,000 new welfare recipients.

JobSeeker recipients who test positive would be placed on the Cashless Debit Card for their welfare payments and be subjected to further tests and possible referral for treatment.

Other welfare measures include: strengthening verification requirements for single parents seeking welfare, a crackdown on those attempting to collect multiple payments, stricter residency rules for new migrants to access Australian pensions, and denying welfare for a disability caused solely by their own substance abuse.

Conclusion

Mr Speaker, this is a responsible Budget.

It sets out a credible and affordable plan, based on the principles of fairness, security and opportunity.

Above all this is an honest Budget.

It is honest about our challenges and opportunities.

It does not pretend to do things with money we do not have.

It does not indulge simplistic solutions to what we know are complex problems.

This is a Budget that makes the right choices for Australians who are working hard to secure the better days ahead for themselves and their families.

That is why this Budget is a plan that can be trusted and supported.

So to be clear, our plan is,

  • to grow our economy to create more and better paid jobs,
  • to guarantee the essentials that Australians rely on,
  • to reduce cost of living pressures, and
  • to ensure that the government lives within its means.

Once again Mr Speaker, I commend our plan, this Budget and this Bill to the House.

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370 Responses to Budget Speech 2017

  1. Mike of Marion

    What a waste of recycled electrons!!

  2. C.L.

    Mr Speaker, tonight I announce a fair and responsible path back to a balanced budget.

    LOL. He announces a path.

  3. Baldrick

    Bullshit … bullshit … bullshit …

    THE HONOURABLE SCOTT MORRISTEEN MP … “The four years of a return to surplus I announce tonight …”

  4. stackja

    Dreaming? Time will tell!

  5. a reader

    Can someone give me the precis? I haven’t got the time or patience to read that bollocks.

  6. Motelier

    Can someone give me the precis?

    Deficit, deficit, deficit.

  7. kc

    Scomo is channelling Swany. Who would have thought a conservative party (cough cough) treasurer could be such a disappointment. Time to start looking OS again for retirement options.

  8. Rabz

    Gee, only a projected deficit for 17-18 of $30 billion.

    Great work, squandermonkeys!

  9. a reader

    Thought that might be the case Motelier. Thanks!

  10. C.L.

    Gee, only a projected deficit for 17-18 of $30 billion.

    Great work, squandermonkeys!

    No no. We get a path.

  11. stackja

    a reader – precis – MT hopes to survive!

  12. Rabz

    LOL – a special li’l brown foreign wukka tax.

  13. Cary

    Mum and dad investors will continue to be able to use negative gearing, supporting the supply of rental housing and placing downward pressure on rents.

    Bullshit spin. They just don’t care that this continues to make housing unaffordable and is a tax dodge.

  14. Zyconoclast

    There is no arse-clown emoji arsey or clowny enough.

  15. john constantine

    Railways that can run trains during Summer sound alright.

    The 20 grand immediate deduction from taxable income for small business to buy something nice for the business instead of having a holiday will be welcome.

  16. Motelier

    Nothing to worry about though, SloMo predicts a surplus in 20/21*.

    *Hmmmmmm, is this “surplus” the same one Shane Wand was predicting in 08, 09, 10, 11 and 12?

  17. Rabz

    “We will explain what the NDIS will deliver”

    Good luck with that.

  18. custard

    No cuts to the ABC, no wage freeze for the PS, no abolition of the HRC, not one cut that I can see.

    What a joke.

  19. Tel

    There is now a clear and growing consensus that the global economic outlook is improving.

    Like every other clear and growing consensus, it’s a load of crap.

    The “boomer” generation will never deal with debt, nor will the so called millennials. Not in Australia, nor anywhere else in the world. They don’t have it in them. All of the EU is drowning in debt, so is the USA, and China is trying their best to catch up in the race for the cliff jump… for reasons no one can understand.

    That means waiting until the “boomers” finally let go of power and then hope the millennials don’t grab that power too quickly afterwards. If there’s any available gap there to work with, I don’t know… but that’s all there is.

  20. Rabz

    Budget surpluses – they’re as mythical as unicorns.

  21. Leigh Lowe

    Fuckin gibberish.
    I have started watching dogs playing pianos on YouTube.

  22. Rabz

    FFS, this is excruciating.

  23. Motelier

    Budget surpluses – they’re as mythical as unicorns.

    I seem to remember a dream of a surplus in the mid-noughties.

    Must have been the alcohol.

  24. Baldrick

    This is an excellent Labor budget … oh, hang on …

  25. C.L.

    An online land bank!
    LOL.

  26. Rabz

    Porter sporting a new pair of Erkos.

    Beyond parody.

  27. Tom

    Growth in payments has been restricted to less than 2.0 per cent per year.

    Bullshit. In the expenses column in the budget aggregates, spending will rise by 4.9%, 3.3% and 3.9% in the next three years and spending as a percentage of GDP is stuck well above 25% for the foreseeable future.

    Combined with the squandermonkeys in state and local government, that means total government spending is in the process of spiralling past 40%. Government is now confiscating 40 cents in the dollar of people’s hard earned.

    BTW, the IPA needs to get cracking and update its tables on total government spending as a % of GDP, which hasn’t been done for at least three years.

  28. custard

    Not one single announcement of reducing the size and scope of government, not one.

  29. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Scott Morrison’s decision to increase the Medicare levy will more than swallow the gains from the abolition of the deficit levy for many high income earners when it kicks in from mid-2019.

    The Treasurer has announced the Medicare levy will rise by 0.5 per cent to 2.5 per cent in two years as the government moves to pay for its decision to fully fund the National Disability Insurance Scheme and underpin the nation’s health care system.

    The decision — pushed out to beyond the next election — will disappoint taxpayers with incomes between $180,000 and up to $240,000 who will find themselves worse off under the new arrangements when they begin in two years. These taxpayers will however have been able to pocket the gains from the abolition of the deficit levy for two years.

  30. custard

    Probably the most subdued atmosphere during a budget speech that I can recall.

  31. Leigh Lowe

    This should be on the comedy channel.

  32. Fisky

    $300 million reduction in foreign aid over the estimates.

  33. Fisky

    Haha! Compulsory drug-testing for welfare recipients.

  34. Gab

    At last! What Sinclair has been predicting for many months – Turnbull has reached peak Potential Greatness™

  35. Robber Baron

    The SFL party have ensured electoral annihilation under the Waffler, they are officially more Layba than Layba.

    Time to vote PHON. As idiotic as that sounds, at the very least Pauline hates the ABC and will take an axe to it. Its PHON or green muzzo communism. That’s the choice we face.

  36. Motelier

    This should be on the comedy channel.

    Sorry but no. Try the channel with all of those horror movies.

  37. Fisky

    A few good ideas, but mostly rehashed garbage from the 1950s.

  38. Rabz

    Leigh – some of it has had me in stitches. If anyone is currently sounding drunk and drug affected, it’s Morristeen.

  39. JC

    What’s the top marginal tax rate now including the revised med levy. I forget. I always figure it’s around 50%.

  40. Makka

    and denying welfare for a disability caused solely by their own substance abuse

    If he applies this to the letter, at least 50% of DSP’ers will be denied their pension. No chance of passing. Zero.

  41. a reader

    Chairman Mal and co won’t rest until it’s 85%

  42. Gavin R Putland

    “We are all Keynesians now…”

  43. Infidel Tiger

    What an horrendous man Morrison turned out to be.

