Opportunity costs

Wondering how many children in the Third World could get clean drinking water for the price of the subsidies for rooftop solar in the west?
Add the price of subsidies for windmills etc.

Judging from some of the comments we don’t need to fund clean water projects, what about cleaning up their household air pollution by funding affordable and reliable coal-fired power?

Around 3 billion people cook and heat their homes using open fires and simple stoves burning biomass (wood, animal dung and crop waste) and coal.
Over 4 million people die prematurely from illness attributable to the household air pollution from cooking with solid fuels.
More than 50% of premature deaths due to pneumonia among children under 5 are caused by the particulate matter (soot) inhaled from household air pollution.
3.8 million premature deaths annually from noncommunicable diseases including stroke, ischaemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are attributed to exposure to household air pollution.

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29 Responses to Opportunity costs

  1. Rafe;

    Wondering how many children in the Third World could get clean drinking water for the price of the subsidies for rooftop solar in the west?

    They’re little Brown People. The Left believe they don’t matter.

  2. stackja

    But AGW will kill them!

  3. Nerblnob

    I argue to wind and solar lovers that subsidy is actually stifling their beloved technology’s​ development by trying to pick winners. They don’t get it at all.

  4. Jim Rose

    I was deeply naive that the last few times I have this vanilla, they have no plastic bags and must use paper bags at the supermarket but the water is still unsafe to drink.

  5. RobK

    It’s not just the money squandered on non-dispatchable electricity; the drag on the economy that those subsidies, extracted from coal, have had by quenching growth and burdening us with heavy debt repayments puts the dampener on so much opportunity. Not to mention the cost of putting things right after the penny drops that it was all folly.

  6. Mark M

    The high price of intermittent energy is destroying Australian Business
    AusChamberCEO James Pearson (0.98)

    https://twitter.com/abcnews/status/87595090773673164

  7. Marcus Classis

    Wondering how many children in the Third World could get clean drinking water for the price of the subsidies for rooftop solar in the west?

    All of them. Five times over.

  8. Adelagado

    Seriously, is it that hard to get clean drinking water?

    1. Dig a well.
    2. Don’t shit in it.

    Does ‘The Third World’ really find this so hard to understand? Are they so lazy and so stupid that they haven’t grasped the concept yet after, what about, 100 years? Or is it just a bogus NGO piggy bank filler that never fails?

  9. RobK

    Seriously, is it that hard to get clean drinking water?
    The UN did a big water boring program in Bangladesh some decades ago and unwittingly caused extensive arsenic poisoning.

  10. The Vengeful Ghost of Fiona Watson's Moggie

    Yer not supposed to ask difficult qvestions!

    Go back to the plantation, pay yer taxes, and vote the way we tell you.

  11. RobK

    link How the West poisoned Bangladesh | The Independent

  12. Ubique

    According to the 2015 Minerals Council paper Electricity Production Subsidies in Australia “by far the largest component of renewable subsidies went to generation from solar PV technologies, more than $2 billion in 2013-14 (68 per cent of aggregate subsidies). The bulk of these subsidies ($932 million) is attributable to the small-scale part of the renewable energy target (RET) and to payments under state feed-in tariff (FiT) schemes ($855 million). Payments made by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) to benefitt solar generation are estimated to account for an additional $157 million.”

    A well to provide clean water to a community of 2,000 costs around US $8,000 , let’s call it A$11,000, or $5.50 per person.

    So our subsidies for PV energy in a single year are enough to provide clean drinking water for 364 million people.

  13. .

    Nuclear power.

    Everyone can have clean, cheap potable water with widespread adoption of nuclear power.

    No subsidies needed either. There also ought to be no caterwauling about carbon.

  14. Warty

    No argument, the billions going into renewable subsidies is straight out lunacies, but why substitute one madness for outright delusion? We have been pouring multibillions into Aboriginal welfare so that we can feel wonderful about solving apparent deprivation, all the while creating generational welfare dependency for those same communities.
    But it’s apparently perfectly wonderful when we employ the same ‘feel-good’ flawed policies in Africa. The overall impression, in impoverished third world countries, is that we have limitless capacity for loosening the purse strings, yet the hostility towards the white man matches their dependency on him. Go and visit South Africa, the Congo, Kenya, but leave your sentimentality aside and open your eyes. You are an alien in a country that has no sense whatsoever of multiculturalism: there is no equivalent of multiculturalism in Africa. And yet they are more than happy to take your money, though the gratitude lasts only so long as it takes to put it in their collective pockets, before the hand is extended once again.
    Create the expectation and you create an inequitable relationship. Your self satisfaction is as transitory as the apparent gratitude.