    Taxes up. Spending up. Bullshit through the roof.

  44. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Haha! Compulsory drug-testing for welfare recipients.

    A pilot programme for 5,000 – listen to the SJW’s scream about that.

  45. Motelier

    That’s the choice we face.

    Nope. Support the cash economy. Support those that do not declare income as they are now the only ones classed as truly free.

  46. Its Remarkable

    Said so on the old fred, but …All I have heard is an ever growing government. There is no facet of life the government cannot interfere with or intrude.
    “Turnbull Government” featured all over the place.
    We are stuffed!

  47. Fisky

    None of the half-assed punitive measures will get through the Senate. But all of the spending increases will. The Bank Tax, the NDIS, Medicare repayment, all of that will sail through. But the drug test for welfare recipients is DOA.

  48. Infidel Tiger

    What’s the top marginal tax rate now including the revised med levy. I forget. I always figure it’s around 50%.

    50% now. And that is just income tax!

    FME. We are boned.

  49. Baldrick

    As usual, most of the increased spending measures will be passed by the Senate and those very very small budget cuts will be blocked.

  50. Its Remarkable

    Said so on the old fred, but …
    All I have heard is an ever growing government, like a hydra. There is no facet of life the government cannot interfere with or intrude. Bank levy = another tax on all people.
    “Turnbull Government” featured all over the place.
    We are stuffed!

  51. procrustes

    I thought Labor lost the last election. More tax, more spending, wasteful projects, more regulation.

    What a shower.

  52. Makka

    Fme, these clowns are forecasting wages growth of 3.5%plus.

  53. Motelier

    The only way we as taxpayers can win now is to starve the squandermonkeys. Withhold all tax payments indefinately.

  54. Infidel Tiger

    Probably the most subdued atmosphere during a budget speech that I can recall.

    Both sides are nodding in agreement at this crap.

  55. Tom

    Hahaha! Fakefacts Radio is quoting the (Greenfilth) Ponds Institute as a credible source on fiscal management.

  56. Fisky

    Stephen Murray‏ @smurray38 5m5 minutes ago
    Replying to @PeterPhelpsMLC
    Snowy 2.0, socialised medicine, a new airport for Sydney, punishing the banks. This isn’t any old Labor budget. It’s a Chifley Labor Budget

    Hahaha!

  57. Infidel Tiger

    Don’t forgwt the $10bn on railways!

  58. Baldrick

    What’s the top marginal tax rate now including the revised med levy. I forget. I always figure it’s around 50%.

    The increased Medicare Levy by 2019, will affectively push the highest tax rate closer to 55%, for those earning above 200k

  59. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    and denying welfare for a disability caused solely by their own substance abuse

    Does this mean my cunning plan to claim the DSP for alcohol dependency has failed?

  60. Arnost

    Are there any cuts? (Apart from cutting the cuts that were held up in the Senate – LOL)

  61. Fisky

    Tax hike on foreign workers. Snowy mountains scheme. Did Arthur fucking Calwell write this budget? Where did it come from?

  62. Baldrick

    Everybody working and paying tax will be hit with the increased Medicare Levy to fund the NDIS.
    EVERYBODY

  63. Arnost

    Of course the company tax cuts will just get stalled in the Senate in stead!

  64. Bruce of Newcastle

    Taxes up. Spending up. Bullshit through the roof.

    Always entertaining to see a politician commit ceremonial seppuku in front of everyone.

  65. Gab

    and denying welfare for a disability caused solely by their own substance abuse

    I give them a week before they back down on this.

  66. Fisky

    “Treasurer, could you be the first Liberal Treasurer in history to deliver a Labor budget?”

    -Leigh Sales to Morrison

  67. Infidel Tiger

    Morrison made sure to mention that Snowy 2.0 would never be privatised.

    It’s over baby. The Australian experiment ends with some fat bald loser wanking himself into a stupor of keynsian delight.

  68. Fisky

    Watch Morrison on Sales now. His foundation is so white, it looks like he’s fully drained of blood.

  69. Motelier

    Well it is a start.

    Trouble is that at the current cost of road building in Australia this might cover the cost of about 100 km of highway.

  70. Baldrick

    It’s a Labor budget.

    That is all.

  71. Fisky

    Where is Sinclair? Get over here at once and explain yourself!

  72. duncanm

    Finally Mr Speaker, we have chosen to ensure the Government lives within its means.

    where ? I see no restrictions or reductions in government spending?

    I suggest an approach, ironically pioneered by these goons.

    Split spending into ‘essential’ and ‘non-essential’ services.

    Essential — health, education, police, defence, welfare, science, that sort of stuff. The things people think off when they’re asked the perennial ‘cut services or increase taxes’ false dichotomy.

    Non-essential — ABC, SBS, HRC, most quangos, yarts, the UN, most foreign aid. I’m sure DL has a more comprehensive list.

    Non-essential gets an immediate 10% or more cut. Quangos like the HRC get axed.

  73. kc

    These taxpayers will however have been able to pocket the gains from the abolition of the deficit levy for two years”.

    The quickly move to NZ

  74. Motelier

    For context, Yeppen South highway upgrade on the southside of Rockvegas cost 286 million.

  75. Gab

    Morrison/Turnbull make Swan’s budgets look genius.

  76. Rabz

    Amusing to hear Morristeen harping on about trying to increase housing supply by putting pressure on the states to free up land releases and reduce regulation.

  77. Makka

    None of the half-assed punitive measures will get through the Senate. But all of the spending increases will. The Bank Tax, the NDIS, Medicare repayment, all of that will sail through.

    Exactly. The real deficit will end up being 30 Billion plus.

  78. Tom

    Ross Greenwood says Morriswan will crack down on negative gearing by $2 billion ($500m p.a.) over the next four years. So, in combination with the higher interest rates the banks announced today because of the new bank tax, that guarantees the housing market will be either depressed or will collapse, by my reckoning.

  79. Gerard O

    No dolies executed on the floor of Parliament? Very socialist, Morrison…Communism wins.

  80. Gab

    Morriswan will crack down on negative gearing by $2 billion ($500m p.a.) over the next four years

    Fabulous. Now rents will increase and there’ll be almost zero in new property investments.

  81. Fisky

    Amusing to hear Morristeen harping on about trying to increase housing supply by putting pressure on the states to free up land releases and reduce regulation.

    Recycled rubbish from the Howard years. Every time they asked him about house prices, he called for the states to “release land”. Which never happened.

    Nothing ever changes.

  82. Baldrick

    As if the big banks are going to sit back and cop a $6 billion hit, without scrapping that money back from borrowers.
    Stupid.Fucking.Liberals

  83. Fisky

    Fme, these clowns are forecasting wages growth of 3.5%plus.

    Oh yes! The massive productivity gains from hitting the banks will achieve that alone!

  84. C.L.

    None of the half-assed punitive measures will get through the Senate. But all of the spending increases will.

    Fisk nails it.
    It’s almost on purpose now, isn’t it?

    Here some tough stuff but – gosh darn it – blocked in the Senate. Oh well.

  85. Leigh Lowe

    Fuckwit on Sky wetting his pants with excitement …
    “Abbott-Hockey spending cuts are gone forever. We are taxing ourselves to surplus… with extra added growth”
    We.
    Are.
    Fucked.

  86. Rabz

    So, in combination with the higher interest rates the banks announced today because of the new bank tax, that guarantees the housing market will be either depressed or will collapse, by my reckoning.

    Homeowners and mortgagees across the country will rejoice. But funnily enough, not in a way that will benefit the gliberals at the polls.

  87. Leigh Lowe

    Here some tough stuff but – gosh darn it – blocked in the Senate. Oh well.

    Exactly.
    Just said the same to Mrs L.
    They should just say that they will link the bank tax and NDIS funding to the welfare tests.
    No fucking negotiation.

  88. Herodotus

    Lee Sales to Morrison in the post-budget interview on ABC:

    “A lot of the chatter on social media was about “….. WTF? This is where the ABC is at.

  89. Gerard O

    Too bad if any down-on-their-luck NRL players want to get Centrelink payments. FU Morrison!!11!

  90. cynical1

    Bullshit spin. They just don’t care that this continues to make housing unaffordable and is a tax dodge.

    Don’t talk rubbish.

    Some of these pollies have half a dozen.

    Cheap as chips.

    Especially when you stay in one of the three your missus owns in Canberra and claim staying away from home allowance.

    Who needs a tax dodge?

    But since you asked…

  91. Makka

    So as if by magic, wages growth will leap from from under 2% to nearly 4% over 4 years??

    Smoke and mirrors.

  92. Fisky

    The foreign worker tax hike will definitely get Labor’s support. You have to wonder why anyone would move to or invest in Australia.

  93. custard

    Where is guy who was throwing around the pies this morning? ( Joyce )

    Get in here and mess up ScoMo will you.

  94. Mrskeletor

    Everyone still think Malcolm is better than Abbott?

  95. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Budget 2017: Shorten’s scare tactics blunted as PM adapts

    Budget 2017: Political success, failure and a reversal of fortune

    The Australian
    8:04PM May 9, 2017

    Bill Shorten was enormously pleased with himself when he ran a successful Medicare privatisation scare campaign against Malcolm Turnbull and almost won government.

    The Opposition Leader has persevered with this tactic, and raised others as part of a relentlessly negative and opportunistic campaign to keep the Coalition off balance and expose Malcolm Turnbull’s political inexperience.

    It has worked, and Turnbull’s leadership and public standing is under pressure.

    But this budget may very well make Shorten regret the Medicare scare success, or at least his continued efforts to keep it alive and pursue the Coalition over the NDIS, Gonski school funding, negative gearing, housing affordability, savings measures blocked in the Senate and a banking royal commission

    After too long, the Prime Minister has stirred from a fog of overconfidence, vacillation, unreality and delay to strike back at Shorten in the all the areas where he has hurt the Coalition most.

    Freed from the shackles of the courageous 2014 Budget, for the first time Turnbull and Scott Morrison — along with others such as Mathias Cormann — have been able to produce an economic statement the closest to a John Howard political document we have seen for years.

    With the handouts to the special interest groups and fixed income retirees, there is a Howard flavour in a modest document that cuts spending, but only just.

    But Morrison has kept a Costello flavour as well, with an eye on a return to budget surplus and a promise — or hope — of growth and good times ahead. It won’t be enough for the hard-line economists, but it will be welcomed on the backbench.

    The Turnbull touch here is the desire to neutralise Labor’s political success built on the back of Shorten’s obstruction, negativity and preparedness to mislead.

    Turnbull turned to his chief torment first — the Medicare scare — and has locked in funding, but went further with a Gillard-esque Medicare levy to really fund the NDIS; and a recruitment of Gonski to direct the school funding program.

    Even negative gearing was changed, as the Coalition moved to help first-time home buyers and shut down excessive tax claims and foreign residential investment.

    And as for Shorten’s claim that Turnbull is a friend of the big banks, it is unlikely a new $6.2 billion tax that can’t be passed on to customers is going to be seen as a being a friend to the big five profitable banks.

    Shorten has achieved a lot politically, but by doing the same thing all the time you allow, or even encourage, your opponent to adapt. Turnbull has adapted, and now it will be time for Shorten to change.

    From the Oz. There seems to be an awful lot of black cloud for very little silver lining.

  96. Herodotus

    Leigh Sales to Labor shadow treasurer:

    What do,you think of the budget?

  97. Marcus

    Turnbull and Morrison’s fiscal strategy is obvious. Suck up to Donald Trump so much, that when he shuffles off this mortal coil he’ll leave us all his money – which, based on the Budget, they’re anticipating happening in the 2020 financial year (or possibly earlier, depending on the length of the probate process).

    On a serious note, though, the quantity surveyors are going to have to mobilise pretty quickly if they want to save their industry.

  98. Makka

    Very big signal to property investors and potential downsizers…. SELL now!

    Lots of properties to hit the market shortly.

  99. John64

    Turtlehead Bowen blathering to Sales on TheirABC.

    Bowen and his predecessor Goose Swansteen at least give Morriswan a tiny sliver of credibility.

  100. Fisky

    AusTaxpayers‏
    @AusTaxpayers
    Follow
    More
    A STAGGERING $12 BILLION IN TAX HIKES OVER FORWARD ESTIMATES in #Budget2017

  101. Rabz

    So as if by magic, wages growth will leap from from under 2% to nearly 4% over 4 years??

    Well, stranger things have happened, I guess.

    Otherwise, it’s just yet another fabrication.

  102. Habib

    We are now officially a One Party State, and I for one welcome our cardigan wearing, vicks inhaling, minority hoovering, window licking overlords.

  103. Rebel with cause

    Hard for Labor to get upset with this Budget. They are being out spent and out taxed.

    MT genius strategy to outflank Labor on the left and pinch some of those Socialist Alliance votes.

  104. cynical1

    and denying welfare for a disability caused solely by their own substance abuse

    We will be in surplus in no time.

    Think of all the security screens that will get installed to keep ice addled burglars out.

    Meanwhile, any mention of the unemployed who must take any work offered?

    Which is not offered very often to people in burkas who don’t speak English.

    They have to survive on the single parent pension.

    With the other four wives…

  105. rickw

    The only sensible discussions to be had after this budget:

    1). Where to emigrate to?
    2). How to leave without getting robbed blind?

    There is not a spec of sense or truth in this budget.

  106. Leigh Lowe

    Fme, these clowns are forecasting wages growth of 3.5%plus.

    I nearly vomited when Morriswan said …

    And it’s been a fair while since most hardworking Australians have had a decent pay rise

    EXCEPT IF YOU ARE A FEDERAL PUBLIC SERVANT YOU XUNT!!!

  107. Infidel Tiger!

    Does anybody know if Sinclair is ok?

  108. Rabz

    That JJJ political reporterette has very ample boozies.

  109. Infidel Tiger!

    EXCEPT IF YOU ARE A FEDERAL PUBLIC SERVANT YOU XUNT!!!

    Makes you fucking sick.

    Where is that pie throwing old man when you need him?

  110. Fisky

    The only difference between LNP and ALP is boats and SSM. On literally every other policy they are the same.

  111. Makka

    The real deficit will end up being 30 Billion plus.
    50 Billion , not 30 Billion.

  112. Baldrick

    $12 BILLION IN TAX HIKES OVER FORWARD ESTIMATES

    Fuck you – Stupid.Fucking.Liberals

  113. C.L.

    Is there a link up for the Online Land Bank?
    I want to withdraw a beach house.