  15. RobK

    Nuclear power, it can even run desalination plants in the quieter times.

  16. Snoopy

    Seriously, is it that hard to get clean drinking water?
    1. Dig a well.

    How many have you dug?

  17. Texas Jack

    Dutton reckons we’ve spent $13.7 billion on asylum seekers. For that we could have paid the whole 50,000 the equivalent of the minimum wage for seven years and still come out with pocket change. What could we have done with that for genuine refugees if we’d bought rat-packs and clean water tabs and distributed them where it actually matters?

  18. min

    In January my Granddaughter in her final year of Doctor of Medicine,volunteered to work in a hospital and mobile clinic in Tanzania.
    She worked in the maternity ward wher there were 3 to a bed after baby was born . However the village where the mobile clinic operated had no electricity, Rafe I will send you photos as I do not know how to get them on this post . I was there some 30 years ago it has got worse as the Masai now have goats that have eaten the countryside bare. The photos tell it all.

  19. Gavin R Putland

    Good point. Now what’s the opportunity cost of land speculation?

  20. Dr Lenin

    Wonder how much of the money screwed from the peoplefrom these stupid subsidies ends up in bank accounts of soros gore ,,goldman sachs, the criminal ban who caused the GFC , and Cayman islands secret accounts? .
    The Caymans should be blockaded by sea and air ,all aid and financial contact frozen untill the Cayman government forces banks registered ther to disclose names ,details and amounts of secret accounts there ,,.can you imagine the panic amongst the elites of the world this would cause . The Caymans could= forbid all movement of banking without disclosure of destinations . Now that would be an historic blow against the elitists . If large amounts went to another country with secret accounts do the same hound them.

  21. duncanm

    Does ‘The Third World’ really find this so hard to understand? Are they so lazy and so stupid that they haven’t grasped the concept yet after, what about, 100 years?

    try thousands of years.

    The Nabataeans, Romans and others had it well sussed.

  22. PB

    “They’re little Brown People. The Left believe they don’t matter.”

    They aren’t so little when they are invading your homes and businesses with machetes and hammers. Ask any West-Melbournian. When they get caught, tagged and released they matter to the Left because a concerned woman with short hair will inevitably appear on TV demanding more money for programs, education, something about falling through cracks, racial this or that etc etc….

  23. Chris M

    how many children in the Third World could get clean drinking water for the price of the subsidies for rooftop solar in the west?

    I’m so so tired of this nonsense. If it only costs $30 or so to dig a well for the village to be drinking fresh water why the heck have the lazy ass parents in that village not already long since done it? Their mobile phones and satellite TV’s are more important than having their kids drink water??

  24. Zatara

    Seriously, is it that hard to get clean drinking water?
    1. Dig a well.

    How many have you dug?

    I dug quite a few of them in Africa, or caused them to be dug.

    Adelagado is right, wells are a godsend, and village life centers around them, until someone shits in them or blows them up because tribes/islam.

    Still, it is the single best way to spend western guilt money in that the people actually benefit from it rather than the govt tucking it away in a Swiss bank account.

  25. Snoopy

    I dug quite a few of them in Africa, or caused them to be dug.

    Well then you know that it is impossible to dig much below the water table and consequently they are useless during drought. Unless you are actually talking about boreholes and they are not drilled with simple tools.

  26. Zatara

    Well then you know that it is impossible to dig much below the water table and consequently they are useless during drought

    The wells I’m speaking of were drilled. Like 99% of the wells ‘dug’ in the last few centuries.

  27. Adelagado

    Snoopy
    #2416199, posted on June 19, 2017 at 12:01 am

    Seriously, is it that hard to get clean drinking water?
    1. Dig a well.

    How many have you dug?

    Our shack has no mains water. We use bore water (put down by me and a mate with a 20′ post hole digger) and rainwater tanks. Its not rocket science. You just have to get off your arse and do something about it.

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