  114. Fisky

    LOL – bank lobbyist Anna Bligh denounces the Tobin Tax!

  115. Infidel Tiger!

    Make no mistake Fisk, the LNP are gung ho for boats and queer marriage.

  116. Leigh Lowe

    Rickw.
    Having that very discussion at the moment.
    I worry about parking money in Europe.
    What about the US?
    Or NZ?
    Or salting, say 10%, of your assets in three different jurisdictions.
    But where?
    And what are the consequences of taking funds offshore.

  117. Motelier

    The only sensible discussions to be had after this budget:

    1). Where to emigrate to?
    2). How to leave without getting robbed blind?

    There is not a spec of sense or truth in this budget.

    3). Identifying methods to invite more patrons into the cash and barter economies to starve the bastards of money.

  118. JC

    We’re all Socialist Alliance now.

  119. Leigh Lowe

    Infidel Tiger!
    #2376042, posted on May 9, 2017 at 8:35 pm
    Does anybody know if Sinclair is ok?

    He is writing a letter of apology to Tony Abbott.

  120. Fisky

    Australia will be invaded by gay Muslims in Turnbull’s final year in office.

  121. candy

    Drug testing for job seekers. Is this legal and how is it done, where and who does the test etc, and how much does it cost. It surely could not just be random.

    Anyways, there are simply not enough jobs to go around, and under-employment a big problem. So I’m not keen on this idea. Why not simply try to create a better economy.

    This is to get the Hanson voters. I wonder though if even Hanson voters are unkind enough to think this is appropriate.

    Apart from that it’s a half reasonable Labor budget.

  122. Richard

    I wonder if the people who were whingeing about a seven dollar Doctor visit in Joe Hockey’s budget are looking forward to paying half a percent more of their taxable income

  123. Fisky

    Sky News Australia‏Verified account @SkyNewsAust 1m1 minute ago
    More
    CEO of the ABA Anna Bligh says every Australian will have to pay for the levy on the big 5 banks #Budget2017 MORE http://bit.ly/2pppLdC

    Maybe those fucking idiots at the ABA should have hired someone competent.

  124. Infidel Tiger!

    Bill Shorten will have to attack this budget from the right.

    The IPA should give him a call.

  125. a reader

    That JJJ political reporterette has very ample boozies.

    needs proof

  126. Tom

    MT genius strategy to outflank Labor on the left and pinch some of those Socialist Alliance votes.

    … while sending the LNP base, who voted for responsible economic management, into the arms of minor parties. Yeah, fucking Martin Trumble genius.

  127. Gab

    I wonder if the people who were whingeing about a seven dollar Doctor visit in Joe Hockey’s budget are looking forward to paying half a percent more of their taxable income

    Except the people whingeing about it weren’t the taxpayers.

  128. JC

    What about the US?

    If the Trumpster get his lower corporate tax through, parts of the US that don’t have a state tax become interesting destinations.

    Stick your assets in a S corporation and only take out the money you need to live on, which would be taxed at the personal rate. The rest at 15 to 20%.

  129. Infidel Tiger!

    I wonder if the people who were whingeing about a seven dollar Doctor visit in Joe Hockey’s budget are looking forward to paying half a percent more of their taxable income

    Ahaha! The people who objected will be too stupid to compute that.

  130. JC

    What happened to Cigs and Liquor?

  131. Habib

    Mind you, fining wogs for having their hovel empty for six months or more is a good start, how about charging for the permamently vacant real estate between the wingnut ears of every dullard, dolt and dickhead who’s ever sought, gained or been ejected from public office? Defecit sorted.

  132. Habib

    Bungers & booze are indexed, go up every 6 months. Like parliamentary payment and allowances.

  133. Fisky

    We need to just accept that Australia is a socialist country, and look for ways to loot the place without conscience.

  134. Infidel Tiger!

    Why the fuck are we lowering company tax and then doing this?

    i would like to remind everybody that I called the Morrison disaster years and years ago and predicted exactly what has happened tonight would transpire.

    You can congratulate me later.

  135. Herodotus

    Great panel – Leathery, Annabelle, Probyn, and JJJ sjw.

  136. Jumpnmcar

    Surplus in the never never of 1/3 of our interest payments.
    My wife would perform domestic violence if I said that was a good ” path “.
    Fuck !!
    Sorry Grandkids, my generation of Politicians were pus.

  137. Gab

    Ah well at least Morrison and Turnbull and the rest of the Liberal turncoats achieved their main objective: to be loved by the Left.

  138. Notafan

    Doesn’t the drug dsp measure simply mean they stay on newstart.

    A small savings.

    $20,000 tax deduction for brought forward depreciation.

    So no not really that exciting.

    That Snowy 2.0 is a disgrace.

    Build a proper dam somewhere else and a couple of coal fired power stations.

    As for medicare.

    Unbelievable.

  139. rickw

    Rickw.
    Having that very discussion at the moment.
    I worry about parking money in Europe.
    What about the US?
    Or NZ?
    Or salting, say 10%, of your assets in three different jurisdictions.
    But where?
    And what are the consequences of taking funds offshore.

    I put half of everything I owned into US stocks before Trump.

    My basis was simply that the only way a lot of this shit would get sorted out was with guns and the mindset to use them. Australia doesn’t have either.

    I’m trying to hook up another stint in PNG. I don’t know where the income will go, but it definitely won’t come back to Australia. Possibly SE Asia, maybe Singapore.

  140. Its Remarkable

    Morrison just said to David Speers: “The difference between us and labor is that our budget is paid for”
    Breathtaking in its delusion, and dishonesty.
    We are truly F*cked

  141. Herodotus

    Typical ABC polarisation approach, not worth persevering with, book beckons.

  142. cynical1

    Ahaha! The people who objected will be too stupid to compute that.

    No, no, no. Not so fast.

    You don’t pay tax on unemployment benefits.

    The stupid ones pay tax…

  143. Baldrick

    “Taxing ones self into prosperity is like standing in a bucket and lifting yourself up by the handle.”
    Winston Churchill

  144. Fisky

    Sky News Australia‏Verified account @SkyNewsAust 22s23 seconds ago
    More
    [email protected] says #Budget2017 is a desperate attempt from @ScottMorrisonMP to catch up to Labor #auspol

    Bowen is a liar. Morrison hasn’t just caught up to Labor, he’s lapped them.

  145. Peter Bayne

    Is this the plan? The LNP know (recalling what happened to the courageous 2014 Budget) they have no hope of getting a sensible budget through the Senate. The plan then is to write off budget reform for the rest of this term of office, and by undermining the force of Labor’s talking points, hope to be re-elected with a workable Senate. The Senate reforms may help them in this regard.

    I hope that an LDL/Australian Conservatives/PHON alliance will force them to cut deeper than they might otherwise do. Thinking that PHON will co-operate may be wishful of course. Would XPHON support them? Who knows. Maybe LDL with Latham aboard will do better than one an see at this point.

  146. Fisky

    Bill Shorten‏Verified account @billshortenmp 7s7 seconds ago
    More
    People are saying this is a like a “Labor budget.” A Labor budget wouldn’t cut schools to give millionaires a tax cut.

  147. Everybody working and paying tax will be hit with the increased Medicare Levy to fund the NDIS.
    EVERYBODY

    Not me. Holland here I come, and not a moment too soon.

  148. zyconoclast

    It’s over baby. The Australian experiment ends with some fat bald loser wanking himself into a stupor of keynsian delight.

    Arthur Sinodinos?

  149. Sean

    The cuts can’t happen because the micro parties talk tough to get seats and refuse to make any tough decisions once they get on the gravy train

  150. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    “Taxing ones self into prosperity is like standing in a bucket and lifting yourself up by the handle.”
    Winston Churchill

    It’s well said, over on the other thread. “Once the monkeys work out how to vote themselves free bananas, they aren’t going to climb another tree.”

  151. Notafan

    Interesting out buying drugs tonight the pharmacist had a sign up saying you could only have one script filled at a time without an extra special note from the doctor.

    Ethnic couple in front of me not happy about that.

    Wonder how much of our subsidized medication ends up on the black market?

    If the government is going to reverse the rebate freeze and increase the Medicare levy they’d better invest some money on preventing health care scams.

    Photo id medicare cards for adults and cash up from for non residents at ERs would be a good start.

  152. John

    God I am one of the Liberals base. I would have loved to see a budget measure that looked to reduce public sector head count by 2000 or 5% or something! Im not suggesting soldiers or Police be affected. But the PS needs to be reigned in. On the assumption each is worth $100k , a reduction of each 1000 is a $100 mill. With over 150k PS a 5% reduction is about 7000 so a saving of $700 million. My bet is that at least 10% could be ripped out and you wouldnt know it. Thats $1.5bn. Note that I am assuming $100k ea but it is probably more when you consider the oncosts of employing them. Like yoga lessons etc.

  153. Makka

    My bet is that at least 10% could be ripped out and you wouldnt know it.

    At least 25% could be cut with no noticeable change.

  154. H B Bear

    Well this is worse than anything even Howard could have come up with. Trains to nowhere, a cave-in to the doctors’ union, funding Gillard’s Fabian monster and on and on. And the usual Treasury BS forecasts as the icing on the sh1t sandwich.

  155. Leigh Lowe

    What is an “S Corporation” JC?

  156. Geriatric Mayfly

    Right now the post budget drinky-poos. Spend, spend, spend. Margaux instead of Goon Bag, Heidsieck rather than Spumante, Single Malt as opposed to Corio 5 Star, Grand Marnier rather than Passion Pop.

  157. rickw

    Final thought:

    How can these fuckers morally take more than half of what I earn?

  158. Marcus Classis

    Decisions decisions….

    Vote PHON or LDP at the next election? neither appeal much

    Only other choices are Deep Green Greens, Green ALP or Lite Green “Liberals”.

    Notice that as Manboobs the Accused Rapist moves hard left chasing the greenfairies smoking crack at the bottom of the garden, The Point Piper Manchurian is chasing after the little sod?

    Run candidates, Cory. Run candidates.

  159. Sparkx

    A big thank you to all cat contributors. I get to know what was it was all about without having to listen to all the b*llSh*t. You are living national treasures.

  160. Gab

    Any mention of politicians’ pay being cut? No? Ah well, we had better pay more taxes then.

  161. Sparkx

    And thanks to you all for the great moments of laughter.

  162. Final thought:

    How can these fuckers morally take more than half of what I earn?

    Come on Rick, you know the drill. It’s not your money. You should feel lucky that the nice government is letting you keep some.

  163. EB

    I guess insurance is going up if they’re drug testing welfare recipients because they’ll start pinching all my shit.

  164. twostix

    It’s not too bad, fairly steady and the first budget to show whisps of the coming age of nationalist populism.

    I’m not sure why people melt down every year anymore. Canberra is a full blown communist state and is out of the people’s control, this simple truth that is discussed to death seems to surprise people anew every day. Like that movie where that girl gets bumped on the head then forever more wakes up every day and forgets what happened the day before.

    A budget like this is as good as it gets until we have a major political realignment and Trump style revolution in this county.

  165. candy

    The tax on the big banks is the prize policy to get the Newspoll up. I would say Turnbull/Morrison/Bishop are really sweating on that.

    Knowing how people in general feel about some big bank charges and annoyances, it’s probably a very good approach to get the Newspoll up.

  166. H B Bear

    Someone needs to remind Weatherdill he is running a Failed State and getting 30c in the GST dollar straight from WA. A bigger begging bowl isn’t actually an economic policy.

  167. Motelier

    How much will the cash and barter economies grow after this?

    Asking for a friend.

  168. JC

    What is an “S Corporation” JC?

    Limited liability private company

    Here

    An S corporation (also referred to as an S corp) is a special type of corporation created through an IRS tax election. An eligible domestic corporation can avoid double taxation (once to the corporation and again to the shareholders) by electing to be treated as an S corporation. … Only the shareholders are taxed.

    There’s no double tax , the profits can be passed to the shareholders without a double whammy.

  169. Makka

    They will have to triple the number of Centrelink staff just to administer the new drug penalty rules. They will need to remodel every Centrelink office in the nations so several million people can piss in a small bottle.

  170. twostix

    Vote PHON or LDP at the next election? neither appeal much

    You’ll pay equally either way.

    Either in taxes to fund trains and such for PHON or taxes at the state level to fund legions of police to deal with the 10 million arab lunatics that the LDP let into your suburb.

  171. EB

    Bungers & booze are indexed, go up every 6 months. Like parliamentary payment and allowances.

    I quit drinking in Australia. Fucking leeches.

  172. Leigh Lowe

    Rickw at 8:49.
    OK.
    Earning money offshore and not repatriating money to Australia is a useful tool if you can access that option.
    And investing money from Australia into the US markets pre-Trump was a smart move, but how do you stop Australian governments getting their hands on the proceeds?
    I want accounts domiciled offshore that I can legally grow without copping Withholdimg Tax etc.

  173. Squirrel

    The 2017 Budget in a nutshell –

    Revenue estimated to rise from $405bn in 2016-17 to $526bn in 2020-21 (29.9% increase)

    Spending estimated to rise from $440bn in 2016-17 to $519bn in 2020-21 (18% increase)

    [http://budget.gov.au/2017-18/content/glossies/overview/download/Budget2017-18-Overview.pdf – Appendix F]

    Australian Human Rights Commission – average staffing level to rise from 111 in 2016-17 to 116 in 2017-18

    [http://budget.gov.au/2017-18/content/bp4/download/Budget2017-18_BP4.pdf – p.130]

  174. twostix

    They will have to triple the number of Centrelink staff just to administer the new drug penalty rules. They will need to remodel every Centrelink office in the nations so several million people can piss in a small bottle.

    They do roadside drug tests RBT style now. It’ll be nothing.

    Am I hearing conservatives mumbling that they’re going to be against drug testing welfare recipients now that they get it?

    That would basically vindicate everyone who says that conservatives aren’t serious and just prefer to whinge and grump.

  175. Motelier

    Bungers & booze are indexed, go up every 6 months. Like parliamentary payment and allowances.

    I don’t smoke and have done the home brewing and distilling in the past.

    Everyone one should now get absolutely serious about reducing the tax take by the government.

    Make the come at you with gun to rob you and then explain in a public forum why they should.

    Boston Tea Party time.

  176. Fat Tony

    twostix: “….Trump style revolution in this county.”

    Can’t happen here – not with our political system.

    There may be a revolution, but it won’t be peaceful.

  177. Fisky

    There is a way for the Right out of this disaster, but it involves abandoning the language of “budget responsibility” and cutting taxes across the board without conscience. Let Labor be responsible for the spending cuts to their own base.

  178. Makka

    They do roadside drug tests RBT style now. It’ll be nothing.

    Breath test on drivers = welfare recipient test? In your dreams.

    “Am I hearing conservatives mumbling that they’re going to be against drug testing welfare recipients now that they get it?”

    Nope. Just pointing out that they’ll need to find a way to do it that doesn’t involve massive outlays to the CFMEU and rent seeking construction companies.

  179. Fisky

    Just say, “Yes, that’s fine, Labor – NDIS, Gonski, etc, fully-funded – but you’ll have to find a way to do it with taxes at 15% of GDP. Sorry!”

  180. Motelier

    Actually it has been done here in Aust before, the tea party thing.

    Rum rebellion then the Eureka Stockade.

    poor fellla, my country.

  181. jupes

    Morrison just said to David Speers: “The difference between us and labor is that our budget is paid for”

    What’s the bet Speers let him get away with it, as is the way press gallery sycophants. They just accept that spending is the way to govern.

    Saw about two minutes of some government numptie being interviewed on Sky this morning. He just prattled off a few sentences of utter bullshit like the Morrison quote above and Kieran Gilbert didn’t have one skeptical question. Not fucking one.

  182. I’ve run out of swear words to describe these pricks.

    Having exhausted every opportunity to secure savings from our 2014–15 and 2015–16 Budgets, we have decided to reset the Budget by reversing these measures at a cost of $13 billion.

    Translated: “We were utterly shit and made absolutely no effort to fix the Budget so we are giving up and becoming Labor Lite instead.”

    Ten year recession just got a step closer.
    Fuck this socialist shit hole.

  183. candy

    They will need to remodel every Centrelink office in the nations so several million people can piss in a small bottle.

    I think they would send people to QML etc, although I would have thought only a doctor could authorise a urine test, not a Centrelink staffer. And surely a doctor would need to be involved to read the results. How could they rely on an administrative person to read a medical pathology result, would that be legal? What a big ordeal to catch how many.

  184. Notafan

    I’m actually pretty cool with the changes to foreign ownership rules especially the removal of the main residence exemption.

    Of course they have to catch the money before it leaves the country.

    Good luck with that.

    They will probably just rely on passenger movement records for the $5000 levy on foreign investors.

    Im hoping the changes to pension access for new migrants means putting the residency requirement back to 20 years.

    The negative gearing change for depreciating assets is okay too. A lot of the valuations of pre existing carpet curtain crap must gave been very creative and impossible to verify.

    What happens when you get too carried away.

  185. Fisky

    Henry Sherrell‏ @henrysherrell 2m2 minutes ago
    More
    Immigration budget sidenote: Previous budgets had a planning number for permanent visas. This budget cites a “ceiling”. Haven’t seen before.

    Interesting.

  186. politichix

    Leigh Lowe
    #2376053, posted on May 9, 2017 at 8:37 pm
    Rickw.
    Having that very discussion at the moment.
    I worry about parking money in Europe.
    What about the US?
    Or NZ?
    Or salting, say 10%, of your assets in three different jurisdictions.
    But where?
    And what are the consequences of taking funds offshore.

    The Lance Spicer books are good read on this subject…

  187. Snoopy

    If alcohol and drug related conditions were not recognised for the DSP the program cost would be less than half. Fuck ’em.

  188. Motelier

    Fisky

    Just say, “Yes, that’s fine, Labor – NDIS, Gonski, etc, fully-funded – but you’ll have to find a way to do it with taxes at 15% of GDP. Sorry!”

    Stop dreaming!

  189. pete m

    Tax Rates for 2016-2017:
    Taxable Income Tax on this income
    $18,201 – $37,000 19c for each $1 over $18,200
    $37,001 – $87,000 $3,572 plus 32.5c for each $1 over $37,000
    $87,001 – $180,000 $19,822 plus 37c for each $1 over $87,000
    Over $180,000 $54,232 plus 45c for each $1 over $180,000

    also the 2% rich person Abbott levy is being phased out.

  190. Makka

    And surely a doctor would need to be involved to read the results.

    Colour coded results are read on hundreds of mine sites across the country by numpties today. It’s the dunnies that will bust the budget!

  191. Fisky

    Not everything in the budget is bad. Some of the immigration measures seem promising. Visa fee hikes, PR caps, and a few other things. We’ll see what comes out in the wash.

    But it’s basically the ALP’s budget in every major item.

  192. Notafan

    Yanks drug test welfare recipients.

    It’s pretty clear that it’s going to be targeted at people who miss appointments because they were, allegedly, off their face.

    Who cares?

    If they can afford drugs and alcohol on benefits they have another source of income.

  193. Makka

    Crikey, NDIS funding to go from 5 to 20 Billion in 4 years.

  194. Fisky

    Makka
    #2376158, posted on May 9, 2017 at 9:24 pm
    Crikey, NDIS funding to go from 5 to 20 Billion in 4 years.

    That is…a lot of money. Jesus.

  195. Makka

    If they can afford drugs and alcohol on benefits they have another source of income.

    Well of course. The question is how can you make administration of this policy cost effective in this Socialist haven.

  196. Notafan

    Simple; don’t turn up, dont get paid.

  197. twostix

    There may be a revolution, but it won’t be peaceful.

    There’ll never be a non-leftist non-peaceful revolution here, it’s not in the blood. But to be sure political revolutions do happen here fairly regularly, every couple of decades.

    Todays US inspired “conservatives” won’t be part of the next one, it’s not even conceivable.

  198. OldOzzie

    candy
    #2376126, posted on May 9, 2017 at 9:07 pm
    The tax on the big banks is the prize policy to get the Newspoll up. I would say Turnbull/Morrison/Bishop are really sweating on that.

    Knowing how people in general feel about some big bank charges and annoyances, it’s probably a very good approach to get the Newspoll up.

    The tax on the big banks is the prize policy to get the Newspoll up. I would say Turnbull/Morrison/Bishop are really sweating on that.

    Brilliant, so all Australian’s whose Super Funds are invested in Bank Shares will really enjoy the Bank Share Price Fall and a diminution of the value of their Super.

    Genius Work by the Labor/Liberals

  199. Makka

    Simple; don’t turn up, dont get paid.

    Think it through. Have you ever been through a drug and alcohol test? Now multiply that task by potentially every DSP recipient in the nation – a million? What do you think that program might cost to set up, police and administer?

  200. Richard Bender

    A government body deciding whether or not a private bank pay an executive what that private bank thinks that executive is worth?

    What fucking country am I in?

  201. candy

    Simple; don’t turn up, dont get paid.

    The thing with this is that a lot of these individuals will have children. A social mish mash of many troubles, where withdrawing a payment can be devastating.

  202. Rob MW

    Taxes up, smokers fucked – again, spending up, Venezaustraela ™ coming soon.

    Gotta laugh at fucking the multinational thingy. The morons won’t countenance the idea that if (IF) they were to make corporate tax rates internationally competitive here then the multinationals would be happy to domicile here and pay Ozzie profit taxes. No, no, no just introduce some other stupid turnout that will cost more to administer than what it collects. FMD.

  203. Fat Tony

    twostix: “But to be sure political revolutions do happen here fairly regularly, every couple of decades.”

    What do you call a “political revolution”?

    All I’ve seen in my lifetime is wall-to-wall dickheads who never seem to be working for us.

  204. Makka

    The thing with this is that a lot of these individuals will have children.

    Oh, so that’s ok then. I don’t mind being taxed up the clacker to pay for drunken legovers involving various fathers.

  205. OldOzzie

    Summary by Judith Sloan

    Budget 2017: party trick of good and bad debt

    This is a budget that Labor would not dare deliver. It is based on big new revenue measures and big new spending initiatives.

    It targets big banks with a highly inefficient liabilities tax. It increases the Medicare levy by half a percentage point. It restricts the value of negative gearing by limiting the deduction for depreciation to actual cash outlays as well as disallowing the costs of travel to rental properties. These are big changes.

    Receipts as a proportion of GDP rise from 23.8 per cent in 2017-18 to 25.4 per cent in 2020-21. The last time receipts were as proportionally high as this was 2005-06, prior to the global financial crisis.

    By contrast, payments as a proportion of GDP fall from 25.2 per cent next financial year to 25 per cent in 2020-21. (They increase to 25.4 per cent in 2018-19.) Note that both former treasurer Peter Costello and Audit Commission chairman Tony Shepherd have warned that fiscal repair is impossible unless payments fall to well below 25 per cent of GDP.

    The budget attempts to draw a line under every policy area in which Labor is seen to have an advantage over the government; in particular, health, education and bank bashing.

    To justify throwing money around like confetti on big infrastructure projects, most of which don’t appear to have been exposed to serious cost-benefit analysis (Snowy 2.0, for instance), the government is emphasising the distinction between the underlying cash balance and the net operating balance.

    Note both figures exclude net Future Fund earnings before 2020-21. The $4 billion of earnings in 2020-21 contributes more than half of the underlying cash balance of $7.4 billion.

    Over the forward estimates, the gap between the cash balance and the NOB (I particularly love that acronym) grows to nearly $10 billion. This is the party trick the government wanted to execute by making the arbitrary distinction between good and bad debt. It allows the government to assert that the government will not have to borrow for recurrent spending from 2018-19, an essentially artificial construct.

    But the real issue is that the government can run but not hide. The face value of Commonwealth Government Securities on issue is projected to rise from $540 billion in 2017-18 to $606 billion at the end of the forward estimates. And gross debt will continue to rise, reaching $725 billion in 2027-28.

    The interest paid on CGS will rise from $16.6 billion in 2017-18 to $20.4 billion in 2020-21. Needless to say, this is serious money; it would buy a lot of health, education or welfare spending.

    The expectation of changes in the major economic parameters over the budget period, it has to be said, are on the optimistic side. Real GDP is expected to grow by 3 per cent per year from 2018-19, with nominal GDP (which principally drives revenue) also growing relatively strongly by past standards.

    While bemoaning the current very low rate of growth of wages (as well as failing to explain this international trend), the wage price index is expected to tick up from the current figure of 2 per cent this financial year to 3 ¾ per cent in the last year of the forward estimates. This is close to a doubling of wage growth and underpins the optimistic growth of revenue from income tax.

    To gauge the impact of these optimistic assumptions on the budget outcome, we need to look at the reconciliation of the underlying cash balance estimates. Over the entire forward estimates period, the positive impact of these parameter changes on the cash balance is over $5 billion relative to last year’s Mid-year Economic and Fiscal Outlook.

    Mind you, the biggest impact on the cash balance is the additional $20.7 billion in receipts that are the result of policy decisions taken in this budget. (There is also an additional $14.5 billion in payments.) And the two biggest revenue decisions are the increase in the Medicare Levy and the Major Bank Levy (6 basis points on total liabilities of the big banks) which together will raise $14.4 billion over the forward estimates.

    The two changes to negative gearing will rake in an additional $800 million. Ironically, they are classified as measures to “reduce pressure on housing affordability”. This rather flies in the face of the Coalition’s strong view that negative gearing doesn’t affect housing affordability and there is no case for Labor’s more radical decision to eliminate it for all assets apart from new residential real estate.

    The most extraordinary aspect of this budget, apart from its deeply Labor roots of big spending and big taxing, is the Treasurer’s speech itself. Who utters sentences such as “Terribly, this had meant families have even broken apart” or “Australians have had to dig deep to keep our economy on the right track” or “We will provide the Australian Taxation Office with additional funding to chase and tax the crooks”?

    Someone needs to give the Treasurer – let’s call him Scott Morriswan – a tip: that he is not delivering some infantile sermon to an excitable congregation but rather a serious policy document that sets the fiscal framework for the next four years.

  206. Notafan

    As I understand it Makka some welfare recipients aren’t turning up for mutual obligation appointments using drunk/stoned as an excuse.

    These people still wont turn up but if they dont they’ll hit exclusion periods more quickly easily.

    The drug trial is a separate thing.

    That excuse will no longer cut the mustard and as for those addicts with children as far as im concerned they should be removed immediately.

    Those expressing faux concern over how these changes will hurt welfare recipients are just trolling, as usual.


    Mutual obligation requirements

  207. Leigh Lowe

    The thing with this is that a lot of these individuals will have children. A social mish mash of many troubles, where withdrawing a payment can be devastating.

    OK.
    Fucking show up then.
    Bring the tribe.
    Plenty of seats in Centerlink reception.
    You owe it to honest taxpayers.

  208. ned

    Bloody statist and lier

    The government promised to take care of us from the cradle to the grave.

    “We have the best government that money can buy.” – Mark Twain

    ‘Politicians and diapers must be changed often, and for the same reason.’ – Mark Twain

    “There is no distinctly American criminal class – except Congress.” – Mark Twain

  209. Zulu Kilo Two Alpha

    Oh, so that’s ok then. I don’t mind being taxed up the clacker to pay for drunken legovers involving various fathers.

    One local example is five children by three different fathers – none of who has worked a day in their lives, and she has the hide to tell me that, if I can pay a hundred dollars for a bottle of Scotch, I should pay more tax, so she and her children don’t have to do it so hard.

  210. twostix

    Crikey, NDIS funding to go from 5 to 20 Billion in 4 years.

    NDIS is going to be used to keep old people at home because as it turns out having the government fund tens of thousands of modern coolies to look after white australia’s elderly in institutions posing as nursing homes isn’t financially doable.

  211. Makka

    The drug trial is a separate thing.

    That excuse will no longer cut the mustard and as for those addicts with children as far as im concerned they should be removed immediately.

    Sure. Every program has a cost, every one. This one looks unworkable to me, cost wise. Therefore the savings are bullshit, fabrications.

  212. Makka

    Lenore isn’t changing gracefully.

  213. Up The Workers!

    Sarah Halfwit-Bung must have doubled her annual salary of late.

    She is now not only the Chief Intellectual “finker” and Policy adviser to Bull Shitten and Allah’s Local Party, but evidently to Halal Mal the Head-Loppers’ Pal and the Laberals as well!

  214. duncanm

    So for all intents and purposes, every decision in this budget was driven by ‘what will the ALP say? How can we make a policy that they can’t attack?’.

    No thought beyond that.

    How one can collect so many arseholes in a single hat astounds me.

  215. twostix

    What do you call a “political revolution”?

    All I’ve seen in my lifetime is wall-to-wall dickheads who never seem to be working for us.

    Howard was revolutionary (though the jury is out on whether he was in line with ‘conservatism’ or not, I think by definition he was progressive who hates and loathes the traditional Australian nation).

    Whitlam & Menzies were too.
    Then we go back to the states, Jack Lang, etc, various revolutionary governers.

    There have been lots of peaceful political revolutions progressive and “conservative” here.

  216. Makka

    The ALPBC attacking the Lieberals because no cuts to spending.

  217. Infidel Tiger

    PETA Credlin was exactly right. This is a budget for the next Newspoll.

    It is not the budget that should follow an election win, even a narrow win. That’s when you are supposed to take the tough decisions. This is the budget version of “fake news” — “fake fiscal frugality.”

    It is not a budget from a Liberal treasurer. It increases taxes big-time. And even that’s not been done to slash the deficit, but to fund even more spending, off its already high base.

    Most importantly — and dangerously ——of all, it is not a budget for our volatile, ultimately unpredictable, times.

    It’s not “Trump-adjusted” — to incorporate the challenges and opportunities of the Trump presidency. It assumes the economic sun keeps shining brightly — even brighter — out beyond 2020 and then on and on through the 2020s.

    Hopefully the Senate blocks all of it.

  218. duncanm

    The ALPBC attacking the Lieberals because no cuts to spending.

    oh — maybe it was worth it just to see that 🙂

  219. Leigh Lowe

    And the cry goes up through dozens of outback towns…
    “Yee-har … the railroads comin’ through.
    Ya hear me boy? . . The railroad is a-comin’ through.”

  220. twostix

    The biggest welfare bludgers in this country now are white collar middle class families who don’t want to raise their own babies because News.com.au and Home and Away modernity.

    They start with a non means tested cheque of $7500 per year per child for the Child Care Rebate.
    Then there’s all the rest on top of that.

    All so mum can pretend she “works” and dad can buy a brand new Prado.

  221. Notafan

    I have no opinion on the drug trial for new welfare recipients.

    But cutting payments for existing recipients who miss appointments because they were off their face is fine with me.

  222. Zipster the leftoid torturemeister

    The ALPBC attacking the Lieberals because no cuts to spending.

    We have stepped through the mirror into inverse land.

  223. Dr Fred Lenin

    I know why the former libs are doing labor communust budgets ,its so when they amalgamate into the national green laboral pardee they will fit inneatly as the turnbullite left left centre left as against the shortenist keft left left centre left and di nataleiest left left communust green left . Its simple when you study how tge mah]ggots of the left think . The minor oarties will of course be abolished ,hiw can we accomplish full socialism with opposition being allowed ,its counter productive innit >

  224. Notafan

    The guts of the problem hasnt changed a bit.

    As twostix points out child care rebate and all the other boondoggles are staying or worse.

    As for the downsizing thing, I suspect that is largely a myth.

    People are doing that all the time. They just aren’t selling their houses to hipsters.

    I suspect a lot of existing houses being purchased by ‘migrants’ is held for relatives back in the mainland too.

  225. hzhousewife

    A big thank you to all cat contributors. I get to know what was it was all about without having to listen to all the b*llSh*t. You are living national treasures.

    Hear, hear. I am binging on series one and two of Billions this evening, but can’t help peeking at the thread. Horrendous budget.

    NDIS is going to be used to keep old people at home because as it turns out having the government fund tens of thousands of modern coolies to look after white australia’s elderly in institutions posing as nursing homes isn’t financially doable.

    In actual fact, the NDIS keeps no old people at home, it quits at 65, then you go on the pension. Unless that got changed tonight.

  226. twostix

    In actual fact, the NDIS keeps no old people at home, it quits at 65, then you go on the pension. Unless that got changed tonight.

    It begun to be formally changed tonight.

    It was always the point of the NDIS.

    What happens if I turn 65 years after I become an NDIS participant?

    Arrangements between NSW and the Commonwealth governments for Continuity of Supports for people over 65 has been agreed. The CoS program was introduced in the Hunter New England, Nepean Blue Mountains regions and Southern NSW in December 2016.

    This stuff is all so obvious, isn’t it?

  227. Notafan

    Yes hz

    Though some people are being employed as personal carers for the aged, not sure what program that would be.

    Around the clock personal care attendants for every pensioner was too much, even for Gillard.

  228. Motelier

    Did I see some mention tonight of a “ghost house” tax?

    This really is a nightmare, although might be time to start up a new “cash” business.

  229. Fat Tony

    twostix:
    Howard was revolutionary I can see that – and not conservative.

    Whitlam & Menzies were too. Same with whitlam – though I don’t remember too much about Menzies – I was 13 when he stepped down.

    I now understand what you meant by political revolutions – thanks.

  230. pete m

    NDIS is so bad people are asking (and going to Court) to be let out of it.

    Need a new catheter – fill in this voucher, wait 2 weeks, wait, take voucher to service provider we pick in nearby State, wait, insert catheter 5 weeks after you needed it.

    Yeah right!

  231. twostix

    The whole point of the NDIS is to be federal home based (aged) care.
    It’s the final piece in the cradle to grave vision of the new Dept of Human Services.
    Its ripening was just funded tonight, $20 billion.

    In ten years the NDIS will be as entrenched as Medicare and will provide many services and money for people to “care” for their old parents at home.

  232. Up The Workers!

    Abraham Lincoln once said:

    “You don’t make the poor any richer, by making the rich poorer.”

    Most fat-bottomed crooks of A.L.P./Union Bosses in their mansions, sipping back on a single-malt, would totally agree with him, and they devote each and every day to proving him right.

  233. Habib

    The thing with this is that a lot of these individuals will have children. A social mish mash of many troubles, where withdrawing a payment can be devastating.

    And we’re supposed to give a shit, let alone our beer vouchers why exactly?

  234. Leigh Lowe

    But cutting payments for existing recipients who miss appointments because they were off their face is fine with me.

    Jesus wept!
    The main reasons people miss Centrelink appointments are:-
    (1) they have a cash job;
    (2) they are in Syria under their brothers passport;
    (3) they are at a DSP appointment;
    (4) jail;
    (5) dead.

  235. Harlequin Decline

    Habib
    #2376232, posted on May 9, 2017 at 10:28 pm
    The thing with this is that a lot of these individuals will have children. A social mish mash of many troubles, where withdrawing a payment can be devastating.

    And we’re supposed to give a shit, let alone our beer vouchers why exactly?

    Spot on-why? Might even teach the useless bastard parents a bit of responsibility.

  236. Notafan

    LL

    I’m flabbergasted it was a valid excuse.

    You’re in Syria so call in drunk.

    Okay.

  237. Motelier

    The main reasons people miss Centrelink appointments are:-
    (1) they have a cash job;

    Apart from pulling money from Centrelink, WTF is the problem here?

    More people should get into the the cash economy and the barter economy. Hide the procedes from the government and starve them and tge PS of funds.

  238. hzhousewife

    Nothing said about the non-existant jobs that the Centrelink applicants are supposed to be going to interviews for then?

  239. Motelier

    Bugger me, I have two g’s on my keypad.

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